OwlTail

Cover image of Aerospace Engineering Podcast

Aerospace Engineering Podcast

Conversations with Aerospace Pioneers

Popular episodes

All episodes

The best episodes ranked using user listens.

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #2 – Prof. Paul Weaver on Shape, Stiffness and Smart Aerospace Structures

"There's been a lot of good press from the science community on self-assembly of atoms. Well, I guess what I'm looking for is self-assembly and disassembly of large-scale structures...There is all sorts of exciting things we can do when [engineering] structures re-configure themselves." --- Prof. Paul WeaverThis episode features Prof. Paul Weaver, who holds a Bernal Chair in Composite Structures at the University of Limerick in Ireland, and is the Professor in Lightweight Structures at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. Lightweight design plays a crucial role in the aerospace industry, and Paul has worked on some fascinating concepts for more efficient aircraft structures. Paul's research has influenced analysis procedures and product design at NASA, Airbus, GKN Aerospace, Augusta Westland Helicopters, Vestas (and many more), and in this episode we cover some of his past accomplishments and his vision for the future.Central to this vision is artificial metamorphosis, which is a term that Paul coined to describe structures that re-configure by dis-assembly and re-assembly to adapt and optimise on the fly. Although Paul thinks that this vision of engineering structures is still 50 years into the future, he is well known for his work on a related technology: topological shape-morphing. The simplest example of a morphing structure is a leading edge slat, which is used on all commercial aircraft today to prevent stall at take off and landing. Paul, on the other hand, envisions morphing structures that are more integral, that is without joints and which do not rely on heavy actuators to function. Apart from artificial metamorphosis, Paul and I discuss his teenage dreams of becoming a material scientist his work with Mike Ashby at Cambridge University on material and shape factors interesting coupling effects in composite materials that can be used for elastic tailoring his work with Augusta Westland helicopters on novel rotor blades why NASA contacted him about his research on buckling of rocket shells and much, much moreI hope that you get a feel for Paul’s enthusiasm for aerospace engineering. If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by becoming a patron.Please enjoy this wide ranging conversation with Prof. Paul Weaver!What have you learned from this episode? Let me know on Twitter by clicking here.Selected Links from the Episode Bernal Institute, University of Limerick Paul’s research group at the University of Limerick and the University of Bristol Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down and The New Science of Strong Materials: Or Why You Don't Fall Through the Floor by Prof. J E Gordon Prof. Mike Ashby, materials selection using Ashby plots and its geometrical counterpart: shape factors, CES Materials Selector Second moment of area AugustaWestland AW101 Merlin helicopter that uses bend-twist coupling in the rotor blades to decouple vibration modes Bend-twist coupling of a wing-box explained on the Grumman X-29 Geometrically swept wind-turbine blades for improved performance Imperfection sensitivity of cylinders (the introduction of this paper conveys the message) Video of collapsing soda can and "scientific" crush test Morphing: NASA morphing aircraft FlexSys wing without flaps A project by NASA and MIT on flexible morphing structures NASA shape-shifting wings A morphing air inletA video featuring Paul talking about his research and vision for artificial metamorphosis Some topics related to metamorphosis are: Molecular self-assembly 4D printing Re-configurable materialsThe deHavilland Mosquito, the importance of phenolic resins in constructing the Mosquito, and Norman de Bruyne

48mins

6 Nov 2017

Rank #1

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #29 – Samson Sky is Building the First Truly Useful Flying Car

Sam Bousfield is the founder and CEO of Samson Sky, a company that is developing the first truly useful flying car. Sam is an architect by training, but a passion for aviation led him to work on a supersonic aircraft with Boeing. Out of this experience came the idea of building a flying car called the Switchblade.Harking from an architectural background, Sam approached the problem of designing a flying car slightly differently. Rather than asking the question of how you could make a car fly, Sam and his team focused on the architectural question of how a vehicle that can both fly and drive should be designed. Answering this question led the Samson team to some unique design choices, such as a three-wheel layout and wings that stow and swing out from underneath the vehicle. One of the other challenges in designing a flying car is striking the right compromise between on-road and off-road performance. For example, a car should preferably create downforce, while a plane should create lift. To achieve this Samson Sky has made some very clever design choices in terms of the layout and shaping of the Switchblade, as well as the positioning of the wings and centre of gravity, and the use of lightweight composite materials. In our conversation, Sam and I talk about: why it has taken so long for a functional flying car to be built the main design challenges that need to be overcome the changes that need to be made to the vehicle when switching between flying and driving the way that Sam envisions the Switchblade to be used in practice and much, much more.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by my patrons on Patreon. Patreon is a way for me to receive regular donations from listeners whenever I release a new episode, and with the help of these generous donors I have been able to pay for much of the expenses, hosting and travels costs that accrue in the production of this podcast. If you would like to support the podcast as a patron, then head over to my Patreon page. There are multiple levels of support, but anything from $1 an episode is highly appreciated. Thank you for your support!This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Samson Sky Webpage Samson Sky Youtube Switchblade Overview Slalom Test Wing Swing MechanismNBC reports on the Switchblade's transforming tail

56mins

16 Apr 2019

Rank #2

Similar Podcasts

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #3 – Airbus Senior Expert Ian Lane on the A350, Innovation in Aerospace, and Diversity in Engineering

"You could say: What could we possibly do next? You look back at history and say: All the shelves must be full now! We must have the capabilities to do everything we need. And yet, we still go on...It's your generation that is going to Mars. So please, can you get on with it and do it, because I want to enjoy it from the augmented reality that other engineers are going to produce." --- Ian LaneThis episode features Ian Lane, Senior Expert in Composite Analysis for Airbus UK. Ian has more than 40 years of experience in the aerospace industry and his career has taken him from British Hovercraft to British Aerospace, Westland Helicopters and finally to his current role at Airbus. On top of this broad aerospace background, Ian's specialty are modern composite airframes and he was the lead stress engineer on the Airbus A400M and Airbus A350. Ian is also a Visiting Professor in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol, and a great example of an industry leader who knows how to inspire the next generation of young engineers. Indeed, Ian is actively involved with the Airbus Fly Your Ideas campaign, and a regular attendee at many international research conferences.In this episode Ian and I discuss: his career progression from apprentice to Senior Expert at Airbus the incredible safety record of the aerospace industry why the demise of Concorde wasn't a step backwards how Airbus fosters innovation and out-of-the-box thinking why inclusion and diversity in engineering are so important and much, much moreI hope that you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by becoming a patron.What have you learned from this episode? Let me know on Twitter by clicking here.This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and processes, consider attending the SAMPE 2018 Technical Conference and Expo in Long Beach, California.Selected Links from the Episode Airbus in Bristol & Filton, UK British Hovercraft Company Westland Helicopters (for a time known as AugustaWestland and now Leonardo Helicopters) Sikorsky Crisis, also known as the Westland Affair British Aerospace (now known as BAE Systems) The EU TANGO project (overview slides) A400M and A350 airframes, and contrasts between the two Evolution of composite application at Airbus Airbus Helicopters NH90 and Tiger Bend-twist coupling in aircraft wings Clean Sky initiative New aerospace metallic alloys Additive manufacturing and bionic 3D printing at Airbus Aerospace testing pyramid and virtual testing Burt Rutan and Scaled Composites A picture history of aviation safety and the "anti-fragile" nature of aircraft design Concorde demise and the Concorde Museum Airbus Fly Your Ideas Diversity at Airbus, Diversity & Inclusion in Engineering Women of NASA Lego Evolution of flying machines

51mins

19 Dec 2017

Rank #3

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #21 – Prof. Paul Withey on Single-Crystal Superalloys for Jet Engine Turbines

Paul Withey is the Professor of Casting at the School of Metallurgy and Materials of the University of Birmingham, UK. Before joining the University of Birmingham in 2018, Paul worked at Rolls Royce for 21 years developing new superalloys and manufacturing processes for gas turbine components. As an Engineering Associate Fellow, Paul was a member of a select group of the top 100 specialist engineers across all engineering disciplines within Rolls Royce, and in 2015, Paul and his team were awarded the highest technical award within Rolls-Royce; the Sir Henry Royce Award.Paul’s particular expertise lies in investment casting of aerospace metals, especially of high-temperature superalloys used in the hot turbine stages of modern jet engines. Throughout his career at Rolls-Royce, Paul has developed and optimised manufacturing processes for single-crystal turbine blades with a total of 14 patents to his name. Despite phenomenal advances in materials technology, a number of questions with regard to how the turbine blade shape, materials and process parameters interact remain unanswered, and these questions form the basis of Paul’s ongoing research. In this episode, Paul and I discuss: the unique differences between research in academia and industry what single-crystal superalloys are and how they are manufactured why single-crystal superalloys are a critical technology for modern jet engines and the research questions that Paul is currently trying to answerIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by AnalySwift. Do you work in the design and analysis of aerospace structures and materials? If so, AnalySwift’s innovative engineering software SwiftComp may be the solution you’re seeking. Used either independently for virtual testing of aerospace composites or as a plugin to power conventional FEA codes, SwiftComp delivers the accuracy of 3D FEA in seconds instead of hours. A general-purpose multi-scale modelling program, SwiftComp provides an efficient and accurate tool for modelling aerospace structures and materials featuring anisotropy and heterogeneity. SwiftComp quickly calculates the complete set of effective properties needed for use in macroscopic structural analysis. It also accurately predicts local stresses and strains in the microstructure for predicting strengths. Find out how others in composites are saving time while improving accuracy, considering more design options, and arriving at the best solution more quickly. A no-cost Academic Partner Program is now available for eligible universities. For a free trial, visit analyswift.com. SwiftComp: Right results. Right away.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Paul Withey's research profile A brief history of single-crystal superalloys Turbines stresses and turbine blade materials Modelling video of grain selection manufacturing Video about Rolls Royce turbine blades

29mins

27 Nov 2018

Rank #4

Most Popular Podcasts

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #11 – Dr Priyanka Dhopade on Jet Engine Optimisation and Women in Engineering

Priyanka Dhopade received her PhD from the University of New South Wales in Canberra, Australia and was the recipient of the Zonta Amelia Earhart Fellowship award, awarded annually to the 35 most outstanding female aerospace PhD students worldwide. Since 2013 she has been researching the thermodynamics of jet engines in the Thermofluids Institute at Oxford University. Priyanka is an expert in computational fluid dynamics modelling of heat transfer, aerodynamics and aero-elasticity in jet engines. She is currently leading the modelling campaigns for various projects in collaboration with industry partners relating to turbine and compressor tip clearance control, turbine internal cooling and active flow control. In this episode, Priyanka and I talk about: the challenges of improving the efficiency of current gas turbines the intricacies of fluid dynamics modelling and a topic particularly close to her heart, the diversity challenge in STEM fields.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode is brought to you by KDC Resource—the experts in engineering recruitment for the aerospace and defence sector. For more than 15 years, KDC has been matching the very best engineers with the biggest names in the industry; from Airbus Group and GKN Aerospace to Cobham and BAE Systems. KDC’s deep talent pool of aerospace engineers means they are perfectly poised to meet your particular needs with the ideal candidate. In a time of unprecedented engineering skills shortage, KDC Resource will give you an edge over your competitors in the recruitment market.Selected Links from the Episode Priyanka's research profile at Oxford University Oxford Thermfluids Institute Turbine Cooling and Design Active tip-clearance control (Wiki and NASA) What is CFD? Women in Engineering at Oxford Priyanka on the BBC This is Engineering

45mins

22 May 2018

Rank #5

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #28 – Natilus: the Startup Building Large Autonomous Cargo Drones

Aleksey Matyushev is the co-founder and CEO of Natilus, a startup headquartered in San Francisco. Natilus has set out to reduce global air freight costs through the use of large autonomous drones, and has moved quickly over the last couple of years to develop a sea-plane prototype to serve as a technology demonstrator.The engineers at Natilus are now moving ahead at full steam to design a land-based freighter drone based on a blended-wing body. As the name suggests, a blended aircraft has no clear demarcation line between wings and fuselage. Advantages of this approach are efficient lift generation aided by the wide airfoil-shaped body, allowing the entire aircraft to generate lift. This means that a blended wing body has better lift-to-drag ratios than a conventional aircraft, resulting in improved fuel efficiency. One particular challenge, however, is that a blended wing body does not feature a vertical and horizontal tail, and this makes controlling the aircraft particularly challenging. In this episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast, Aleksey and I talk about: his educational journey to becoming an expert aerodynamicist the technical details of the freighter drone Natilus is designing Natilus’ business model and near-term developments that are in the pipelineLast but not least, Natilus is currently hiring for a number of roles. So if you're interested in working for an innovative, fast-moving company, then head over to their website.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by my patrons on Patreon. Patreon is a way for me to receive regular donations from listeners whenever I release a new episode, and with the help of these generous donors I have been able to pay for much of the expenses, hosting and travels costs that accrue in the production of this podcast. If you would like to support the podcast as a patron, then head over to my Patreon page. There are multiple levels of support, but anything from $1 an episode is highly appreciated. Thank you for your support!This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Natilus website Careers pagePrototype test of sea-based drone Another interview with Aleksey Fast Company profile of Natilus

37mins

1 Apr 2019

Rank #6

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #5 – Concorde Chief Engineer John Britton on Supersonic Flight

In this episode I am talking to John Britton. John was the chief engineer of Concorde on the British side of the enterprise from 1994 until Concorde’s demise in 2003. John possesses a wealth of knowledge regarding the engineering behind Concorde, and its heritage in Bristol, UK. Because he was the chief engineer at its demise, he also has a unique insight into why the aircraft is no longer flying today. In this conversation, John and I talk about: how he ended up as the Chief Engineer of Concorde what engineering feats made Concorde special why Concorde is no longer flying today and what he thinks new supersonic companies need to focus onThis interview was recorded at Aerospace Bristol, which is a new aerospace museum located at Filton Airfield in the South West of the United Kingdom. From the beginnings of powered flight, Filton Airfield was the birthplace of many a flying machine – from aeroplanes and helicopters to missiles and satellites. Aerospace Bristol represents the new heart to the area’s aerospace heritage.I hope that you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by becoming a patron.This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and processes, consider attending the SAMPE 2018 Technical Conference and Expo in Long Beach, California.Selected Links from the Episode Aerospace Bristol museum Heritage of Filton Airfield Sir George White The Bristol Aeroplane Company British Aircraft Corporation Concorde: Timeline  The Concorde Story documentary Powerplant, fuel system, wing and skin temperatures The demise of Concorde: video and article and another articleThe Concorde rival: Tu-144 Overview The Paris Crash (ironic that Concorde too would crash in Paris 30 years later)Return of supersonic commercial flights with:  Boom Supersonic (video)  Spike Aerospace (video)

29mins

11 Feb 2018

Rank #7

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #14 – Dufour Aerospace Co-Founder Thomas Pfammatter on the aEro2 VTOL Electric Aircraft

On this episode I am speaking to Thomas Pfammatter, who is the co-founder of the Swiss electric aircraft startup Dufour Aerospace. Dufour is currently designing an electric aircraft with vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capabilities for the urban and rural transport market. The promise of their current aircraft, the aEro 2, is that with VTOL capabilities it can take-off and land pretty much anywhere, which can considerably reduce travel times, especially to places that are difficult to reach by car or train.There is a long-standing compromise in aviation between taking-off vertically, and being able to travel fast horizontally. Dufour Aerospace believes that with electric propulsion it is possible to combine these two worlds. To achieve this, Dufour are using a tilt-wing design fitted with two propellers. The wing and attached propellers can pivot around a hinge between the horizontal and vertical planes, and thereby provide exceptional lift, stability and control characteristics even in slow flight. Dufour have proven their electrical aviation ambitions with the aEro1 aerobatic aircraft and are currently in the process of developing the tilt-wing aEro 2 airplane. In this episode you will learn about many of the details behind Dufour’s technology such as:the tilt-wing concept and the tail fan used for pitch control the aerodynamic importance of the vortex ring state the future of regional travel and how Dufour hopes to influence this spaceIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode is brought to you by AnalySwift. Do you work in the design and analysis of aerospace structures and materials? If so, AnalySwift’s innovative engineering software SwiftComp may be the solution you’re seeking. Used either independently for virtual testing of aerospace composites or as a plugin to power conventional FEA codes, SwiftComp delivers the accuracy of 3D FEA in seconds instead of hours. A general-purpose multiscale modeling program, SwiftComp provides an efficient and accurate tool for modeling aerospace structures and materials featuring anisotropy and heterogeneity. Not only does SwiftComp quickly calculate the complete set of effective properties needed for use in macroscopic structural analysis, it also accurately predicts local stresses and strains in the microstructure for predicting strengths. Find out how others in composites are saving time while improving accuracy, designing earlier in the process, and getting to market more quickly. For a free trial, visit analyswift.com. SwiftComp: Right results. Right away.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Dufour Aerospace: The vision The technology of the aEro 2 The aEro 1 aircraftaEro 2 flying simulation aEro 2 press release What does it feel like to fly an electric aircraft? The vortex ring state

52mins

10 Jul 2018

Rank #8

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #4 – Kim-Tobias Kohn on Electric Aviation

"We need to get going into the future in terms of clean aviation" --- Kim-Tobias KohnOn this episode of the podcast I speak to Kim-Tobias Kohn who is a lecturer in Aerospace Engineering at the University of the West of England. Beside his main vocation, Kim is also an avid pilot and runs an electric skateboard startup company. Kim has garnered attention in the media and from aerospace societies in the UK for his unique university project of building an electric glider with his undergraduate students. For obvious reasons, building an electric passenger aircraft that can replace current fuel-powered airliners is significantly more challenging than replacing gasoline cars with electric vehicles. However, there is a growing grass-roots initiative developing in the UK that is attempting to solve some of the regulatory and technical challenges to realise this vision of electric aviation.So in this episode Kim and I talk about: the unique regulatory framework for experimental aircraft in the UK known as the E-conditions the major technical hurdles that need to be overcome to make electric aviation a reality how the UAV/drone sector is opening doors for larger-scale electric aviation his university project of building an electric glider his dreams for a student-led design, build and fly competition for electric aircraft and much, much moreI hope that you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by becoming a patron.What have you learned from this episode? Let me know on Twitter by clicking here.This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and processes, consider attending the SAMPE 2018 Technical Conference and Expo in Long Beach, California.Selected Links from the Episode Kim's electric glider project and his YouTube Vlog Kim's company emotion engineering (UAV's, electric skateboards and aerial photography) More info from the University of the West of England about the undergraduate electric glider project Royal Aeronautical Society on electric flight The UK E-conditions Airbus, Rolls Royce and Siemens E-fan hybrid electric aircraft EasyJet on electric aircraft Wired on electric aircraft Electric flight potential and limitations Formula Student and Formula SAE SolarFlight solar-powered planes Boeing 787 Dreamliner battery problems

46mins

5 Feb 2018

Rank #9

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #10 – Kitty Hawk Roboticist Dr Mark Cutler on UAVs, Machine Learning and Personalised Flying

Dr Mark Cutler has a PhD in Robotics and Autonomous Systems from MIT. He has researched multiple aspects of UAV technology—from designing and building his own novel quadrotor for aerobatic flight to developing machine learning algorithms for autonomous systems. Mark is currently working for the California-based startup Kitty Hawk backed by Google founder Larry Page.At Kitty Hawk, Mark is applying his expertise in rotorcraft to create the next generation of vehicles for everyday flight. Kitty Hawk are currently designing, testing and building all-electric vertical take-off and landing vehicles for work and play. Their first product, the Cora, is an air taxi that could one day bring us an UBER-like service for the sky, and Kitty Hawk is currently in the first stages of testing the Cora in New Zealand. In this episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast, Mark and I talk about: his diverse background in UAV's the explosion of hobbyist rotorcraft the promises of machine learning for autonomous flight and the future of personalised flyingIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode is brought to you by KDC Resource—the experts in engineering recruitment for the aerospace and defence sector. For more than 15 years, KDC has been matching the very best engineers with the biggest names in the industry; from Airbus Group and GKN Aerospace to Cobham and BAE Systems. KDC’s deep talent pool of aerospace engineers means they are perfectly poised to meet your particular needs with the ideal candidate. In a time of unprecedented engineering skills shortage, KDC Resource will give you an edge over your competitors in the recruitment market.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, StressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Contact Mark through his website Mark's quadcopter on Gizmodo Kitty Hawk and career opportunities A video of Kitty Hawk's Cora A Tech Insider video on Kitty Hawk's Flyer The New York Times on Kitty Hawk's flying cars A vision for flying taxis

40mins

8 May 2018

Rank #10

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #13 – Skyrora’s Lead Engineer Robin Hague on Scotland’s New Satellite Launch Capability

Robin Hague is the Lead Engineer at the rocket startup Skyrora based in Edinburgh, Scotland. The goal of Skyrora is to provide a dedicated launch vehicle for small satellites. It has never been cheaper to build small satellites that provide imaging and communication services, and this sector of the space economy is expected to grow rapidly over the coming years. The UK is a world leader in the small satellite business—with Glasgow in Scotland building more satellites than any other city in Europe—but there is currently a shortfall of dedicated launchers for these satellite companies. Skyrora hopes to serve this market by launching rockets from Norther Scotland, which has great access to polar and sun-synchronous orbits. In this episode of the Aerospace Engineering podcast Robin and I talk about: the history of British rocketry (the Black Arrow) the benefits of using hydrogen peroxide as a propellant the role of 3D printing in modern rocket engines and the future of Skyrora.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and process visit SAMPE's website, or consider attending one of SAMPE’s conferences, such as CAMX, the largest and most comprehensive composites and advanced materials event for products, solutions, networking, and advanced industry thinking.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Skyrora: Webpage and Twitter feed Skyrora and 3D printing Hydrogen peroxide as propellant: Wikipedia Building a peroxide-pasta rocket ESA on hydrogen peroxidePlans to launch from Northern Scotland The British are coming...for the rocket-launching industry The Black Arrow rocket: (1, 2) and cross-section drawing

32mins

21 Jun 2018

Rank #11

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #22 – Mark Crouchen on Rockwood Composites and Manufacturing Complex Composite Components

Mark Crouchen is the managing director of Rockwood Composites, a company in the UK that specialises in manufacturing complex composite components using compression and bladder moulding. These manufacturing processes use fibre mats of carbon fibre, glass fibre, Kevlar, or any other material, which are pre-impregnated with a resin matrix and then placed in a mould, where they are cured at elevated temperature with the addition of external or internal pressure.The team at Rockwood has been supplying the aerospace, defense, medical and nuclear industries for over 25 years, with customers ranging from Leonardo Helicopters and the McLaren Formula 1 team to Safran and Facebook’s Aquila internet drone. In 2018, Rockwood won the Innovation in Manufacture award at the Composite UK industry event for their innovative use of advanced composite materials on the Tokomak ST40 nuclear fusion reactor. Composite materials have many benefits in terms of their excellent strength and stiffness at low weight. However, there is a common misconception that metal or ceramic components can easily be replaced one-to-one with composite components. The performance of any composite component is closely linked to the quality of the manufacturing process, and designing and manufacturing quality components is an area where Rockwood Composites particularly excel. In this episode of the podcast, Mark and I talk about:his background in engineeringthe types of structures that Rockwood Composites manufacturewhy composites manufacturing is a challengeand the special solution Rockwood found for the Tokomak ST40 fusion reactorIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by AnalySwift. Do you work in the design and analysis of aerospace structures and materials? If so, AnalySwift’s innovative engineering software SwiftComp may be the solution you’re seeking. Used either independently for virtual testing of aerospace composites or as a plugin to power conventional FEA codes, SwiftComp delivers the accuracy of 3D FEA in seconds instead of hours. A general-purpose multi-scale modelling program, SwiftComp provides an efficient and accurate tool for modelling aerospace structures and materials featuring anisotropy and heterogeneity. SwiftComp quickly calculates the complete set of effective properties needed for use in macroscopic structural analysis. It also accurately predicts local stresses and strains in the microstructure for predicting strengths. Find out how others in composites are saving time while improving accuracy, considering more design options, and arriving at the best solution more quickly. A no-cost Academic Partner Program is now available for eligible universities. For a free trial, visit analyswift.com. SwiftComp: Right results. Right away.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the EpisodeRockwood CompositesRockwood wins Innovation in Manufacture awardRockwood and fusion reactors

28mins

18 Dec 2018

Rank #12

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #17 – Alba Orbital Engineer Andrew Dunn on PocketQubes

On this episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast I am speaking to Andrew Dunn who is an engineer at the satellite company Alba Orbital in Glasgow, Scotland. Alba Orbital is in the business of building PocketQubes, which are miniaturised satellites mainly used for space science, Earth imaging and space exploration. As the name suggests, PocketQubes are pocket-sized, usually around 5 cm (2 in) cubed and weighing no more than 180 grams. What is more, PocketQubes are typically assembled entirely from commercial off-the-shelf components, driven mostly by the miniaturisation of smartphone electronics, and this makes PocketQubes an ideal low-cost testbed for university labs and smaller startup companies.Traditional satellites of the last decades often took so long to develop that by the time they were launched into space, the technology was already out of date. Furthermore, their large size increased launch costs and most components were one-off designs that made them too expensive but for the largest companies. Alba Orbital is currently developing the Unicorn-2 PocketQube platform, which is a modular design that can host different payloads, such as optical equipment, deployable antennas or a radio module, but is built on a foundation of integrated electronics that can serve any need. In this episode, Andrew and I talk about: the unique features of PocketQubes their components and how they are manufactured and Alba Orbital’s future plans for the Unicorn-2 platformIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode is brought to you by AnalySwift. Do you work in the design and analysis of aerospace structures and materials? If so, AnalySwift’s innovative engineering software SwiftComp may be the solution you’re seeking. Used either independently for virtual testing of aerospace composites or as a plugin to power conventional FEA codes, SwiftComp delivers the accuracy of 3D FEA in seconds instead of hours. A general-purpose multiscale modeling program, SwiftComp provides an efficient and accurate tool for modeling aerospace structures and materials featuring anisotropy and heterogeneity. Not only does SwiftComp quickly calculate the complete set of effective properties needed for use in macroscopic structural analysis, it also accurately predicts local stresses and strains in the microstructure for predicting strengths. Find out how others in composites are saving time while improving accuracy, designing earlier in the process, and getting to market more quickly. For a free trial, visit analyswift.com. SwiftComp: Right results. Right away.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Alba Orbital Webpage Unicorn-1 Unicorn-2Alba Orbital Twitter Alba Orbital profile in Wired Alba Orbital and Vector partnership

34mins

11 Sep 2018

Rank #13

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #19 – Manuel Schleiffelder on the Hound Project and Metal Matrix Composites for Rockets

Today I am speaking to Manuel Schleiffelder, an aerospace engineer based in Vienna, Austria. Manuel has a background in designing and building experimental rockets with the student space team of the Technical University in Vienna, known as the Hound Project. I spoke to Manuel after he returned from a trip to the Black Rock Desert, where the Vienna space team tested their newest two-stage experimental rocket. Manuel has a very broad background in space engineering having worked on projects varying from spacecraft design of lunar landers and systems engineering of rocket propulsion systems, to his newest research project in materials science: metal matrix composites.In a classic rocket engine the exhaust gases have a speed limit of exactly Mach 1 (the speed of sound) at the narrowest portion of the nozzle—the so-called choking condition. Since the speed of sound increases with temperature, hotter combustion means the exhaust gases can be expelled from the rocket at greater velocity. While the speed of sound in air at room temperature is typically around 1200 km/hr (745 mph), the speed of sound in the hot exhaust gases of a rocket can be more than 5 times this value. So even though we want our rocket engine to run as hot as possible, there are obvious practical limitations in terms of the ability of materials to withstand these extreme temperatures. For this reason, most rocket engines use some form of cooling to keep the material temperature within reasonable bounds. Manuel is currently developing metal matrix composite materials (carbon fibres embedded within a metal matrix) that are strong enough to withstand the extreme temperatures without the additional mass and complexity of a cooling system. In this episode, Manuel and I talk about his background in aerospace engineering the rockets that the Vienna student space team are building and testing and the advantages and challenges of developing metal matrix composites for rocket engines.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and process visit SAMPE's website, or consider attending one of SAMPE’s conferences, such as CAMX, the largest and most comprehensive composites and advanced materials event for products, solutions, networking, and advanced industry thinking.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Manuel's web presence Webpage TwitterPropulsion system schematic Metal matrix composite thruster prototype Vienna Space Team (the Hound Project) Hound Project launch video Detailed analysis of the Black Rock Desert launch

45mins

23 Oct 2018

Rank #14

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #32 – Air-to-Air Refuelling and Higher Education Engineering Reform with Dr Steve Bullock

Dr Steve Bullock is an engineering researcher in air-to-air refuelling and cooperative control of UAVs, as well as the Programme Director of the Aerospace Engineering programme at the University of Bristol. As the programme director of a leading European aerospace engineering programme, Steve has a unique vantage point on how the higher education landscape is changing, and specifically, how technology trends such as aviation sustainability and digitisation are changing the requirements for an engineering university education in the 21st century.As a TeachFirst ambassador and presenter of the Cosmic Shed podcast, Steve has a clear passion for education in general and is actively exploring different ways of disseminating technical information to a broad audience. In this episode of the podcast Steve and I talk about, his path into aerospace engineering and how he found his passion for teaching his PhD work on air-to-air refuelling and cooperative control what he considers to be some of the key challenges in engineering university education how the Aerospace Engineering department in Bristol is planning for the future and much, much more.This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by my patrons on Patreon. Patreon is a way for me to receive regular donations from listeners whenever I release a new episode, and with the help of these generous donors I have been able to pay for much of the expenses, hosting and travels costs that accrue in the production of this podcast. If you would like to support the podcast as a patron, then head over to my Patreon page. There are multiple levels of support, but anything from $1 an episode is highly appreciated. Thank you for your support!Selected Links from the Episode Steve's personal webpage and University of Bristol profile Steve's Twitter and LinkedIn The Cosmic Shed Live: TRON in the Planetarium (Eventbrite)Aerospace Engineering in Bristol Can flying go green?The Science behind 2001: A Space Odyssey Flipping lectures for increased teaching effectiveness TeachFirst

40mins

20 Nov 2019

Rank #15

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #9 – Faradair Founder Neil Cloughley on the Bio-Electric Hybrid Aircraft and Regional Aviation

Neil Cloughley is the founder and managing director of Faradair, the UK's leading hybrid aviation programme. Neil has a broad background in the aviation industry ranging from aircraft re-marketing and aircraft leasing to starting his own aircraft consultancy business, which found him working with the world's major airlines, OEMs and trailblazing companies like Virgin Galactic. Neil's father developed one of the most advanced unmanned aerial vehicles of the early 1990s, and had a flying prototype before the General Atomics MQ-1 Predator entered service in 1995. Unfortunately, as a result of being slightly ahead of its time, and due to a lack of funds and unfortunate timing, ASVEC UK had to close its doors.Neil is now stepping into his father's footsteps and building the bio-electric hybrid aircraft (BEHA) drawing from many of the lessons he learned from his father. The BEHA is a six-passenger aircraft with a hybrid gas and electric propulsion system, and is to be used for regional travel of around 200 miles. The BEHA has an unconventional design with a triple-staggered wing, an all-composite airframe and a ducted propeller. These design decisions reflect the three key specifications that need to be met to make regional inter-city flight a reality: minimising noise, emissions and operational costs. In this conversation, Neil and I talk about the engineering behind BEHA the challenging economics of new aviation businesses his long-term vision for a regional Uber-like taxi service in the sky and much, much moreIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and processes, consider attending the SAMPE 2018 Technical Conference and Expo in Long Beach, California.Selected Links from the Episode Faradair and the BEHA Neil's vision of an UBER in the sky The Journey of an Aerospace Startup --- Royal Aeronautical Society lecture Profile of Neil Cloughley Faradair partnership with Swansea University ProDrive's partnership with Faradair

1hr 16mins

25 Apr 2018

Rank #16

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #31 – Virtual Reality in Aerospace with Mbryonic Founder Tom Szirtes

Tom Szirtes is the founder and director of Mbryonic, a London-based digital design studio. Mbryonic specialises in creating virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR) experiences that help organisations communicate, educate and entertain more effectively. Apart from the traditional applications in gaming and education, VR is now increasingly important for industrial design and engineering in general. For example, Mbryonic recently partnered with All Nippon Airways to provide customers an immersive virtual tour of All Nippon's new business class in the Boeing 777 cabin. Mbryonic has also partnered with Acumen to create ‘The Adient Ascent VR’; a modular aircraft seating system that allows airlines to configure their cabins through a touch screen interface and then experience what it’s actually like to be in the cabin through a VR headset. Apart from discussing these two projects, Tom and I talk about: the fundamentals of and differences between virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality some of the advantages of VR that will transform the aerospace business landscape and how engineers can benefit from using the technologyThis episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by my patrons on Patreon. Patreon is a way for me to receive regular donations from listeners whenever I release a new episode, and with the help of these generous donors I have been able to pay for much of the expenses, hosting and travels costs that accrue in the production of this podcast. If you would like to support the podcast as a patron, then head over to my Patreon page. There are multiple levels of support, but anything from $1 an episode is highly appreciated. Thank you for your support!Selected Links from the Episode Mbryonic on the web Webpage Twitter VimeoAdient Ascent VR ANA Business Class VR Further applications of VR/AR in aerospace Digital Twinning in aerospace

30mins

28 Oct 2019

Rank #17

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #24 – Veronica Foreman on Small Satellites and Virgin Orbit’s Air-Launched Rocket System

Veronica Foreman is a payload engineer at the small-satellite launch provider Virgin Orbit. Before starting her career at Virgin Orbit, Veronica earned several academic accolades including an Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award at Georgia Tech, and a Best Masters Thesis award at MIT. What I find especially impressive about her Masters work on small-satellite constellations is that Veronica considered both the design of constellations, as well as the economic and policy challenges to small-satellite mission success.As Virgin Orbit's mission is to be the premier dedicated launch service for small satellites, Veronica has seemingly found the perfect place for her expertise and passion. One of the key features of Virgin Orbit's launch design is its air-launching system that drops the rocket (LauncherOne) from the wing of a Boeing 747 (Cosmic Girl), providing a movable launchpad. As Veronica explains in this episode, this capability provides Virgin Orbit unique advantages in terms of providing a dedicated launch service for small satellites. In this episode of the Aerospace Engineering podcast, Veronica and I discuss: Virgin Orbit's vision the unique advantages and challenges of an air-launched rocket system some of Virgin Orbit's key engineering technologies and the growing importance of satellite constellationsIf you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is brought to you by AnalySwift. Do you work in the design and analysis of aerospace structures and materials? If so, AnalySwift’s innovative engineering software SwiftComp may be the solution you’re seeking. Used either independently for virtual testing of aerospace composites or as a plugin to power conventional FEA codes, SwiftComp delivers the accuracy of 3D FEA in seconds instead of hours. A general-purpose multi-scale modelling program, SwiftComp provides an efficient and accurate tool for modelling aerospace structures and materials featuring anisotropy and heterogeneity. SwiftComp quickly calculates the complete set of effective properties needed for use in macroscopic structural analysis. It also accurately predicts local stresses and strains in the microstructure for predicting strengths. Find out how others in composites are saving time while improving accuracy, considering more design options, and arriving at the best solution more quickly. A no-cost Academic Partner Program is now available for eligible universities. For a free trial, visit analyswift.com. SwiftComp: Right results. Right away.This episode is also sponsored by StressEbook.com, which is an online hub for you if you are interested in aerospace stress engineering. StressEbook.com provides world-class engineering services and online courses on the stress analysis of aircraft structures, as well as a free ebook and blog. No matter if you’re a junior or senior structural analyst, stressEbook.com provides you with the skills and know-how to become a champion in your workplace.Selected Links from the Episode Virgin Orbit's homepage Technical details about the LauncherOne rocket Follow Virgin Orbit on Twitter Virgin Orbit YouTube channel Veronica on payload processing 2018 Highlights LauncherOne hot fireVeronica's MIT Master thesis on second-generation LEO satellite constellations

22mins

6 Feb 2019

Rank #18

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #30 – Digitisation at Rolls Royce and the Information Vanguard Conference

Today I am talking to Gareth Hetheridge (Interim Head of IT at Rolls Royce) and Luca Leone (Team Defence Information Task Force Consultant) about the UK defence industry. Team Defence Information (TD-Info) is a collaborative association that informs defence information policy and pilots new ways of working to transform the defence ecosystem in the UK. TD-Info pools the collective insights, knowledge and innovations of its members, such as Rolls Royce, BAE Systems, and others, to help the Ministry of Defence deliver its objectives for equipment and information. In this episode we discuss: the importance of TD-Info for the UK defence sector Rolls Royce’s vision regarding the increasing digitisation of the aerospace sector and hot topics such as Artificial Intelligence and Virtual Reality.We also discuss a key industry event that TD-Info and Rolls Royce are co-organising, the 1st Annual Information Vanguard conference, an event for Young Industry Professionals that will be held on the 18th October 2019 at Rolls Royce in Filton, UK. The conference is open to all, but has been especially designed with newer-entry professionals in the defence industry in mind. There are some exciting speakers confirmed including Team Tempest and Reaction Engines, and live exhibitions from the likes of Rolls Royce and Airbus. You can sign-up to attend here.If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by supporting it directly on Patreon, where patrons of the podcast receive exclusive behind-the-scenes content and special episodes. Thanks a lot for listening!Selected Links from the Episode Team Defence Information 1st Annual Information Vanguard (InVan) Conference Digitisation at Rolls Royce Rolls Royce uses Virtual Reality to train engineers AI to maximise jet engine availability Team Tempest Airbus Bird of Prey

20mins

4 Oct 2019

Rank #19

Podcast cover

Podcast Ep. #8 – Rocket Lab’s Lachlan Matchett on Democratising Access to Space and the Rutherford Rocket Engine

In this episode I am talking to Lachlan Matchett, who is the VP of Propulsion at Rocket Lab. Rocket Lab is a startup rocket company with the mission of removing barriers to commercial space by frequent launches to low-earth orbit. The current conundrum of many space technology companies that want to launch small satellites into space is that there is no dedicated launch service tailored to their needs. This is where Rocket Lab enters the picture. To provide small payloads with a flexible and dedicated launch vehicle, Rocket Lab has developed the Electron rocket. The Electron is a two-stage rocket that can be tailored to unique orbital requirements and provides frequent flight opportunities at personalised schedules.In terms of the engineering, there are many interesting features to the Electron rocket, but one of the key innovations is the Rutherford engine that Lachlan Matchett and his team have developed over the last five years. Rutherford is the first oxygen/kerosene-powered engine to use 3D printing for all primary components. In fact, the Rutherford engine can be printed in an astounding 24 hrs, and this is one of the driving factors behind Rocket Lab's cost efficiency and high target launch frequency. So in this episode, Lachlan and I talk about: Rocket Lab's business model their recent launch success in Jan 2018 some of the engineering highlights of the Rutherford engine and Rocket Lab's plans for the futureI hope that you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. If you enjoy the Aerospace Engineering Podcast you can support it by leaving a review on iTunes or by becoming a patron.Also, as of this writing Rocket Lab is hiring, so make sure to check out their careers page. You can tune into Rocket Lab's future launches by following Rocket Lab on Twitter.What have you learned from this episode? Let me know on Twitter by clicking here.This episode of the Aerospace Engineering Podcast is sponsored by SAMPE North America. SAMPE is a global professional society that has been providing educational opportunities on advanced materials for more than 70 years. SAMPE’s network of engineers is a key facilitator for the advancement of aerospace engineering by enabling information exchange and synergies between aerospace companies. To find out how SAMPE can help you learn more about advanced materials and processes, consider attending the SAMPE 2018 Technical Conference and Expo in Long Beach, California.Selected Links from the Episode Rocket Lab Electron rocket Rutherford Engine Careers at Rocket Lab Rocket Lab on TwitterFollow the Humanity Star Lachlan Matchett wins Young Engineer of the Year Jan 2018 launch "Still Testing" (launch video countdown at 14:50) Rocket Lab's upcoming launch "It's Business Time"

36mins

6 Apr 2018

Rank #20