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Up To Date

Updated 7 days ago

News
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Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

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Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

iTunes Ratings

21 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
1
1
2
0

Thank you!

By Ctado - Feb 22 2019
Read more
Thought-provoking, KC-centric conversations that invite listener input. This podcast helps to keep me informed!

Social security

By FelicityFarm - Sep 13 2016
Read more
Smart Money Expert claims Reagan tweked social security so it would last longer. Check your facts he stole from ss. That same "expert" can't help clicking on interesting on site where his computer was hacked. A financial advisor that didn't buy apple. Smh😣

iTunes Ratings

21 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
1
1
2
0

Thank you!

By Ctado - Feb 22 2019
Read more
Thought-provoking, KC-centric conversations that invite listener input. This podcast helps to keep me informed!

Social security

By FelicityFarm - Sep 13 2016
Read more
Smart Money Expert claims Reagan tweked social security so it would last longer. Check your facts he stole from ss. That same "expert" can't help clicking on interesting on site where his computer was hacked. A financial advisor that didn't buy apple. Smh😣

Listen to:

Cover image of Up To Date

Up To Date

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

Seg. 1: Ambassadors And Presidents | Seg. 2: Film Critics

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Segment 1: Former U.S. ambassador thinks "the diplomatic corps is having a very good moment." Allan Katz was appointed as the ambassador to Portugal and held the post from 2010 to 2013. When it comes to events surrounding Ukraine Katz said, "I think the biggest problem here was is that these were acts that were contrary to the policy of the United States government." The president's conduct toward Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, Katz feels, has made the foreign service less attractive to potential diplomats. Allan Katz, founder of American Public Square and former U.S. Ambassador to Portugal Segment 2, beginning at 21:14: "Parasite" is the must-see film this week. Our film critics liked "Give Me Liberty" but with only four showings at The Tivoli in the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, you'll need to be quick if you want to see it. "Harriet," a fictionalized account of abolitionist Harriet Tubman's life, didn't impress but Steve Walker raved about "Parasite," saying the South Korean movie

Nov 22 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: KCPD Chief Rick Smith | Seg. 2: Ethics Professors

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Segment 1: Chief Smith speaks to 'disheartening' amount of violent crime in Kansas City, Missouri. When asked about the causes behind violent crime in his city, police chief Rick Smith pointed to several factors including lack of conflict resolution skills, public policies and gun law issues. Smith shared the department's new approach that focuses on the most dangerous individuals involved in gun crimes and acknowledged that the police department "will always be a constant review process" to keep up with changes in technology and the types of jobs needed within the force. Rick Smith , chief, Kansas City, Missouri Police Department Segment 2, beginning at 27:22: How to ethically approach climate change resolutions and thoughts on cancel culture. Our ethics professors agree climate change resolutions are an issue of public policy. While Wayne Vaught said individuals should certainly be making "conscience decisions," it's ultimately about supporting efforts to combat the phenomenon on a

Nov 13 2019

48mins

Play

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas

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With more than 100 days in office, Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas reviews his progress and future challenges. Policing gets a lot of attention, but Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says addressing violent crime requires a holistic approach. To help find solutions and opportunities for the region's youths, Lucas says he's working closely with many local school districts. On the subject of tax incentives for property developers, the mayor who campaigned on reducing them says he's not "torpedoing every project," but they can't all be on the backs of taxpayers. Quinton Lucas , mayor of Kansas City, Missouri

Nov 11 2019

40mins

Play

Seg. 1: Racial Inequality in KC | Seg. 2: Kansas Ticket Scandal

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Segment 1: 2019 report shows black Kansas Citians are still separate and unequal. By comparing things like poverty and homeownership rates by race, a report from the Urban League of Greater Kansas City found black people are only 73% as equal as whites in Kansas City. The report is released every few years, and is used to educate community members and elected oficials about progress in economics, education and social justice. Gwen Grant , CEO and president, Urban League of Greater Kansas City Rev. Wallace Hartsfield II , pastor emeritus, Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church Segment 2, beginning at 27:12: The University of Kansas was the site of the biggest ticket scandal in college sports history — so far. The NCAA is currently investigating the University of Kansas' athletics program, but it's not the only snafu to rock the department in recent years. A 2010 case resulted in millions of dollars' worth of tickets being stolen by university employees, who then sold them for personal

Nov 18 2019

48mins

Play

Seg. 1: Preventing School Shootings | Seg. 2: KC Symphony's Michael Stern

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Segment 1: Two area schools discuss their approach to preventing on-campus shootings, and protecting students Students across the country live in fear that the next mass shooting might happen on their campus. Today, we hear how two school jurisdictions think about the safety and security of their students, and what steps they can and can't take to keep the next tragedy from happening on their watch. Alisa Pacer , director of emergency management, Johnson County Community County Robert McLees , director of safety & security, North Kansas City Schools Segment 2, beginning at 25:09: Kansas City Symphony's music director is closing in on his last few years in the post. Michael Stern has been credited for playing an intrumental role in raising the profile of the Kansas City Syphony. As he approaches the last few years of his tenure, he discusses the remaining goals he's pursuing and the importance of carrying that momentum forward, after his contract ends in 2023. Michael Stern , music

Nov 08 2019

48mins

Play

Seg. 1: Downtown Development Update | Seg. 2: Harriet Tubman's Life

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Segment 1: The new structures and businesses making news in Downtown Kansas City. Some of the more noteworthy announcements in recent downtown development projects include the United States Department of Agriculture relocation and Waddell & Reed's move from Overland Park. We learn about these and other projects, and discuss the use of property tax abatements to attract new growth. Kevin Collison , publisher, CitySceneKC.com Segment 2, beginning at 26:02: A new book about the life of Harriet Tubman explores the abolitionist's multiple triumphs. Harriet Tubman's sacrifice and determination was not widely recognized until after her death. Erica Armstrong Dunbar's latest book celebrates the legacy of Tubman by bringing attention to her work on the Underground Railroad, her service in the Civil War, and her activism late in life. Erica Armstrong Dunbar , professor of history at Rutgers University, and author of " She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman "

Nov 04 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Former Sen. Claire McCaskill | Seg. 2: Kansas & Olympic Basketball

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Segment 1: The former U.S. Senator from Missouri says, "traditional qualifications for president are on life support." Claire McCaskill's current role as a political analyst allows her more freedom to say what's on her mind. She used that liberty to discuss the current goings-on in state and national politics, including impeachment proceedings on Capitol Hill, election returns from around the country, and next year's race for Missouri governor. Her advice for hopeful Democrats in the Show-Me State? "It's hard when you live in Kansas City and St. Louis sometimes to remember that Trump still has a positive approval rating in our state," she says. Claire McCaskill, political analyst and former Democratic U.S. Senator Segment 2, beginning at 23:36: Basketball's beginnings have connections to Kansas, Missouri and Nazi Germany. Among the state of Kansas' many ties to the history of basketball, James Naismith and Phog Allen loom large. Lesser-known is how Allen became the driving force behind

Nov 06 2019

46mins

Play

Seg. 1: U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver | Seg. 2: History of Black Banks

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Segment 1: Congressman for Missouri's 5th district shares his stance on the current impeachment inquiry. Representative Emanuel Cleaver said constituents in Missouri's 5th District have mixed feelings on impeaching the president. Cleaver has been cautious in his calls for impeachment, but is now certain a crime was committed. Learn why he said, "It's not so much a political crime as it is a civil crime." U.S. Representative Emanuel Cleaver, Missouri's 5th District Segement 2, beginning at 25:05: Blacks in America have a long history of saving, lending and borrowing money. Very few financial institutions in this country would do business with blacks. It wasn't until after Reconstruction that black banks appeared. Tim Todd related the history of those early banks and their importance in enabling former slaves and freemen in buying homes, starting businesses and owning land. Today, only 22 black-owned banks exist in the United States. Tim Todd , executive writer and historian for the

Nov 07 2019

47mins

Play

Kansas City's Christopher Elbow Turns Chocolate Into Art

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On this very special edition of KCUR's Up To Date, one of Kansas City's most renowned chocolatiers discussed responsible sourcing of cacao beans, his approach to the combining of other flavors with his favorite ingredient, and how non-experts can stear clear of junk when shopping for something to satisfy a chocolate craving. Christopher Elbow , founder and owner of Christopher Elbow Chocolates

Dec 06 2019

28mins

Play

Seg. 1: Impeachment Then & Now | Seg. 2: U.S.S. Missouri History

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Segment 1: Richard Nixon's impeachment parallels that of President Donald Trump. President Richard Nixon's impeachment trials were about more than just the Watergate scandal. Biographer John Farrell said Nixon's use of presidential power to advance his personal political ambition mirrors that of the current Oval Office occupant, who is currently being investigated by the U.S. House of Representaives. John Farrell , journalist and author of " Richard Nixon: The Life " Segment 2, beginning at 15:58: The world's most famous battleship It was the site of the surrender of the Emperor of Japan, where World War II officially ended. And the U.S.S. Missouri also hosted the filming of a notorious Cher music video. Today, we got a short history of the ship, discussed its ties to President Truman, and learned what to expect next year — the 75th anniversary of the end of the war. Mike Carr , president and CEO of the U.S.S. Missouri Memorial Association John Farrell will speak about his book at 6:30

Dec 05 2019

47mins

Play

A Wine-Tasting Lunch With Doug Frost

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Kansas City-based wine expert attributes his expansive knowledge to his "drinking and reading" habits. Seated in Room 39, Master sommelier Doug Frost guided a group of KCUR supporters through a tasting of six distinctive wines. A number of his selections underwent unique growth, harvesting or barrelling processes like the sauvignon blanc from Napa Valley which was harvested at night. Chef Ted Habiger also offered insight into how he selects wines for his restaurant's dishes. Doug Frost , master of wine and master sommelier Ted Habiger , chef and owner, Room 39 The wines featured in today's program were: Paul Dangin Brut Champagne, Maxville Sauvignon Blanc 2018 Napa Valley, Jordan Chardonnay 2017 Alexander Valley, Tinto Pesquera Crianza 2014 Ribera del Duero, Chateau Greysac 2012 Medoc Cru Bourgeois and BenMarco Expresivo (Malbec-Cabernet) 2015 Mendoza

Dec 03 2019

49mins

Play

Seg. 1: Regional & National Politics | Seg. 2: Music Critic's Life

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Segment 1: Mike Pompeo looks more likely to enter the race for Kansas' U.S. Senate seat. When it comes to the race for president, The Call's Eric Wesson expects another four years of Trump. However, Mike Mahoney of KMBC sees U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar as the sleeper Democratic candidate while Caroline Sweeney is looking at Andrew Yang to gain ground. They also analyzed the U.S. Senate race in Kansas, the early days of Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas and former city manager Troy Schulte's shift to Jackson County government. Eric Wesson , senior staff writer, The Call Caroline Sweeney , reporter Micheal Mahoney , reporter, KMBC 9 Segment 2: What it's like to be a music critic in Kansas City Bill Brownlee has been attending and critiquing concerts around Kansas City for decades. By his estimation, Brownlee will have seen some 300 artists by the end of this year. The lifelong music fan said he wants to feel something when he goes to a show. One factor he consistently takes into account? The

Dec 02 2019

47mins

Play

Commentary: Halls of Fame

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Mention "the hall of fame," and the average fan might think of Cooperstown or Canton. But shrines to our sports legends can be found from coast to coast, including right here in Kansas City. As commentator Victor Wishna contends in this month’s edition of “A Fan’s Notes,” that's a good thing. Ah, that familiar squeak is back. Tonight, for the first time since last spring’s NCAA Tournament, college basketball returns to the Sprint Center. Four teams, including the Missouri Tigers, will face off in the Hall of Fame Classic. That’s the Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame; last night, a special ceremony here welcomed the newest class: six players and three coaches who have left their mark on the game’s “magnificent history.” Which got me thinking… Yes, about basketball, but also…“the Hall of Fame.” The idea of enshrining living (and once-living) legends is as old as the crumbling, ancient Greek busts of the first Olympic champions. But the modern version is a mainly American phenomenon.

Nov 27 2019

4mins

Play

Seg. 1: Teaching Climate Change | Seg. 2: 'Walking Wall' Update

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Segment 1: Teachers highlight current events and human impact to help students learn about climate change. Teachers are seeing less resistance to teaching climate change in Missouri schools. The state has adopted the Next Generation Science Standards , and one Raytown High School teacher said, "I've also changed my approach some, in the sense that I really don't indulge argument on the topic at this point." Sarah Apple , biology teacher, Raytown High School Jen Lacy , environmental science teacher, Crossroads Prepatory Academy Michael Wysession , geophysics professor, Washington University in St. Louis Segment 2, beginning at 26:11: The architect behind "Walking Wall" looks back his journey moving the stone exhibit across the lawn of Nelson-Atkins. Through five phases, a stone wall has moved around the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and, according to the architect, each stage has a distinct story. The rewards of the project, he said, has been "greater than I ever hoped." Andy Goldsworthy

Nov 27 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Making Environmentalism Inclusive | Seg. 2: 'My Penguin Year'

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Segment 1: Environmentalism and the outdoors have long been seen as safe spaces for white people. The concerns of climate change action organizations are wide-ranging and well-founded, but membership is largely white and adult. Learn the benefits and challenges of adding young people of color to these groups, apart from just making them more reflective of the communities they serve. The founder of an Atlanta group and the head of a Kansas City organization explained how they are bringing diversity and youth to the environmental ranks. Angelou Ezeilo , founder and CEO of Greening Youth Foundation , and author of " Engage, Connect, Protect: Empowering Diverse Youth as Environmental Leaders " John Gordon , founder of Boys Grow Segment 2, beginning at 25:35: Meet the man who spent a year in Antarctica documenting the lives of emperor penguins. Sub-zero temperature, howling wind and abundant ice and rock — these are the elements emperor penguins thrive in day-to-day, and those Lindsay McRae

Nov 26 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Heartland Center Woes | Seg. 2: The KC-Oakland Rivalry

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Segment 1: Heartland Center for Behavioral Change was not equipped to accept the full array of inmates brought in by the Kansas City Police Department. Accepting prisoners from the Kansas City Municipal Court system was initially seen as a chance for the nonprofit organization to link inmates with resources that could help them reintegrate into the community. In retrospect, Heartland Center's CEO said serving as a temporary jail "is outside of our scope" of ability. Kyle Mead, president and CEO of Heartland Center for Behavioral Change Segment 2, beginning at 19:03: How a sports rivalry between cities defined an era. The beginnings of Kansas City's contentious relationship with Oakland, California, is sometimes traced to a dirty football play back in 1970. In reality, though, the rivalry began when Oakland lured Kansas City's pro baseball team, the Athletics, west to California. Matt Ehrlich , professor emeritus at the University of Illinios and author of " Kansas City vs. Oakland: The

Nov 25 2019

34mins

Play

Seg. 1: Ambassadors And Presidents | Seg. 2: Film Critics

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Segment 1: Former U.S. ambassador thinks "the diplomatic corps is having a very good moment." Allan Katz was appointed as the ambassador to Portugal and held the post from 2010 to 2013. When it comes to events surrounding Ukraine Katz said, "I think the biggest problem here was is that these were acts that were contrary to the policy of the United States government." The president's conduct toward Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, Katz feels, has made the foreign service less attractive to potential diplomats. Allan Katz, founder of American Public Square and former U.S. Ambassador to Portugal Segment 2, beginning at 21:14: "Parasite" is the must-see film this week. Our film critics liked "Give Me Liberty" but with only four showings at The Tivoli in the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, you'll need to be quick if you want to see it. "Harriet," a fictionalized account of abolitionist Harriet Tubman's life, didn't impress but Steve Walker raved about "Parasite," saying the South Korean movie

Nov 22 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Racial Inequality in KC | Seg. 2: Kansas Ticket Scandal

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Segment 1: 2019 report shows black Kansas Citians are still separate and unequal. By comparing things like poverty and homeownership rates by race, a report from the Urban League of Greater Kansas City found black people are only 73% as equal as whites in Kansas City. The report is released every few years, and is used to educate community members and elected oficials about progress in economics, education and social justice. Gwen Grant , CEO and president, Urban League of Greater Kansas City Rev. Wallace Hartsfield II , pastor emeritus, Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church Segment 2, beginning at 27:12: The University of Kansas was the site of the biggest ticket scandal in college sports history — so far. The NCAA is currently investigating the University of Kansas' athletics program, but it's not the only snafu to rock the department in recent years. A 2010 case resulted in millions of dollars' worth of tickets being stolen by university employees, who then sold them for personal

Nov 18 2019

48mins

Play

Seg. 1: Municipal Court Outreach | Seg. 2: 'The Inclusive Economy'

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Segment 1: Kansas City, Missouri Municipal Court is working to improve the judicial experience. Kansas City's Municipal Court is participating in a pilot project to improve trust between courts and the communities they serve. Through dialogue sessions, it hopes to tackle problems like its high failure-to-appear rate. Because citizens often face confusion and intimidation within the judicial system, personnel "want to demystify the courts," Benita Jones, the court's public information officer said. Benita Jones , public information officer, Kansas City Municipal Court Megan Pfannesstiel , municipal court administrator, Kansas City Municipal Court Segment 2, beginning at 23:09: Public policy expert calls for reform of practices that "have continued to push people into poverty." Cato Intstitute's Michael Tanner said the nation does well providing basic material needs to residents, but "we don't do a very good job at enabling people to flourish." Tanner targeted areas where reform is

Nov 14 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: KCPD Chief Rick Smith | Seg. 2: Ethics Professors

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Segment 1: Chief Smith speaks to 'disheartening' amount of violent crime in Kansas City, Missouri. When asked about the causes behind violent crime in his city, police chief Rick Smith pointed to several factors including lack of conflict resolution skills, public policies and gun law issues. Smith shared the department's new approach that focuses on the most dangerous individuals involved in gun crimes and acknowledged that the police department "will always be a constant review process" to keep up with changes in technology and the types of jobs needed within the force. Rick Smith , chief, Kansas City, Missouri Police Department Segment 2, beginning at 27:22: How to ethically approach climate change resolutions and thoughts on cancel culture. Our ethics professors agree climate change resolutions are an issue of public policy. While Wayne Vaught said individuals should certainly be making "conscience decisions," it's ultimately about supporting efforts to combat the phenomenon on a

Nov 13 2019

48mins

Play

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas

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With more than 100 days in office, Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas reviews his progress and future challenges. Policing gets a lot of attention, but Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says addressing violent crime requires a holistic approach. To help find solutions and opportunities for the region's youths, Lucas says he's working closely with many local school districts. On the subject of tax incentives for property developers, the mayor who campaigned on reducing them says he's not "torpedoing every project," but they can't all be on the backs of taxpayers. Quinton Lucas , mayor of Kansas City, Missouri

Nov 11 2019

40mins

Play

Seg. 1: Preventing School Shootings | Seg. 2: KC Symphony's Michael Stern

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Segment 1: Two area schools discuss their approach to preventing on-campus shootings, and protecting students Students across the country live in fear that the next mass shooting might happen on their campus. Today, we hear how two school jurisdictions think about the safety and security of their students, and what steps they can and can't take to keep the next tragedy from happening on their watch. Alisa Pacer , director of emergency management, Johnson County Community County Robert McLees , director of safety & security, North Kansas City Schools Segment 2, beginning at 25:09: Kansas City Symphony's music director is closing in on his last few years in the post. Michael Stern has been credited for playing an intrumental role in raising the profile of the Kansas City Syphony. As he approaches the last few years of his tenure, he discusses the remaining goals he's pursuing and the importance of carrying that momentum forward, after his contract ends in 2023. Michael Stern , music

Nov 08 2019

48mins

Play

Seg. 1: U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver | Seg. 2: History of Black Banks

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Segment 1: Congressman for Missouri's 5th district shares his stance on the current impeachment inquiry. Representative Emanuel Cleaver said constituents in Missouri's 5th District have mixed feelings on impeaching the president. Cleaver has been cautious in his calls for impeachment, but is now certain a crime was committed. Learn why he said, "It's not so much a political crime as it is a civil crime." U.S. Representative Emanuel Cleaver, Missouri's 5th District Segement 2, beginning at 25:05: Blacks in America have a long history of saving, lending and borrowing money. Very few financial institutions in this country would do business with blacks. It wasn't until after Reconstruction that black banks appeared. Tim Todd related the history of those early banks and their importance in enabling former slaves and freemen in buying homes, starting businesses and owning land. Today, only 22 black-owned banks exist in the United States. Tim Todd , executive writer and historian for the

Nov 07 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Former Sen. Claire McCaskill | Seg. 2: Kansas & Olympic Basketball

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Segment 1: The former U.S. Senator from Missouri says, "traditional qualifications for president are on life support." Claire McCaskill's current role as a political analyst allows her more freedom to say what's on her mind. She used that liberty to discuss the current goings-on in state and national politics, including impeachment proceedings on Capitol Hill, election returns from around the country, and next year's race for Missouri governor. Her advice for hopeful Democrats in the Show-Me State? "It's hard when you live in Kansas City and St. Louis sometimes to remember that Trump still has a positive approval rating in our state," she says. Claire McCaskill, political analyst and former Democratic U.S. Senator Segment 2, beginning at 23:36: Basketball's beginnings have connections to Kansas, Missouri and Nazi Germany. Among the state of Kansas' many ties to the history of basketball, James Naismith and Phog Allen loom large. Lesser-known is how Allen became the driving force behind

Nov 06 2019

46mins

Play

Commentary: A Royal Outlook

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Well, from what we understand, another World Series is set to start next week. However, fans of the Kansas City Royals are looking ahead…a little further than that. Commentator Victor Wishna elaborates in this October edition of “A Fan’s Notes.” Oh, somewhere in this favored land…the playoffs are still going on. But for baseball fans in Kansas City, the calendar has already turned to that mythical time of the year when anything is possible. Not the postseason. Not the preseason. The offseason. Sometimes the fortunes of an entire franchise can turn on a single moment. Salvador Perez’s crazy Wild-Card-winning line drive comes to mind. But really, change—like most things in baseball—happens a bit more gradually, through some crafty drafting, patient prospect development, and, every once in awhile, a bold move from the front office. This Royals’ offseason is already shaping up to be one of the more transformative in recent memory. A new owner. A new manager. And, well, the same old GM, who

Nov 05 2019

4mins

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Seg. 1: KCK Mayor David Alvey | Seg. 2: Planned Parenthood In Missouri

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Segment 1: The Unified Government's chief executive discusses violent crime, economic development and local elections. A deadly bar shooting on Central Avenue has added urgency to the push to curb violent crime in Kansas City, Kansas, which Mayor David Alvey reported is approximately 50 officers below the ideal number for the Police Department. The CEO-mayor described how the city and county are approaching that, municipal indentification cards and other civic issues. David Alvey , mayor and CEO of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas Segment 2, beginning 30:40: The fate of Missouri's last legal abortion provider is in the balance. Administrative Hearing Commissioner Sreenivasa Rao Dandamudi is expected to decide early next year whether the Show-Me State's last remaining abortion provider can continue to operate . This, after state health officials decided against renewing the clinic's license. We hear the latest on the case. Sarah Fentem , health reporter

Nov 05 2019

48mins

Play

Seg. 1: Downtown Development Update | Seg. 2: Harriet Tubman's Life

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Segment 1: The new structures and businesses making news in Downtown Kansas City. Some of the more noteworthy announcements in recent downtown development projects include the United States Department of Agriculture relocation and Waddell & Reed's move from Overland Park. We learn about these and other projects, and discuss the use of property tax abatements to attract new growth. Kevin Collison , publisher, CitySceneKC.com Segment 2, beginning at 26:02: A new book about the life of Harriet Tubman explores the abolitionist's multiple triumphs. Harriet Tubman's sacrifice and determination was not widely recognized until after her death. Erica Armstrong Dunbar's latest book celebrates the legacy of Tubman by bringing attention to her work on the Underground Railroad, her service in the Civil War, and her activism late in life. Erica Armstrong Dunbar , professor of history at Rutgers University, and author of " She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman "

Nov 04 2019

47mins

Play

Seg. 1: Bridging The Divide | Seg. 2: Houdini's Life & Legacy

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Segment 1: One professor's move from New York City to rural North Carolina taught him lessons in bridging America's partisan divide. When it comes to most hot-button issues, the foundational values Americans stand for are often more similiar than not, says one New York professor who moved to Appalachian State University to teach ethics. He wrote about it for Politico magazine , and says, instead of looking for disagreement, people should start by finding common ground. Evan Mandery , chairperson of the Department of Criminal Justice at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and author of " A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America " Segment 2, beginning at 22:47: Long after his death, one of the most famous magicians still inspires a sense of wonder. On a tour through Kansas City in 1915, Harry Houdini dangled stories above the ground in a straight jack. His stunt amazed thousands, and is just one example of a successful escape that remains a

Nov 01 2019

46mins

Play