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Rank #174 in Business category

Business
News

World Business Report

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #174 in Business category

Business
News
Read more

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

Read more

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

iTunes Ratings

146 Ratings
Average Ratings
105
23
6
3
9

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
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Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

Very good

By petronila2918 - Nov 09 2011
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Excelente way to start the day.

iTunes Ratings

146 Ratings
Average Ratings
105
23
6
3
9

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

Very good

By petronila2918 - Nov 09 2011
Read more
Excelente way to start the day.
Cover image of World Business Report

World Business Report

Latest release on Feb 17, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 6 days ago

Rank #1: Yahoo Reveals A Billion User Accounts Hacked

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Yahoo has disclosed that it was victim to a massive data breach in 2013, in a cyber attack that compromised data of more than a billion users. It follows a disclosure from the internet company in September of a separate breach that affected more than 500 million accounts.User names, telephone numbers, passwords and email addresses were stolen, but not bank and payment data. Cynthia Brumfield, a Washington cyber security consultant, tells us what this reveals about security standards at Yahoo.
As Donald Trump reveals more names of the people he wants to join his cabinet we are getting a better picture of the shape of the next administration in the White House. He has selected Rick Perry, former governor of oil rich Texas, to lead the Department of Energy and his choice to nominate Rex Tillerson, the chief executive of ExxonMobil, as Secretary of State is controversial. Mr Trump also wants a former Goldman Sachs banker, Steven Mnuchin, for Treasury Secretary. Our regular US economic commentator, Irwin Stelzer, gives us his thoughts on what these choices signal about how Donald Trump might govern.
Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system went live today, after 17 years of planning with numerous setbacks and going three times over budget. It promises to outperform rivals like America's GPS, but with 18 satellites in place so far, Galileo's signal will need to be boosted by GPS satellites operated by the US. Thierry Dubois, France bureau chief for the magazine and website Aviation Week in Lyon, tells us more about Europe's new satellite navigation system.
Imagine being forced to leave your home, a where you feel comfortable, to uproot your life to another country, thousands of kilometres away. That is the sad fate for millions of the world's refugees and asylum seekers, as record numbers of people this year have had to flee from conflict, in countries like Syria and Afghanistan. However for some refugees in the Indian capital Delhi it is not all bad news, as women from Afghanistan are cooking up a project that is helping them get back on their feet. The BBC's Sumiran Preet Kaur reports.
Health experts constantly remind us that getting enough sleep and exercise are two major factors that help people perform better at work. Perhaps time to consider a new resolution for 2017, but easier said than done. Dr Steven MacGregor is the founder of the Leadership Academy of Barcelona, and as an expert on workplace health he explains how we can improve business performance.
(Picture: Yahoo headquarters in California. Getty Images.)

Dec 15 2016

27mins

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Rank #2: Battle to do business in Iran

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BBC's Ivana Davidovic hears from the boss of a manufacturing company and an internet entrepreneur, both of whom contributed anonymously for fear of repercussions from talking to the BBC. Esfandyar Batmanghelidj, founder of Boursa Bazaar, a publication which tracks developments in Iran's economy discusses why ordinary Iranians feel so let down at the moment. And Rana Rahimpour of the BBC Persian service explores the historical roots of the current protests. Also in the programme, France is in the grip of a nationwide strike against government plans to dramatically reform the pension system. Sophie Pedder is Paris bureau chief for The Economist, and explains why workers across the economy are taking action. Plus we look at the growing dominance of English as the global language of business.

Dec 05 2019

26mins

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Rank #3: Update: Wall Street Shares Hit New High

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Chris Low from FTN Financial in New York explains how the Dow Jones hit a new record

Sep 21 2018

7mins

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Rank #4: The challenge of expanding airlines in Africa

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The development of aviation in Africa faces challenges, ranging from high taxes to government mismanagement, but despite these barriers new airlines are starting and existing carriers are expanding their route network.

Russell Padmore analyses the prospects for African airlines, with insights from aviation experts, like Patrick Edmond from Altair Advisory, Alan Peaford, editor in chief of African Aerospace Magazine and Sally Gethin, from Gethin's In Flight News.

We hear if the introduction of the Single African Air Transport Market agreement will create the open skies that allowed aviation to prosper in Europe.

Alan Kilavuka, the chief executive of Jambojet in Kenya, talks candidly about the challenges of operating a low cost airline in Africa.

We also hear from Judith Tyson at the Overseas Development Institute how expanding aviation will help economies across the continent, by creating jobs and enhancing transport infrastructure.

(Picture: Entebbe Airport Kampala. Copyright Getty Images.)

Dec 29 2019

22mins

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Rank #5: Review of the Year - 2019

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Boeing's 737 Max plane remains grounded after a second deadly crash in March and investigations into one of the on-board software systems. As the United States banned Huawei equipment from its 5G network, the Chinese telecoms giant was defiant saying the world needs its technology. A decisive general election victory for the Conservative Party sees the UK on track to leave the European Union at the end of January. Countries failed to agree on how to tackle global warming, in spite of prominent media coverage of the climate strikes, spearheaded by activist Greta Thunberg. And as competition heats up for online video subscription services, we ask Variety chief TV critic Caroline Framke if we’ve reached peak Netflix.

Martin Webber is joined by Captain Dennis Tajer, a pilot with American Airlines and spokesperson for the Allied Pilots Association and Dominic Gates, aerospace reporter at the Seattle Times. Plus we hear from economists Roger Bootle and Dr Rebecca Harding.

Dec 24 2019

26mins

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Rank #6: The rise of K-pop

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We find out why K-pop or Korean pop music has become an industry in its own right. The band BTS is in the same league as Samsung when it comes to generating GDP, and three fans from the Korean Entertainment Society at the London School of Economics tell us why they find K-pop so exciting. Samera Iqbal is senior correspondent for the website unitedKpop.com, and explains why the phenomenon has become so popular. And we hear from Sime Kosta, singer with EXP Edition, which is a band that markets itself as the first non-Korean K-pop band. Also in the programme, the chief executive of Swiss bank Credit Suisse has resigned amid a spying scandal at the firm. The BBC's Imogen Foulkes in Geneva bring us the story, and we get further analysis from Alex Bomberg, chief executive of International Intelligence. Plus there's been widespread disruption in Nigeria's commercial capital, Lagos, after a ban was imposed on motorbikes and tricycles, commonly used as a form of taxi. The BBC's Yemisi Adegoke explains the impact it is having on commuters in the city.

(Picture: Korean pop band BTS performing in Paris, France. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

Feb 07 2020

25mins

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Rank #7: Update: Wall Street Stocks Finish Higher

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Chris Low of FTN Financial provides us his analysis

Sep 14 2018

8mins

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Rank #8: Finland at 100

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Finland is celebrating the centenary of its independence from Russia. We assess the country's economic significance with Finland's prime minister, Juha Sipilä. Also in the programme, environment ministers from around the world have agreed that the flow of waste plastic into the ocean must be stopped. We report from a meeting of UN environment ministers in Kenya. The European Commission has outlined plans for greater integration for countries using the euro. Our regular economic commentator Roger Bootle of Capital Economics assesses the proposals. We have an update on the latest developments around ongoing Brexit talks between the UK and European Union. Plus the American jewellery designer Kendra Scott tells us how she started a billion dollar business from a spare bedroom.

Dec 06 2017

26mins

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Rank #9: Spain 'Will Accept' Disputed Migrant Ship

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Spain says it will accept a migrant rescue ship that Italy had rejected. Cesare Pitea is professor of international law at Parma University, and tells us whether Italy was legally able to refuse the migrants permission to land. Also in the programme, as Singapore prepares for Tuesday's historic summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un, we hear about the likely economic impact of the meeting. Egypt has been raising concerns over an Ethiopian dam on the River Nile. Ahmed Soliman is a research associate with the Africa Programme at the Chatham House think tank, and explains why tensions appear to have eased. A summit is being held in France to help the next generation of women in the animation industry to break through. Michelle Nardone is head of animation at University College in Copenhagen, and tells us about the challenges women in the industry face. Plus our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare discusses whether being fit can help you get ahead at work.

Jun 11 2018

26mins

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Rank #10: Polish Premier Appoints New Cabinet

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Law and Justice leader Mateusz Morawiecki fired a number of ministers in the wake of EU legal action. The EU has said judicial reforms threaten the rule of law in the country. The BBC's Mark Easton reports. Also in the programme, as the Consumer Electronics Show gets under way in Las Vegas, our reporter tells us what is catching people's attention. We hear about the hopes for 2018 for India's economy, and get reaction from our regular economic commentator, Roger Bootle of Capital Economics. We have a report from Mozambique about the spread of a disease that is threatening the world's most commonly sold type of banana. Plus we find out why Italy's rollout of a new law to minimise plastic bag usage has not gone smoothly.

Jan 09 2018

26mins

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Rank #11: Swedish Deadlock as Nationalists Gain

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Sweden's two main political blocs are tied, as the anti-immigrant party made gains. We hear how economic issues are likely to impact the process of forming a governing coalition in the country. Also in the programme, Jack Ma, founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba says he's leaving the firm next year. Duncan Clark wrote 'The House that Jack Built', and explains Mr Ma's legacy. We hear about a court case in Germany where an investment fund is suing carmaker Volkswagen over whether the firm was open enough about the rigging of emissions tests. Italy's government is to introduce a ban on Sunday trading in large commercial centres. Monica Cannalire of the Italian Council of Shopping Centres tells us why her organisation is opposed to the move. Plus our workplace commentator Alison Green explores the thorny etiquette around hugging people at work.

Sep 10 2018

26mins

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Rank #12: Update: Argentinian Austerity Measures Announced

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Argentina's President Mauricio Macri has announced austerity measures, including the elimination of government ministries and stiff taxes on exports, in an effort to stabilize the economy. Luc Cohen of the Reuters news agency explains exactly what the measures are designed to do. Microsoft has reversed its redesign of Skype, it's internet calling software. It had changed the service in an attempt to take on younger and trendier apps likes Snapchat. It introduced animations and bright colours. But Skype users rebelled. In response Microsoft has removed the features, and dressed up the U-turn as a new-found "focus on simplicity". Kate Bevan, the editor of Which Computing magazine, tells us what happened.

Sep 03 2018

11mins

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Rank #13: Trump meets Trudeau

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Canada's Prime Minister is in Washington for his first meeting with the new US president

Feb 13 2017

26mins

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Rank #14: Apple Shares Fall After Sales Warning

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Shares in technology giant Apple fell sharply in response to news of weak sales in China. Gareth Beavis is UK editor of the website Tech Radar, and explains what's behind the company's difficulties. Also in the programme, we find out why pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb has agreed to buy cancer drug maker Celgene in a deal valued at $74 billion. A strange smell has engulfed the Iranian capital Tehran. Ghanbar Naderi is an independent journalist in the city and tells us nobody is quite sure what is causing the problem. Plus our reporter travels to the small island communities off the west coast of Ireland to find out what's being done to ensure they stay inhabited.

Jan 03 2019

26mins

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Rank #15: Switzerland Puts Local Job Seekers Ahead Of Immigrants

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The Swiss parliament has passed legislation aimed at limiting immigration, by putting people living in the country first in the queue when they apply for jobs. Immigration has been a divisive issue in the Alpine country and it had been feared Switzerland could have introduced restrictions on citizens of the European Union. which would have created a rift with Brussels. BBC Geneva Correspondent, Imogen Foulkes, explains why the government made the compromise.
Human toilet waste is being used to alleviate the shortage of electricity in Kenya. It is not only boosting power supplies in that part of East Africa, but is also helping with the problem of inadequate sewage systems. The waste is collected and dried before being burned to generate power, as the BBC’s Joshua Thorpe explains.
The BBC's Business News Team has spent another busy week reporting on developments like an increase in US interest rates, Italy's unfolding banking crisis and new research that claims money cannot buy happiness. We reflect on the weeks's events with Mark Gilbert from Bloomberg in London and Mamta Badkar, at the Financial Times in New York.
Major chains of supermarkets continue to threaten to put the traditional British corner shop out of business, but the often family run stores are still open. In the UK many of them are operated by Indian and Pakistani immigrants who keep their store open for long hours everyday. Many are still owned by people whose families came to the UK in the 1960's or 1970's who saw the economic potential of a grocery store. BBC World TV presenter Babita Sharma tells us about her new documentary programme, Booze Beans and Bhajis, which looks at the impact of immigration and economic change on small retail outlets.
(Picture: Poster in Switzerland highlights immigration. Getty Images.)

Dec 16 2016

26mins

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Rank #16: Coronavirus hits businesses

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As the human toll of Coronavirus rises, businesses are beginning to count the cost. Car maker Hyundai has suspended a production line in South Korea because of a shortage of parts from China. Peter Goodman is European economics correspondent for the New York Times and tells us about the global impact Coronavirus is having. Herbert Lun is managing director of Wing Sang Electrical in Shenzhen, China, and explains why production has been halted at his firm. We get a sense of the impact on the hospitality sector from Noel Smyth, managing director of Delaneys, a chain of Irish themed pubs in Hong Kong. And Rachel Winter, investment director at Killick and Co in London, discusses how the world's financial markets have been responding to the outbreak. Also in the programme, the UK media regulator Ofcom says parents are increasingly worried about their childrens' online activity. We discuss how parents should navigate the online world with journalist Liat Hughes Joshi, who has written several books on parenting.

Feb 04 2020

26mins

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Rank #17: Update: Stocks continue to gain on Wall Street

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The S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed the day with record highs. Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago explains.

Feb 05 2020

2mins

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Rank #18: The UK after Brexit

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On the day the UK leaves the European Union we consider the future for Britain and Europe. We take a tour of the United Kingdom to how hear how Brexit will impact different communities. Justin Urquhart-Stewart of Seven Investment Management examines the challenges and opportunities for London, where financial services are dominant. Tim Martin is a staunch Brexit supporter and chairman of the British pub chain, Wetherspoons, and tells us how he thinks the UK will evolve now. And we explore the future of the European Union with German MEP Jutta Paulus.

Jan 31 2020

26mins

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