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RightsUp

The Oxford Human Rights Hub (OxHRH) aims to bring together academics, practitioners, and policy-makers from across the globe to advance the understanding and protection of human rights and equality. Through the vigorous exchange of ideas and resources, we strive to facilitate a better understanding of human rights principles, to develop new approaches to policy, and to influence the development of human rights law and practice.

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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RightsUp - UK Supreme Court Rules in Brexit Case (with Alison Young)

On 24 January 2017, the UK Supreme Court ruled in the case Miller and Dos Santos vs. Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union. The Court decided that the Government does not have a prerogative power to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Instead, an act of parliament will be needed to begin the process of the UK leaving the EU. In this episode, we bring back Professor Alison Young, an expert in constitutional law, to talk about the aftermath of this decision - what it means and what we can now expect from the Brexit process. Join us in person or on Facebook Live tomorrow, 31 January, at 5:15 PM GMT, for a conversation on Brexit and human rights. Professor Alison Young will be discussing Brexit with Professors Paul Craig, Timothy Endicott, and Nick Barber. Produced by: Dr Kira AllmannInterview(s) with: Professor Alison YoungMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 30 January 2017]

17mins

30 Jan 2017

Rank #1

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RightsUp - What to Expect When You're Expecting Brexit (with Alison Young)

The UK Supreme Court is expected to deliver a decision on the case Miller and Dos Santos vs. Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union on January 24th. The question before the Supreme Court is whether the Government or parliament has the power to invoke Article 50 and start the process of the UK leaving the EU. In this episode, Dr Kira Allmann talks to Professor Alison Young about the case and its implications for Brexit. Produced by: Dr Kira AllmannInterview(s) with: Professor Alison YoungMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 20 January 2017]

14mins

20 Jan 2017

Rank #2

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RightsUp - When Human Rights Are Not Enough: Defending the Rights of Nature (with Mari Margil)

There is an unmistakable growing awareness of the ways in which our human lives and the environment are intertwined and interdependent. Unprecedented environmental degradation, resource depletion, and the looming reality of climate change have all drawn anxious attention to the human impact on the environment. Law is critically important here. Countries like Spain, France, Portugal, and Finland have already recognized a human right to a healthy environment. But some environmental advocates are arguing that this isn’t enough. We need to recognize the inherent rights of nature itself. In this episode, we discuss the limitations of human rights in confronting environmental harms and how we could realise the rights of nature.Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)Interview(s) with: Mari Margil (Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund)Music by: Rosemary AllmannIf you like this podcast, please consider making a donation to the Oxford Human Rights Hub to support the work we do to make human rights information more accessible: https://www.alumniweb.ox.ac.uk/law/donations/make-a-donation

29mins

10 Apr 2018

Rank #3

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RightsUp - A No-Man's Land of Justice: Holding Corporations Accountable (with Boni Meyersfeld)

There are many ways in which private businesses hold financial and political power akin to states. They also commit violations and abuses of power akin to states. But are they held accountable in the same way that states are? This episode is all about whether corporations should have human rights obligations – should they be responsible for upholding and defending human rights the way that we expect governments to? We interview Boni Meyersfeld, Professor of Law at the University of Witswatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, about corporate responsibility, gender inequality, and human rights in an age of globalization.Interview with: Professor Boni MeyersfeldProduced by: Dr Kira AllmannMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 20 September 2017]

32mins

20 Sep 2017

Rank #4

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RightsUp #RightNow - Sustainable Development as a Human Right (with Olivier De Schutter)

In September 2015, the UN adopted a set of goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all people. These are the UN Sustainable Development Goals, to be realised by 2030. The Sustainable Development Goals replace and build on the Millennium Development Goals, which were established in 2000 with targets set for 2015. The Sustainable Development Goals make some important changes to the development agenda, and one significant update is that they include an overt commitment to human rights for the first time. But how to integrate human rights into development agendas remains an open question. What will the relationship between human rights and the Sustainable Development Goals look like in practice? This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman, Fellow of the British Academy and Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. As part of this project, the Academy convened a roundtable in January 2018 with academic experts, policymakers and practitioners from the UK and overseas to discuss the ways in which human rights and developmental goals can work together to achieve the SDG agenda and particularly gender equality and women’s empowerment. Professor Olivier de Schutter participated in the discussion. Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford) Interview(s) with: Olivier de Schutter (Université catholique de Louvain) Music by: Rosemary Allmann If you like this podcast, please consider making a donation to the Oxford Human Rights Hub to support the work we do to make human rights information more accessible: https://www.alumniweb.ox.ac.uk/law/donations/make-a-donation

30mins

12 Mar 2018

Rank #5

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RightsUp #RightNow - Female Genital Mutilation as a Question of Gender Equality (with Brenda Kelly)

In September 2015, the UN adopted the Sustainable Development Goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all people. For the first time, these goals explicitly aim to bring human rights and economic development into conversation with one another. There are 17 Sustainable Development Goals to be realised by 2030, each with their own targets. Goal number 5 is to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.’ One of the targets under Goal 5 is to eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage, and female genital mutilation, or FGM. In this episode, we talk with Brenda Kelly, a consultant obstetrician at the John Radcliffe Hospital and a founder of the Oxford Rose Clinic, which specialises in treating women and girls who have experienced FGM. Brenda shares her insights from working with FGM patients about how the law and medicine interact when it comes to achieving gender equality. This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman, Fellow of the British Academy and Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. As part of this project, the Academy convened a roundtable in January 2018 with academic experts, policymakers and practitioners from the UK and overseas to discuss the ways in which human rights and developmental goals can work together to achieve the SDG agenda and particularly gender equality and women’s empowerment. Brenda Kelly participated in the discussion. Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford) Interview(s) with: Dr Brenda Kelly (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford) Music by: Rosemary Allmann If you like this podcast, please consider making a donation to the Oxford Human Rights Hub to support the work we do to make human rights information more accessible: www.alumniweb.ox.ac.uk/law/donations…ke-a-donation

33mins

13 Jul 2018

Rank #6

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RightsUp - The Death Penalty in the Middle East and North Africa (with James Lynch)

In the six years following the Arab Spring, there has been a notable increase in death sentences and executions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). In this episode, we talk to James Lynch, Deputy Director of the Global Issues Programme at Amnesty International, about the death penalty in MENA countries, the aftermath of the Arab Spring, and the prospects for abolition in the future. Produced by: Dr Kira AllmannInterview(s) with: James LynchMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 10 February 2017]

18mins

10 Feb 2017

Rank #7

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RightsUp - 'I am not here to delight you': Indira Jaising and Gender Justice in India

Episode 3 of RightsUp (released 08 July 2015)Interviews with: Arushi Garg, Indira JaisingProduced by: Kira Allmann, Max Harris, and Laura Hilly

31mins

3 Jan 2017

Rank #8

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RightsUp - Sex Education in UK Schools (with Meghan Campbell)

RightsUp #RightNow is a series of mini episodes in the RightsUp podcast series that explores current events dealing with human rights issues.On 11 January, members of a public bill committee in the UK parliament voted against an amendment to the Children and Social Work Bill that would have made sex and relationship education compulsory in all schools. In this episode of RightsUp #RightNow, we talk to Dr. Meghan Campbell, deputy director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub, about the implications of this decision and the need for a human rights based approach to sex education.Produced by: Dr Kira AllmannInterview(s) with: Dr Meghan CampbellMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 16 January 2017]

9mins

16 Jan 2017

Rank #9

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RightsUp - A Precarious Future? Examining the UK Human Rights Act (with Sir Keir Starmer)

The Human Rights Act incorporated the rights guaranteed in the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law. In this episode, we look at the Human Rights Act in a past interview with Sir Keir Starmer, MP for Holborn and St. Pancras, currently Shadow Brexit Secretary, and former Director of Public Prosecutions for the Crown Prosecution Service.Interview(s) with: Sir Keir Starmer, MPProduced by: Dr Kira AllmannMusic by: Rosemary Allmann

8mins

24 Apr 2017

Rank #10

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RightsUp - Nothing About Us Without Us: Disability Law and Policy in the UK (with Marie Tidball)

Almost exactly a year ago, in January 2017, the UK Department of Education published a report by the Disabled Students Sector Leadership Group (DSSLG) which offered guidance on how universities and other higher education providers could better support disabled students. In short, the report found that institutions of higher education could do much more to make learning and teaching more inclusive for disabled students. This February the University of Oxford will be hosting a conference on Disability Law and Policy to mark the launch of the newly established Oxford University Disability Law and Policy Project, headed by Dr Marie Tidball. In this episode, Marie talks about disability rights and the importance of teaching a new generation of lawyers about disability law. The Disability Law and Policy Project aims to put disability law at the centre of learning and teaching in the law curriculum. This conference will focus on legal issues affecting persons with disability, at the intersection of gender, race, age, sexuality and class, in the interest of promoting the intellectual study of disability and its relationship with domestic and international law. Registration is free and open to the public.Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/oxford-disability-law-and-policy-conference-2018-tickets-41955341556Interview with: Dr Marie Tidball (University of Oxford)Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)Music by: Rosemary Allmann[Released: 29 January 2017]A transcript of this interview is available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: http://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/nothing-about-us-without-us-disability-law-and-policy-in-the-uk

24mins

29 Jan 2018

Rank #11

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RightsUp - Environmental Justice: Coal, Campaigns and Climate Change in America (with Nick Stump)

Following U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, what is the future of environmental justice and human rights in the United States and the world? We talk with environmental human rights expert and lawyer, Nick Stump, about what we can learn from the experiences of the Appalachian region of the U.S. Appalachia is known for coal mining, and it became a focal region in Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, as Trump promised to save a declining and environmentally destructive industry to create more coal jobs. As such, Appalachia has become symbolic of the American economic crisis, along with other industrial regions. We talk about the environmental realities in Appalachia, the power of symbolism, and the prospects for realising environmental human rights.Interview with: Nick Stump (West Virginia University)Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)Music by: Rosemary Allmann[Release: 1 August 2017]

27mins

1 Aug 2017

Rank #12

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RightsUp - About Abortion (with Carol Sanger)

Since the 1973 Supreme Court ruling on Roe v. Wade, abortion has been legal in the United States. But terminating pregnancy remains a controversial issue, and it plays a surprisingly large role in American politics. In this episode, we talk to Carol Sanger, professor of law at Columbia University and author of 'About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in 21st Century America' about why abortion is such a prominent political issue in the United States and how we might expect the Trump administration to deal with reproductive rights.Interview with: Professor Carol SangerProduced by: Dr Kira AllmannMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 12 May 2017]

26mins

12 May 2017

Rank #13

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RightsUp - The Impact of Brexit on Human Rights in Northern Ireland (with Colin Harvey)

Just this morning, news broke that the UK has reached a deal with the EU. Theresa May announced that there would be no hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, the Good Friday Agreement would be upheld, and that EU citizens’ rights would be protected in the UK. Few details about the agreement are available, and there are still many questions about how these very critical elements of the deal will be implemented. What has been clear, however, is that Northern Ireland is center stage right now in the Brexit debates, so we're diving into the issues at stake here and how human rights might also be important in this ongoing conversation.For more information about Professor Colin Harvey's ESRC project on Brexit law, please visit: https://brexitlawni.orgInterview with: Professor Colin Harvey (Queen's University, Belfast)Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)Music by: Rosemary Allmann[Recorded: 9 October 2017 / Released: 8 December 2017]

30mins

8 Dec 2017

Rank #14

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RightsUp - We Never Get Out of the Hands of Men: The Contagious Diseases Acts (with Anne Hanley)

In the 19th century, the Contagious Diseases Acts were passed in the UK and Ireland to curtail the spread of venereal disease among military personnel in certain cities. In this episode, we talk to Dr Anne Hanley, a Junior Research Fellow at New College, Oxford, about why this legislation had such a disproportionate effect on women and what we can learn from it today.Produced by: Dr Kira AllmannInterview(s) with: Dr Anne HanleyMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 11 April 2017]

18mins

11 Apr 2017

Rank #15

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RightsUp - Transforming the Law: Transgender Rights in the United States (with Corey Stoughton)

In May of 2016, the Obama administration issued federal guidance that stated transgender people are protected according to United States civil rights law preventing sex discrimination in schools. It was a historic move, in response to a wave of cases making their way through federal courts regarding discrimination against transgender people. But in February 2017, the newly elected Trump administration rescinded the federal guidance issued under President Obama, and the legal landscape on this issue instantly changed. In this episode we talk with Corey Stoughton, former Senior Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, about the future of transgender rights in America.Interview with: Corey StoughtonProduced by: Dr Kira AllmannMusic by: Rosemary Allmann[Original release: 30 May 2017]

22mins

30 May 2017

Rank #16

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RightsUp #RightNow - Gender Equality through Economic Development (with Isabel Jaramillo Sierra)

In September 2015, the UN adopted the Sustainable Development Goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all people. For the first time, these goals explicitly aim to bring human rights and economic development into conversation with one another. There are 17 Sustainable Development Goals to be realised by 2030, each with their own targets. Goal number 5 is to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.’ While gender equality stands alone as a goal, it also cuts across many of the other sustainable development goals. This raises some questions – about whether gender equality can ever be realised on its own, in its own right – or whether it has to be realised in context. Inclusion and empowerment of women and girls must take place at every level and in every development target. In this episode, we explore development issues that disproportionately affect women and girls and interrogate how the SDGs can do better to address them. This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman, Fellow of the British Academy and Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. As part of this project, the Academy convened a roundtable in January 2018 with academic experts, policymakers and practitioners from the UK and overseas to discuss the ways in which human rights and developmental goals can work together to achieve the SDG agenda and particularly gender equality and women’s empowerment. Isabel Cristina Jaramillo Sierra participated in the discussion. Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford) Interview(s) with: Isabel Cristina Jaramillo Sierra (Universidad de los Andes) Music by: Rosemary Allmann If you like this podcast, please consider making a donation to the Oxford Human Rights Hub to support the work we do to make human rights information more accessible: https://www.alumniweb.ox.ac.uk/law/donations/make-a-donation

30mins

26 Mar 2018

Rank #17

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RightsUp - A Theatre of Death: Challenging the Death Penalty in India (with Anup Surendranath)

The death penalty was written into the colonial penal code in India when the country was under British direct rule, and it stayed on the books after independence. Today India remains a ‘retentionist’ country – meaning that it retains the death penalty in the face of a growing global movement to abolish it worldwide on human rights grounds. At the end of 2017, there were 371 prisoners on death row in India. India is one of the few democracies that retains the death penalty, and it has voted against recent UN resolutions seeking a global end to the death penalty. In this episode, Anup Surendranath talks about the research he and his team at the National Law University in Delhi have conducted on death row inmates in India and what challenges remain on the path to abolition.Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)Interview with: Dr Anup Surendranath (National Law University in Delhi)Music by: Rosemary AllmannIf you like this podcast, please consider making a donation to the Oxford Human Rights Hub to support the work we do to make human rights information more accessible: www.alumniweb.ox.ac.uk/law/donations…ke-a-donation

29mins

23 Apr 2018

Rank #18

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RightsUp - The Impact of Covid-19 on Workers' Rights in the UK (with Michael Ford)

The spread of Covid-19 has affected many areas of our lives with major implications for our rights and freedoms. The instigation of a UK-wide lockdown has had an especially pronounced effect on our rights, and the burden of this disruption will fall most heavily on those whose livelihoods, health, and security were already fragile. Furloughed employees, those who are self-employed, and those who must now seek social security benefits face an unprecedented level of uncertainty. Today we discuss the impact of coronavirus on worker's rights in the UK.Full transcript available: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-workers-rights-with-michael-fordInterview with: Michael Ford, QC (University of Bristol & Old Square Chambers)Hosted by: Natasha Holcroft-EmmessProduced and edited by: Christy Callaway-GaleExecutive producer: Kira AllmannShownotes: Sarah DobbieMusic: Rosemary Allmann

34mins

15 May 2020

Rank #19

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RightsUp - The Need for Empathy: Understanding India's COVID-19 Lockdown (with Kalpana Kannabiran)

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all of us in many ways. States around the world have imposed restrictions of varying levels of stringency to control the spread of the virus. The Central Government in India introduced a nationwide 21-day lockdown on 24th of March 2020. The lockdown saw an almost complete restriction on the movement of people and the closure of all establishments except those providing essential services. India’s lockdown has been described as the world’s biggest coronavirus lockdown and the harshest coronavirus containment measure in the world. The lockdown was declared with a four-hour notice period. It has been extensively reported that the impact of the lockdown has fallen most heavily on those most vulnerable. In this episode, we speak to Professor Kalpana Kannabiran, a professor of sociology and the Director of the Council for Social Development Hyderabad, about the Indian government's response to the pandemic and the impact on rights.Full transcript and shownotes: http://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/the-need-for-empathy-understanding-indias-covid-19-lockdown-with-kalpana-kannabiran/Interview with: Kalpana Kannabiran (Council for Social Development Hyderabad)Hosted by: Gauri PillaiProduced and edited by: Christy Callaway-GaleExecutive producer: Kira AllmannShownotes: Sarah DobbieMusic: Rosemary Allmann

37mins

8 May 2020

Rank #20