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Rank #11 in Philosophy category

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The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Updated 2 months ago

Rank #11 in Philosophy category

Arts
Comedy
Society & Culture
Philosophy
Read more

The Partially Examined Life is a podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.We also feature episodes from other podcasts by our hosts to round out your partially examined life, including Pretty Much Pop (prettymuchpop.com, covering all media), Nakedly Examined Music (nakedlyexaminedmusic.com, deconstructing songs), and (sub)Text (lit, film, psychoanalysis). Learn about more network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

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The Partially Examined Life is a podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.We also feature episodes from other podcasts by our hosts to round out your partially examined life, including Pretty Much Pop (prettymuchpop.com, covering all media), Nakedly Examined Music (nakedlyexaminedmusic.com, deconstructing songs), and (sub)Text (lit, film, psychoanalysis). Learn about more network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

iTunes Ratings

1655 Ratings
Average Ratings
1385
106
72
44
48

Very good

By city of pod - May 04 2020
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Stretches me all the way to the limit.

A great listen.

By r.m.lankford - Apr 11 2020
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Thoroughly enjoyable. Interesting content.

iTunes Ratings

1655 Ratings
Average Ratings
1385
106
72
44
48

Very good

By city of pod - May 04 2020
Read more
Stretches me all the way to the limit.

A great listen.

By r.m.lankford - Apr 11 2020
Read more
Thoroughly enjoyable. Interesting content.
Cover image of The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Latest release on Aug 02, 2020

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The Partially Examined Life is a podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.We also feature episodes from other podcasts by our hosts to round out your partially examined life, including Pretty Much Pop (prettymuchpop.com, covering all media), Nakedly Examined Music (nakedlyexaminedmusic.com, deconstructing songs), and (sub)Text (lit, film, psychoanalysis). Learn about more network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Rank #1: Episode 119: Nietzsche on Tragedy and the Psychology of Art

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On Friedrich Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy (1872). Nietzsche thought that you could tell how vital or decadent a civilization was by its art, and said that ancient Greek tragedy was so great because it was a perfect synthesis of something highly formal/orderly/beautiful with the intuitive/unconscious/chaotic. But then Socrates ruined everything! With guest John Castro.

Includes a preview of the Aftershow feat. Greg Sadler.

End song: "Some Act" by Mark Lint and the Fake from "So Whaddaya Think?" (2000).

Jul 06 2015

2hr 46mins

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Rank #2: Ep. 243: Aristotle's "Poetics" on Art and Tragedy (Part One)

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These notes from 335 BCE are still used in screenwriting classes. Aristotle presents a formula for what will move us, derived from Sophocles's tragedies.

What is art? The text describes it as memesis (imitation), and tragedy imitates human action in a way that shows us what it is to be human. Aristotle has lots of advice about how to structure a plot optimized to our sensibilities. Join Mark, Wes, Dylan, and Seth to see if you think he's right.

Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: For 20% off and free shipping on Ettitude's CleanBamboo Charcoal sheets, text PEL to 64-000.

May 11 2020

50mins

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Rank #3: Ep. 224: Kierkegaard Critiques The Present Age (Part One)

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On Soren Kierkegaard's essay "The Present Age" (1846) and Hubert Dreyfus’s "Nihilism on the Information Highway: Anonymity vs. Commitment in the Present Age" (2004).

What's wrong with our society? Kierkegaard saw the advent of the press and gossip culture as engendering a systematic passivity and shallowness in his fellows, and Dreyfus thinks this is an even more apt description of the Internet Age. With guest John Ganz.

Don't wait for part 2; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Try the OmniFocus to-do list manager at omnifocus.com.

Aug 26 2019

48mins

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Rank #4: Episode 213: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part One)

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On Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, books 1 and 2 (1883).

What is wisdom? In this text whose style parodies the Bible, we get pithy advice and allegorical imagery to guide us away from self-defeating, life-denying attitudes and orient us towards creative self-overcoming (i.e. exertion of the Will to Power). The Last Man who no longer knows how to give birth to a dancing star is a rotten egg!

Don't wait for part 2! Get your ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsors: St. John's College Graduate Institute: partiallyexaminedlife.com/sjcgi. Listen to the Hi-Phi Nation podcast at hiphination.org.

Apr 15 2019

55mins

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Rank #5: Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)

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On René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628).

Is there a careful way to approach problems that will ensure that you'll always be right? What if you just never assert anything you can't be sure of? This is Descartes's strategy, modeled on mathematics. We likewise carefully move step-by-step through this text.

This is part 1 of 3; get the whole discussion now via the Citizen Edition now? Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit HempFusion.com for CBD supplements and use code PEL at check-out for 20% off/free shipping.

Nov 04 2019

50mins

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Rank #6: Episode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: "Twilight of the Idols" (Part One)

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On Friedrich Nieztsche's 1888 book summarizing his thought and critiquing the founding myths of his society. He defends "spiritualized" instinct and frenzied creativity, but also Napoleon and war. We try to figure out what kind of social critic he'd be today. Would we actually like him?

Dec 04 2017

55mins

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Rank #7: Ep. 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part One)

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On "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003), with special guest Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast.

Can we explain human experience using the terms of brain physiology? Chalmers thinks not, and lays out the arguments against this and the range of positions philosophers have taken in response to these objections. 

Continues on part two, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jun 17 2019

56mins

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Rank #8: Ep. 241: Political Philosophy and the Pandemic

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How should we think politically about the current global crisis? Do extreme circumstances reveal truths of political philosophy or do they reinforce whatever it is we already believe? Mark, Wes, Seth, and Dylan talk about applying philosophical insights to real-life situations rife with unknowns, John Rawls' veil of ignorance and Adam Smith on our interconnectedness, utilitarianism, libertarianism, and more. A source we used was "How Coronavirus Is Shaking Up the Moral Universe" by John Authers.

For an ad-free version of this episode, become a PEL Citizen. Please support PEL!

End song: "Date of Grace" by Rob Picott, as discussed on Nakedly Examined Music #80.

Sponsor: Visit TheGreatCoursesPLUS.com/PEL for a free trial of unlimited learning at $10/month w/ a quarterly plan.

Apr 20 2020

1hr 5mins

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Rank #9: PREVIEW-Episode 32: Heidegger: What is “Being?”

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Discussing Martin Heidegger's Being and Time (1927), mostly the intro and ch. 1 and 2 of Part 1.

Feb 08 2011

32mins

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Rank #10: PREVIEW-Episode 61: Nietzsche on Truth and Skepticism

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On Friedrich Nietzsche's "On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense" (1873). What is truth? This essay, written early in Nietzsche's career, is taken by many to make the extreme claim that there is no truth, that all of the "truths" we tell each other are just agreements by social convention. WIth guest Jessica Berry, who argues that that Nietzsche is a skeptic: our "truths" don't correspond with the world beyond our human conceptions; all knowledge is laden with human interests. Get the full discussion at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Aug 15 2012

31mins

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Rank #11: Episode 124: The Stoic Life with Epictetus

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On the Manual of Epictetus, aka The Enchiridion (135 CE). What's a wise strategy for life? Stoicism says that the secret is mastering yourself. Nothing external can break your spirit unless you let it. So, how weird and misguided is that advice? With guest Alex Fossella.

End song: "But I Won't" by Mark Lint from Spanish Armada: Songs of Love and Related Neuroses (1993).

Sep 21 2015

2hr 8mins

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Rank #12: PREVIEW-Episode 70: Marx on the Human Condition

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On Karl Marx's The German Ideology, Part I, an early, unpublished work from 1846. What is human nature? What drives history? How can we improve our situation? Marx thought that fundamentally, you are what you do: you are your job, your means of subsistence. All the rest, this culture, this religion, this philosophy, is just a thin layer over our basic situation. Ideas are not primarily what changes the world; it's economics. Get the full discussion at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Jan 30 2013

30mins

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Rank #13: Episode 192: "The Closing of the American Mind": Allan Bloom on Education (Part One)

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On Allan Bloom's 1987 best-selleing polemic. What is the role of the university in our democracy? Bloom thinks that today's students are conformist, relativistic, and nihilistic, and that great books and thinking for thinking's sake are the cure.

Continued on part 2, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition plus an exclusive follow-up discussion. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a one-month free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jun 11 2018

53mins

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Rank #14: Episode 171: Buddhism vs. Evolution with Guest Robert Wright (Part One)

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Bob joins the PEL four to discuss his new book Why Buddhism Is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment.

Bob applies his expertise in evolutionary psychology to corroborate Buddhism's claims that we are deluded: about our desires, emotions, the unity of our selves, and the "essences" we project on things and people. And he thinks meditation can instill in the diligent the ability to see things more clearly. But does it really?

Continue with part 2, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sep 04 2017

55mins

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Rank #15: Episode 170: Guy Debord's "Society of the Spectacle" (Part One)

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What is culture? In modern capitalism, Debord’s 1967 book describes it as all about the economy. It’s not just our jobs that keep us trapped, but our life outside of working hours is also demanded by “the system” via our activity as consumers, and this commoditization infiltrates every corner of our lives. Debord wants us to WAKE UP, break our chains, and live lives of immediacy, vitality, and authenticity.

Continue with part 2 or get your unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Aug 14 2017

55mins

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Rank #16: Episode 201: Marcus Aurelius's Stoicism with Ryan Holiday (Part One)

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On The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius (ca. 180 C.E.) plus Ryan's The Daily Stoic (2016).

What does Stoicism look like in practice, in both ancient and modern contexts? You might think that eschewing the shallow, out-of-our-control trappings of fame and wealth in favor of personal cultivation would make one unambitious, but Ryan uses Marcus as a prime example of how to be a Stoic while trying to accomplish great things.

Continue on part 2, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now along with the Citizen-only follow-up discussion getting more into the text of Marcus. Please support PEL!

Oct 22 2018

59mins

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Rank #17: Episode 116: Freud on Dreams

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On Sigmund Freud's On Dreams (1902) and other stuff. Are dreams just random, or our best key to understanding the mind?

After you listen to this, check out the Aftershow.

End song: "Sleep" by Mark Lint. Read about it.

May 25 2015

2hr 25mins

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Rank #18: Episode 174: Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations" (Part One)

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On the foundational, 1776 text of modern economics. How does the division of labor and our instinct to exchange lead to the growth of wealth? Is the economy sufficiently machine-like to enable us to manipulate its output, or at least to tell us how not to screw it up?

Oct 16 2017

57mins

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Rank #19: PREVIEW-Episode 65: The Federalist Papers

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On Alexander Hamilton/James Madison's Federalist Papers (1, 10-12, 14-17, 39, 47-51), published as newspaper editorials 1787-8, plus Letters III and IV from Brutus, an Anti-Federalist. What constitutes good government? These founding fathers argued that the proposed Constitution, with its newly centralized (yet also separated-by-branch) powers would be a significant improvement on the Articles of Confederation, which had left states as the ultimate sovereigns. Get the full discussion at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Oct 27 2012

31mins

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Rank #20: PREVIEW-Episode 84: Nietzsche’s “Gay Science”

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On Friedrich Nietzsche's The Gay Science (1882, with book 5 added 1887).

What is wisdom? Nietzsche gives us an updated take on the Socratic project of challenging your most deeply held beliefs. Challenge not just your belief in God (who's "dead"), but uncover all your habits of thinking in terms of the divine. Realize how little of your life is actually a matter of conscious reflection, and the consequent limits on self-knowledge. The very act of systematization in philosophy overestimates what we can know; instead, we need a "gay" (in the sense of cheerful, carefree, and subversive) science (in the sense of organized knowledge) that chases after fleeting insights and is able to question, i.e. laugh at, the pretensions of its own activity.

Looking for the full Citizen version?

Nov 11 2013

32mins

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Ep. 249: Dewey on Education and Thought (Part One)

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On John Dewey's How We Think (1910) ch. 1 and Democracy and Education (1916) ch. 1, 2, 4, and 24.

What model of human nature should serve as the basis for education policy? Dewey sees learning as growth, and the point of education as to enable indefinite growth. With guest Jonathan Haber.

Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsors: Visit SJC.edu to learn about St. John's College. Check out the Being Reasonable podcast.

Aug 02 2020

52mins

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PEL Presents PMP#54: The Genius(?) of Rick and Morty

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Mark, Erica, and Brian address critically acclaimed Adult Swim show. What kind of humor is it? Can we take the sci-fi and family drama elements seriously? How smart are the show and its fans? Is Rick a super hero, or Dr. Who? What will this serialized sit-com look like in longevity?

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Jul 29 2020

47mins

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Ep. 248: Racism and Policing (Al-Saji, Merleau-Ponty, et al) (Part Two)

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Continuing on Alia Al-Saji’s “A Phenomenology of Hesitation” (2014) and other things with guest Phil Hopkins

Can we restructure our (and the police's) reactions and live with each other? We further explore the psychology of habit and Al-Saji's notion of hesitation. How does it compare to other types of heistation recommended by philosophies and religions?

Start with part one, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition. Includes a preview of our Citizen Hang.

End song: "Every Man's Burden" by Dusty Wright, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #89.

Sponsors: Get $35 off meal delivery at SunBasket.com/PEL, code PEL. Visit TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jul 27 2020

1hr 10mins

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PEL Presents PMP#53: The Hamilton Phenomenon w/ Sam Simahk

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Erica, Mark, and Brian are joined by Broadway actor Sam to discuss this unique convergence of musical theater, rap, and historical drama.

Does Hamilton deserve its accolades? We cover the re-emergence of stage music as pop music, live vs. filmed vs. film-adapted musicals, creators starring in their shows, race-inclusive casting, and the politics surrounding the show.

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Jul 22 2020

52mins

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Ep. 248: Racism and Policing (Al-Saji, Merleau-Ponty, et al) (Part One)

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On Alia Al-Saji’s “A Phenomenology of Hesitation” (2014), bits of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945), and Linda Martín Alcoff’s Visible Identities (2006), plus Alex Vitale's The End of Policing (2017).

Is there sub-conscious racism, and how might we root it out and fix our policing problems? Ex-cop Phil Hopkins joins to look at how phenomenology can help.

Don't wait for part two, get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jul 20 2020

52mins

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PEL Presents: PMP#52: The Twilight Zone from Serling to Peele

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Something's strange... Is it a dream? If it's a morality tale with a twist ending, you're probably in the Twilight Zone.

Brian, Erica, Mark, and guest Ken Gerber are in it this week, discussing the thrice revived TV series. Does the 1959-1963 show hold up? What makes for a good TZ episode, and does Jordan Peele's latest iteration capture the spirit? We talk about episodes new and old, the 1983 film, plus comparisons to Black Mirror and David Lynch.

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Jul 14 2020

54mins

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Ep. 247: Aristotle on Rhetoric and Emotions (Part Two)

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Continuing on the Rhetoric (ca. 335 BCE) book 1, ch. 1–6 and book 2, ch. 1–5, 18–24.

We finish up with enthymemes (rhetorical arguments), maxims, and signs. We then move to emotions, where we chiefly talk about anger: Is it always a matter of status injury, or is frustration equally (or more) foundational?

Begin with part one, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

End song: "Reason with the Beast" by Shriekback, whose leader Barry Andrews was interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #107.

Sponsors: Save 25% on clothing styled for you at StitchFix.com/PEL. Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jul 13 2020

53mins

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PEL Presents PMP#51: Pictures Telling Stories w/ Joseph Watson

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Is it really true that "every picture tells a story"? For Joseph, a Las Vegas artist who illustrates Go, Go GRETA!, narrative is essential, but how does the story an artist has in mind actually convey to the viewer?

He joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to tell art stories and touch on Guernica, Where the Wild Things Are, Dr. Seuss, Narnia, and more.

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Jul 08 2020

41mins

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Ep. 247: Aristotle on Rhetoric and Emotions (Part One)

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On the Rhetoric (ca. 335 BCE) book 1, ch. 1-6 and book 2, ch. 1-5, 18-24.

What role does persuasion play in philosophy? Aristotle (contra Plato) argues it can and should be used for good: in law courts, political debates, public speeches. He describes the arguments forms used in rhetoric ("enthymemes") and analyzes the emotions that an audience might have so that speakers know what points are worth dwelling on and how to best argue them.

Don't wait for part two! Get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Get 15% off game-changing wireless earbuds at BuyRaycon.com/pel.

Jul 06 2020

54mins

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REISSUE-PEL Ep 75: Lacan & Derrida Criticize Poe's "The Purloined Letter" (w/ New Intro)

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Enjoy this normally paywalled episode from Apr. 2013 about Jacques Lacan’s “Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter'” (1956) and Jacques Derrida’s “The Purveyor of Truth” (1975). How should philosophers approach literature? Lacan read Edgar Allen Poe’s story about a sleuth who outthinks a devious Minister as an illustration of his model of the psyche, and why we persist in self-destructive patterns. Derrida thought this reading not only imposed a bunch of psychobabble onto the story, but demonstrated that Lacan just didn’t know how to read a text.

Plus, Mark starts things off explaining some things about these Friday releases and what's ahead. Ep. 74 introducing Lacan is now available with a $1 Patreon pledge

End song: "Came Round" (solo version) by Mark Lint. Read about it.

Jul 03 2020

2hr 11mins

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PEL Presents PMP#50: MJ's Last Dance w/ Seth Paskin

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Brian, Erica, Mark, and Seth from The Partially Examined Life interrogate the 10-part ESPN documentary on Michael Jordan's Bulls' six championships.

Was it worth ten hours? Does its time-jumping structure work? Is it really hagiography, or is the vision of ultra-competitiveness repulsive? Why are sports amenable to creating cultural icons? Does the doc's success mean many more?

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Jul 01 2020

51mins

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Ep. 246: Susan Sontag on Interpreting Art (Part Two)

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Continuing on Sontag's essays “On Style” (1965) and "The Death of Tragedy” (1963).

Mark, Wes, Seth and Dylan keep talking about the appropriate distance to retain (or not) to a work of art, which is supposed to be relevant to moral action in the world. We also spell out how this is relevant to our recent episodes on tragedy.

Start with Part One or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL!

End song: "Mela" by Julie Slick, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #115.

Jun 29 2020

52mins

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PEL Presents PMP#49: Conspiracy Theories as Pop w/ Al Baker

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Al works for Logically, a company that fights misinformation. He joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to try to discuss the appeal of conspiracy theories, whether their fandom is like other fandoms, the relation between pernicious and fun theories, and theories that end up true.

We touch on echo chambers, the role of irony and humor in spreading these theories, how both opponents and proponents claim to be skeptics, Dan Brown Novels, Tom Hanks, the Mel Gibson film Conspiracy Theory, and documentaries like Behind the Curve and The Family.

For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop.

Sponsor: Visit sunbasket.com/pretty and use promo code pretty to get $35 off healthy, delicious meal deliveries.

Jun 23 2020

50mins

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Ep. 246: Susan Sontag on Interpreting Art (Part One)

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On Sontag's essays “Against Interpretation” (1964), “On Style” (1965), and "The Death of Tragedy” (1963).

What is it to understand a work of art? Sontag objects to critics' need to decode art into its "meaning" or "content," divorcing it from how this content is embodied. She argues that the content vs. form distinction isn't tenable; that the style of a work is an essential part of experiencing it. Sontag thinks we're too analytical, too divorced from our instincts, and a direct encounter with art is essential to enliven us.

Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jun 22 2020

46mins

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PEL Presents NEM#124: Alev Lenz's Tracts of Blood and Sisterhood

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Alev started in Germany with her metal band "Alev" in the early '00s and has released three atmospheric, idea-filled solo albums since 2009 plus several soundtracks and collaborations.

We discuss "The Chair" (and at the end listen to "Cigarettes & Blow") from 3 (2019), plus the title track from Two-Headed Girl (2016), "Flowers of Love" from Storytelling Piano Playing Fräulein (2009), and "In this Mouth" by Anoushka Shankar feat Alev Lenz from Love Letters (2020). Intro: "Fall Into Me" from the Black Mirror Soundtrack (2016). For more, visit alevlenz.com.

Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon.

Visit masterclass.com/EXAMINED for 15% off a MasterClass All-Access Pass.

Jun 19 2020

1hr 6mins

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Ep. 245: Fashion (Derrida, Foucault, Sontag) w/ Shahidha Bari (Part Two)

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We conclude with Foucault's "The Ethics of the Concern of the Self As A Practice of Freedom" (1984) and add Susan Sontag's "On Style" (1965). After our guest's departure, we give some concluding remarks about her book Dressed: A Philosophy of Clothes (2020) and Derrida's "The Animal That Therefore I Am" (1999).

Start with part one or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition. Support PEL and be entered in a drawing to win a copy of Dressed.

End song: "Clothe Me in Ashes" by K.C. Clifford, interviewed for Nakedly Examined Music #121.

If you enjoy PEL, learn about the Hi-Phi Nation podcast at hiphination.org.

Jun 15 2020

50mins

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Ep. 245: Fashion (Derrida, Foucault) w/ Shahidha Bari (Part One)

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On Jacques Derrida's "The Animal That Therefore I Am" (1999), Michel Foucault's "The Ethics of the Concern of the Self As A Practice of Freedom" (1984), and our guest's Dressed: A Philosophy of Clothes (2020).

Philosophy devalues appearances, but our changing dominant metaphysics (there is no "underneath" but rather a complex built out of appearance itself) should have changed this. Our guest provided us with readings that elaborate this change, arguing for our continuity with animal nature (Derrida) and the ethical importance of self-care (Foucault).

Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Signing up will enter you in to our 6/22 drawing to win a copy of Shahidha's book. Please support PEL!

Sponsor: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service.

Jun 08 2020

53mins

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Ep. 244: Camus on Strategies for Facing Plague (Part Two)

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Continuing on Albert Camus's 1947 novel, covering the old functionary Grand, the criminal (or just paranoid?) Cottard, and more of our narrators Dr. Rieux and his doomed friend Tarrou, plus more on the overall message of the book and how it might relate to our current situation.

Start with part one or get the unbroken Citizen Edition. Please support PEL!

End song: "You Will Kill the One You Love" by Jack Hues, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #122.

Jun 01 2020

1hr 5mins

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Ep. 244: Camus on Strategies for Facing Plague (Part One)

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On Albert Camus' existentialist novel The Plague. How shall we face adversity? Camus gives us colorful characters that embody various approaches. Yes, the plague is an extreme situation, but we're all dying all the time anyway, right?

Join Mark, Wes, Dylan and Seth to tease out Camus' positions from this bleak yet colorful text.

Don't wait for part two; get the unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

May 25 2020

47mins

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Ep. 243: Aristotle's "Poetics" on Art and Tragedy (Part Two)

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Continuing on the Poetics from around 335 BCE, on the structure of plot (every element must be essential!), the moral status of the heroes, Homeric poetry, the difference between tragedy and history, and how Aristotle's formula may or may not apply to modern media.

Begin with part one or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL!

End song: "Structure of a Tragedy" by Mark Lint. Read about it.

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May 18 2020

54mins

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iTunes Ratings

1655 Ratings
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Very good

By city of pod - May 04 2020
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Stretches me all the way to the limit.

A great listen.

By r.m.lankford - Apr 11 2020
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Thoroughly enjoyable. Interesting content.