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(484)

Rank #15 in Natural Sciences category

Education
Science
Natural Sciences

BirdNote

Updated 2 months ago

Rank #15 in Natural Sciences category

Education
Science
Natural Sciences
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Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

Read more

Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

iTunes Ratings

484 Ratings
Average Ratings
447
18
8
5
6

BirdNote

By Magpie's Garden and Nursery - May 18 2020
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My favorite podcast educational and delightful! Keep it coming !

My favorite podcast

By Slippery Dwayne - Feb 29 2020
Read more
No podcast is as grounding as this one...a two minute daily oasis for bird lovers of all ages!

iTunes Ratings

484 Ratings
Average Ratings
447
18
8
5
6

BirdNote

By Magpie's Garden and Nursery - May 18 2020
Read more
My favorite podcast educational and delightful! Keep it coming !

My favorite podcast

By Slippery Dwayne - Feb 29 2020
Read more
No podcast is as grounding as this one...a two minute daily oasis for bird lovers of all ages!
Cover image of BirdNote

BirdNote

Latest release on Aug 08, 2020

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Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

The Crow and the Gull

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Crows and gulls are opportunists - grabbing a bite wherever, whenever, however they can. Listener Nick Woodiwiss of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, wrote to BirdNote about a funny scene between an American Crow and a Glaucous-winged Gull on the beach. It seems that crows and gulls are frequent

Aug 08 2020

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Grassland Meander

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In summer, the grasslands of southern Saskatchewan resound with bird song. This Bobolink is among the birds that combine their voices in a rich, ringing chorus. Through these grasslands flows the Frenchman River, twisting and looping — the epitome of a meandering river. The southern reaches of the

Aug 07 2020

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Life on the Beach with Wilson's Plovers

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Along the Gulf of Mexico, you’ll find undeveloped sandy flats and shallow lagoons. This is prime habitat for Wilson’s Plovers to nest and raise their chicks. But life on the beach can be tough for birds. In many parts of its U.S. range on the Gulf and south Atlantic coasts, Wilson’s Plover habitat

Aug 06 2020

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Sound Escapes 2 - Inviting You to Listen

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We’re proud to share a new season of our podcast, Sound Escapes. Host Gordon Hempton transports us to some of the most incredible places on Earth through his nature recordings. Sound Escapes is made possible by the generous support of Jim and Birte Falconer of Seattle.

Aug 05 2020

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Woodpeckers as Keystone Species

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Woodpeckers - including this Northern Flicker - are master carpenters of the bird world. They're called "keystone" species for their crucial role in creating habitat suited to other woodland wildlife. Abandoned woodpecker nest-holes become nests or roosts for small owls, cavity-nesting ducks, swifts

Aug 04 2020

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Working Turnstones Turn Stones

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In John James Audubon’s “Birds of America,” he profiled the peculiar sandpiper we know today as the Ruddy Turnstone. As he describes it, the bird bends its legs to half their length, places its bill beneath the object to be turned, and with a sudden quick jerk of the head pushes it over. True to its

Aug 03 2020

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Shifts in Habitat = Shifts in Species

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We asked David Sibley, creator and illustrator of The Sibley Guide to Birds, how changes in the environment are affecting birds such as this Brown Thrasher. He says, “A shift of habitat has caused a shift in the species” he's observed in the Northeastern US. For example, Wild Turkeys, Pileated

Aug 02 2020

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Flammulated Owl

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The Flammulated Owl is a study in camouflaged grays and browns, with cinnamon-brown shoulder straps and large brown eyes. This astute aerial predator stands a little more than six and a half inches tall, from its sharp-clawed feet to its stubby, ear-like tufts. It winters in southern Mexico or

Aug 01 2020

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A Trip to the Field Museum

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Students from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago took a class trip to the city’s Field Museum for a natural history illustration class. The students had to draw three bird heads and three birds’ feet. Junior Michelle Flitman chose first the Rufous Hornbill, a bird native to the Philippines

Jul 31 2020

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Soaring with Redtails

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A Red-tailed Hawk soars on broad, rounded wings, the epitome of effortless flight. Without flapping, it traces a leisurely, rising circle. The hawk is riding a thermal, a column of warm rising air generated near the earth's surface by heat from the sun. The Red-tail periodically circles to stay

Jul 30 2020

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Small Birds Mob Big Ones

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When smaller birds join forces to ward off larger birds, it's called mobbing. This behavior — like calling your family for help — is used by many bird species. The best time to observe mobbing is spring and early summer, when breeding birds are trying to protect their nests and young. Birds

Jul 29 2020

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Indigo Bunting - Bird of the Ecotone

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Many birds – like this Indigo Bunting – can be found in ecotones, the borders between two habitats. Indigo Buntings breed in the ecotone between forest and meadow. They are common at Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge in Indiana, where grassland and forest are interspersed to produce superb

Jul 28 2020

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Peregrine-Shorebird Interaction

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Have you ever seen a Peregrine Falcon attack a flock of shorebirds, igniting a breathtaking aerial display? The late falcon researcher Steve Herman called this pattern of evasion "instantaneous synchronicity." The shorebird flock will often form a cone, with the sharpest point shifting continuously

Jul 27 2020

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Wilson's Phalarope

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If any bird is an anomaly, it's the Wilson's Phalarope. In a birdbook, Wilson's Phalaropes are found among the sandpipers. But they forage while swimming. Spinning like tops, they create an upwelling, pulling food to the surface. The breeding of Wilson's Phalaropes is anomalous, too. Females are the

Jul 26 2020

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Birds Have No External Ears

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Unlike mammals, birds have no external ear structures. Their ear openings are hidden beneath feathers on the side of the head, just behind and slightly below the eyes. (It's easy to imagine where this House Finch's ear is, isn't it?) In mammals, the external ear structure helps funnel sound in, and

Jul 25 2020

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Poorwills at Night

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Close kin to the Whip-poor-will, the nocturnal Common Poorwill can be heard in summer in the rocky scrublands of the West at the deep end of dusk. And the Common Poorwill's greatest claim to fame? It was the first bird confirmed to hibernate, based on evidence verified in 1946. Since then, we have

Jul 24 2020

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A Plover's Journey

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Pacific Golden-Plovers, known as Kolea, winter in grassy, open areas of the Hawaiian islands by the tens of thousands. The birds return each fall to the same patch. Kolea spend nine months in Hawaii, but by late April, they form large flocks and head north, over the Pacific Ocean to, as the poet W.S

Jul 23 2020

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A Drive Along on a Bar Ditch

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In the rural Southeast, roadside ditches – known as “bar ditches” – carry on for miles. The term bar ditch probably comes from their construction, when dirt was "borrowed" to build up the road. The ditches are full of water and full of life, these narrow wetlands. Herons stalk the shallow water

Jul 22 2020

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Birds as Pollinators

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Birds are part of the complex web of Nature, and each fits into this web in its own way. Some even pollinate flowers! While feeding at a flower, this Rainbow Lorikeet gets pollen on its forehead and throat. When it visits another flower of the same species, it transfers the pollen to that flower

Jul 21 2020

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Tony Angell on the Raven

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Tony Angell reflects: "It's a cloudless summer day as I listen to ravens behind me in the woods. There's an endless repertoire of croaks, krawks, barks, yelps, and yodels. Other ravens across the bay respond in kind, and I imagine that this is a day of poetry and perhaps a few jokes shared between

Jul 20 2020

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iTunes Ratings

484 Ratings
Average Ratings
447
18
8
5
6

BirdNote

By Magpie's Garden and Nursery - May 18 2020
Read more
My favorite podcast educational and delightful! Keep it coming !

My favorite podcast

By Slippery Dwayne - Feb 29 2020
Read more
No podcast is as grounding as this one...a two minute daily oasis for bird lovers of all ages!