Cover image of BirdNote
(387)
Science
Natural Sciences

BirdNote

Updated 9 days ago

Science
Natural Sciences
Read more

Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

Read more

Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

iTunes Ratings

387 Ratings
Average Ratings
358
13
6
4
6

Cherish gifts

By gwlk - Jun 01 2019
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I just love birds. And clouds. Each are different and unique.

Informative

By P2w99 - Nov 16 2017
Read more
Great podcast for bird trivia.

iTunes Ratings

387 Ratings
Average Ratings
358
13
6
4
6

Cherish gifts

By gwlk - Jun 01 2019
Read more
I just love birds. And clouds. Each are different and unique.

Informative

By P2w99 - Nov 16 2017
Read more
Great podcast for bird trivia.

Listen to:

Cover image of BirdNote

BirdNote

Updated 9 days ago

Read more

Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.

The Red-shouldered Hawk - One Gorgeous Bird of Prey

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Sharp, insistent cries signal the presence of one of North America’s most beautiful birds of prey: the Red-shouldered Hawk.

Nov 27 2019

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A Blizzard of Snow Geese

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An immense field appears to be covered with snow, blanketed in white. But a closer look reveals more than 10,000 Snow Geese. Snow Geese nest on Wrangel Island, in the Chukchi Sea off northern Siberia. Don't miss the amazing video by Barbara Galatti!

Nov 26 2019

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How Long Does a Robin Live?

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If a young American Robin survives its first winter, its chances of survival go up. But robins still don’t live very long. The oldest robins in your yard might be about three years old (although thanks to banding, we know of one bird that lived to be almost 14).

Nov 25 2019

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A World of Parrots

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Parrots have strong, hooked beaks that are great for cracking tough seeds. Their feet allow them to climb and to hold on to objects, like food. Parrots are known for their legendary intelligence and ability to talk. And they come in almost every color of the rainbow!

Oct 24 2019

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Boreal Chickadees Stay Home for the Winter

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Boreal Chickadees live in the boreal forest year-round. How do they survive the harsh winter? First, during summer, they cache a great deal of food, both insects and seeds. Then in fall, they put on fresh, heavier plumage.

Nov 24 2019

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Common Redpoll

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The tiny Common Redpoll, one of the smallest members of the finch family, weighs only as much as four pennies, yet it survives the cold and darkness of winter in the far North. Most birds depart in autumn to warmer climes.

Nov 03 2019

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Geese in V-formation

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Autumn…and geese fly high overhead in V-formation. But what about that V-formation, angling outward through the sky? This phenomenon — a kind of synchronized, aerial tailgating — marks the flight of flocks of larger birds, like geese or pelicans.

Oct 25 2019

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Birds Winter at the Salton Sea

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California's Salton Sea is hot and smelly - and it's also a Mecca for thousands of wintering birds. This inland sea formed when the Colorado River breached floodgates in 1905, forming a lake 45 miles long.

Nov 23 2019

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Swallows and Mud - A Myth?

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The swallows that make mud nests in spring and catch flying insects all summer are now far south in Mexico, and Central and South America. It's only as recently as the end of the nineteenth century that ornithologists agreed that swallows, including this Cliff Swallow, migrate.

Oct 23 2019

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Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers

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These Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers appear nearly identical, but the Hairy Woodpecker is larger than the Downy, with a distinctly longer bill. And it doesn't have the black spots on its outer tail feathers like the Downy.

Nov 09 2019

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The Butcherbird

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The Northern Shrike breeds in the tundra and taiga of the north, but migrates south into the lower 48 for the winter. It has a pleasing and rhythmical song, which it sings even in winter. But its song belies a rather bloodthirsty feeding habit.

Nov 04 2019

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Birds of Prey and Nesting Territories

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Red-tailed Hawks typically have a nesting territory of about a half-mile to a full square mile, depending on how much food there is. Bald Eagles’ nesting territories range from 2½ square miles to as much as 15 square miles, for the same reason.

Nov 19 2019

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Ptarmigan Toes

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With its rubbery-sounding rattles and clownish red eyebrows, the ptarmigan is quite the stand-out northern bird. As winter approaches, the ptarmigan’s feet grow feathers, and its claws grow longer. All that added surface area means the ptarmigan practically has its own set of snowshoes.

Oct 29 2019

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Purple Martins Head South to the Amazon

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The Purple Martin is the largest swallow that nests in the US and Canada. During fall, Purple Martins from western North America migrate to a distinct wintering area in southeastern Brazil — a travel distance of more than 5,000 miles!

Oct 26 2019

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American Wigeon

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The American Wigeon is a grazer. Its bill is narrow, with a pointed tip like that of a goose. When feeding on water plants, a wigeon grabs a leaf and rips it off with its strong bill, rather than using the straining apparatus typical of dabbling ducks.

Nov 13 2019

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The Haunting Voice of the Common Loon

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The call of the Common Loon brings to mind a summer visit to northern lakes. A "yodel" call is given by a male on his breeding territory. With his neck outstretched, the male waves his head from side to side, sending his eerie calls across forests and open water.

Nov 05 2019

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The Stealthy Shoebill

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Deep in the dense, remote swamps of Central Africa lives the Shoebill, a massive, blue-gray stork-like bird, standing up to five feet tall. The bird takes its name from its large bill, which is shaped like an oversized Dutch wooden shoe.

Nov 01 2019

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Birds in the Winter Garden

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Put your winter garden to work as a haven for birds. Leaves and brush left to compost provide foraging and roosting places, smother this year’s weeds, and feed next spring’s plant growth. Watch for juncos and towhees in the leaf litter, and wrens in the brush.

Nov 02 2019

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Pinyon Jay

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Pinyon Jays take their name from pinyon pines. Extracting the seeds from cones, the jays fill their throats. Then they fly to a caching site, sometimes miles away, to push each seed into the leaf litter. Collectively, they cache millions of seeds, some of which sprout before they can be eaten.

Oct 22 2019

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Clean Nestboxes in October

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It’s a wistful moment when your backyard birds — like these Black-capped Chickadees — depart their nestboxes. By October, it’s time for one last duty as nestbox landlord: to clean it out.

Oct 27 2019

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Birds and Bird Conservation Matter - Interview with David Yarnold

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We asked David Yarnold, President of National Audubon, why bird conservation matters. He says that preserving wild places and preserving the links in nature's chains allow wildlife to thrive.

Dec 10 2019

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The Pecking Order

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Birds in flocks almost invariably develop a pecking order. An alpha chicken can peck any other in the flock, and a beta chicken can peck all others but the alpha bird. Juncos and other small birds have a pecking order, too.

Dec 09 2019

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American Bittern - Thunder-Pumper

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American Bitterns nest in marshes across the northern half of the United States and throughout much of Canada, and they winter along both US coasts south into Central America. But in some places, bitterns are in serious trouble.

Dec 08 2019

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Why Birds Stand on One Leg

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Birds' legs have an adaptation called "rete mirabile" that minimizes heat loss. The arteries that transport warm blood into the legs lie in contact with the veins that return colder blood to the bird's heart. The arteries warm the veins.

Dec 07 2019

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Are Northern Forest Owls Coming South This Winter?

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The boreal forest stretches across Canada and Alaska, a huge expanse of woods, wetlands and wilderness. And it’s full of magnificent forest owls that depend on mice and other rodents for food.

Dec 06 2019

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Wingspan Takes Flight

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The goal is to attract birds to your aviary by collecting things they like to eat. Your birds are worth points, and they score you more points when they lay eggs, gather food, or do other bird-y things.

Dec 05 2019

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Encounter with a Cassowary

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In a tropical woodland in eastern Australia, you glimpse a Southern Cassowary, a huge flightless bird that must rate as the most prehistoric looking of all birds.

Dec 04 2019

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Pelicans Go Fishing

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There are two kinds of pelicans in North America – the American White Pelican and the Brown Pelican. And they’ve evolved different tactics to catch their prey.

Dec 03 2019

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The Benefits of a Raven's Black Feathers

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It turns out, a raven's black plumage works quite well in the desert. Black feathers do conduct the sun’s warming rays, but they concentrate that solar heat near the feathers’ surface.

Dec 02 2019

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Snow Geese: Too Much of a Good Thing

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When small family farms gave way to large, industrial agricultural operations, the Snow Geese followed. Waste grain left over from harvests has allowed Snow Goose populations to jump. Now, there are so many Snow Geese they degrade their Arctic summer habitat, threatening other birds.

Dec 01 2019

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How Much Do Birds Eat?

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There used to be a saying about somebody who doesn’t eat much — “she eats like a bird.” But how much does a bird typically eat? As a rule of thumb, the smaller the bird, the more food it needs relative to its weight. A Cooper’s Hawk, a medium-sized bird, eats around 12% of its weight per day.

Nov 30 2019

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Giblets and Gizzards

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A bird’s stomach is divided into two parts. The first part is a lot like our stomach; it’s filled with digestive juices to break down food. But the second part — that’s the bird’s gizzard. It’s a strong, muscular pouch that breaks down hard foods like seeds and nuts.

Nov 29 2019

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The Wild Turkey - One Well-Traveled Bird

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It’s likely that the Mayans of southern Mexico were the first to domesticate turkeys.

Nov 28 2019

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The Red-shouldered Hawk - One Gorgeous Bird of Prey

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Read more
Sharp, insistent cries signal the presence of one of North America’s most beautiful birds of prey: the Red-shouldered Hawk.

Nov 27 2019

Play

A Blizzard of Snow Geese

Podcast cover
Read more
An immense field appears to be covered with snow, blanketed in white. But a closer look reveals more than 10,000 Snow Geese. Snow Geese nest on Wrangel Island, in the Chukchi Sea off northern Siberia. Don't miss the amazing video by Barbara Galatti!

Nov 26 2019

Play

How Long Does a Robin Live?

Podcast cover
Read more
If a young American Robin survives its first winter, its chances of survival go up. But robins still don’t live very long. The oldest robins in your yard might be about three years old (although thanks to banding, we know of one bird that lived to be almost 14).

Nov 25 2019

Play

Boreal Chickadees Stay Home for the Winter

Podcast cover
Read more
Boreal Chickadees live in the boreal forest year-round. How do they survive the harsh winter? First, during summer, they cache a great deal of food, both insects and seeds. Then in fall, they put on fresh, heavier plumage.

Nov 24 2019

Play

Birds Winter at the Salton Sea

Podcast cover
Read more
California's Salton Sea is hot and smelly - and it's also a Mecca for thousands of wintering birds. This inland sea formed when the Colorado River breached floodgates in 1905, forming a lake 45 miles long.

Nov 23 2019

Play

Convocations, Coveys and Charms

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Everybody’s heard of a gaggle of geese and a covey of quail. But what’s a group of penguins called? And a “conspiracy” of ravens? Maybe the way we label birds says more about us than it does about them.

Nov 22 2019

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Winter Birds Love Suet

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Birds at a suet feeder... What a burst of vitality on a chilly morning! What's the attraction? A cake of suet, suspended from a branch in a small wire feeder. Suet is beef fat, a high-energy food critical for birds' survival in the colder months.

Nov 21 2019

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