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Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Fine Woodworking magazine editors and contributors answer your questions and share woodworking tips and techniques.

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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STL206: The best plywood for jigs

This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/ Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://www.finewoodworkinglive.com Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

1hr 6mins

3 Jan 2020

Rank #1

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STL204: Don't Shoot Your Miters

This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/ Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com Links from this episode can be found here - https://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

1hr 3mins

6 Dec 2019

Rank #2

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STL202: This guy found a workbench on the side of the road!

This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/ Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com This episode's poll, shop-music playlists and links can be found here - https://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com Become an UNLIMITED member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0 To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

1hr 1min

8 Nov 2019

Rank #3

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STL197: Clean Miters That Are Actually Strong

Question 1:  From Elijah: I’m planning on building a floating media cabinet out of 5/4 cherry. The basic idea of the cabinet is an open box that looks like you can look through to the wall. However, it will actually have a false back made of 1/4” MDF painted the same color as the wall to hide all of the wires. For this project I like the clean look of miter joints, but I am worried that it will not be strong enough. The cabinet will be about 48 inches wide, 10 inches tall, and 14 inches deep. Do I need to reinforce the miters somehow or will glueing in the false back strengthening it sufficiently? Strong and Handsome: Half-Blind Mitered Dovetails How to Cut Half-Blind Mitered Dovetails 3-D Shelves Enliven Any Room Add Muscle To Your Miters Question 2: From Reg: I’m trying to make bird’s eye maple legs that have face grain on all four sides.  Unlike (for eg.) white oak laminated legs, the side grain on bird’s eye is obtrusively different and a lamination would be obvious if done in the white oak manner of laminating only on two sides.  So I think I need four-sided laminations, which seems to mean mitered laminations. What is the best way to go about this? I am assuming some core 4-square stock is the starting point. These are going to be Krenov-type legs, so thinly laminating finished leg seems out of the question. Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool  Mike: Holdfast Get a grip on your work Ben: CNC used as a pin router The Pin Router Anissa: Her marking gauges Shopmade Cutting Gauge Tool Test: Marking Gauges Question 3: From Dave: What machinery can be bought vintage and what should be bought new(er_)? It seems as though this kind of discussion is all but exhausted when it comes to hand tools but I don't hear as much about the bigger purchases in the shop. For instance, not much has changed for drill presses, so an old and stout model seems like a chance to save some money. Meanwhile, it's clear that table saws have improved dramatically with regards to safety and dust collection, so if a SawStop is attainable, I should budget accordingly. But what are your thoughts about bandsaws, jointers, planers, lathes, and the like? Are some types of shop equipment less vulnerable to the risks of buying used? Used tools are this woodworker’s best friend Question 4: From Frank: I am making several MDF plinths for an upcoming exhibit. They are 16" square. I mitered the edges so the only visible end gain is at the top. I’m looking for painting suggestions. Some videos say to use Zinsser BIN, and others say to just use regular drywall type primer, then lightly sand before applying primary color. Do you have any suggestions that would steer me in the proper direction? MDF edge, end grain prep, Edgetech Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

1hr 3mins

30 Aug 2019

Rank #4

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STL211: Woodworker's aprons

Click here to enter to win a Shaper Origin: http://www.finewoodworking.com/shapertools Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

1hr 3mins

13 Mar 2020

Rank #5

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STL214.5: The one with no questions

Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

49mins

1 May 2020

Rank #6

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STL 100: Matt is out of control, plus a mystery guest

It’s our 100th episode, with a special guest to celebrate. Plus we interview new contributing editor Chris Gochnour. Also, we chat up our favorite dovetail methods, and Matt gets a talkin’ to.

1hr 10mins

18 Dec 2015

Rank #7

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STL196: Is It Time to Upgrade Your Planer

Question 1:  From Chase: I have an old 13" hitachi planer I got from craigslist many years ago.  It has served me well but is starting to have issues. 13 inches has been useful, but at times I wish it was wider.  In your experience is it worth the extra money to buy something bigger, or should I stick with a more reasonable choice like DW735?  I have 220v access and floor space, so that isn't an issue. I am in my 30s, have been woodworking for ~10 years. I would like to keep woodworking into my 80s, so I can justify a longer term investment.  I can afford a 1.5 or 2k tool, but could buy something else if I stuck with a cheaper planer.   Segemented Cutterheads Change the Game   Question 2: From Martin: I know Mike likes to have a small offset between the rails and stiles of his frame-and-panel doors. But how does he then avoid chipping the unsupported inside corners of the stiles when planing the top and bottom of the door to fit the opening? How to Fit an Inset Door - Systematic approach yields perfect results every time Install Inset Doors With Ease - Four-step process uses the jointer and tablesaw to guarantee a perfect fit Segment: All Time Favorite Tool of All Time Barry: SketchUp How To Create New SketchUp Textures For Your Models  Mike: Suizan Japanese Saws and DFM Dowel Plate Japanese Sew Overview with Andrea Hunter Ben: Shopmade Hot Pipe Bender Video: Hot Pipe Bender Question 3: From RobGoSlow on YouTube: I'm not sure where to submit questions for the podcast but I have one: I'm a very new wood worker with a lower end contractor table saw. Obviously things like the blade angle and fence are not very precise but I want to know what sources of error are there to look out for? What are the types of error you're concerned about with a cheap table saw?  Portable Saws Question 4: From Capt. Zachary J. Daniels: I want to buy a block plane from Lie-Nielsen.  I know Mike is a fan of the adjustable mouth block plane.  However, I also remember Mike and Matt Kenney having a spirited debate where Matt was extolling the virtues of the rabbeting block plane. I can’t seem to find the original discussion between Matt and Mike.  Instead of listening to the entire catalog again, (and without Matt around to defend himself) I’m interested to hear Mike’s opinion on why he prefers the adjustable mouth block plane over the rabbeting block plane. Right now, I only want to buy one block plane as I also have my eye on the No. 62 low angle jack.     Thanks for the show and keep up the great work!  I became an unlimited member after listening to several of the podcasts, so keep the content coming and inspiring others!  Rabbet Planes Are Real Shop Workhorses The Best Way to Fit Tenons Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

1hr 6mins

16 Aug 2019

Rank #8

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STL 96: Tablesaws and Tool Tests

Fine Woodworking contributing editor Roland (a.ka., Rollie) Johnson talks about how the magazine test machinery, and drops a few details about  his latest head-to-head test: compact cabinet saws. Plus, our favorite techniques of the week, loads of sharpening advice, and yet another cool use of blue tape.

54mins

22 Oct 2015

Rank #9

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STL213.5: The Bob Van Dyke show

Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

40mins

17 Apr 2020

Rank #10

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STL 160: Beginner Mistakes

Plus, dealing with a warped panel, keeping tabletops from moving, the safety of spalted wood, and a snippet from our interview with Brian Boggs

1hr 16mins

30 Mar 2018

Rank #11

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STL 111: Get to know Garrett Hack better

Garrett Hack replaces Mike... for this week. Plus left- vs. right-handed benches, advice on flattening blades, and finally, the big question: can you straighten wood with steam?

59mins

13 May 2016

Rank #12

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STL190: Assembling a Lumber Stash

Become a Fine Woodworking Unlimited member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here. Question 1: From Tom: I’m now semi-retired and finally have the time to create a decent wood shop. I’ve moved to the Florida panhandle, where there are few hardwood dealers. In late May, I’ll be in Tennessee so I intend to stop in at a hardwood dealer/mill near Nashville. Given the projects on my to do list I’ll be picking up walnut, cherry, and ash. I also have my eye on black locust (for a picnic table), popular, box elder (table legs and aprons), and catalpa (ditto). Given the list of woods on the dealer's inventory list, I feel like a kid in a candy store. Perhaps too much like a kid in a candy store. I’d be interested in your collective wisdom about how one might go about stocking a new shop with wood, especially given the fact that the nearest hardwood dealer for a hobbyist is 5-6 hours away (Atlanta) and I don’t drive through Tennessee regularly enough to stop in at a dealer or mill whenever I need something (they are about 11 hours away). Y’all are fortunate to live where you do from a woodworking perspective, but I’ll take our weather over yours … I have lemons and tangerines on the trees in my front yard. :-) Question 2: From Richard: Have you ever heard of hollowing the backs of western chisels? To speed the process of flattening the back of a chisel, my buddy first hollows the center to a depth of about 1 or 2 thousands of an inch with a dremel sanding flap attachment . The edges and toe are not touched by the sander. My buddy says that because the hollow is so slight, it is as easy to re-flatten the back and establish a new flat spot as it is to re-establish the cutting edge of a worn Japanese chisel. Here is the video that Anissa mentions, which she now admits he obviously had running in the dremel Segment: Smooth Move Ben: Drilling a depth-indication hole on the wrong side. Barry: Trimming the horns of a frame and panel too soon. Anissa: Forgetting that two years ago she grain matched the tops of three cabinets, then ignoring the grain match while fitting the cabinets with drawers. Question 3: From Jesse: I’ve recently started the journey into furniture making.  I have a sliding miter saw and a very old table saw that is only good for rough cutting. I’m looking to purchase a band saw or jointer/planer combo. I only have room for one and only 110v availability. I am using hand saws and hand planes to do most of the dimensioning of my lumber. For a beginner, who has limited space and time in the shop, would a band saw or jointer/planer be more advantageous? I’d appreciate any guidance you can offer to ensure my next big purchase is a wise choice and will be the most practical. Recommendations: Ben - Prismacolor Premier Pencil Sharpener Barry - Kettlebells for holding panel glue ups flat Anissa -  A rock  Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

59mins

24 May 2019

Rank #13

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STL 133: On bandsaw blades and waterstones

Which bandsaw blades do you really need? Waterstones: to soak or not to soak. Plus all time favorite techniques and tools (hint: Matt has discovered tape, but it’s not blue!).

54mins

17 Mar 2017

Rank #14

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STL 123: Nick Offerman's All-Time Favorite Tool

57mins

28 Oct 2016

Rank #15

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STL210: Turn that lathe on!

Click here to enter to win a Shaper Origin: http://www.finewoodworking.com/shapertools Click here to enter the Fine Woodworking Live Military Scholarship: http://www.finewoodworkinglive.com/scholarship/ For more information on the American Association of Woodturners: http://www.woodturner.org For more information on the 2020 Turning Symposium in Louisville, June 4-7, 2020: http://bit.ly/2wcI4Me For more on Janet Collins: http://www.greenmountainwoodturning.com/ For more on Josh Friend: http://jfriendwoodworks.com/

1hr 1min

28 Feb 2020

Rank #16

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STL191: A Jointer Worth Traveling For

If you are interested in learning more about how you can support Old Sturbridge Village’s cabinet shop, contact their development office at development@osv.org for more information. Question 1: From Joseph: I bought a new house in 2017 and instead of moving a lot of tools, I sold most of them and started over with new ones. There are 2 things I haven't yet invested in  - a router table and a dado stack. I'm primarily a hand tool guy, but I like to use power tools for dados/grooves and rabbets. Currently I am using my tablesaw with a FTG blade to nibble away at them, but I've reached my breaking point and want something a bit faster. I've used both a dado stack and a router table in the past. Both have some pluses and minuses for me; set up time being a major minus, but equally annoying for each. I'm also open to other alternatives that don't include joinery planes. Been there, bought the planes, sold the planes. I'm a lefty, and using planes right handed isn't fun for me. Tablesaw Blades for Joinery - Cut joinery faster and cleaner with a set of four blades By Bob Van Dyke #253–Mar/Apr 2016 Issue Question 2: From Nick: I have a question regarding a long distance relationship with a beautiful jointer. I am member of a "local" woodworking guild which has nice shop that is outfitted with a 16" jointer, a few nice planers. Unfortunately, I live a little over 2 hours away and at my home shop I currently only have a DW735 planer and no jointer. I would like to use all this nice equipment to do everything required to get straight, flat and square stock to take home and finish my projects. My concern is that by the time I throw it in the back of the truck and drive 2 hours home I would defeat the purpose. Does wood move that quickly when you're driving 80... ahem.. 70 mph? Can I get home and put in my climate controlled basement shop before I've warped everything out of flat/square? How would weather effect this (i.e. cold dry winter/hot humid summer weather?). The Basics of Milling Lumber - Key machines and smart strategy for making boards foursquare By Bob Van Dyke #276-July/August 2019 Issue Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique Mike: Peter Galbert using a heat gun to straighten out riven stock Bob: Flush cutting on the tablesaw Video: Versatile Tablesaw L-Fence- Build a simple tablesaw fence accessory that handles a wide variety of joinery cuts By Bob Van Dyke The Incredible L-Fence - Take your tablesaw to another level with this simple shopmade fence By Bob Van Dyke #237–Tools & Shops 2014 Issue Ben: Drawing an extra line when sawing on the left side of your layout line Question 3:   From Jim: I am planning to build a sewing table for my wife. The plans call for using cherry plywood for several major panels of the case. While the stability of plywood is certainly an advantage, it is expensive and I like the idea of using glued up panels made from 4/4 stock. What would you do and why? Recommendations: Ben - Sharpen your marking gauge, because you know it's dull Mike -  Get a Soda Stream Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

1hr 10mins

7 Jun 2019

Rank #17

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STL 130: Workbench advice and waterfall joinery

Bench tips for a fledgling woodworker. Plus a call for help, and update on SawStop vs. Bosch, and our all time favorite furniture and tools.

1hr 3mins

3 Feb 2017

Rank #18

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STL200: Live from North Jersey

The North Jersey Woodworkers Association or NJWA for short is a community of woodworkers of all types and levels of experience. We have some professionals, some beginners and every skill level in between. Our goal is to share our experience with one another and to support and grow the woodworking community in the Northern New Jersey area. Regardless of woodworking interest or level of experience, we invite you to join us. For directions, membership information and club activities follow this link: About NJWA.

49mins

11 Oct 2019

Rank #19

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STL 101: Cherry is No Substitute for White Oak

Mike extolls the virtues of quartersawn white oak in Arts and Crafts work. Plus the guys reveal their New Year’s woodworking resolutions and chat about how to keep warm in a winter shop.

52mins

30 Dec 2015

Rank #20