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Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #61 in Leisure category

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Fine Woodworking magazine editors and contributors answer your questions and share woodworking tips and techniques.

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Fine Woodworking magazine editors and contributors answer your questions and share woodworking tips and techniques.

iTunes Ratings

1021 Ratings
Average Ratings
919
47
22
12
21

So Happy with the Current Hosts

By xjumper65 - Jan 14 2020
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This is a great Woodworking podcast from the writers and editors of the finest woodworking magazine I’ve ever read. The content is entertaining and informative. The current hosts and the occasional guest hosts are a pleasure to spend time listening to which wasn’t always the case there for a a while. Tom, Ben, Mike, (along with the occasional ray of sunshine known as Anissa Kapsales and others) are fun and interesting. I haven’t enjoyed the hosts of this podcast this much since Asa and Ed departed the show. Once again, I am now looking forward to each new podcast episode.

#197 Great Pod (as are the rest of the episodes)

By rexhansen - Sep 09 2019
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Loved the discussion on miter joints and shrink and swell. Kept it coming.

iTunes Ratings

1021 Ratings
Average Ratings
919
47
22
12
21

So Happy with the Current Hosts

By xjumper65 - Jan 14 2020
Read more
This is a great Woodworking podcast from the writers and editors of the finest woodworking magazine I’ve ever read. The content is entertaining and informative. The current hosts and the occasional guest hosts are a pleasure to spend time listening to which wasn’t always the case there for a a while. Tom, Ben, Mike, (along with the occasional ray of sunshine known as Anissa Kapsales and others) are fun and interesting. I haven’t enjoyed the hosts of this podcast this much since Asa and Ed departed the show. Once again, I am now looking forward to each new podcast episode.

#197 Great Pod (as are the rest of the episodes)

By rexhansen - Sep 09 2019
Read more
Loved the discussion on miter joints and shrink and swell. Kept it coming.
Cover image of Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Latest release on Jan 17, 2020

Read more

Fine Woodworking magazine editors and contributors answer your questions and share woodworking tips and techniques.

Rank #1: STL197: Clean Miters That Are Actually Strong

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Question 1: 

From Elijah: I’m planning on building a floating media cabinet out of 5/4 cherry. The basic idea of the cabinet is an open box that looks like you can look through to the wall. However, it will actually have a false back made of 1/4” MDF painted the same color as the wall to hide all of the wires. For this project I like the clean look of miter joints, but I am worried that it will not be strong enough. The cabinet will be about 48 inches wide, 10 inches tall, and 14 inches deep. Do I need to reinforce the miters somehow or will glueing in the false back strengthening it sufficiently?

Question 2:

From Reg: I’m trying to make bird’s eye maple legs that have face grain on all four sides.  Unlike (for eg.) white oak laminated legs, the side grain on bird’s eye is obtrusively different and a lamination would be obvious if done in the white oak manner of laminating only on two sides.  So I think I need four-sided laminations, which seems to mean mitered laminations. What is the best way to go about this? I am assuming some core 4-square stock is the starting point. These are going to be Krenov-type legs, so thinly laminating finished leg seems out of the question.

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool 

Mike: Holdfast

Ben: CNC used as a pin router

Anissa: Her marking gauges

Question 3:

From Dave: What machinery can be bought vintage and what should be bought new(er_)? It seems as though this kind of discussion is all but exhausted when it comes to hand tools but I don't hear as much about the bigger purchases in the shop. For instance, not much has changed for drill presses, so an old and stout model seems like a chance to save some money. Meanwhile, it's clear that table saws have improved dramatically with regards to safety and dust collection, so if a SawStop is attainable, I should budget accordingly. But what are your thoughts about bandsaws, jointers, planers, lathes, and the like? Are some types of shop equipment less vulnerable to the risks of buying used?

Question 4:

From Frank: I am making several MDF plinths for an upcoming exhibit. They are 16" square. I mitered the edges so the only visible end gain is at the top. I’m looking for painting suggestions. Some videos say to use Zinsser BIN, and others say to just use regular drywall type primer, then lightly sand before applying primary color. Do you have any suggestions that would steer me in the proper direction?

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Aug 30 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #2: STL199: In Defense of Tail Vises

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Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sep 27 2019

1hr 9mins

Play

Rank #3: STL200: Live from North Jersey

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The North Jersey Woodworkers Association or NJWA for short is a community of woodworkers of all types and levels of experience. We have some professionals, some beginners and every skill level in between. Our goal is to share our experience with one another and to support and grow the woodworking community in the Northern New Jersey area. Regardless of woodworking interest or level of experience, we invite you to join us. For directions, membership information and club activities follow this link: About NJWA.

Oct 11 2019

49mins

Play

Rank #4: STL196: Is It Time to Upgrade Your Planer

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Question 1: 

From Chase:

I have an old 13" hitachi planer I got from craigslist many years ago.  It has served me well but is starting to have issues. 13 inches has been useful, but at times I wish it was wider.  In your experience is it worth the extra money to buy something bigger, or should I stick with a more reasonable choice like DW735?  I have 220v access and floor space, so that isn't an issue. I am in my 30s, have been woodworking for ~10 years. I would like to keep woodworking into my 80s, so I can justify a longer term investment.  I can afford a 1.5 or 2k tool, but could buy something else if I stuck with a cheaper planer.  

 Question 2:

From Martin:

I know Mike likes to have a small offset between the rails and stiles of his frame-and-panel doors. But how does he then avoid chipping the unsupported inside corners of the stiles when planing the top and bottom of the door to fit the opening?

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool of All Time

Barry: SketchUp

Mike: Suizan Japanese Saws and DFM Dowel Plate

Ben: Shopmade Hot Pipe Bender

Question 3:

From RobGoSlow on YouTube:

I'm not sure where to submit questions for the podcast but I have one: I'm a very new wood worker with a lower end contractor table saw. Obviously things like the blade angle and fence are not very precise but I want to know what sources of error are there to look out for? What are the types of error you're concerned about with a cheap table saw? 

Question 4:

From Capt. Zachary J. Daniels:

I want to buy a block plane from Lie-Nielsen.  I know Mike is a fan of the adjustable mouth block plane.  However, I also remember Mike and Matt Kenney having a spirited debate where Matt was extolling the virtues of the rabbeting block plane. I can’t seem to find the original discussion between Matt and Mike.  Instead of listening to the entire catalog again, (and without Matt around to defend himself) I’m interested to hear Mike’s opinion on why he prefers the adjustable mouth block plane over the rabbeting block plane.

Right now, I only want to buy one block plane as I also have my eye on the No. 62 low angle jack.    

Thanks for the show and keep up the great work!  I became an unlimited member after listening to several of the podcasts, so keep the content coming and inspiring others! 

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Aug 16 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #5: STL 96: Tablesaws and Tool Tests

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Fine Woodworking contributing editor Roland (a.ka., Rollie) Johnson talks about how the magazine test machinery, and drops a few details about  his latest head-to-head test: compact cabinet saws. Plus, our favorite techniques of the week, loads of sharpening advice, and yet another cool use of blue tape.

Oct 22 2015

54mins

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Rank #6: STL 100: Matt is out of control, plus a mystery guest

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It’s our 100th episode, with a special guest to celebrate. Plus we interview new contributing editor Chris Gochnour. Also, we chat up our favorite dovetail methods, and Matt gets a talkin’ to.

Dec 18 2015

1hr 10mins

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Rank #7: STL191: A Jointer Worth Traveling For

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If you are interested in learning more about how you can support Old Sturbridge Village’s cabinet shop, contact their development office at development@osv.org for more information.

Question 1:

From Joseph: I bought a new house in 2017 and instead of moving a lot of tools, I sold most of them and started over with new ones. There are 2 things I haven't yet invested in  - a router table and a dado stack. I'm primarily a hand tool guy, but I like to use power tools for dados/grooves and rabbets. Currently I am using my tablesaw with a FTG blade to nibble away at them, but I've reached my breaking point and want something a bit faster. I've used both a dado stack and a router table in the past. Both have some pluses and minuses for me; set up time being a major minus, but equally annoying for each. I'm also open to other alternatives that don't include joinery planes. Been there, bought the planes, sold the planes. I'm a lefty, and using planes right handed isn't fun for me.

Question 2:

From Nick: I have a question regarding a long distance relationship with a beautiful jointer. I am member of a "local" woodworking guild which has nice shop that is outfitted with a 16" jointer, a few nice planers. Unfortunately, I live a little over 2 hours away and at my home shop I currently only have a DW735 planer and no jointer. I would like to use all this nice equipment to do everything required to get straight, flat and square stock to take home and finish my projects. My concern is that by the time I throw it in the back of the truck and drive 2 hours home I would defeat the purpose. Does wood move that quickly when you're driving 80... ahem.. 70 mph? Can I get home and put in my climate controlled basement shop before I've warped everything out of flat/square? How would weather effect this (i.e. cold dry winter/hot humid summer weather?).

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique Mike: Peter Galbert using a heat gun to straighten out riven stock Bob: Flush cutting on the tablesaw

Ben: Drawing an extra line when sawing on the left side of your layout line

Question 3:  

From Jim: I am planning to build a sewing table for my wife. The plans call for using cherry plywood for several major panels of the case. While the stability of plywood is certainly an advantage, it is expensive and I like the idea of using glued up panels made from 4/4 stock. What would you do and why?

Recommendations:

Ben - Sharpen your marking gauge, because you know it's dull Mike -  Get a Soda Stream

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

Jun 07 2019

1hr 10mins

Play

Rank #8: STL 123: Nick Offerman's All-Time Favorite Tool

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Oct 28 2016

57mins

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Rank #9: STL195.5: Scott Landis of Greenwood Global

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For more than 25 years GreenWood has worked with artisans in Honduras and the Peruvian Amazon to produce high-quality wood products from well-managed forests. They train woodworkers to use appropriate tools and technologies, and connect their products to good markets.

The GreenWood Carver's Mallets are available at LeeValley.com.

Support GreenWood's efforts by heading over to their GoFundMe page.

The Workbench Book by Scott Landis

Aug 09 2019

1hr 2mins

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Rank #10: STL 160: Beginner Mistakes

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Plus, dealing with a warped panel, keeping tabletops from moving, the safety of spalted wood, and a snippet from our interview with Brian Boggs

Mar 30 2018

1hr 16mins

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Rank #11: STL 84: One Big Problem with Helical Cutterheads

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Helical cutterheads are all the rage for jointers and planers, but is there a white elephant in the room? Plus, your questions on finishing, mortise-and-tenon joinery, and a whole lot more.

May 08 2015

52mins

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Rank #12: STL 93: Nick Offerman's Dream Shop

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Nick Offerman describes the inner workings of his Los Angeles workshop, working with big slabs, and more. Plus, your questions on woodworking and an "All Time Favorite Technique of All Time."

Sep 11 2015

1hr 14mins

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Rank #13: STL 101: Cherry is No Substitute for White Oak

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Mike extolls the virtues of quartersawn white oak in Arts and Crafts work. Plus the guys reveal their New Year’s woodworking resolutions and chat about how to keep warm in a winter shop.

Dec 30 2015

52mins

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Rank #14: STL187: Desert Island Dream Projects

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Question 1: From Paul: Heide Martin’s serving trays in the May/June 2018 are beautiful and I have since made a couple. My question is about keeping the bottom boards flat. I cut some walnut that had been air dried for probably 20 years. In an hour or two both boards cupped. I then sequentially tried wetting one side, wetting both sides, soaking in water, soaking in fabric softener, each time clamping the boards to keep them flat and leaving for days and days to dry out. None of these things worked and in the end I ended up using some walnut plywood instead. How do you folks keep wide, thin boards flat?

Question 2: From Richard: In reality we all have limited amount of shop time available.  However, if the amount of time you could work on a project was not limited what one piece would you choose to make?

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique

Mike: Using pocket holes to quickly make and change full-size mockups

Tom: Beveling an edge of a workpiece with a handplane

Ben: Riding the back of the blade to start a cut on the edge of workpiece

Question 3:   From Mark: I have been building furniture full-time for just over a year. Is it legal and/or ethical to build something from the magazine or a video workshop and then sell it? For instance, if a client asks me to build 4 Adirondack chairs, my thought is build them loosely based on what I find at Fine Woodworking, vs. reinventing the wheel with my own design every-time.

Question 4: From John: I was reading a FWW article by Steve Latta in issue #241 about draw-bored tenons where he said, “I make pins from riftsawn or quartersawn stock...”. If you’re making dowels, how can it possibly make any difference whatsoever if you use quartersawn or plain sawn boards? I still like Steve Latta, btw.  Keep up the great work, see y’all at FWWlive!

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Apr 12 2019

1hr 13mins

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Rank #15: STL 45: Taking the Fun Out of Fine Woodworking

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We welcome our new editor onto the show and tackle questions including tips on working with furniture-grade plywood, bandsaw wisdom, and how dumpster diving can get you into trouble. Plus, we tackle the question of whether Shop Talk Live is too heavy on chit-chat and too light on woodworking. To do this, we debut a brand new segment that just might take the "fun" out of Fine Woodworking!

Nov 15 2013

57mins

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Rank #16: STL190: Assembling a Lumber Stash

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Become a Fine Woodworking Unlimited member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here.

Question 1:

From Tom: I’m now semi-retired and finally have the time to create a decent wood shop. I’ve moved to the Florida panhandle, where there are few hardwood dealers. In late May, I’ll be in Tennessee so I intend to stop in at a hardwood dealer/mill near Nashville. Given the projects on my to do list I’ll be picking up walnut, cherry, and ash. I also have my eye on black locust (for a picnic table), popular, box elder (table legs and aprons), and catalpa (ditto). Given the list of woods on the dealer's inventory list, I feel like a kid in a candy store. Perhaps too much like a kid in a candy store. I’d be interested in your collective wisdom about how one might go about stocking a new shop with wood, especially given the fact that the nearest hardwood dealer for a hobbyist is 5-6 hours away (Atlanta) and I don’t drive through Tennessee regularly enough to stop in at a dealer or mill whenever I need something (they are about 11 hours away). Y’all are fortunate to live where you do from a woodworking perspective, but I’ll take our weather over yours … I have lemons and tangerines on the trees in my front yard. :-)

Question 2:

From Richard: Have you ever heard of hollowing the backs of western chisels? To speed the process of flattening the back of a chisel, my buddy first hollows the center to a depth of about 1 or 2 thousands of an inch with a dremel sanding flap attachment . The edges and toe are not touched by the sander. My buddy says that because the hollow is so slight, it is as easy to re-flatten the back and establish a new flat spot as it is to re-establish the cutting edge of a worn Japanese chisel.

  • Here is the video that Anissa mentions, which she now admits he obviously had running in the dremel

Segment: Smooth Move

Ben: Drilling a depth-indication hole on the wrong side. Barry: Trimming the horns of a frame and panel too soon. Anissa: Forgetting that two years ago she grain matched the tops of three cabinets, then ignoring the grain match while fitting the cabinets with drawers.

Question 3:

From Jesse: I’ve recently started the journey into furniture making.  I have a sliding miter saw and a very old table saw that is only good for rough cutting. I’m looking to purchase a band saw or jointer/planer combo. I only have room for one and only 110v availability. I am using hand saws and hand planes to do most of the dimensioning of my lumber. For a beginner, who has limited space and time in the shop, would a band saw or jointer/planer be more advantageous? I’d appreciate any guidance you can offer to ensure my next big purchase is a wise choice and will be the most practical.

Recommendations:

Ben - Prismacolor Premier Pencil Sharpener Barry - Kettlebells for holding panel glue ups flat Anissa -  A rock 

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

May 24 2019

59mins

Play

Rank #17: STL 149: Sharpening demystified

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Plus, the guys talk about migrating sawdust staining the surrounding wood, shoulder planes, green wood, and they take a deep dive on drawer fitting

Oct 27 2017

1hr 13mins

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Rank #18: STL186: Machinery Placement Guidelines

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Question 1: From Harry: How can I prevent Camellia from becoming all gummy. After letting a plane set for a few weeks that had been wiped down with Camellia Oil it was next to impossible to get the plane apart. I actually caused some minor damage it was stuck so hard.

Rollie’s answer: On tools if you have areas that the oil is applied to that don’t see use it can build a bit, but not much and over a long period of time. A quick wipe with a bit of naphtha or acetone will clean it off. Those solvents are essential because they are fully volatile and won’t leave any oily residue, which mineral spirits will do.

Question 2: From Mike: In in a couple months I will be building a house and I will be putting my shop in the basement. Currently I have a small shop, but in my new shop it will be large (about 25x35). Since I have this rare opportunity, I want to put power in the floor and dust collection the floor. Therefore, I have to decide where to put my tools and I will not be able to move them. Are there general guidelines on placement of tools? How far should a table saw be away from a wall? What about a bandsaw, how far from a wall or in the sides? Same question for a router table, jointer and thickness planer.

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique

Mike: Using a bendy stick to hold in moldings as you glue them

Anissa: A Box Worth Repeating by Laura Mays #240–May/June 2014 Issue

Ben: Using blue tape and CA glue as a stand-in for double-sided tape

Mike’s double-down technique: Using a bendy ruler clamped in a pipe clamp as a curve bow

Question 3:  

From Chris: Do those of you with kids suffer like I do from a never ending queue of fix it items that are piled on the workbench and take precedence over projects? It’s fun to hack together solutions for beloved toys, and see the delight on their faces when it works, but it sucks up most of my limited shop time. Any tips on quick fixes, or do I just need to wait this period out until they are teenagers?

Question 4:

From Jim: I recently upgraded table saws with a killer deal on a used Delta Unisaw with a Unifence. I'm used to a Biesemeyer fence, and have a number of jigs utilizing the parallel faces of the fence, such as an L fence. I do not think I can use these jigs on the Unifence because it lacks the parallel faces necessary to track or clamp the jigs. Any ideas for Unifence modification or other tricks to increase the utility of the Unifence?

Recommendations:

Ben - StewMac’s YouTube Channel Anissa - Jonathan Livingston Seagull Mike -  Lee Valley - Lee Valley Toggle Clamp Plate

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Mar 29 2019

55mins

Play

Rank #19: STL 162: Mary May, Marc Spagnuolo, and Tim Rousseau

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Show notes: http://bit.ly/2HCvQxD

This episode was sponsored by Titebond: http://www.titebond.com/

Check out MM Wood Studio's experience at FWW Live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwvx3FRkkl4

For more information about Rikon's turning system: http://bit.ly/2HyVEut Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Apr 27 2018

41mins

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Rank #20: Shop Talk Live 41: Ask a Rocket Scientist

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Tablesaw safety comes center-stage as we bring a certified, honest-to-goodness rocket scientist to Shop Talk Live. Plus, we answer a variety of questions including how to deal with "gummy" bandsaw blades, stubborn handplane tearout in figured maple, and hand tools for intricate inlay work.

Sep 20 2013

55mins

Play

STL207: Is woodworking art?–Part 2

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Enter Woodpecker's Shop Upgrade Giveaway here: http://www.finewoodworking.com/woodpeckers   Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://www.finewoodworkinglive.com   Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com   Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter   Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Jan 17 2020

1hr 4mins

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STL206: The best plywood for jigs

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://www.finewoodworkinglive.com

Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Jan 03 2020

1hr 6mins

Play

STL205: Swimming In Sawdust!

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com

Links from this episode can be found here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Become an UNLIMITED member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Dec 20 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

STL204: Don't Shoot Your Miters

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com

Links from this episode can be found here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Dec 06 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

STL203: Finding holly for inlaying and banding

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com

Links from this episode can be found here: https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Become an UNLIMITED member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Nov 22 2019

1hr 5mins

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STL202: This guy found a workbench on the side of the road!

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Check out the lineup for this year's Fine Woodworking Live here - https://:www.finewoodworkinglive.com

This episode's poll, shop-music playlists and links can be found here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Become an UNLIMITED member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Nov 08 2019

1hr 1min

Play

STL201: Friends Don't Let Friends Go Metric

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This episode is brought to you by Maverick Abrasives. https://www.maverickabrasives.com/

Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter

Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited

Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Oct 25 2019

1hr

Play

STL200: Live from North Jersey

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The North Jersey Woodworkers Association or NJWA for short is a community of woodworkers of all types and levels of experience. We have some professionals, some beginners and every skill level in between. Our goal is to share our experience with one another and to support and grow the woodworking community in the Northern New Jersey area. Regardless of woodworking interest or level of experience, we invite you to join us. For directions, membership information and club activities follow this link: About NJWA.

Oct 11 2019

49mins

Play

STL199: In Defense of Tail Vises

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Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sep 27 2019

1hr 9mins

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STL198.5: Bonus Episode with Tim Rousseau

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Tim's Modern Desk video workshop: https://www.finewoodworking.com/videoworkshop/2019/07/danish-modern-desk-with-tim-rousseau   Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewooworking.com/newsletter   Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited   Shop Talk Live show notes are available here - https://www.shoptalklive.com

Sep 20 2019

36mins

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STL198: How much lumber is too much lumber?

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John, Barry, and Ben discuss workbench stretchers, basement shop vs. garage shop, and a new chapter begins in the round vs. square mortise debate

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Shop Talk Live show notes are available here.

Sep 13 2019

55mins

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STL197: Clean Miters That Are Actually Strong

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Question 1: 

From Elijah: I’m planning on building a floating media cabinet out of 5/4 cherry. The basic idea of the cabinet is an open box that looks like you can look through to the wall. However, it will actually have a false back made of 1/4” MDF painted the same color as the wall to hide all of the wires. For this project I like the clean look of miter joints, but I am worried that it will not be strong enough. The cabinet will be about 48 inches wide, 10 inches tall, and 14 inches deep. Do I need to reinforce the miters somehow or will glueing in the false back strengthening it sufficiently?

Question 2:

From Reg: I’m trying to make bird’s eye maple legs that have face grain on all four sides.  Unlike (for eg.) white oak laminated legs, the side grain on bird’s eye is obtrusively different and a lamination would be obvious if done in the white oak manner of laminating only on two sides.  So I think I need four-sided laminations, which seems to mean mitered laminations. What is the best way to go about this? I am assuming some core 4-square stock is the starting point. These are going to be Krenov-type legs, so thinly laminating finished leg seems out of the question.

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool 

Mike: Holdfast

Ben: CNC used as a pin router

Anissa: Her marking gauges

Question 3:

From Dave: What machinery can be bought vintage and what should be bought new(er_)? It seems as though this kind of discussion is all but exhausted when it comes to hand tools but I don't hear as much about the bigger purchases in the shop. For instance, not much has changed for drill presses, so an old and stout model seems like a chance to save some money. Meanwhile, it's clear that table saws have improved dramatically with regards to safety and dust collection, so if a SawStop is attainable, I should budget accordingly. But what are your thoughts about bandsaws, jointers, planers, lathes, and the like? Are some types of shop equipment less vulnerable to the risks of buying used?

Question 4:

From Frank: I am making several MDF plinths for an upcoming exhibit. They are 16" square. I mitered the edges so the only visible end gain is at the top. I’m looking for painting suggestions. Some videos say to use Zinsser BIN, and others say to just use regular drywall type primer, then lightly sand before applying primary color. Do you have any suggestions that would steer me in the proper direction?

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Aug 30 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

STL196: Is It Time to Upgrade Your Planer

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Question 1: 

From Chase:

I have an old 13" hitachi planer I got from craigslist many years ago.  It has served me well but is starting to have issues. 13 inches has been useful, but at times I wish it was wider.  In your experience is it worth the extra money to buy something bigger, or should I stick with a more reasonable choice like DW735?  I have 220v access and floor space, so that isn't an issue. I am in my 30s, have been woodworking for ~10 years. I would like to keep woodworking into my 80s, so I can justify a longer term investment.  I can afford a 1.5 or 2k tool, but could buy something else if I stuck with a cheaper planer.  

 Question 2:

From Martin:

I know Mike likes to have a small offset between the rails and stiles of his frame-and-panel doors. But how does he then avoid chipping the unsupported inside corners of the stiles when planing the top and bottom of the door to fit the opening?

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool of All Time

Barry: SketchUp

Mike: Suizan Japanese Saws and DFM Dowel Plate

Ben: Shopmade Hot Pipe Bender

Question 3:

From RobGoSlow on YouTube:

I'm not sure where to submit questions for the podcast but I have one: I'm a very new wood worker with a lower end contractor table saw. Obviously things like the blade angle and fence are not very precise but I want to know what sources of error are there to look out for? What are the types of error you're concerned about with a cheap table saw? 

Question 4:

From Capt. Zachary J. Daniels:

I want to buy a block plane from Lie-Nielsen.  I know Mike is a fan of the adjustable mouth block plane.  However, I also remember Mike and Matt Kenney having a spirited debate where Matt was extolling the virtues of the rabbeting block plane. I can’t seem to find the original discussion between Matt and Mike.  Instead of listening to the entire catalog again, (and without Matt around to defend himself) I’m interested to hear Mike’s opinion on why he prefers the adjustable mouth block plane over the rabbeting block plane.

Right now, I only want to buy one block plane as I also have my eye on the No. 62 low angle jack.    

Thanks for the show and keep up the great work!  I became an unlimited member after listening to several of the podcasts, so keep the content coming and inspiring others! 

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Aug 16 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

STL195.5: Scott Landis of Greenwood Global

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For more than 25 years GreenWood has worked with artisans in Honduras and the Peruvian Amazon to produce high-quality wood products from well-managed forests. They train woodworkers to use appropriate tools and technologies, and connect their products to good markets.

The GreenWood Carver's Mallets are available at LeeValley.com.

Support GreenWood's efforts by heading over to their GoFundMe page.

The Workbench Book by Scott Landis

Aug 09 2019

1hr 2mins

Play

STL195: New Tools From AWFS in Vegas

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Rollie Johnson and Justin Fink join Tom, Barry, and Ben to discuss new tools being shown at the AWFS fair in Las Vegas

Aug 02 2019

1hr 5mins

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STL194: New-Fangled Finishes

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Danish Modern Desk with Tim Rousseau

Question 1: 

From Devin: Over the years of listening to your show, reading Fine Woodworking, and watching instructional videos, I’ve heard a million different suggestions for how long to let a glue-up sit before you take the clamps off. Ranging from “a little while” -whatever that is?- to overnight, and everything in between. Do you guys have any good rules of thumb for drying time?

Question 2:

From the Fine Woodworking forum by forum member NewAndGreen: I’d like to apply a water based topcoat to two white oak chairs I’ve sanded. I was interested in using General Finishes water-based topcoat, but don’t know if I should go with the flat or the satin finish. I have read that GF’s satin is shinier than most. Is that true?  (I put a coat of Minwax Satin Polycrylic on one and liked the look, but I’m looking for a better product .) I know I don’t want to start mixing. (I’ve already over-complicated the process!) I also know I don’t want a glossy look and not a totally matte look. Ugh. Pictures of two parts of chair attached for reference. Thanks in advance for your advice/thoughts to this new and green refinisher!

Question 3:

Also from Paul: I  have not heard Rubio Monocoat or Osmo mentioned on the podcast. Have any of you tried Monocoat? Being in the industry professionally myself, and, seeing what other pros are using, Monocoat and Osmo seem to be the two go-to products that many professionals use as their primary oil finish (they’re like the BMW and Mercedes of woodworking it seems). Any experience and/or recommendations there?

Price of Osmo Polyx Oil at time of broadcast: .75-Liter=$58.56

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique of All Time

Mike: Tom McLaughlin’s “cut some off and glue it on the other side” technique

Anissa: Steve Latta’s hinged flips stop

Ben: Using metal files to shape difficult woods

Question 4:

From Brendan: I can’t draw by hand at all.  Not even a little. My 3rd grade drawings look every bit as good as my current attempts. On STL180, you talked about design for about 30 minutes without mentioning cad as a design medium.   I know it’s a scary topic but as a resolution at least one of you should try to design a furniture piece down to the jointery on your computer. The learning curve can be steep but I find that designing on the computer allows me to virtually build the piece without creating any sawdust.

And from Paul: I don’t know that I’ve ever heard Fusion 360 mentioned on the podcast. I used Sketchup for several years and loved it… however, a few years ago a landed a very complicated project (with cnc work involved), and came to the realization I needed something more sophisticated. Fusion 360 is now such a huge part of my business and can’t imagine ever going back to Sketchup. Having parametric capabilities now seems absolutely necessary. Have any of you ever tried it?

 Recommendations: 

Anissa - Ted Talk - Rives: The Museum of Four in the Morning Ben - The Woodworkers Podcast and luthiery podcast Omo

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Jul 18 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

STL193: Pocket Screws vs. Dominos

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Start Woodworking Season 1 by Matt Berger, Asa Christiana

https://www.finewoodworking.com/videoworkshop/2019/07/start-woodworking-season-1

Question 1:  From Dan: I recently built a pair of desks featured in issue #270. I built them mostly the way Michael Robbins did, however instead of using a domino to construct the top I used pocket screws. I don't own a domino, I opted for a hollow chisel mortiser, and  I thought it would be silly to use a hollow chisel mortise. How do you feel about pocket screws versus slip tenons made with a domino? Both tools make joining pieces of wood much simpler. One uses screws, the other uses wood and glue. One is under $100, and the other is over $1000. They are both faster and easier than traditional joinery. Am I wrong to think if I am not going to use traditional joinery pocket screws and domino slip tenons are interchangeable? I love my hollow-chisel mortiser, and if I'm gonna cheat on it, I’ll just use screws. 

Biscuit Joinery Tips and Tricks Learn how to harness the full potential of your biscuit joiner in Part I of our two-part series By Asa Christiana Simple Cabinetry with Pocket Hole Joinery Low-cost jig produces basic cabinetry joinery that's easy and strong By Asa Christiana

Question 2: From Chase: I was trying to edge-joint two 10-ft. long boards to make a wide shelf for our closet using a #7 handplane.  Typically, I clamp the boards together and plane the common glue edge until I get an even shaving across both.  I think that the length of the two boards meant there was some variation that the #7 didn't get. I can't imagine trying to joint these on a jointer, even if I had one.  How would you go about making this glue up work?  

Jointing Boards for Dead-Flat Panel Glue-Ups Even if your jointer fence is out of square, this simple tip will ensure perfect edge joints By Michael Pekovich

Segment: All-time favorite tool of all time… for this week Mike: An Exacto knife with a brand new blade Asa: Cordless Trim Routers Ben: James Mursell Travisher (@windsorworkshop)

Build a Simple Stool Fast, fun approach to making a comfortable, casual seat By Fabian Fischer #256–Sep/Oct 2016 Issue

Question 3: From Chad, I was just listening to episode 190, and a listener asked about which big tool to buy next, a combo planer/jointer or a band saw. I've heard similar questions on the show before. I'm curious as to why you never mention the idea of investing in a makerspace, shared shop, or tool library?  There are a lot of great examples of makerspaces that give access to fully stocked wood and metal shops for a reasonable membership fee as well as not-for-profit tool libraries that are usually state funded just like normal libraries that allow for the borrowing of tools like books! For someone who's just getting started in woodworking getting access to a full woodshop for a membership fee that wouldn't be enough to buy a single quality power tool might be worth considering!  Maker Spaces:

Tool Libraries:

Question 4: From David: I am planning to build some outdoor chairs out of mahogany, and was wondering what finish to apply. I would like something that I don't have to touch up every year.   Or, should leave them unfinished. How does mahogany age in the weather?

Torture Test for Outdoor Finishes We sent five types around the country and found one favorite By Tom Begnal #205–May/June 2009 Issue

 Recommendations: 

Ben - YouTube Channel: arboristBlairGlenn Mike -  Asa's book - Handmade: A Hands On Guide Asa -  www.instructables.com

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Jul 05 2019

1hr 2mins

Play

STL192: Learning To Cut Dovetails

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Dovetailing episodes from Chris Gochnour's Enfiled Cupboard Video Workshop:

<a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4a-case-dovetails-tails"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4a-case-dovetails-tails"> Ep 4a: Case Dovetails – Tails</a>  <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4b-case-dovetails-pins"></a>   <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4b-case-dovetails-pins"> Ep 4b: Case Dovetails – Pins</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4c-handcut-rabbets-dovetail-fitting"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/06/ep-4c-handcut-rabbets-dovetail-fitting"> Ep 4c: Handcut Rabbets and Dovetail Fitting</a>       <p>Video: Chris Becksvoort–The Dovetail Master</p> <p>Question 1:From Jerrud: I'm making a dresser that is 72" long, 18" deep and 24" high not including legs. For a dresser this size–or any deep piece that is dovetailed–is seasonal wood movement a concern? Plain sawn lumber is cheaper than rift or quartersawn.</p> <p>Question 2: From Christian: I’m lucky enough to be expecting my first child, a baby boy, and I’ve always liked the idea of giving him a <a href="https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/no.-1-bench-plane">Lie Nielsen No 1</a> as a christening present. Recently, someone has suggested it a novelty tool and will be useless to him when he grows up. What alternative premium tools would you suggest as a christening gift?</p> <p>Question 3: From Mike: I’m building up my skills slowly by adding one new skill to each project I take on where I can.  I want to try my hand at dovetails one of these days as that new skill. I have two questions:</p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;">There are a ton of ways I see people doing them. Is there a method you recommend people start with? You recommend people learn to sharpen by picking one method, and sticking with it until you're good at it. Would the same apply to dovetail methods, or should you try a bunch of ways and then go with what you find out you like doing?</li> <li style="font-weight: 400;">Should I start with practice joints on scrap wood or incorporate them when I'm actually making a project so there's more at stake and I have to take it more seriously?</li> </ol> <p> </p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/09/30/half-blind-dovetails-cut-by-hand"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/09/30/half-blind-dovetails-cut-by-hand"> Half-Blind Dovetails Cut by Hand</a> <p class="thumb__published">By <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/author/christian-becksvoort">Christian Becksvoort</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/issue/2015/10/december-2015">#250–Nov/Dec 2015 Issue</a></p> <p class="thumb__published">The craftsman’s calling card</p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2013/12/05/dont-fear-the-hand-cut-dovetail-part-1"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2013/12/05/dont-fear-the-hand-cut-dovetail-part-1"> Don’t Fear the Hand-Cut Dovetail (Part 1)</a> <p class="thumb__published">By <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/author/christian-becksvoort">Christian Becksvoort</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/issue/2013/12/february-2014">#238–Jan/Feb 2014 Issue</a></p> <p class="thumb__published">For the first time, a modern master reveals every step of his system</p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/02/05/how-to-cut-and-fit-perfect-dovetail-pins-part-2"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/02/05/how-to-cut-and-fit-perfect-dovetail-pins-part-2"> How to Cut and Fit Perfect Dovetail Pins (Part 2)</a> <p class="thumb__published">By <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/author/christian-becksvoort">Christian Becksvoort</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/issue/2014/02/april-2014">#239–Mar/Apr 2014 Issue</a></p> <p class="thumb__published">Scribe the tails accurately and the rest is simple handwork</p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2006/05/23/hand-cut-dovetails-accurate-and-fast"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2006/05/23/hand-cut-dovetails-accurate-and-fast"> Hand-Cut Dovetails, Accurate and Fast</a> <p class="thumb__published">By <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/author/christian-becksvoort">Christian Becksvoort</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/issue/2004/07/issue-171">#171–July/Aug 2004 Issue</a></p> <p class="thumb__published">A tip from a tails-first guy</p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2004/08/01/my-favorite-dovetail-tricks"> </a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2004/08/01/my-favorite-dovetail-tricks"> My Favorite Dovetail Tricks</a> <p class="thumb__published">By <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/author/christian-becksvoort">Christian Becksvoort</a> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/issue/2004/07/issue-171">#171–July/Aug 2004 Issue</a></p> <p class="thumb__published">Five ways to increase accuracy and reduce the time it takes to execute this hand-cut joint</p> <p>Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique</p> <ul> <li>Barry: Using blue tape as a shim</li> <li>Ben: When you're done cutting an odd angle, cut it one more time on a piece of scrap so you can recall the angle</li> <li>Mike: Full-size mockups</li> </ul> <p>Question 4: From Yves: I have just made my first checkerboard (walnut and maple) inlay strip which is intended for a cherry end table top. When sanding, the strip cracked along its length and I discovered that I had done a poor job of the clamping. The cracked section, which is about  4-5 inches long on one side of the checkerboard strip appears to have “lifted” during clamping and there is now an air space under the crack. Any suggestions that might help to save this? I thought perhaps trying to inject some glue under the crack to fill in the space using a needle???</p> <p>Question 5:   From David: I’ve recently had the opportunity to revamp my shop and am planning to build a Matt Kenney’s monster workbench. I’ve bought the plans, and watched the videos, but I don’t see how the top is fastened to the stand? Is there something I’m missing? Is it supposed to just sit on top?</p> <p>Question 6: From Dave: I love books but dislike most book covers - they're generally too visually noisy! I feel like my living space is full of loud colorful ad copy, or like I'm in a chain bookstore. Do you have any recommendations for ways to keep books in the home that would allow you to conceal the visual clutter? Really, I'm just asking for permission to make a bookcase hidden-door that spins around.</p> <a href= "https://www.finewoodworking.com/2010/02/11/4-ways-to-make-panels-pop"> 4 Ways to Make Panels Pop</a> <p class="thumb__teaser">Doors are dominant on most cabinet designs, so dressing up door panels is an easy way to make furniture stand out.</p> <p> </p> <p>Recommendations:</p> <p>Barry - Get a camelback for hiking</p> <p>Ben - <a href= "https://www.yeti.com/en_US/drinkware/rambler-18-oz-bottle/YRAM18.html"> Yeti 18-oz. Rambler Bottle</a> with  <a href= "https://www.yeti.com/en_US/accessories/rambler-bottle-magdock-cap/21071300216.html"> MagDock Cap</a></p> <p>Mike - <a href= "https://www.amazon.com/DFM-Steel-Dowel-Plate-English/dp/B07Q4RY3T7/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=dowel+plate&qid=1561054753&s=gateway&sr=8-3"> DFM A2 Steel Dowel Plate by DFM Tool Works</a></p>

Jun 21 2019

59mins

Play

STL191: A Jointer Worth Traveling For

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If you are interested in learning more about how you can support Old Sturbridge Village’s cabinet shop, contact their development office at development@osv.org for more information.

Question 1:

From Joseph: I bought a new house in 2017 and instead of moving a lot of tools, I sold most of them and started over with new ones. There are 2 things I haven't yet invested in  - a router table and a dado stack. I'm primarily a hand tool guy, but I like to use power tools for dados/grooves and rabbets. Currently I am using my tablesaw with a FTG blade to nibble away at them, but I've reached my breaking point and want something a bit faster. I've used both a dado stack and a router table in the past. Both have some pluses and minuses for me; set up time being a major minus, but equally annoying for each. I'm also open to other alternatives that don't include joinery planes. Been there, bought the planes, sold the planes. I'm a lefty, and using planes right handed isn't fun for me.

Question 2:

From Nick: I have a question regarding a long distance relationship with a beautiful jointer. I am member of a "local" woodworking guild which has nice shop that is outfitted with a 16" jointer, a few nice planers. Unfortunately, I live a little over 2 hours away and at my home shop I currently only have a DW735 planer and no jointer. I would like to use all this nice equipment to do everything required to get straight, flat and square stock to take home and finish my projects. My concern is that by the time I throw it in the back of the truck and drive 2 hours home I would defeat the purpose. Does wood move that quickly when you're driving 80... ahem.. 70 mph? Can I get home and put in my climate controlled basement shop before I've warped everything out of flat/square? How would weather effect this (i.e. cold dry winter/hot humid summer weather?).

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique Mike: Peter Galbert using a heat gun to straighten out riven stock Bob: Flush cutting on the tablesaw

Ben: Drawing an extra line when sawing on the left side of your layout line

Question 3:  

From Jim: I am planning to build a sewing table for my wife. The plans call for using cherry plywood for several major panels of the case. While the stability of plywood is certainly an advantage, it is expensive and I like the idea of using glued up panels made from 4/4 stock. What would you do and why?

Recommendations:

Ben - Sharpen your marking gauge, because you know it's dull Mike -  Get a Soda Stream

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

Jun 07 2019

1hr 10mins

Play

STL190: Assembling a Lumber Stash

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Become a Fine Woodworking Unlimited member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here.

Question 1:

From Tom: I’m now semi-retired and finally have the time to create a decent wood shop. I’ve moved to the Florida panhandle, where there are few hardwood dealers. In late May, I’ll be in Tennessee so I intend to stop in at a hardwood dealer/mill near Nashville. Given the projects on my to do list I’ll be picking up walnut, cherry, and ash. I also have my eye on black locust (for a picnic table), popular, box elder (table legs and aprons), and catalpa (ditto). Given the list of woods on the dealer's inventory list, I feel like a kid in a candy store. Perhaps too much like a kid in a candy store. I’d be interested in your collective wisdom about how one might go about stocking a new shop with wood, especially given the fact that the nearest hardwood dealer for a hobbyist is 5-6 hours away (Atlanta) and I don’t drive through Tennessee regularly enough to stop in at a dealer or mill whenever I need something (they are about 11 hours away). Y’all are fortunate to live where you do from a woodworking perspective, but I’ll take our weather over yours … I have lemons and tangerines on the trees in my front yard. :-)

Question 2:

From Richard: Have you ever heard of hollowing the backs of western chisels? To speed the process of flattening the back of a chisel, my buddy first hollows the center to a depth of about 1 or 2 thousands of an inch with a dremel sanding flap attachment . The edges and toe are not touched by the sander. My buddy says that because the hollow is so slight, it is as easy to re-flatten the back and establish a new flat spot as it is to re-establish the cutting edge of a worn Japanese chisel.

  • Here is the video that Anissa mentions, which she now admits he obviously had running in the dremel

Segment: Smooth Move

Ben: Drilling a depth-indication hole on the wrong side. Barry: Trimming the horns of a frame and panel too soon. Anissa: Forgetting that two years ago she grain matched the tops of three cabinets, then ignoring the grain match while fitting the cabinets with drawers.

Question 3:

From Jesse: I’ve recently started the journey into furniture making.  I have a sliding miter saw and a very old table saw that is only good for rough cutting. I’m looking to purchase a band saw or jointer/planer combo. I only have room for one and only 110v availability. I am using hand saws and hand planes to do most of the dimensioning of my lumber. For a beginner, who has limited space and time in the shop, would a band saw or jointer/planer be more advantageous? I’d appreciate any guidance you can offer to ensure my next big purchase is a wise choice and will be the most practical.

Recommendations:

Ben - Prismacolor Premier Pencil Sharpener Barry - Kettlebells for holding panel glue ups flat Anissa -  A rock 

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

May 24 2019

59mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

1021 Ratings
Average Ratings
919
47
22
12
21

So Happy with the Current Hosts

By xjumper65 - Jan 14 2020
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This is a great Woodworking podcast from the writers and editors of the finest woodworking magazine I’ve ever read. The content is entertaining and informative. The current hosts and the occasional guest hosts are a pleasure to spend time listening to which wasn’t always the case there for a a while. Tom, Ben, Mike, (along with the occasional ray of sunshine known as Anissa Kapsales and others) are fun and interesting. I haven’t enjoyed the hosts of this podcast this much since Asa and Ed departed the show. Once again, I am now looking forward to each new podcast episode.

#197 Great Pod (as are the rest of the episodes)

By rexhansen - Sep 09 2019
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Loved the discussion on miter joints and shrink and swell. Kept it coming.