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Coder Radio

Updated 2 months ago

Business
Education
Technology
How To
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A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of Software Development and the world of technology.

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A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of Software Development and the world of technology.

iTunes Ratings

113 Ratings
Average Ratings
103
4
1
0
5

real world coding

By zero1s - Jun 25 2014
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Michael does a great job of relaying real world coding experiance

Gread podcast

By whzor - May 20 2014
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Chris and mike are great hosts, entertaining and informative. I also like the linux bias :D

iTunes Ratings

113 Ratings
Average Ratings
103
4
1
0
5

real world coding

By zero1s - Jun 25 2014
Read more
Michael does a great job of relaying real world coding experiance

Gread podcast

By whzor - May 20 2014
Read more
Chris and mike are great hosts, entertaining and informative. I also like the linux bias :D
Cover image of Coder Radio

Coder Radio

Latest release on Sep 17, 2019

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A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of Software Development and the world of technology.

Rank #1: Go Go Golang | CR 203

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A little reflective & contemplative after a successful human forking, our hosts reflect on a well stated OO vs Functional rant, the bot frameworks that impress & the surprisingly great use case for Go.

Plus the 800 pound snake in the room, a quick Linux switch update for Mike & more!

May 02 2016

55mins

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Rank #2: Chris Goes to Microsoft | CR 296

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Why the hell did Microsoft open source PowerShell Core, .Net Core, Visual Studio Code? What could possibly be in it for them? Chris goes onsite to ask what’s been on everyone’s mind & figure out what their angle is.

Plus the massive leaps Kotlin seems to be making, your questions, our answers & more!

Feb 13 2018

1hr 12mins

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Rank #3: Code Your Enthusiasm | CR 78

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It’s a mailbag special with a hidden message. Mike and Chris discuss burnout a bit more, the pitfalls of bad Q&A, automated UI testing, and the open source projects we’re thankful for this year.

Dec 02 2013

1hr 44mins

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Rank #4: 364: Gabbing About Go

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Mike and Wes burrow into the concurrent world of Go and debate where it makes sense and where it may not.

Plus gradual typing for Ruby, a new solution for Python packaging, and the real story behind Jony Ive's exit.

Links:

  • Goroutines - Concurrency in Golang — Goroutines are functions or methods that run concurrently with other functions or methods. Goroutines can be thought of as light weight threads. The cost of creating a Goroutine is tiny when compared to a thread.
  • Why build concurrency on the ideas of CSP? — One of the most successful models for providing high-level linguistic support for concurrency comes from Hoare's Communicating Sequential Processes, or CSP. Occam and Erlang are two well known languages that stem from CSP. Go's concurrency primitives derive from a different part of the family tree whose main contribution is the powerful notion of channels as first class objects.
  • Jony Ive ‘dispirited’ by Tim Cook’s lack of interest in product design — To many, Jony Ive’s announced departure from Apple last week felt very sudden. But a narrative is forming to suggest that he’s been slowly exiting for years as the company shifted priorities from product design to operations.
  • CSP Paper
  • A Tour of Go — These example programs demonstrate different aspects of Go. The programs in the tour are meant to be starting points for your own experimentation.

  • GoLand: A Clever IDE to Go by JetBrains — GoLand is cross-platform IDE built specially for Go developers.
  • Google I/O 2013 - Advanced Go Concurrency Patterns — Concurrency is the key to designing high performance network services. This talk expands on last year's popular Go Concurrency Patterns talk to dive deeper into Go's concurrency primitives, and see how tricky concurrency problems can be solved gracefully with simple Go code.
  • Michael Dominick on Twitter — Ok, so this is cool I have a fully working #rails dev environment up under #Windows usign #WSL and @PengwinLinux. Using @code for the editor. So far so good!
  • Pengwin by Whitewater Foundry — Pengwin is a Linux environment for Windows 10 built on work by Microsoft Research and the Debian project.
  • Open-sourcing Sorbet — Sorbet is a fast, powerful type checker designed for Ruby. It scales to codebases with millions of lines of code and can be adopted incrementally.
  • Sorbetting a gem, or the story of the first adoption — After reading about Brandon's first impression (highly recommend to check it out), I decided to give Sorbet a try and integrate it into one of my gems.
  • Gradual typing of Ruby at Scale — This talk shares experience of Stripe successfully been building a typechecker for internal use, including core design decisions made in early days of the project and how they withstood reality of production use
  • Building Standalone Python Applications with PyOxidizer — PyOxidizer's marquee feature is that it can produce a single file executable containing a fully-featured Python interpreter, its extensions, standard library, and your application's modules and resources. In other words, you can have a single .exe providing your application.
  • Packaging Your Code — The Hitchhiker's Guide to Python
  • An Overview of Packaging for Python
  • pex — pex is a library for generating .pex (Python EXecutable) files which are executable Python environments in the spirit of virtualenvs.
  • shiv — shiv is a command line utility for building fully self-contained Python zipapps as outlined in PEP 441, but with all their dependencies included!

Jul 02 2019

48mins

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Rank #5: Windows 10, The Best Linux Yet? | CR 285

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After Mike’s big Black Friday hardware score the guys try out a little Windows 10 challenge for their workflow & walk away a bit humbled and surprised by the experience.

But first Mike shares his late night session with JavaScript & the big change he’s making.

Plus our pick of the week, some hoopla & more!

Note: We keep making the audio better by the week. We make a switch mid-way in this episode to a new system we think sounds much better!

Nov 28 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #6: Rails Crazies React | CR 197

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We discuss Mike’s general thoughts on ReactJS, the NY bill that would provide a tax credit for open source contributions & the interesting details in developer data.

Plus some real talk about your real value, what no indie developer wants to hear about the App Store & more!

Mar 21 2016

1hr

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Rank #7: Episode 312: Git with Microsoft

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Microsoft is buying GitHub, Apple just kicked off WWDC 2018, and we've got a packed show!

Sponsored By:

Links:

Jun 05 2018

52mins

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Rank #8: Selling the FLOSS | CR 281

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Mike and Chris begrudgingly accept the fundamental problem in sticking with boring and safe platforms, debate building a brand around FLOSS, get burned by Angular & reflect on some regrets in our business.

Plus SQL’s new hype, some feedback & a project pick of the week!

Oct 31 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #9: Proprietary Stress Management | CR 163

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A special edition of Coder Radio that dives into the darker side of start ups, the practicality of building super portable apps, the wear advantage & NASA’s top 10 coding commandments.

Plus Noah from the Linux Action Show joins us, we cover some great feedback & more!

Jul 21 2015

57mins

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Rank #10: Living in a Clamshell | CR 239

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After we answer some audience feedback and chat about the week’s Hoopla & a fresh batch of Coder Radio 2017 predictions!

Jan 10 2017

50mins

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Rank #11: Shuffling Code | CR 237

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We've given the guys the week off after a year of hard work, so in this episode we'll take a look back at a series of events where the guys ended up realigning their opinions. From hybrid vs native apps & developing on linux to Pokémon & Bots, a lot changed in 2016.

So sit back, grab a nice warm beverage & enjoy the show!

Dec 26 2016

3hr 2mins

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Rank #12: Hey Google | CR 291

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After a great batch of feedback we make some bold predictions for 2018, and it’s not your dad’s crystal ball this year.

Jan 09 2018

1hr 13mins

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Rank #13: Doxing Developers | CR 121

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Google is requiring developers to submit their physical address, and the Apple community has outed the manager behind the botched iOS 8.0.1 update. Are we seeing a dangerous threat or just a frantic response?

Plus some great questions, when to lawyer up & much more!

Sep 29 2014

50mins

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Rank #14: Disillusioned NixBeards | CR 240

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Mike and Chris start things off with some traditional feedback, get into some Dart discussion & then get into the hardware throw down.

Jan 17 2017

1hr 2mins

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Rank #15: You Need a Barb | CR 287

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Mike shares some recent lessons he’s learned trying to scale his team, some tools they tried & the processes that have stuck.

But first we kick it off with some of your feedback, a bit of Hoopla & wrap it up with a quick touch on hardware.

Dec 12 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #16: Fools Aren't Protected | CR 117

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We take live calls, and discuss why .Net rules a Linux Admins life, learning OOP. Then, in light of the recent celebrity photo hacks, do developers have a moral obligation to protect the uninformed public?

Sep 02 2014

59mins

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Rank #17: Apple Payday | CR 289

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Mike’s spent a week with JavaScript, Apple has a big gift & that launching a new product glow.

Plus Linux’s new fight, Amazon’s big wins & the things that have really gone to hell.

Dec 23 2017

56mins

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Rank #18: Niche Busters | CR 298

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Mike’s back from a conference in New York & to say he’s got a few things on his mind is putting it mildly. Strap in as we rip through myths, lies & salesmen.

Mar 03 2018

56mins

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Rank #19: Hipster Tendencies | CR 159

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Mike makes the case for Chris’ slide into hipsterhood & Chris responds in kind. Between those hijinks the guys discuss the massive LLVM advantage Apple is leveraging that nobody is talking about.

Plus we reflect on the most important skill in software development, read some emails & more!

Jun 22 2015

51mins

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Rank #20: DOM Be Gone | CR 116

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Mike and Chris follow up on the TypeScript and JavaScript discussion from last week after a lot of you jumped to the defense of JavaScript. Plus the guys discuss why the phrase “work-life-balance” feels cheap & how each of us have to figure it all out for ourselves.

Aug 25 2014

41mins

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375: The Grey Havens

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We say goodbye to the show by taking a look back at a few of our favorite moments and reflect on how much has changed in the past seven years.

Links:

  • Coder Radio Back Catalog
  • Coder Radio - A New Developer Podcast! — A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of software development and related technologies.
  • WWDC Fallout | Coder Radio 2 — Michael and Chris cover the items from WWDC that they think developers will be impacted by, discuss the Facebook pressure, and reflect on hardware updates announced.

  • Docker All The Things | Coder Radio 66 — We’re joined by two gentlemen from dotCloud, the folks behind Docker. We chat about what Docker is best at, how far out the 1.0 release is, the projects use of Go, the future of Docker, and much more.

  • Open Season on Swift | Coder Radio 182 — The majority of our discussion this week is around the open sourcing of Swift, what Apple got really right & what areas still really need improvement.
  • Clojure Calisthenics | Coder Radio 325 — Wes joins Mike to discuss why .NET still makes sense, the latest antics from Fortnite, a brave new hope for JVM concurrency, and the mind-expanding benefits of trying a Lisp.
  • Mike on Twitter — Software Developer & entrepreneur at a #startup in the #Aerospace and #IOT spaces. @TheMadBotterINC.
  • Mike's Blog — Meditations on the Art of Technology
  • Check out Linux Headlines — Linux and open source headlines every weekday, in under 3 minutes.

Sep 17 2019

33mins

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374: Python's Long Tail

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As Python 2's demise draws near we reflect on Python's popularity, the growing adoption of static typing, and why the Python 3 transition took so long.

Plus Apple's audacious app store tactics, Google's troubles with Typescript, and more!

Links:

  • Correction: macOS and Zsh — I believe the new macOS Catalina shell is zsh.
  • Feedback: What about Perl 6? — Last episode (373) that's on about shell scripting, interpreted  languages, repl & cli, made me think about Perl 6.
  • Feedback: Pry and a Pick — In the previous episode I was amazed to hear that Mike had never used pry before! It's one of the first things I show off to people when introducing them to Ruby.
  • Feedback: Learning Web Dev — I feel woefully unready and I was wondering if either of you had suggestions for structured content around web dev/design that I could use to augment my learning? I've been using Pluralsight, which is great, and I'd be curious to know what else you might suggest.
  • Google feedback on TypeScript 3.5 — We know and expect every TypeScript upgrade to involve some work. For example, improvements to the standard library are expected and welcomed by us, even though they may mean removing similar but incompatible definitions from our own code base. However, TypeScript 3.5 was a lot more work for us than other recent TypeScript upgrades.
  • Apple has copied some of the most popular apps in the App Store for its iPhone, iPad and other software updates - The Washington Post — Apple plans this month to incorporate some of Clue’s core functionality such as fertility and period prediction into its own Health app that comes pre-installed in every iPhone and is free — unlike Clue, which is free to download but earns money by selling subscriptions and services within its app. Apple’s past incorporation of functionality included in other third-party apps has often led to their demise.

  • How Apple’s Apps Topped Rivals in the App Store It Controls - The New York Times — But as Apple has become one of the largest competitors on a platform that it controls, suspicions that the company has been tipping the scales in its own favor are at the heart of antitrust complaints in the United States, Europe and Russia.
  • Sunsetting Python 2 | Python.org — We have decided that January 1, 2020, will be the day that we sunset Python 2. That means that we will not improve it anymore after that day, even if someone finds a security problem in it. You should upgrade to Python 3 as soon as you can.
  • Python 2.7 Countdown
  • Porting Python 2 Code to Python 3
  • Our journey to type checking 4 million lines of Python | Dropbox Tech Blog — Dropbox is a big user of Python. It’s our most widely used language both for backend services and the desktop client app (we are also heavy users of Go, TypeScript, and Rust). At our scale—millions of lines of Python—the dynamic typing in Python made code needlessly hard to understand and started to seriously impact productivity. T
  • ProjectPSX: Experimental C# Playstation Emulator — ProjectPSX is a C# coded emulator of the original Sony Playstation (Playstation 1/PS1/PSX)

  • junegunn/fzf — fzf is a general-purpose command-line fuzzy finder.

Sep 10 2019

33mins

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373: Interactive Investigations

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We debate the best way to package scripting language apps then explore interactive development and the importance of a good shell.

Plus npm bans terminal ads, what comes after Rust, and why Mike hates macros.

Links:

  • Feedback: Getting started on .NET? — My question is what is the easiest route to get started in .net development? When I looked online there are several different languages that can be used from C# ,F#, ASP.NEt among others. In your personal experience what is the easiest way to get started on this path?
  • Feedback: Questioning Rust — [...] The primary issue here is that most of the work to prove that safety (beyond "trust me" blocks) is pushed onto the developer instead of having the compiler insert protections surmised from uses of the data structures outlined in the source code.  After all, it can only prove what it is shown, not what it assumes.
  • Feedback on Mike and Macros — I'd also love to hear more about what you dislike about macros. Personally, I view Rust's macro system as one of its biggest selling points. I've written more than a few macros myself and, every time, they've simplified my code in ways I couldn't have managed without them. Perhaps more importantly, I've also noticed that many of my favorite crates make heavy use of macros—and doing so lets them expose a much more ergonomic API.
  • The Imposter's Handbook by Rob Conery — You've had to learn on the job. New languages, new frameworks, new ways of doing things - a constant struggle just to stay current in the industry. This left no time to learn the foundational concepts and skills that come with a degree in Computer Science.
  • npm Bans Terminal Ads — After last week a popular JavaScript library started showing full-blown ads in the npm command-line interface, npm, Inc., the company that runs the npm tool and website, has taken a stance and plans to ban such behavior in the future.
  • Apple wants to remove scripting languages from macOS — Scripting language runtimes such as Python, Ruby, and Perl are included in macOS for compatibility with legacy software. In future versions of macOS, scripting language runtimes won’t be available by default, and may require you to install an additional package. If your software depends on scripting languages, it’s recommended that you bundle the runtime within the app
  • Building Standalone Python Applications with PyOxidizer — Python hasn't ever had a consistent story for how I give my code to someone else, especially if that someone else isn't a developer and just wants to use my application.
  • Traveling Ruby: self-contained, portable Ruby binaries — Traveling Ruby lets you create self-contained Ruby app packages for Windows, Linux and OS X.
  • ruby-packer — Packing your Ruby application into a single executable.

  • fogus: Notes on Interactive Computing Environments — Your programming environments should be an active partner in the act of creating systems.

  • Tim Ewald - Clojure: Programming with Hand Tools — For most of human history, furniture was built by hand using a small set of simple tools. This approach connects you in a profoundly direct way to the work, your effort to the result. This changed with the rise of machine tools, which made production more efficient but also altered what's made and how we think about making it in in a profound way. This talk explores the effects of automation on our work, which is as relevant to software as it is to furniture, especially now that once again, with Clojure, we are building things using a small set of simple tools.
  • Things You Didn't Know About GNU Readline — GNU Readline is an unassuming little software library that I relied on for years without realizing that it was there. Tens of thousands of people probably use it every day without thinking about it. If you use the Bash shell, every time you auto-complete a filename, or move the cursor around within a single line of input text, or search through the history of your previous commands, you are using GNU Readline.
  • bpython — A fancy curses interface to the Python interactive interpreter
  • pry — Pry is a runtime developer console and IRB alternative with powerful introspection capabilities. Pry aims to be more than an IRB replacement. It is an attempt to bring REPL driven programming to the Ruby language.

  • Ammonite — Ammonite lets you use the Scala language for scripting purposes: in the REPL, as scripts, as a library to use in existing projects, or as a standalone systems shell.

  • rebel-readline — A terminal readline library for Clojure Dialects

  • litecli — A command-line client for SQLite databases that has auto-completion and syntax highlighting.

Sep 03 2019

37mins

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372: Crystal Clear

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We're back and going crazy about Crystal, a statically typed language that's as fast as C and as slick as ruby.

Plus an update on Rails 6, Intel's growing adoption of Rust, and the challenge of making breaking changes.

Links:

  • Feedback: Academia and Industry — Do either of you have any insights as to how the software development community would view someone with a math PhD, but no industry coding experience as a job applicant? Any advice would be appreciated.
  • Feedback: Absurd Abstractions — FYI about wanting `interface` in Python: they are called abstract base classes. Check out the standard library module, abc for that and collections.abc some useful predefined container interfaces.

  • Feedback: Breaking Changes — I developed  a niche Python package that has some user following in the network security realm.  I’m at a crossroads though as a change I want to make will subtly break scripts that worked in previous/current versions.  The end result of my pending change  is good for the project but I fear I’ll ruin the workflow of my users.  Other than my github page I don’t know how to query/inform my users of this pending change.  What should I do?
  • Ruby on Rails 6.0 Release Notes — Make Webpacker the default JavaScript compiler for Rails 6
  • Intel and Rust: the Future of Systems Programming: Josh Triplett — Hear about how Intel is working to bring Rust to full parity with C, building the future of systems programming.
  • Altruism Still Fuels the Web. Businesses Love to Exploit It | WIRED — The original well-meaning, geeky architects of the web believed that there was an abundance of altruism in human nature—and they were more correct on this count, it turns out, than many esteemed social philosophers were. But they were too optimistic in overlooking the possibility that corporations would exploit and colonize this new realm. If only we had all seen it coming.
  • The Crystal Programming Language — Crystal is statically type checked, so any type errors will be caught early by the compiler rather than fail on runtime. Moreover, and to keep the language clean, Crystal has built-in type inference, so most type annotations are unneeded.
  • The Imposter's Handbook by Rob Conery — You've had to learn on the job. New languages, new frameworks, new ways of doing things - a constant struggle just to stay current in the industry. This left no time to learn the foundational concepts and skills that come with a degree in Computer Science.

Aug 27 2019

54mins

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371: Absurd Abstractions

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It’s a Coder Radio special all about abstraction. What it is, why we need it, and what to do when it leaks.

Plus your feedback, Mike’s next language challenge, and a functional ruby pick.

Links:

  • Feedback: Clojure, Racket, and Extempore — Thinking about the problem could take the form of leveraging the REPL to work out code to solve a problem or you could spend some time away from your computer screen (or in “Hammock Time”) working out problems.  If I have learned anything from Clojure’s creator, “Rich Hickey” its “Programming is not about not about typing, it’s about thinking”.
  • Knuth's Sensitivity Conjecture One-Pager
  • Law Of Leaky Abstractions — All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky.
  • The Law of Leaky Abstractions – Joel on Software — This is what I call a leaky abstraction. TCP attempts to provide a complete abstraction of an underlying unreliable network, but sometimes, the network leaks through the abstraction and you feel the things that the abstraction can’t quite protect you from.
  • Forget about Leaky Abstractions — Even if an abstraction is leaky it can still be useful. Sometimes you cannot escape it (uniform memory) and sometimes the workaround is costly to implement (TCP, SQL). So you accept the technical debt for now. Hope the debt does not kill the project. Maybe there will come a time where it is worthwhile to pay off the debt.
  • All Abstractions Are Failed Abstractions — It's our job as modern programmers not to abandon abstractions due to these deficiencies, but to embrace the useful elements of them, to adapt the working parts and construct ever so slightly less leaky and broken abstractions over time.
  • Appropriate Levels of Abstraction — Instead of aspiring to higher levels of abstraction, we should instead seek to work at the appropriate level of abstraction for the problem at hand. The appropriate level is sometimes very high and sometimes very low. It varies for different situations even in the same software project. Just as other engineering disciplines require different tools for different situations, software development also requires tools and languages that support our work at multiple levels of abstraction.
  • Choosing The Proper Level of Abstraction — In software development, choosing the right abstraction can be tricky. If you make it too simple, it won’t let you create a model to satisfy even the immediate requirements. If you make it restricted to the urgent needs, you might have to change it almost immediately to implement the next iteration of the model. However, if you make your abstraction too generic and all-encompassing, modeling solutions might get so complicated that you’ll go out of business before you are finished.

  • The Crystal Programming Language — Crystal is statically type checked, so any type errors will be caught early by the compiler rather than fail on runtime. Moreover, and to keep the language clean, Crystal has built-in type inference, so most type annotations are unneeded.

  • affect: Algebraic effects for Ruby — Affect is a tiny Ruby gem providing a way to isolate and handle side-effects in functional programs. Affect implements algebraic effects in Ruby, but can also be used to implement patterns that are orthogonal to object-oriented programming, such as inversion of control and dependency injection.

  • Algebraic Effects for the Rest of Us — Imagine that you’re writing code with goto, and somebody shows you if and for statements. Or maybe you’re deep in the callback hell, and somebody shows you async / await. Pretty cool, huh? If you’re the kind of person who likes to learn about programming ideas several years before they hit the mainstream, it might be a good time to get curious about algebraic effects. Don’t feel like you have to though. It is a bit like thinking about async / await in 1999.
  • MinIO — The 100% Open Source, Enterprise-Grade, Amazon S3 Compatible Object Storage

Aug 20 2019

39mins

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370: F'ing #

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Things get heated when it’s time for Wes to check-in on Mike’s functional favorite, F#, and share his journey exploring modern .NET on Linux.

Plus your feedback, combining ruby and rust, and the latest scandal with JEDI.

Links:

  • Emacs Feedback from DJ — Another point for the show is a soft intro to functional programming. Wes mentioned Emacs because of the packages supporting Clojure development when he started with that. Elisp seems to be fairly intuitive and well documented, as a little functional language its own right (correct me if I'm wrong)--this makes for a soft intro to FP. Most of my coding has been in the space of embedded systems and low-level languages--not much functional programming to be had. This show has gotten me curious about FP, which is quite old in concept, and getting implemented nicely in modern languages. For me, I still rely heavily on special Vim keys that are not mapped in evil-mode, which causes some paper cuts. However, elisp makes it easy to customize the desired UI functionality with very short programs/elisp statements in a config file. It's quite a refreshing exercise for someone like me.
  • artichoke/artichoke: Artichoke is a Ruby made with Rust — Artichoke is a platform for building MRI-compatible Ruby implementations. Artichoke provides a Ruby runtime implemented in Rust that can be loaded into many VM backends.

  • AP Sources: Boeing changing Max software to use 2 computers — Boeing is working on new software for the 737 Max that will use a second flight control computer to make the system more reliable, solving a problem that surfaced in June with the grounded jet, two people briefed on the matter said Friday.

  • In Pentagon Contract Fight, Amazon Has Foes in High Places - The New York Times — Experts thought the contract for the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, known by the cinematic acronym JEDI, would go to Amazon Web Services, the dominant player in the field of cloud computing. They did not count on two developments: an extraordinarily aggressive public relations and lobbying campaign by Oracle, one of Amazon’s competitors, and the hostility of Mr. Trump to Amazon and its founder, Jeff Bezos.

  • The Early History of F# (pdf)
  • Use F# on Linux | The F# Software Foundation
  • Ionide - Crossplatform F# Editor Tools — A Visual Studio Code package suite for cross platform F# development.

  • The Problem With F# Evangelism — There seems to be a constant struggle to convince seasoned C# developers to give F# a try. Which is a pity because language and concepts deserve better.

  • TopShell — Purely functional, reactive scripting language.

Aug 13 2019

44mins

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369: Old Man Embraces Cloud

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Chris finally gets excited about Docker just as Wes tells him it’s time to learn something new.

Plus the state of browser extension development, the value of non-technical advice, and your feedback.

Links:

Aug 06 2019

49mins

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368: Clojure Clash

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Mike and Wes debate the merits and aesthetics of Clojure in this week's rowdy language check-in.

Plus why everyone's talking about the sensitivity conjecture, speedy TLS with rust, and more!

Links:

Jul 30 2019

43mins

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367: 10x Evilgineers

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Mike rekindles his youthful love affair with Emacs and we debate what makes a "10x engineer".

Plus the latest Play store revolt and some of your feedback.

Links:

  • Feedback on Coder Radio 366 — As a C++ developer working on a large, primarily OO codebase, I’ve been writing ever more C++ as “just a pipeline of data transformations.” As you guys mentioned, you can get a lot of benefit even in an OO situation from wrapping a functional “core” up in an object “package.”
  • Functional Core, Imperative Shell — In this screencast we look at one method for crossing this divide. We review a Twitter client whose core is functional: managing tweets, syncing timelines to incoming Twitter API data, remembering cursor positions within the tweet list, and rendering tweets to text for display. This functional core is surrounded by a shell of imperative code: it manipulates stdin, stdout, the database, and the network, all based on values produced by the functional core.
  • Postmodern immutable data structures — We are presenting Immer, a C++ library implementing modern and efficient data immutable data structures.
  • Mike on Twitter — So when I just was getting started I was an #emacs user but had that beaten out of me. I’m thinking of looking back at it on #macOS and #Linux under GNOME any recommendations?
  • Spacemacs: Emacs advanced Kit focused on Evil — Spacemacs is a new way to experience Emacs -- a sophisticated and polished set-up focused on ergonomics, mnemonics and consistency.
  • Tinder Bypasses Google Play, Revolt Against App Store Fee — Tinder joined a growing backlash against app store taxes by bypassing Google Play in a move that could shake up the billion-dollar industry dominated by Google and Apple Inc.

  • EmacsWiki: Evil — Evil is an extensible vi layer for Emacs. It provides Vim features like Visual selection and text objects.
  • A personal story about 10× development — The "×ness" of any developer does not exist in a vacuum but depends on many organizational things. The most obvious one is tooling.
  • Shekhar Kirani on Twitter — 10x engineers. Founders if you ever come across this rare breed of engineers, grab them. If you have a 10x engineer as part of your first few engineers, you increase the odds of your startup success significantly.
  • The mythical 10x programmer - — The following is a list of qualities that I believe make the most difference in programmers productivity.
  • rubocop — RuboCop is a Ruby static code analyzer and code formatter. Out of the box it will enforce many of the guidelines outlined in the community Ruby Style Guide.

Jul 23 2019

34mins

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366: Functional First

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It’s a Coder Radio special as Mike and Wes dive into functional programming in the real world and share their tips for applying FP techniques in any language.

Links:

  • Porting Redis to WebAssembly with Clang/WASI — In this post, we share our experience of porting an existing open-source software package — the data structure server Redis — to WebAssembly. While this is not the first time that Redis has been ported to Wasm (see this port by Sergey Rublev), it is the first time to our knowledge that the obtained port can be run deterministically.
  • Solving Problems the Clojure Way - Rafal Dittwald — It is said that Clojure is a "functional" programming language; there's also talk of "data-driven" programming. What are these things? Are they any good? Why are they good? In this talk, Rafal attempts to distill the particular blend of functional and data-driven programming that makes up "idiomatic Clojure", clarify what it looks like in practise (with real-world examples), and reflect on how Clojure's conventions came to be and how they continue to evolve.
  • The Value of Values with Rich Hickey — In this keynote speech from JaxConf 2012, Rich Hickey, creator of Clojure and founder of Datomic gives an awesome analysis of the changing way we think about values.
  • Clojure Made Simple by Rich Hickey — In the seven years following its initial release, Clojure has become a popular alternative language on the JVM, seeing production use at financial firms, major retailers, analytics companies, and startups large and small. It has done so while remaining decidedly alternative—eschewing object orientation for functional programming, C-derived syntax for code-as-data, static typing for dynamic typing, REPL-driven development, and so on. Underpinning these differences is a commitment to the principle that we should be building our systems out of fundamentally simpler materials. This session looks at what makes Clojure different and why.
  • Effective Programs: 10 Years of Clojure by Rich Hickey
  • sparklemotion/mechanize — Mechanize is a ruby library that makes automated web interaction easy.
  • How to write idempotent Bash scripts — It happens a lot, you write a bash script and half way it exits due an error. You fix the error in your system and run the script again. But half of the steps in your scripts fail immediately because they were already applied to your system. To build resilient systems you need to write software that is idempotent.

Jul 16 2019

38mins

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365: Objectively Old

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Wes turns back the clock and explores the message passing mania of writing Objective-C without a Mac, and we wax-poetic about programming language history.

Plus Mike gets real about the Windows Subsystem for Linux, and our take on the new MacBook keyboard leak.

Links:

  • Apple is reportedly giving up on its controversial MacBook keyboard - The Verge — Apple is planning to ditch the controversial butterfly keyboard used in its MacBooks since 2015, according to a new report from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. 9to5Mac notes that Apple will reportedly move to a new scissor-switch design, which will use glass fiber to reinforce its keys. According to Kuo’s report, the first laptop to get the new keyboard will be a new MacBook Air model due out this year, followed by a new MacBook Pro in 2020.
  • Objective-C - History - Wikipedia — After acquiring NeXT in 1996, Apple Computer used OpenStep in its then-new operating system, Mac OS X. This included Objective-C, NeXT's Objective-C-based developer tool, Project Builder, and its interface design tool, Interface Builder, both now merged into one application, Xcode. Most of Apple's current Cocoa API is based on OpenStep interface objects and is the most significant Objective-C environment being used for active development.
  • A Short History of Objective-C — While most programmers discovered Objective-C only during the iPhone app revolution, Objective-C has been around for over 30 years. Objective-C has been the foundation of Apple’s desktop operating system, Mac OS X, since its debut in 2001, and was also the basis for NEXTSTEP — OS X’s immediate ancestor — created by Steve Jobs’ NeXT Computer Inc. However, Objective-C was created neither by Apple nor NeXT. Its origin was a small Connecticut startup in the early 1980s called Stepstone.
  • GNUstep — GNUstep is a mature Framework, suited both for advanced GUI desktop applications as well as server applications. The framework closely follows Apple's Cocoa (formerly NeXT's OpenStep) APIs but is portable to a variety of platforms and architectures.

  • GNUstep: Fun with Objective-C — Objective-C is a language based upon C, with a few additions that make it a complete, object-oriented language. Why do I think Objective-C is fun? Precisely because of this emphasis on simplicity
  • Beginners Guide to Objective-C Programming
  • Installing and Using GNUstep and Objective-C on Linux - Techotopia — The basics of Objective-C are supported by the GNU compiler collection. In order to utilize the full power of Objective-C together with the Cocoa /openStep environments on Linux, and to work with many of the examples covered in this book, it is necessary to install gcc, the gcc Objective-C support package and the GNUstep environment.

  • Objective-C Compiler and Runtime FAQ - GNUstepWiki — The history of Objective-C in GCC is somewhat complicated. Originally, NeXT was forced to release the original Objective-C front end in order to comply with the GPL. This code was not quite compatible with the GNU runtime and so it was modified. NeXT did not adopt these modifications and so each release of GCC by NeXT, and then Apple, contained changes that needed back-porting to the main branch of GCC.

    For a long time, GCC was the only compiler that worked with GNUstep. Unfortunately, the GCC team has not invested much effort in Objective-C in the last few years and it currently lags behind Apple's version by a significant amount.

Jul 09 2019

38mins

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364: Gabbing About Go

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Mike and Wes burrow into the concurrent world of Go and debate where it makes sense and where it may not.

Plus gradual typing for Ruby, a new solution for Python packaging, and the real story behind Jony Ive's exit.

Links:

  • Goroutines - Concurrency in Golang — Goroutines are functions or methods that run concurrently with other functions or methods. Goroutines can be thought of as light weight threads. The cost of creating a Goroutine is tiny when compared to a thread.
  • Why build concurrency on the ideas of CSP? — One of the most successful models for providing high-level linguistic support for concurrency comes from Hoare's Communicating Sequential Processes, or CSP. Occam and Erlang are two well known languages that stem from CSP. Go's concurrency primitives derive from a different part of the family tree whose main contribution is the powerful notion of channels as first class objects.
  • Jony Ive ‘dispirited’ by Tim Cook’s lack of interest in product design — To many, Jony Ive’s announced departure from Apple last week felt very sudden. But a narrative is forming to suggest that he’s been slowly exiting for years as the company shifted priorities from product design to operations.
  • CSP Paper
  • A Tour of Go — These example programs demonstrate different aspects of Go. The programs in the tour are meant to be starting points for your own experimentation.

  • GoLand: A Clever IDE to Go by JetBrains — GoLand is cross-platform IDE built specially for Go developers.
  • Google I/O 2013 - Advanced Go Concurrency Patterns — Concurrency is the key to designing high performance network services. This talk expands on last year's popular Go Concurrency Patterns talk to dive deeper into Go's concurrency primitives, and see how tricky concurrency problems can be solved gracefully with simple Go code.
  • Michael Dominick on Twitter — Ok, so this is cool I have a fully working #rails dev environment up under #Windows usign #WSL and @PengwinLinux. Using @code for the editor. So far so good!
  • Pengwin by Whitewater Foundry — Pengwin is a Linux environment for Windows 10 built on work by Microsoft Research and the Debian project.
  • Open-sourcing Sorbet — Sorbet is a fast, powerful type checker designed for Ruby. It scales to codebases with millions of lines of code and can be adopted incrementally.
  • Sorbetting a gem, or the story of the first adoption — After reading about Brandon's first impression (highly recommend to check it out), I decided to give Sorbet a try and integrate it into one of my gems.
  • Gradual typing of Ruby at Scale — This talk shares experience of Stripe successfully been building a typechecker for internal use, including core design decisions made in early days of the project and how they withstood reality of production use
  • Building Standalone Python Applications with PyOxidizer — PyOxidizer's marquee feature is that it can produce a single file executable containing a fully-featured Python interpreter, its extensions, standard library, and your application's modules and resources. In other words, you can have a single .exe providing your application.
  • Packaging Your Code — The Hitchhiker's Guide to Python
  • An Overview of Packaging for Python
  • pex — pex is a library for generating .pex (Python EXecutable) files which are executable Python environments in the spirit of virtualenvs.
  • shiv — shiv is a command line utility for building fully self-contained Python zipapps as outlined in PEP 441, but with all their dependencies included!

Jul 02 2019

48mins

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363: Find Your Off-Ramp

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We take on the issues of burnout, work communication culture, and keeping everything in balance.

Plus Wes asks 'Why Not Kotlin' and breaks down where it fits in his toolbox.

Links:

  • Kotlin overview — Kotlin is an open-source, statically-typed programming language that supports both object-oriented and functional programming. Kotlin provides similar syntax and concepts from other languages, including C#, Java, and Scala, among many others. Kotlin does not aim to be unique—instead, it draws inspiration from decades of language development. It exists in variants that target the JVM (Kotlin/JVM), JavaScript (Kotlin/JS), and native code (Kotlin/Native).
  • Kotlin/Native — Kotlin/Native is a technology for compiling Kotlin code to native binaries, which can run without a virtual machine. It is an LLVM based backend for the Kotlin compiler and native implementation of the Kotlin standard library.
  • Kotlin for JavaScript — Kotlin provides the ability to target JavaScript. It does so by transpiling Kotlin to JavaScript. The current implementation targets ECMAScript 5.1 but there are plans to eventually target ECMAScript 2015 as well.
  • My favorite examples of functional programming in Kotlin — One of the great things about Kotlin is that it supports functional programming. Let’s see and discuss some simple but expressive functions written in Kotlin.

  • Arrow: Functional companion to Kotlin's Standard Library — Arrow aims to provide a lingua franca of interfaces and abstractions across Kotlin libraries. For this, it includes the most popular data types, type classes and abstractions such as Option, Try, Either, IO, Functor, Applicative, Monad to empower users to write pure FP apps and libraries built atop higher order abstractions.

  • Awesome Kotlin Resources — The ultimate resource list for your most loved coding language.

  • awesome-kotlin — A curated list of awesome Kotlin frameworks, libraries, documents and other resources
  • Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian Warns Always-On Work Culture Creating ‘Broken’ People - WSJ — “I’ve spoken out quite a bit about things like ‘hustle porn,’ and this ceremony of showing off on social [media] about how hard you’re working,” said Mr. Ohanian, who previously co-founded online discussion forum Reddit. “Y’all see it on Instagram and you certainly see it in the startup community, and it becomes really toxic.”
  • Thread by @mwseibel — I’ve noticed that many people compete in games they don’t understand because they are modeling the behavior of people around them. Most common is the competition for wealth as a proxy for happiness.
  • Understanding Burnout Meetup — You may not know it yet, but IT is not easy. Breakdowns in people, processes, and technology leads to frustrating times for all of us. As it spirals out of control, we often meet the final boss: burnout.
  • Linux Academy is Hiring!

Jun 25 2019

43mins

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362: It Crashes Better

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It's a Coder three-way as Chris checks-in with an eGPU update, and Mike shares his adventures with ReasonML.

Plus the state of linux application packaging, and Chris' ultimate mobile workflow.

Links:

Jun 18 2019

56mins

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361: ZEEEE Shell!

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Apple is shaking up the foundations of UI development with SwiftUI and raising developer eyebrows with a new default shell on MacOS.

Plus feedback with a FOSS dilemma and an update on our 7 languages challenge.

Links:

  • Feedback: Lance’s FOSS Quandary — I was working on an open source project for school that we (4 members) submitted. Myself and another did 98% of the work the others contributed to the documentation (outside of the codebase). Class is over now for many months and nobody has touched the code but one other member and I wish to keep it going.
  • Feedback: Developer, have money for a new Mac Pro? Buy these instead. — The recently unveiled Mac Pro is no doubt a gorgeous machine, engineered for a very particular group of people. While it will likely be a great machine for those who live and breathe within Finalcut and work with ProRes files, it’s overkill for a good developer machine.
  • Apple makes fancy zsh default in forthcoming macOS 'Catalina' — "zsh is highly compatible with the Bourne shell (sh) and mostly compatible with bash, with some differences," Apple explained in a support document posted on Monday in conjunction with the announcement of macOS Catalina, which ships this fall.

  • Oh My Zsh - a delightful & open source framework for Z-Shell — Oh My Zsh is a delightful, open source, community-driven framework for managing your Zsh configuration. It comes bundled with thousands of helpful functions, helpers, plugins, themes, and a few things that make you shout... “Oh My ZSH!”
  • Zsh · macOS Setup Guide
  • zsh-apple-touchbar: Make your touchbar more powerful.
  • Mike's Blog: Converting to SwiftUI Steps[0] — SwiftUI is the next paradigm in iOS and macOS user interface development. However, if you’re like me you already have Xcode projects that are using the now legacy storyboard technology. Luckily, it possible to update your existing projects to use SwiftUI and the process is very straightforward.
  • Mike's Blog: Converting to SwiftUI Steps[1] — Continuing my journey into SwiftUI, I am taking a look at re-using existing UIViews and UIViewControllers in SwiftUI. The primary advantage here is not having to rewrite your existing code from scratch, however, it’s probably best to create any new views in SwiftUI directly rather than UIView.

  • SwiftUI for React Native Developers — Developers with React Native experience may notice some similarities to the philosophies Apple has imbued into their new UI framework. Utilizing structs as immutable value types for view modeling, a declarative syntax, and with their new async event library Combine, a reactive architecture.
  • SwiftUI - Apple Developer — SwiftUI is an innovative, exceptionally simple way to build user interfaces across all Apple platforms with the power of Swift.

Jun 11 2019

35mins

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360: Swift Kick In The UI

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We react to Apple's big news at WWDC, check in with Mike's explorations of Elixir, and talk some TypeScript.

Plus Mike's battles with fan noise, and why he's doubling down on the eGPU lifestyle.

Links:

  • Thelio Fan Noise Hack - Mike's Blog — I’ve had a System 76 Thelio for a little over four months now and a consistent issue that I’ve been experiencing is persistent fan noise even when the machine is idle.
  • Advent of Code 2015
  • Elixir — Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain.

  • Mike on Twitter — Someone tell @wespayne that I hate him ;) He introduced me to @elixirlang and it's like fast #Ruby. I think I might be hooked. Totally failed to get anything done though lol
  • Elixir vs. Ruby and Phoenix vs. Rails: Detailed Comparison and Use Cases — If you are facing the Elixir vs. Ruby/Phoenix vs. Rails dilemma, the best way to decide is to cater to the needs of your project. In fact, it is even possible to use both technologies in one project by choosing which of them works best for each individual feature. For example, you can implement chats with Elixir Phoenix, and the rest of the code can be written in Ruby on Rails.

  • TypeScript - JavaScript that scales. — TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
  • Why TypeScript · TypeScript Deep Dive — Types have proven ability to enhance code quality and understandability. However, types have a way of being unnecessarily ceremonious. TypeScript is very particular about keeping the barrier to entry as low as possible.
  • Basic Types · TypeScript Handbook
  • TypeScript Playground
  • microsoft/TypeScript-New-Handbook — Incubation repository for the new TypeScript handbook.
  • Introduction - fp-ts — fp-ts provides developers with popular patterns and reliable abstractions from typed functional languages in TypeScript.

  • Purify — Functional programming library for TypeScript
  • piotrwitek/utility-types — Collection of utility types, complementing TypeScript built-in mapped types and aliases (think "lodash" for static types).

  • Solving Problems the Clojure Way - Rafal Dittwald — After overcoming a fear of brackets, the next challenge for would-be Clojurians is less superficial: to stop writing Java (or Javascript, or Haskell...) with Clojure's syntax, and actually start "thinking" in Clojure. It is said that Clojure is a "functional" programming language; there's also talk of "data-driven" programming. What are these things? Are they any good? Why are they good? In this talk, Rafal attempts to distill the particular blend of functional and data-driven programming that makes up "idiomatic Clojure", clarify what it looks like in practise (with real-world examples), and reflect on how Clojure's conventions came to be and how they continue to evolve.

Jun 04 2019

46mins

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359: 7 Languages

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Wes is back and Mike's got a few surprises in store, including a new view on Electron, a hot take on titles, and a programming challenge for the both of them.

Plus when it's okay to lie to the compiler, what GitHub's Sponsors program means for open source, and your feedback.

Links:

  • Coder Radio 343: Say My Functional Name — Mike breaks down the drama around nullable reference types in C# 8.0, and we debate what it means for the future of the language.

  • Coder Radio 358 Feedback — In the discussion of Marzipan and Electron I think the answer is WKWebView, which just arrived in macOS 10.10.

  • Show Content Poll — What Do You Want More of on #CoderRadio @CoderRadioShow this is your chance to give me some feedback for the next few months!

  • Why Computer Programmers Should Stop Calling Themselves Engineers — The respectability of engineering, a feature built over many decades of closely controlled, education- and apprenticeship-oriented certification, becomes reinterpreted as a fast-and-loose commitment to craftwork as business.
  • About GitHub Sponsors — Anyone with a GitHub account can sponsor anyone with a sponsored developer profile through a recurring monthly payment. You can choose from multiple sponsorship tiers, with monthly payment amounts and benefits that are set by the sponsored developer.
  • Lying to the compiler | Jon Skeet's coding blog — I’m lying to the compiler to get it to stop it emitting a warning. The reason is that in the case where the value is null, it won’t matter that it’s null.
  • Programming Language Tourism | Bushido Codes — I am attracted to this book precisely because it is impractical. You don’t gain mastery of any programming languages. Rather, you get the chance to explore and complete a series of coding katas to expand your mind about the art of programming.
  • Seven Languages in Seven Weeks: A Pragmatic Guide to Learning Programming Languages by Bruce A. Tate | The Pragmatic Bookshelf — You should learn a programming language every year, as recommended by The Pragmatic Programmer. But if one per year is good, how about Seven Languages in Seven Weeks? In this book you’ll get a hands-on tour of Clojure, Haskell, Io, Prolog, Scala, Erlang, and Ruby.
  • Uno Platform — The only platform for building native mobile, desktop and WebAssembly with C#, XAML from single codebase. Open source and professionally supported.
  • Uno.QuickStart — This repository is a basic sample for an Uno application which cross-targets UWP, iOS, Android and WebAssembly.

May 28 2019

43mins

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358: Batteries are Leaking

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A strong argument against Python’s batteries included model exposes some bigger problems the community is struggling with. We chat about all of it.

Plus lessons learned six years after a project, a new tool, and some feedback.

Links:

May 21 2019

46mins

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357: 3 OSes 1 GPU

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Microsoft catches Mike’s eye with WSL 2, Google gets everyone's attention with their new push for Kotlin, and we get a full eGPU report.

Links:

  • QA Feedback from Lewis — I thought I was going to be in a big rush to get out of the basement and up to a developer position, but after listening to the show I really feel like my contribution to this team is going to be important and necessary from the get go.
  • Request: Subreddit recommendations — Anyone know any linux and/or programming subs aren't full of mindless circlejerking? Most seem to be afflicted with mindless circlejerking, free software extremism and other indiscretions.
  • Feedback on Tools for Docs — One idea is a mind map tool (like Freeplane). This can provide a free-form way to show at a high level how all the parts link together, and attach as much details as needed
  • Kotlin is now Google’s preferred language for Android app development — “Android development will become increasingly Kotlin-first,” Google writes in today’s announcement. “Many new Jetpack APIs and features will be offered first in Kotlin. If you’re starting a new project, you should write it in Kotlin; code written in Kotlin often mean much less code for you–less code to type, test, and maintain.”
  • Flutter and Chrome OS: Better Together — Flutter initially focused on providing a UI toolkit for building apps for mobile devices, which typically feature touch input and small screens. However, we’ve been building keyboard and mouse support into Flutter since before our 1.0 release last December. And today, we’re pleased to announce that Flutter for Chrome OS is now stronger with scroll wheel support, hover management, and better keyboard event support.
  • How Windows and Chrome quietly made 2019 the year of Linux on the desktop — The cleverly named Windows Subsystem for Linux 2, announced at Microsoft’s Build event this week, shakes things up by shipping a full Linux kernel (version 4.19) within Windows itself as a lightweight virtual machine. Doing so should supercharge performance for developers who use the tool.
  • Ubuntu 19.04 – Easy-to-use setup script for your EGPU — I have created a script which automatically detects your (E)GPUs and creates the needed X-Server configuration files.
    You won't have to mess around with finding the correct BUS-IDs and convert them from dec to hex or anything like that, the script takes care of it.
  • Linux Action News 105 — RHEL 8 is released, we report from the ground of the big announcement, Microsoft announces WSL 2 with a real Linux kernel at the core, and details on their new open source terminal.

May 14 2019

47mins

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356: Fear, Uncertainty, and .NET

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.NET 5 has been announced and brings a new unified future to the platform. We dig in to Microsoft's plans and speculate about what they might mean for F#.

Plus the value of manual testing, Visual Studio Code Remote, and Conway's Game of Life in Rust.

Links:

  • Feedback: Testing as a Career
  • Feedback: Keeping up with Documentation
  • ruby/rdoc — RDoc produces HTML and command-line documentation for Ruby projects.
  • Javadoc — Javadoc is a documentation generator created by Sun Microsystems for the Java language for generating API documentation in HTML format from Java source code.
  • Literate programming — Literate programming is a programming paradigm introduced by Donald Knuth in which a program is given as an explanation of the program logic in a natural language, such as English, interspersed with snippets of macros and traditional source code, from which a compilable source code can be generated.
  • Literate Programming — Writing a literate program is a lot more work than writing a normal program. After all, who ever documents their programs in the first place!? Moreover, who documents them in a pedagogical style that is easy to understand? And finally, who ever provides commentary on the theory and design issues behind the code as they write the documentation?
  • A tutorial that implements Conway's Game of Life in Rust and WebAssembly. — This tutorial is for anyone who already has basic Rust and JavaScript experience, and wants to learn how to use Rust, WebAssembly, and JavaScript together.

  • JupiterBroadcasting/Talks — Public repository of crew talks, slides, and additional resources.
  • Visual Studio Code Remote Development — Visual Studio Code Remote Development allows you to use a container, remote machine, or the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) as a full-featured development environment.
  • Remote Development - Visual Studio Marketplace
  • Introducing .NET 5 — There will be just one .NET going forward, and you will be able to use it to target Windows, Linux, macOS, iOS, Android, tvOS, watchOS and WebAssembly and more.
  • The Friday Stream — Our crew from all over the world share stories, make new friends, and give each other a hard time live.

May 08 2019

34mins

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iTunes Ratings

113 Ratings
Average Ratings
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5

real world coding

By zero1s - Jun 25 2014
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Michael does a great job of relaying real world coding experiance

Gread podcast

By whzor - May 20 2014
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Chris and mike are great hosts, entertaining and informative. I also like the linux bias :D