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Focus on Geriatric Medicine and Aging

Updated 2 months ago

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
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As our population grows older, new medical innovations serve to preserve the symbiosis of the body and mind. Are novel therapies for Alzheimer's on the horizon? How do we approach joint replacement surgery for an active 92-year-old? What about research frontiers focused on promoting longevity? ReachMD gathers top medical experts and opinion leaders for a month-long discussion of geriatric medicine and the aging process.

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As our population grows older, new medical innovations serve to preserve the symbiosis of the body and mind. Are novel therapies for Alzheimer's on the horizon? How do we approach joint replacement surgery for an active 92-year-old? What about research frontiers focused on promoting longevity? ReachMD gathers top medical experts and opinion leaders for a month-long discussion of geriatric medicine and the aging process.

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Cover image of Focus on Geriatric Medicine and Aging

Focus on Geriatric Medicine and Aging

Latest release on Mar 30, 2020

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As our population grows older, new medical innovations serve to preserve the symbiosis of the body and mind. Are novel therapies for Alzheimer's on the horizon? How do we approach joint replacement surgery for an active 92-year-old? What about research frontiers focused on promoting longevity? ReachMD gathers top medical experts and opinion leaders for a month-long discussion of geriatric medicine and the aging process.

Rank #1: Brain Food for Seniors: Dietary Impacts on Cognition and Longevity

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Host: Kathy King, RDN

Can good nutrition improve cognition in the aging brain, as well as expand life spans in older adults? Host Kathy King speaks with dietitian and nutrition consultant Matthew Ruscigno about the latest research and subsequent dietetic recommendations aimed at seniors. They discuss which foods and dietary practices are now associated with helping seniors preserve cognition and live longer.

Jan 16 2017

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Rank #2: Tissue-Specific Protein Clusters May Help Predict Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

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A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease

Rosie Freer, Pietro Sormanni, Giulia Vecchi, Prajwal Ciryam, Christopher M. Dobson, and Michele Vendruscolo

Science Advances 10 Aug 2016: Vol. 2, no. 8, e1600947 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600947

Abstract: In Alzheimer’s disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts—at ages well before the typical onset—the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease.

Oct 25 2016

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Rank #3: Combination Drug Treatment Reduces Agitation in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

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Agitation is common in patients with dementia and can contribute to distress for patients and caregivers and an increased risk of institutionalization. Nonpharmacological interventions are recommended as first-line therapy, but many patients fail to respond, and medications are often needed. Currently available medications don't work very well and can have serious side effects. A new study tested a combination of two existing medications, dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate, to see if this would help control agitation in patients with Alzheimer's dementia.

Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic recruited 220 patients with Alzheimer's dementia and agitation. During a preliminary 10 week trial, participants were randomly assigned to receive either the dextromethorphan- quinidine combination or a placebo.

Results showed that patients receiving the combination medication demonstrated fewer episodes of agitation compared to patients who received the placebo. When agitation did occur, it tended to be less severe. Researchers also found that not only is the combined drug effective, but safe.

[Watch more videos of The JAMA Report]

JAMA Report videos provided pursuant to license. ©2015 American Medical Association, publisher of JAMA® and The JAMA Network® journals.

Sep 22 2015

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Rank #4: The Rise of Vertebral Fractures: Incidence, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

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Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO
Guest: Michael Lewiecki, MD, FACP, FACE

With an incidence rate of more than 750,000 per year, vertebral fractures contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality rates in osteoporosis patients, particularly those who have sustained a VCF in the past. In this new segment, we will hear from Dr. Michael Lewiecki, as he examines this debilitating issue. Dr. Lewiecki is the Director of the New Mexico Clinical Research and Osteoporosis Center; and, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at UNM School of Medicine in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Dec 11 2015

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Rank #5: Working With Caregivers of Dementia Patients

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Guest: Karen B. Hirschman, PhD, MSW
Host: Susan Dolan, RN, JD

Is there a best-practice approach to working with families of patients with dementia? Dr. Karen Hirschman, research assistant professor in the department of nursing and a fellow at the Institute on Aging in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania joins host Susan Dolan, RN to discuss many aspects of caring for patients with dementia in the hospital and at home. She also shares the progress of the Enhancing Care Coordination Study examining the benefits of home nursing care following a hospital stay for dementia patients.

Jan 07 2009

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Rank #6: Delaying or Deferring the Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease: Can a New Blood Test Help?

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Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO

Host Jennifer Caudle, DO welcomes Robert Nagele, PhD, a Rowan University researcher and Professor at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Nagele and his team are closing in on a new blood test to detect Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, MS, cancers and other diseases by searching for the autoantibodies created by the disease processes. The test has initially shown to be remarkably accurate in research trials with a capability to accurately assess the stage of disease. More important, it appears to detect pre-clinical disease, giving physicians an opportunity to intervene with lifestyle changes that delay or defer the onset of symptoms.

This program was recorded live at the American Osteopathic Association's annual medical education conference, OMED2015 in Orlando, FL,

Dec 28 2015

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Rank #7: The Rising Obesity Epidemic in Senior Populations

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

According to a recent study, the percentage of elderly people in American nursing homes who are moderately to severely overweight has climbed to 25%, a dramatic increase from 14% back in 2000. How does this alarming trend affect both health outcomes and care delivery in caregiving settings?

Joining Dr. Brian McDonough to discuss this underrecognized issue of obesity in senior populations is Dr. Caroline Cederquist, bariatrics expert and founder of Cederquist Medical Wellness Center in Naples FL. Dr. Cederquist is also co-founder of bistroMD, a company premised on delivering physician-designed gourmet meals to patients for purposes of weight loss and health maintenance.

Apr 11 2016

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Rank #8: Treating Patients as They Approach End of Life

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Guest: Dennis McCullough, MD
Host: Leslie P. Lundt, MD

In the later stages of life, patient care often requires a different approach. How can a physician help geriatric patients and their loved ones through the last stations of life: decline, prelude to dying, dying and grieving? Dr. Dennis McCullough, associate professor of community and family medicine at Dartmouth School of Medicine and practicing geriatrician for 30 years, joins host Dr. Leslie Lundt to explain ‘slow medicine.' Dr. McCullough discusses a forward approach to planning, understanding a patient's comfort with risk vs. safety, as well as building and using a team.

May 14 2008

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Rank #9: Saving Grandmother’s Brain: Therapeutic Options for Maintaining Midlife Mood, Mind, and Memory

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Studies in the field of anthropology have shown that having a healthy grandmother plays a critically positive role in family cohesion. But the wholistic, personalized health needs of women in their elder years are not always recognized. This care disparity is all the more prominent in general OB/GYN practice, but thanks to the work of a select few, the trends may be about to change.

Dr. Matt Birnholz speaks with Dr. Sarah Berga, Professor and Chair of OB/GYN at Wake Forest School of Medicine at ACOG’s annual meeting in San Francisco. They discuss maintaining grandmothers' health across both physiological and psychological spectra, and how this attention in care fundamentally changes larger family units for the better.

Jun 22 2015

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Rank #10: Alzheimer's Disease: What Do Physicians Need to Know?

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Guest: Jill Grimes, MD
Host: Jennifer Shu, MD

More than five million Americans struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. How can you determine if your patients' moments of forgetfulness are an early sign of this illness? How can you help families make tough decisions about independent living? Dr. Jill Grimes, a practicing family physician in Austin, Texas, and author of the chapter on Alzheimer’s in the 5-Minute Clinical Consult textbook, joins host Dr. Jennifer Shu to share her insight on diagnosing, caring for and counseling our Alzheimer’s patients. What adjustments can we make to our practice to best assist patients and their families coping with the burdens of Alzheimer’s?

May 29 2008

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Rank #11: 'Slow Medicine': A Compassionate Approach to Caring for our Elders

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Guest: Dennis McCullough, MD
Host: Leslie P. Lundt, MD

Dr. Dennis McCullough embodies the Tibetan wisdom 'make haste slowly.' How can we navigate caring for our elders with compassion and understanding? Dr. Dennis McCullough has been an in the-trenches family doc and geriatrician for 30 years. He serves as a faculty member in the department of community and family medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He is author of the book My Mother, Your Mother: Embracing 'Slow Medicine,' the Compassionate Approach to Caring for Your Loved Ones. What exactly is slow medicine? Tune in for host Dr. Leslie Lundt's conversation with Dr. McCullough to find out.

May 14 2008

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Rank #12: Treating Alzheimer's Patients Inside & Out

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Guest: Ken Brummel-Smith, MD
Host: Bill Rutenberg, MD

Alzheimer's patients display many special personal needs beyond the physical care of their disease. How can doctors and caretakers work through the challenges posed by cognitive disability? Dr. Ken Brummel-Smith, professor and chair of geriatrics at Florida State University College of Medicine, explores the social and psychological needs of Alzheimer's patients with host Dr. Bill Rutenberg. Like all of us, they desire respect, dignity, and the best feasible quality of life.

Mar 26 2008

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Rank #13: Mechanisms of Alzheimer's Pathogenesis: How Disease Origins Guide Early Detection Practices

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Carol Lippa, MD

Understandings of the origins and mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease are evolving constantly, opening doors to improved targets for therapeutic research. But at a time when disease-modifying therapies for advanced Alzheimer's aren't yet available, the need for early detection becomes critically important to help protect quality of life for patients.

Host Dr. Matt Birnholz welcomes Dr. Carol Lippa, Professor of Neurology & Director of the Memory Disorders Program at Drexel University College of Medicine. Dr. Lippa is a member of the Board of Directors for the Alzheimer's Association and Chair of the Delaware Valley Chapter’s Medical & Scientific Committee.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Rank #14: The Longevity Bible: 8 Essential Strategies for Keeping Your Mind Sharp and Your Body Young

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Guest: Gary Small, MD
Host: Leslie P. Lundt, MD

Dr Gary Small is Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and the Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is a leading expert on memory and aging, joining host Dr. Leslie Lundt to discuss his latest book, The Longevity Bible.

Apr 01 2008

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Rank #15: Geriatrics: Help Wanted (and Needed)

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Guest: Ken Brummel-Smith, MD
Host: Bill Rutenberg, MD

Eighty million Americans will be above age 65 by the year 2030. This projection offers clear warning that our health care system needs more specialists in geriatric medicine. So, how does the practice of geriatrics compare to internal medicine? How can our policies encourage an influx of geriatricians? Host Dr. Bill Rutenberg talks with Dr. Ken Brummel-Smith, professor of geriatrics at Florida State University College of Medicine.

Mar 26 2008

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Rank #16: Study Examines Death Rates, Hospitalizations, and Cost Reductions for Medicare Patients

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America's landmark health care programs, Medicare and Medicaid, celebrate their 50th anniversaries on July 30th. Over the past five decades, the United States healthcare system has experienced dynamic changes, most notably in recent years with improvements in technology, care delivery and health related behaviors. A new study examined key outcomes among the Medicare population over a 15 year period.

Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine reviewed the records of nearly 70 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage plans from 1999 to 2013, to better understand long-term trends in mortality, hospitalizations, and healthcare costs.

Results found that among Medicare beneficiaries, death rates have dropped an estimated twenty percent, there have been ten percent fewer hospitalizations, and overall expenditures have decreased from 1999 to 2013. In the last six months of life, total hospitalizations and inpatient costs have also decreased.

[Watch more videos of The JAMA Report]

JAMA Report videos provided pursuant to license. ©2015 American Medical Association, publisher of JAMA® and The JAMA Network® journals.

Sep 08 2015

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Rank #17: House Calls, Medicare, and Patient Care

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Guest: Wayne McCormick, MD, MPH
Host: Lee Freedman, MD

House calls have become a rarity in the US, but were the cornerstone of medical care for most of modern medical history. Dr. Wayne McCormick, professor of medicine at the University of Washington's division of gerontology and geriatric medicine, talks about how physicians are once again incorporating house calls into their practice. How do insurance companies and Medicare reimburse house call visits, and are house calls a viable option for your practice? Hosted by Dr. Lee Freedman.

May 04 2009

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Rank #18: Why Do We Age?

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Guest: Steven N. Austad, PhD
Host: Mary Leuchars, MD

We assume that we know the answer to the question, Why does the body age? In short, we age, and eventually die, because we live. But what can we learn from studying aging on a cellular level? Host Dr. Mary Leuchars talks with Dr. Steven Austad, professor of cellular and structural biology at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and research chair of the American Federation for Aging Research, about why humans age, why we age, how to extend longevity, and the ramifications of extending our lives.

Oct 19 2010

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Rank #19: Evaluating Elder Competency and Elder Abuse

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Guest: Lisa Gibbs
Host: Susan Dolan, RN, JD

Dr. Lisa Gibbs, associate professor in the department of family medicine at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, describes the different types of elder abuse and who is most vulnerable. She explains how physicians evaluate mental capacity and the difference between capacity and competency. She also discusses the latest research in elder abuse. Hosted by Susan Dolan.

Oct 24 2008

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Rank #20: Latest Methods to Early Detection for Alzheimer's: Cognitive Assessments and Diagnostic Tools in Practice

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Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO
Guest: Douglas Scharre, MD, CMD

Cognitive assessment tools and detection tests for Alzheimer's disease are mutually designed to identify signs of cognitive impairment that are sometimes too subtle to catch by astute clinicians or even patients themselves. But what methods are available to help detect Alzheimer's as early as possible, and how do they impact quality of life for patients throughout the disease progression?

Host Dr. Jennifer Caudle welcomes Dr. Douglas Scharre, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Monitoring Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Elderly Women with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Slavica Janeva, MD

Despite the increasing number of elderly patients diagnosed with breast cancer, few clinical trials focus on this age group. That’s why Dr. Slavica Janeva's team focused on the impacts of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival rates in this patient population, the results of which may change clinical practice paradigms moving forward, as he discusses with Dr. Matt Birnholz.

Mar 30 2020

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Best in Show: The Health Benefits of Therapy Dogs

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

Several studies have shown that therapy dogs help to reduce people’s pain levels and anxiety. Therapy dogs have also been found to increase patients’ physical, mental, emotional and social states and improve their quality of life.

Host Dr. Brian McDonough talks with David Frei, co-creator of Angel on a Leash, a charity supporting therapy dog programs that serve health care facilities, about how therapy dogs bring comfort, affection and happiness to people in confined living situations. Frei is the former host of The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and expert analyst for The National Dog Show on NBC Thanksgiving Day.

Dec 11 2017

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Treating Hip Fractures in Elderly Patients: An Orthopedic Surgeon's Perspective

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

Out of the approximately 340,000 hip fractures that occur in the US each year, 9 out of 10 of them happen to people older than 65. Hip fractures in an older population can result in significant complications including pneumonia and blood clots, among others.

Host Dr. Brian McDonough sits down with Dr. Derek Donegan, Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery in the Division of Orthopedic Trauma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to talk about some of the challenges physicians face when treating hip fractures in elderly patients.

Oct 27 2017

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End-of-Life Care: A Physician's Guide to Helping Families

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Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO

The burden of deciding end-of-life care often falls on family and friends when patients are no longer able to make decisions regarding their own care. What do physicians need to know when guiding families through these tough situations?

Host Dr. Jennifer Caudle is joined by Dr. Marianne Holler, Medical Director of Hospice and Palliative Programs for the VNA Health Group of New Jersey. They talk about what physicians can do to aid families when faced with end-of-life decisions.

Mar 24 2017

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Keeping Love Alive as Memories Fade: The 5 Love Languages and the Alzheimer's Journey

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Host: Maurice Pickard, MD

Dr. Maurice Pickards talks with Dr. Edward Shaw about his book Keeping Love Alive as Memories Fade: The 5 Love Languages and the Alzheimer's Journey. Dr. Shaw shares how love can lift a corner of dementia’s dark curtain to cultivate an emotional connection amid memory loss. The book provides focused help for those feeling overwhelmed by the relational toll of Alzheimer’s.

Jan 23 2017

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Brain Food for Seniors: Dietary Impacts on Cognition and Longevity

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Host: Kathy King, RDN

Can good nutrition improve cognition in the aging brain, as well as expand life spans in older adults? Host Kathy King speaks with dietitian and nutrition consultant Matthew Ruscigno about the latest research and subsequent dietetic recommendations aimed at seniors. They discuss which foods and dietary practices are now associated with helping seniors preserve cognition and live longer.

Jan 16 2017

Play

Tissue-Specific Protein Clusters May Help Predict Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Podcast cover
Read more

A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease

Rosie Freer, Pietro Sormanni, Giulia Vecchi, Prajwal Ciryam, Christopher M. Dobson, and Michele Vendruscolo

Science Advances 10 Aug 2016: Vol. 2, no. 8, e1600947 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600947

Abstract: In Alzheimer’s disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts—at ages well before the typical onset—the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease.

Oct 25 2016

Play

Mechanisms of Alzheimer's Pathogenesis: How Disease Origins Guide Early Detection Practices

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Carol Lippa, MD

Understandings of the origins and mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease are evolving constantly, opening doors to improved targets for therapeutic research. But at a time when disease-modifying therapies for advanced Alzheimer's aren't yet available, the need for early detection becomes critically important to help protect quality of life for patients.

Host Dr. Matt Birnholz welcomes Dr. Carol Lippa, Professor of Neurology & Director of the Memory Disorders Program at Drexel University College of Medicine. Dr. Lippa is a member of the Board of Directors for the Alzheimer's Association and Chair of the Delaware Valley Chapter’s Medical & Scientific Committee.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Recognizing Alzheimer's Disease at the Earliest Stages: Key Signs and Symptoms

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Host: John J. Russell, MD
Guest: Howard Fillit, MD

Quality care for patients with Alzheimer's disease starts with early recognition, which enables a timely diagnosis and subsequent intervention with the best available treatment and support options. As such, understanding the broad spectrum of signs and symptoms at the earliest stages of disease is absolutely critical.

Joining host Dr. John Russell to discuss the keys to early recognition for Alzheimer's Disease is Dr. Howard Fillit, founding Executive Director and Chief Science Officer for the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Understanding the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Douglas Scharre, MD, CMD

Dr. Douglas Scharre, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, describes updated perspectives and understandings on the pathophysiology for Alzheimer's disease.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Recognizing the Spectrum of Signs and Symptoms for Alzheimer's Disease

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: David Weisman, MD

Dr. David Weisman, neurologist with Abington Neurological Associates and Director of Abington Neurologic Association's Trial Center, talks about expert approaches to recognizing the signs and symptoms for Alzheimer's disease.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Screening & Detection Tests for Alzheimer's Disease: The Benefits & Costs

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Douglas Scharre, MD, CMD

Dr. Douglas Scharre, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry with the Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorder at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, speaks to the methods used for early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease, and their respective advantages vs costs in clinical practice.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Why Patients Delay Seeking an Early Diagnosis for Alzheimer’s Disease

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

More than half of those seeking a diagnosis for dementia have delayed going to their doctor by at least a year, according to a survey carried out by the Alzheimer’s Society of Great Britain. Dr. Matt Birnholz reports.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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The Astute Primary Care Clinician's 3 Keys to Improving Alzheimer's Care

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Marwan Sabbagh, MD

Dr. Marwan Sabbagh, Professor of Neurology and Chief of the Memory Disorders Division at Barrow Neurological Institute, describes some of his key priorities for the current and future state of Alzheimer’s care.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Why Early Detection for Alzheimer's Disease Is So Critically Important

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Douglas Scharre, MD, CMD

Dr. Douglas Scharre, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, explains the importance of early detection for Alzheimer's disease on patient quality of life, as well as broader impacts on American healthcare systems.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Alzheimer's: A Hidden Disease in More Ways Than One

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Carol Lippa, MD

Dr. Carol Lippa, Professor of Neurology & Director of the Memory Disorders Program at Drexel University College of Medicine, member of the Board of Directors for the Alzheimer's Association, and Chair of the Delaware Valley Chapter’s Medical & Scientific Committee, reveals the biological, social, and stigma-based ways in which Alzheimer's remains the most prominently "hidden" disease in America.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Addressing Barriers to Early Detection for Alzheimer's Disease

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD
Guest: Marwan Sabbagh, MD

In efforts to detect and diagnose Alzheimer's Disease, time is of the essence. But there are numerous barriers that clinicians face in practice to establishing a diagnosis quickly and accurately, which affects quality of care for patients.

Joining host Dr. Matt Birnholz to address and consider solutions for these barriers is Dr. Marwan Sabbagh, Professor of Neurology and Chief of the Memory Disorders Division at the Barrow Neurological Institute.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

Play

Latest Methods to Early Detection for Alzheimer's: Cognitive Assessments and Diagnostic Tools in Practice

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO
Guest: Douglas Scharre, MD, CMD

Cognitive assessment tools and detection tests for Alzheimer's disease are mutually designed to identify signs of cognitive impairment that are sometimes too subtle to catch by astute clinicians or even patients themselves. But what methods are available to help detect Alzheimer's as early as possible, and how do they impact quality of life for patients throughout the disease progression?

Host Dr. Jennifer Caudle welcomes Dr. Douglas Scharre, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Uncover the truth about Alzheimer's in the non-certified educational series, Alzheimer's Disease: Towards Earlier Detection

Oct 02 2016

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Challenges and Solutions to Alzheimer's Research Funding Barriers

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common cause of dementia among people aged 65 and older. With the population of older Americans growing, research for new therapies becomes ever more critical. Yet one of the most important factors in advancing research, fundraising, has been hampered by numerous challenges.

Host Dr. Brian McDonough talks with Charles Fushcillo Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America about the challenges in securing additional funding for Alzheimer’s Research.

Sep 19 2016

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Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in the Elderly: Best Lipid Strategies

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Host: Alan S. Brown, MD, FNLA
Guest: Joyce Ross, MSN, CRNP, CS, CLS, FNLA, FPCNA

Host Dr. Alan Brown welcomes Joyce Ross, MSN, CRNP, FNLA, President-Elect of the National Lipid Association. Joyce serves as a consultative education specialist in cardiovascular risk intervention with the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Their discussion focuses on lipid management to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in elderly patient populations. Thhis interview was recorded live at the National Lipid Association in San Diego, California for the 2016 Spring Clinical Lipid Update.

May 09 2016

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