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Education

Future Tech: Almost Here, Round-the-Corner Future Technology Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Education
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Future Technologies Poised to Transform Our Lives For The Better are the focus of this podcast. Almost here means these technologies are Now Here, or Just Around The Corner. Listen to the latest future tech news & interviews, featuring Artificial Intelligence, 3D printing, stem cells, regenerative medicine, Bitcoin, Blockchain & other cutting-edge stuff.

Read more

Future Technologies Poised to Transform Our Lives For The Better are the focus of this podcast. Almost here means these technologies are Now Here, or Just Around The Corner. Listen to the latest future tech news & interviews, featuring Artificial Intelligence, 3D printing, stem cells, regenerative medicine, Bitcoin, Blockchain & other cutting-edge stuff.

iTunes Ratings

56 Ratings
Average Ratings
50
3
1
2
0

Good and relevant

By Adrianoesp - Aug 06 2017
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More !!! Thank you, Richard

Outstanding one

By Bradely998 - Nov 21 2016
Read more
I am really enjoying the podcasts. Keep it up Richard.

iTunes Ratings

56 Ratings
Average Ratings
50
3
1
2
0

Good and relevant

By Adrianoesp - Aug 06 2017
Read more
More !!! Thank you, Richard

Outstanding one

By Bradely998 - Nov 21 2016
Read more
I am really enjoying the podcasts. Keep it up Richard.

Listen to:

Cover image of Future Tech: Almost Here, Round-the-Corner Future Technology Podcast

Future Tech: Almost Here, Round-the-Corner Future Technology Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

Future Technologies Poised to Transform Our Lives For The Better are the focus of this podcast. Almost here means these technologies are Now Here, or Just Around The Corner. Listen to the latest future tech news & interviews, featuring Artificial Intelligence, 3D printing, stem cells, regenerative medicine, Bitcoin, Blockchain & other cutting-edge stuff.

Help, I Can’t Sleep! – Michael A. Tompkins, PhD, ABPP, Co-Director of the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy – The Importance of Sleep – Why We Need It and What To Do When We Aren’t Getting Enough Quality Sleep

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Michael A. Tompkins, PhD, ABPP, co-director of the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy (sfbacct.com), delivers an informative overview of mental health issues and contributing factors that play a significant role in how we sleep and the quality of our sleep.

Dr. Tompkins is an experienced licensed psychologist, board certified in behavioral and cognitive psychology. He is an accomplished author and outspoken advocate for mental health. Dr. Tompkins has held, and currently holds, significant leadership roles with various, important mental health centers and educational institutions. He is co-director of the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy, assistant clinical professor at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as Diplomate and Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Additionally, Dr. Tompkins works as a trainer and consultant for the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior.

Dr. Tompkins discusses his nearly 30-year career in mental health, treating primarily anxiety and mood disorders. He states that most people with these kinds of disorders do experience difficulty with sleep. He details CBTI (cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia) and his work with teens who have anxiety and sleep disorders. Insomnia is defined as a difficulty going to sleep or staying asleep, which limits the amount of restorative sleep that we all need. He explains how sleep disrupters, such as stress or travel, impact the sleep cycle. Further, he states that those who struggle to get quality sleep often worry about it, which increases anxiety and exacerbates the problem, or they try to adjust their sleep schedule, which often does not work because regularity of a sleep schedule is critical for the body to get into a working pattern such that restorative sleep can flourish.

Dr. Tompkins’ book, The Insomnia Workbook for Teens, lays out a step-by-step process for achieving better sleep, proven-effective strategies to help the sleep deprived get to sleep and stay asleep. The book explains the many and varied reasons we experience insomnia, and offers advice on how to target and deal with sleep disrupters such as caffeine and sugar. Teens especially need quality sleep as their lifestyles today are fast and furious, and it is difficult to rise to the challenges of each day when we’re sleep deprived and left feeling exhausted, grouchy, and unprepared for daily tasks. Dr. Tompkins coauthored the book with his esteemed colleague, Dr. Monique Thompson, also a licensed clinical psychologist. Dr. Thompson holds a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from California School of Professional Psychology. She is a certified cognitive therapist and also a Diplomate of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. She treats a myriad of mental health issues such as depression, various anxiety disorders (social anxiety, phobias, and panic), and sleep disorders, as well as attention problems, life transitions, and more.

Dr. Tompkins provides an overview of one of their primary goals: focusing on sleep efficiency, which is entirely different than simply looking at quality or quantity of sleep. He discusses various stimulus control strategies and other methods that people can utilize to help get them back on track with their sleep. He states that nearly 80% of the individuals they help with primary insomnia can often benefit from sleep restriction, essentially getting them to stop trying to catch up on sleep, but to focus on having consistent go to bed, and get out of bed times. Additionally he discusses other effective techniques such as breathing exercises, mindful meditation, muscle relaxation, and more. Dr. Tompkins talks about wind down routines and relaxation in general, and the importance of getting one’s body and mind to a state in which all systems are ready to fall asleep willingly.

The sleep specialist and mental health educator discusses the particular issues that teens face, as they are literally going through an organic change in brain development that causes them to want to begin sleep later in the evening and then sleep in later come morning. And with elevated stress in teens’ lives, and the use of social media, all can keep teen minds activated, which leads to sleep disturbances or a general difficulty with falling asleep or staying asleep. He details the types of skills that they teach in CBTI to help teens with their various sleep issues.

Dr. Tompkins discusses melatonin and other supplements, but he stresses that chronic insomnia sufferers may not benefit from melatonin, etc. Ultimately, insomnia sufferers must find a way to focus on wind down time and a consistent schedule of sleep. Additionally he talks about genetic inheritances that may contribute to sleep problems, such as chronotype (when we feel like sleeping naturally) and mental arousability, which many insomniacs tend to be prone to.

Dr. Tompkins is the author of multiple scholarly articles, chapters on cognitive behavior therapy, and books covering related subjects. He treats adults, adolescents, and children with anxiety disorders, as well as obsessive compulsive disorder, health anxiety, stress, insomnia, repetitive behaviors, elimination disorders, Tourette’s and tic disorders.

Jan 01 2019

37mins

Play

The Physics of Life – Adrian Bejan, J.A. Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Duke University – Science and The Origin of Living Things

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Adrian Bejan, J.A. Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Duke University, delivers a thought-provoking analysis of the mechanics of life, energy, and the science of our natural world.

Bejan is world renowned for his pioneering work in engineering and applied science. Specifically, his extensive research has delved deep into multiple areas of science—engineering and applied physics covering thermodynamics, heat transfer and convection, as well as design and evolution in the natural world. Bejan has been celebrated for his work, receiving 18 honorary doctorates from prestigious universities around the world, and he has authored 30 books and in excess of 650 articles on various subjects in his many areas of expertise. His recent book, The Physics of Life The Evolution of Everything, is considered a must-read for the scientific community and anyone who is interested in practical science and the origin of living things. 

Professor Bejan delivers a robust overview of the areas of practical science that are misunderstood, and some that are simply incorrect. Bejan lists a few of the commonly held theories that are inaccurate: that nature is complicated, that we cannot predict nature, and that we are threatened by a population explosion. He cites specific examples that prove his theories about the aforementioned. He states that many of those who speak about science publicly are not actually trained in science. As such, ideas can float around in the public discourse that may not be based in hard science. 

The engineering and science professor discusses thermodynamics, which is, as he describes, everything that has to do with movement—movement that comes from power, with the power coming from burning fuels, etc. Two things are certain: thermodynamics is about everything, and changes are occurring continually in science. The physics of evolution is constantly pushing all life and manufacturing to become a better version of itself. Changes occur, and science is the reason. Professor Bejan talks about the details of the physics of evolution, touching on the topic of power, as he states that nature is full of engines. He details the structure of the greatest engines of Earth. The earth, as an engine, drives our atmosphere and heating from the sun and cooling by the sky drive the earth engine. And this immense power delivery drives all the things on Earth. 

Bejan explains energy within animals and life in general. He talks about the elements of life and predictable design in nature. He states that much in science is recognizable and easy to draw, and all too often we overcomplicate the basic elements and structures of life. Bejan talks about the meaning of the word evolution, and how it is used in every language in western civilization and was certainly not invented or coined by Darwin. Bejan speaks of evolution as a ‘moving forward’ that assures us that tomorrow will be different than today—the future will be different than the past.

Professor Bejan talks about the laws of physics as they relate to evolution, and how the laws of physics help us to see oneness in nature as opposed to blinding complexity. Further, Bejan discusses our organic preference for certain forms in nature, such as the golden ratio. As he explains, there is a globally accepted preference for forms due to the fact that certain shapes are the easiest to be perceived and scanned by the human eye. From business cards to flags to computer screens, we have shaped our world with the shapes that the physics of our humanity prefers. 

Professor Bejan continues to explore his interests in thermodynamics and applied physics, as well as evolution in nature, and his work is pushing the scientific world forward, advancing the understanding of life itself.

Feb 22 2019

54mins

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Diabetes & Diet – Andrew Koutnik, Morsani College of Medicine – Nutritional Considerations and Impact for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

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In this informative podcast, biomedical research expert, Andrew Koutnik, discusses nutrition as it relates to type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Koutnik has dedicated his life to the study of the many biological factors that impact disease and their implications regarding treatment. His body of work has often focused on nutrition and metabolism as they relate to disease and general health. A significant amount of Koutnik’s biomedical research has been conducted at the Metabolic Medicine Lab at the University of South Florida.

Koutnik provides an overview of the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. He states that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and the current thought is that an inappropriate immune response targets specific cells in the pancreas that produce and/or secrete insulin (beta cells). And because the immune system response has targeted them inappropriately, they are seen as foreign, thus the body may produce antibodies against them or attack them. There can sometimes be a rapid change and ultimately the body may no longer be able to manage glucose levels. Therefore insulin and glucose must be managed by the patient/doctor, as the body is negligent in its normal duties in this regard. Koutnik explains that type 2 diabetes is generally described as insulin resistance, where you have the ability to produce insulin but the body is resistant to the insulin that is present. 

Koutnik discusses the relative blood sugar levels in diabetics and various treatment protocols for both types of diabetes from the traditional to new emerging concepts. He details dietary issues for diabetics and how that relates to their insulin and treatment, with a special analysis of ketones and an explanation of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus that can certainly be life threatening, a condition that results from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. Koutnik provides a granular overview of the many processes that the body goes through touching on details of elevated blood sugar, carbohydrates, molecules, proteins/amino acids, lipid molecules and more.

Delving deeper into other related issues, Koutnik talks about the relationship between sleep and glucose control. He explains how stress, caffeine, time of day, etc. can influence insulin sensitivity. 

Koutnik details the many beneficial factors of regular exercise and how it directly impacts the effectiveness of insulin. However, he stresses that with type 1 diabetes there are numerous variables that influence insulin sensitivity. Additionally, the biomedical researcher provides an analysis of nutritional guidelines for diabetics. He talks about the effects of protein and explains the kinetics of protein. He expounds upon the benefits of a low carbohydrate diet and cites his own personal success after making the shift to low carb. 

He underscores the importance of glycemic management and its great impact on the quality of life. He talks about the positive feeling that someone can get when they finally feel that they are taking control of their diabetes through diet, and succeeding! And while taking certain foods, foods we might love, out of the diet completely can be difficult, ultimately the healthy feeling that you achieve is worth the sacrifice.

Mar 12 2019

1hr 38mins

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Psilocybin Salvation – Alan K. Davis, PhD, of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University – Unlocking the Power of Magic Mushrooms in a Clinical Setting that Could Offer New Hope for Depression Sufferers

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Alan K. Davis, PhD, of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University, discusses his important work researching the powerful and positive effects of psilocybin on depression sufferers.

Dr. Davis has vast clinical experience in multiple areas and he regularly works with people who are dealing with trauma-based psychological problems, including addiction, PTSD, depression, and anxiety.

Dr. Davis discusses his research, and his work as a guide for psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for people suffering from depression. The doctor’s work focuses on psychedelic research that includes clinical trials with psilocybin (the active psychedelic ingredient in “magic mushrooms”) for people with depression. His research explores the many psychological mechanisms through which the psilocybin can potentially ameliorate mental health and functioning. Remarkably, approximately 50% of the people who participated in their study stated that their depression was completely eradicated after about one month of treatment. And following up, at the three and six month marks, Dr. Davis states that a good number of those people are still free of depression entirely. Dr. Davis explains their treatment process and how actual psychotherapy is an integral part. As he states, it’s important to build a rapport with study participants and create a level of trust, so they are comfortable with the environment and the process.

Dr. Davis talks about some of the upcoming trials and the data that the FDA will need to approve the psilocybin as a specialty drug that can be prescribed by psychiatrists or general practice doctors and then administered by psychologists, social workers, and counselors. Dr. Davis discusses some of the states that are working to push legislative changes, and how the DEA is involved with the scheduling of the drug.

Continuing, Dr. Davis discusses in detail the mechanisms that allow psilocybin to work. As he states, the psilocybin takes action on serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain. Dr. Davis explains that serotonin is the chemical in the brain that regulates many things such as mood, appetite, and sleep. And as depression sufferers often experience negative mood, decreased or increased appetite, and sleep disruption, psilocybin is potentially a great alternative for depression, especially for those people who have found no relief through other meds that are typically prescribed for depression.

Oct 14 2019

26mins

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King Ketone – Dominic D’Agostino, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Florida – The Impressive Power of Ketones and How Our Diets Hold the Key to Improved Cognition, Increased Energy, Weight Control, and Disease Treatment

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Dominic D’Agostino, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of South Florida’s Morsani College of Medicine, as well as the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology. D’Agostino’s focus of teaching is quite diverse as he educates in the areas of physiology, neuropharmacology, biochemistry (medical), cell metabolism, and signaling. D’Agostino’s laboratory tests metabolic-based strategies for battling multiple human health problems such as seizures, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, and more.

The associate professor leads a discussion on various metabolic therapies including ketogenic diets, and the benefits of ketone supplements. Remarkably, one’s level of ketosis can be assessed and measured in blood and urine samples. Ketosis is a metabolic state; essentially, when an individual removes carbohydrates from their diet they in turn force their body to deplete its stores of glycogen and seek out a new fuel source. As this takes place, ketosis is initiated when the body begins converting fat into ketones as its new, powerful fuel. While the shift may be a major adjustment for the body, and for individuals attempting to make the push toward a ketogenic diet, the results are obvious for most, with many people reporting a general feeling of well-being with more energy also. As D’Agostino explains, those who suffer from age-related cognitive decline, inflammation, or weight problems, all stand to benefit greatly from the shift to a ketogenic diet and the stimulation of ketosis.

The physiology and cell metabolism professor explains how exogenous ketone supplementation can enhance the metabolic efficiency of the body, which can increase cognition and workflow activity. While many seek to get fully into a state of ketosis, this may not be the ultimate goal, for the goal is simply to feel better, and approximating the state may offer some benefits. Many are aware that ketosis can help with weight loss and appetite control, but as health seekers come for the weight loss they will more than likely also benefit from an advanced mental focus, more energy, and increased levels of HDL cholesterol. Additionally, ketosis can help to lower blood pressure and aid in the fight against type II diabetes. D’Agostino digs deep into the scientific workings behind variations on ketone supplementation. He discusses MCTs, or medium-chain triglycerides, and ketone salt combinations that can be delivered before low carbohydrate meals that can buffer the rise in glucose. The professor explains how the ketone benefit works within the body for suppression of appetite and increased cognitive function, and further, he relates how individuals can see improvements across the line with exogenous ketones even without adhering to an absolute ketogenic diet. D’Agostino provides some insight into ketone salts and ketone esters and their affect on the osmotic load in the gut. Ultimately, as D’Agostino explains, the scientific study of ketones is proving that many health issues can be improved by controlling the diet.

Jul 20 2018

49mins

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On Greek Philosophy, Creationism, and Evolutionary Theory—Wynand De Beer—Author of From Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle & Neoplatonism

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Wynand De Beer has always had an interest in evolution as a mechanism for life on Earth, but it wasn’t until about a decade ago that he really started diving into the study of it, guided by a question similar to the one that framed his doctoral work at the University of South Africa: is it possible to reconcile the Christian belief in creationism with the scientific evidence for evolution, and if so, to what degree? In the search for an answer, Wynand De Beer found himself immersed in Greek philosophy and surprised by what he was learning about cosmology, biology, and the connections between the two. He has since authored an account of all this and more, titled From Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle & Neoplatonism.

Wynand De Beer offers a compelling conversation that touches on a variety of topics, including the mathematical foundations of the cosmos taught by Pythagoras, Platonism versus Neoplatonism, Aristotle as the first Western thinker to analyze biological phenomena among pants and animals, the concept that matter is shaped by the soul, physical versus metaphysical realities, how quantum behavior might be compatible with notions of a higher reality, the inaccurate conflation between evolution and Darwinism, the standard scientific explanation of the mind and the rebuttals to it, and the potentially imminent merge between man and machine.

Tune in for the full conversation and find his book on Amazon

Apr 01 2019

42mins

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Human Physiology – Michael J. Joyner, MD, Researcher, Noted Expert on Human Performance –Understanding Physiology, Performance, and Blood Flow

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Michael J. Joyner, MD, physician, researcher, and noted expert on human performance and exercise physiology delivers an overview of the extensive study and research he has embarked upon throughout his long career in the field.

Dr. Joyner has spent a lifetime studying the human body and how it performs and functions. Through his impressive research studying exercise physiology he has made significant contributions to the greater understanding of muscle and skin blood flow, as well as blood pressure regulation, and of course athletic performance. 

Dr. Joyner has been a respected consultant to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as well as NASA and the groundbreaking research at his Mayo Clinic lab has been funded by the NIH since the early 90s. In this informative podcast Dr. Joyner talks about integrative physiology, how humans respond to complex challenges, and the limits of perspective. He discusses blood flow and the restorative properties of systems. He recounts some of the past experimentation regarding blood flow and circulation. He delves into detail about angiogenesis, which is the physiological process by which new blood vessels begin to form from those preexisting vessels already present, and formed in the initial stage of vasculogenesis. The doctor talks about gene therapy and drugs that have been used to stimulate blood vessel growth, but he stresses that the best means for achieving this goal is actually exercise.

Dr. Joyner discusses drug repurposing, and the history of various notable drugs that have found their purpose later, after development and trial. He talks about some of the early experimentation and important studies regarding bed rest, and how we have learned that we need to, in most cases, mobilize people as early as possible right after medical procedures and operations, etc. He expands on his thoughts about progress made in the surgical environment, and the future of technology—and how it can help us to improve. And he rounds the discussion back to his primary area of study—physiology and human performance, which he has studied intensively since the 80s. 

The human performance expert discusses the latest findings regarding glucose and physical exercise. He states that exercise is really the key to fighting prediabetes and diabetes, and its effects are powerful. He discusses various trials, and drug development for many medical conditions, and the evidence that supports some of the new blood pressure controlling type drugs. 

The prestigious Mayo Clinic named Dr. Joyner a Distinguished Investigator in 2010 and his lab provides major educational opportunities for students and trainees, as it continues to further the dialogue on human performance.

Mar 01 2019

50mins

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Biological Beginnings – Luis P. Villarreal, Professor Emeritus, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine – The Viruses In Our World

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Luis P. Villarreal, Professor Emeritus, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, discusses his thoughts on viruses, life, and the changes that motivate evolution.

Is it possible to be passionate about viruses? The answer is yes. As a scientist who is constantly experimenting, with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, Luis Villarreal is definitely passionate about understanding viruses, indeed, especially with regard to viruses that linger either in the genomes or epigenomes of their host. For over 20 years, Villarreal has centralized his study on the overall role of virus evolution on life. And Villarreal states that viruses have had a significant and profound influence on the origin and evolution of life.

Villarreal talks about his early years in science and the classes and information that truly sparked his desire to learn more, and how it organically led him to his life’s work. He details his study of negative-strand RNA viruses, viruses that resemble rabies and ebola—highly pathogenic. He recounts his observation of regulatory RNA that had dramatic consequences, which was the beginning of his true curiosity about viruses. He delves into his study of rearrangements of the genome by various types of retroviruses. He describes how retroviruses actually work together to create the placental network. He questions why this would happen, and surmises that in order for a mother or host to create life, they must take in a foreign biological entity, the embryo, and suppress its natural immune rejection, feed it, and host it for its lifespan, which requires a significant amount of change. Villarreal states that the virus footprint is literally all over all of these functions. 

The biology expert provides an overview of cellular DNA and the many jobs that DNA can fulfill. He explains how RNA and DNA react with each other and outlines their complicated network, although he states that there is much work to be done still to understand the complexity. He discusses his thoughts on human evolution and recounts stories that relate, such as endogenization of the koalas in Australia. He explains that a particular virus that was within these koalas was becoming part of them, and thus their ability to deal with the virus in their immune systems was being changed in real time. He compares this example to human development over time and discusses theories about viruses as they relate to humans, discussing the details of modification as it pertains to viruses and survival. 

His discussion of viruses and biology continues as he summarizes his thoughts on the human species and the many elements that relate to evolution and brain function, etc. On a lighter note, Villarreal muses about some Hollywood versions of viral mutations and provides his thoughts on Hollywood’s interpretation of real science turned into fiction for the movies we enjoy. He goes on to explain the astronomic scale of viruses in our environment, discussing the ocean extensively, and the microbiome. 

Mar 19 2019

58mins

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Expression of Life – Dr. John Torday, MSc, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and Ob/Gyn, Harbor-UCLA – Discussing the Intricate Details of Biological Development and Life

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Dr. John Torday, MSc, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and Ob/Gyn, Harbor-UCLA, Division of Neonatology, discusses biomedical research, genomics, and life.

Dr. Torday’s extensive career in medicine and education has afforded him some choice opportunities, working and researching as a faculty member at prestigious universities such as Harvard Medical School, the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the David Geffen School of Medicine.

Dr. Torday discusses some of his early experiences in the field, as well as some of the incredible advances he has seen in science and medicine. He specifically talks about the landmark observation of his career: that the cortisol hormone could accelerate human development, which was the beginning of neonatology. The implications of this observation were immense and became the fodder for much research ongoing.

The neonatology expert comments on the vast changes in biomedical research, from biochemistry to the transition to molecular biology, and the concept of genomics. He talks in depth about the importance of epigenetics. Epigenetics is the study of heritable phenotype changes that do not require alterations in the existing DNA sequence. He muses on the concepts of epigenetics, regarding embryogenesis (embryonic development). As he states, epigenetic inheritance is passed in more than one generation, which is a particularly interesting and vital point in regard to research. He answers questions regarding genetic expression and the idea of epigenetic heritability. As he states, environment such as habitation in water or on land, play a role in organism development. And additionally, he states that diet can have an influence as well.

Speaking about evolutionary development, the PhD discusses some of his thoughts on various species, considering land and water environments. He provides extensive details on the complex biological factors that are involved. He talks in detail about three genes he states are necessary: parathyroid hormone-related protein gene, glucocorticoid receptor, and the beta adrenergic receptor.

Additionally, he expounds upon the importance of intercepting the loss of homeostatic control, which would provide for profound advances in the way we treat disease. He discusses the distinguishing traits between species, and then recounts some of the concepts and theories he has studied regarding the origin of life.

Mar 06 2019

53mins

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The Ketogenic Defender – Dominic D’Agostino, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Florida, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology – The Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet in Disease Treatment

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Dominic D’Agostino, Ph.D., delivers an informative overview of the potential positive impact of ketogenic diets for disease prevention and treatment. He discusses how many cancers such as endometrial cancer and pancreatic cancer are associated with hyperglycemia, which is a hallmark of type II diabetes.D’Agostino is a tenured professor at the University of South Florida. Working with students at the Morsani College of Medicine and the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, D’Agostino’s primary focus is in the areas of neuroscience and neuropharmacology, medical biochemistry, and physiology. 

As a research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, D’Agostino aggressively pursues his research in methods to optimize and maximize the health, safety, and resilience of soldiers in combat, as well as astronauts. As a laboratory scientist D’Agostino and his team develop and test various metabolic-based strategies for seizures, epilepsy, cancer, and select neurodegenerative diseases. His primary focus for over a decade has been centered upon the many potential anticonvulsant and neuroprotective mechanisms of a ketogenic diet as well as ketone metabolite supplementation.

D’Agostino is an active member of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Society, Society of Neuroscience, Aerospace Medical Association, American Physiological Society, and the American Association of Cancer Research. He holds a Ph.D. and BS from the esteemed Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, respectively.

D’Agostino discusses his current and primary focus on brain cancer and how the ketogenic diet has historically been used to treat epilepsy, thus brain tumor patients experiencing seizures may see significant benefit from a dietary change to this low-carb, high-fat, protein-adequate diet. He talks about the Warburg effect, the phenomenon in which cancer cells produce extra energy via increased oxygen-dependent glycolysis that is then followed by lactic acid fermentation with a secretion of lactate. D’Agostino provides information on cell metabolism; the ATP molecule, which is the nucleotide specifically known in biochemistry as the ‘molecular currency’ of cell to cell energy transfer; as well as mitochondria and the links between diet and some cancers.

The nutrition and health Ph.D. outlines other important and relevant studies, such as the work of Valter Longo, the Italian-American biogerontologist and cell biologist who is known primarily for his study of the role fasting and nutrient response genes play in disease and cellular protection. Additionally, he discusses the protective effects of short-term dietary restrictions as well as fasting, and the potential importance of ketones for metabolic health.

While weight loss is essentially a good side effect of a ketogenic diet, the metabolic benefits provide even more advantages, in addition to the healthy effect of losing weight. He discusses the beneficial impact of decreasing glucose availability to tumors and implementing dietary restrictions as part of a treatment plan for some cancers. The shift in brain metabolism from glucose to ketones can actually reduce neuronal hyperexcitability and oxidative stress, which can enhance brain energy metabolism. D’Agostino feels this methodology can be used to treat a vast array of pathologies, including cancer.  

Additionally, D’Agostino presents an important analysis of the microbiome, which is the community of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, and viruses that inhabit a specific environment, especially in regard to microorganisms living within or on the human body. He provides his opinion on the variations in microbiomes and how the optimal microbiome can differ based upon food eaten, geographical location, and other factors, and how a ketogenic diet and periodic fasting can help purge the overgrowth of the microbiome, and help return the body to balance. And D’Agostino discusses the glucose-ketone index, and how individuals seeking a healthier dietary balance and increased energy can monitor their index to ensure they are reaching ketosis with regularity for maximum health benefits.

Sep 13 2018

1hr 1min

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The Power of the People’s Data—James Turner—Personal Genome Project, Open Humans Foundation

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As a participant of the Personal Genome Project (PGP), which was initiated in 2005 at Harvard Medical School, James Turner has donated a significant amount of information to the project, including an extensive personal health survey, 20 years’ worth of notes pertaining to doctor visits, lab tests, treatments, etc., and MRI images. Once submitted to the PGP, a participant’s information becomes available to any all researchers for the purposes of driving genetic research. The program has two main goals: to perform whole genome sequencing on as many samples as possible, and to correlate the genetic information obtained with phenotypic data.  

As a descendent of the PGP, the Open Humans Foundation takes a slightly different approach to the same idea; it allows participants to choose whether they want their data to be available to everyone or only select researchers, works to facilitate the transfer of information from personal devices to biological data banks, and makes use of data inspired by the Quantified Self Movement (e.g. Fitbit/Apple Watch, diet data). Turner now serves as the treasurer and chairman of this foundation, and he joins the podcast to provide unique insight on the world of genomic data and biological research driven by the people.

Press play to hear the full conversation, and visit https://www.personalgenomes.org/us and http://openhumansfoundation.org/ to learn more.

Apr 23 2019

41mins

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The Myth of Aging – Aubrey de Grey, PhD, Chief Science Officer and Co-founder of SENS Research Foundation – Debunking the Myth That Nothing Can Be Done About Aging, Through Scientific Research and Development

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Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer and Co-founder of SENS Research Foundation, delivers an overview of aging and the many health problems that develop in our advanced years.

Dr. de Grey is a respected member of the science community; he is the noted biomedical gerontologist who devised the innovative SENS platform and co-founded the SENS Research Foundation to further it. Dr. de Grey has written about his work and as an established researcher, he has been appointed to the editorial and scientific advisory boards of many journals, organizations, etc. Dr. de Grey is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America as well as the American Aging Association. He holds a BA in Computer Science and a Ph.D. in Biology from the prestigious University of Cambridge. 

Dr. de Grey discusses his research in aging and the motivations for tackling the career. As he states, aging is the number one medical problem as it causes more suffering. He was motivated to research in this area because he found that not enough was being done to focus on aging and the myriad of problems that come with it. He talks about the many excuses that are given as reasons to simply accept aging as it is, or not focus on it at all, such as “it’s inevitable…everything ages,” or the philosophical—“death gives meaning to life,” or social—“maybe we could do this, but it would create new problems worse than the problem we are solving.” And as the Ph.D. states, none of these excuses stand up to even the faintest scrutiny, however, they still remain quite popular. 

Dr. de Grey explains that ‘why’ and ‘how’ we age are fairly well understood, but it is the understanding of what we already know that is important, to take the information we know to be true and utilize that to design and implement therapies that will prevent the health problems of old age. And this is the core of what Dr. de Grey’s foundation, SENS Research, seeks to accomplish. SENS Research Foundation works to create, promote, and provide wide-ranging access to all kinds of therapies that can cure and prevent the diseases and detrimental disabilities of aging by essentially repairing the damage that builds up within our bodies over long periods of time. SENS Research seeks to change the way the world researches and thus cares for age-related ill health.

The Ph.D. discusses stem cell therapy and its ability to repair the damage, loss of cells, etc. As he explains, stem cells can be injected that target areas within the body and repair damage, replace lost cells, and thus keep the body area, organ, etc. functioning in a healthier state. He explains in detail how cells function and the processes used to make genetic modifications. Additionally, Dr. de Grey expounds upon the kinds of complex research they engage in at his foundation, and the types of conditions that they seek to bring more understanding to in order to combat them.

Jun 14 2019

47mins

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The Promise of 3D Projection Technology—Dr. Daniel Smalley—Smalley Holography

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Despite being otherwise enamored by the intrigue of holography, Dr. Daniel Smalley says that unfortunately the scene in Avengers during which Tony Stark puts his gloved hands into holographic projections would not be possible; holography couldn’t allow light to travel through his hands and certainly couldn’t bend the light to go around it.  Such imagery could, however, be created by 3D projections and Dr. Smalley, an electrical and computer engineering professor at Brigham Young University, is happy to tell us how.

Listen in to learn more about holography and 3D projection technology, including its potential uses in medicine, aerospace surveillance, and telepresence. Visit his website at  www.smalleyholography.org and the Brigham Young University ElectroHolography Research Group at https://holography.byu.edu.

Oct 02 2019

23mins

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Quality Breathing – Patrick McKeown, Author of Close Your Mouth: Buteyko Clinic Handbook for Perfect Health – The Buteyko Method & All That It Can Do for Your Health

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McKeown was a chronic asthmatic who suffered from regular wheezing and coughing for more than twenty years before he discovered the Buteyko Method. After mastering the method, he has been completely free of symptoms, as well as medication, since the late 90s. Today, McKeown is a qualified practitioner after training with Professor Buteyko, the originator of the method.

McKeown talks about his background and how his own struggles with issues such as asthma, constant stuffy nose, and mouth breathing motivated him to find a solution. As he explains, having these issues can seriously impact the quality of our sleep, and as such McKeown used to wake up very tired often, before discovering Buteyko.

Further, the Buteyko practitioner delves into the various techniques people can use to decongest their noses, to allow clearer breathing through the nose. The nose, in fact, is so important, that it is responsible for over 30 functions in the human body, so it’s clear that we want to keep it clear! As McKeown explains, nasal issues that prevent quality nasal breathing can contribute to so many problems from dry mouth/inflammation, to learning difficulties, reduced IQ, decreased productivity, and much more.

The breathing expert talks about blood vessels and how breathing affects carbon dioxide levels. Blood circulation and breath are directly connected. Anxiety, depression, and high stress can greatly benefit from slower, fuller breathing. McKeown’s book, Close Your Mouth, is a respected self-help book that offers an easy to follow, complete instruction set for the Buteyko Method, to help combat asthma, nasal congestion, and snoring. And the proof is in the results, as multiple clinical trials have proven that the Buteyko Method is highly effective and provides a true remedy for the reversal of asthma, resulting in 70% less coughing and wheezing, and an astounding 90% reduction in the need for reliever medication, and a remarkable 50% reduced need for preventer medication.

McKeown talks about how he works with clients to help them develop an exercise plan that works for them. He can measure their breathing during their first visit and ascertain how they will be able to function in various exercises and periods of physical exertion. Through the Buteyko method, many people have found relief from their nagging, lifelong problems, and McKeown is helping to spread the word to the world, to help people find real solutions to their debilitating health issues.

May 20 2019

36mins

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On the Future of Digital Storage and Synthetic DNA—Thomas Coughlin—Coughlin Associates

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As the president of Coughlin Associates, Thomas Coughlin is a widely-respected digital storage analyst and business and tech consultant with over 35 years’ worth of experience in the data storage engineering industry. He also has six patents under his name and is the author of Digital Storage in Consumer Electronics: The Essential Guide. On today’s episode, he discusses the future of digital storage technology, which may very well lie in the strands of synthetic DNA. He explains that DNA can store a high density of information, with a potential capacity 1,000 times greater than what’s currently achievable with modern storage technology like hard drives. He explains what it will take to get there, the challenges that must be overcome, and a rough timeframe for when DNA-based data storage could become commercialized and mainstream.

In addition, Coughlin talks about a number of fascinating topics, including the work being done towards using microfluidic silicon matrices as storage devices, technology obsolescence, neuromorphic computing, brain to electronics interfaces, artificial telepathy, deepfake technology, and the legal and ethical implications of these emerging capabilities. Tune in for all the details, including info about an August 29th conference on emerging memories and AI.

To learn more about Coughlin’s work, visit tomcoughlin.com and feel free to email him at tom@tomcoughlin.com.

Jul 22 2019

34mins

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Virtual Reality Stadiums Featuring Your Favorite Sports Teams, No Matter Where You Are—Symon Perriman—FanWide

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There’s nothing quite like the energy and excitement of seeing your favorite sports team in person while surrounded by hundreds or thousands of other fans rooting right along with you, but for the 100 million Americans who don’t live in the same town as their favorite team, this experience is difficult if not impossible to come by. As the president and founder of FanWide, Symon Perriman set out to change this.

FanWide is the world’s largest fan club network that’s connecting likeminded sports fans—regardless of where they live or travel—in a way that until now has only been possible for those who live in the local market. How are they doing it? By creating a virtual stadium at every sports bar around the country where fans can interact, play games, and cheer on their team in unity. But that’s not all: FanWide incentivizes fans for showing up to events by providing rewards such as free beer, contest entries, and the potential to win cryptocurrency tokens that can be spent on game tickets, sports merchandise, and sports apparel.  

“I found that sports were one of the few things that really transcend where you’re from, what language you speak, your gender, your ethnicity…if you can find fans from the same team, it builds up that immediate bond or connection, and we’re providing…an easy way to have that bond and find those people from the same tribe or background through our digital platform, and then bring them together in real-world events,” says Perriman.

Tune in for all the details and visit fanwide.com for an event near you. 

Dec 03 2018

25mins

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A Novel Therapy for Sleep Apnea that Targets the Root Causes—Sarah Hornsby—Faceology

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According to a meta-analysis study in 2015 that considered 226 studies, the practice of oral and breathing exercises lowered subjects' apnea–hypopnea index (an index of the severity of apnea based on how many times and for how long breathing ceases per hour of sleep) by 50%. So, what exactly are oral exercises? It may sound a little odd at first, but Sarah Hornsby is a myofunctional therapist who teaches people how to strengthen their tongue, throat, breathe through their nose, and keep their tongue resting at the roof rather than the bottom of their mouth through a series of exercises she leads via Skype-based appointments, video programs, and YouTube videos. Her goal is to make this knowledge and resource globally accessible to the many people who are unnecessarily suffering or unaware that there is an actual fixable problem underlying their daily fatigue.

“It really is something that actually addresses root causes, and I appreciate that so much because I feel like a lot of what we do in modern medicine and dentistry is just about treating symptoms,” says Hornsby. In addition to sleep apnea, headaches, jaw pain, neck pain, teeth grinding, and chronic sinus issues are just a few of the symptoms associated with oral myofunctional and breathing problems. Ultimately, a person’s overall health and well-being can be severely compromised by something that's treatable without the use of pills or bothersome devices.

Hornsby makes for an insightful and eye-opening conversation that covers everything from craniofacial development and growth in children (and how it can be altered by the position of the tongue in the mouth), why snoring shouldn’t be brushed off as simply a nuisance, the importance of the respiratory disturbance index in evaluating the seriousness of a person’s sleep apnea, and what an initial consultation with her would look like.

Press play to hear the full conversation, find her videos on YouTube, and visit https://myfaceology.com/ to learn more.

Apr 17 2019

35mins

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DNA Origami A Radical New Way to Develop Microrobots and Mechanosensors—Rebecca Taylor, Ph.D.—Carnegie Mellon University

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Many of us have fond memories of playing with Lincoln Logs and Legos as children, constructing cities and vehicles and whatever else we felt like we needed. As an assistant professor of mechanical engineering with courtesy appointments in biomedical engineering as well as electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, Dr. Rebecca Taylor gets to play out a version of those memories every day in her lab. How? By engineering and developing control schemes for ‘DNA origami’—tiny DNA-based electromechanical systems from which rafts or giant bundles or elastic hinges or any number of other conformations and features can be made. Once programmed to follow a certain pathway, these systems essentially build themselves, making for immensely powerful tools in bioengineering.

Dr. Taylor joins the podcast to discuss how exactly DNA origami works and the specific projects her lab is currently working on, which include the creation of microswimmers—tiny robots capable of swimming through the smallest passageways in the human body, such as capillaries measuring eight microns in diameter. Using DNA technology, Dr. Taylor and her team are able to control the assembly of these systems, dictating the level of stiffness, and where and how they’ll function in the body. The future direction of Dr. Taylor’s work will focus on engineering DNA origami that could act like molecular chaperones, facilitating their own more complex assemblies and changing shape dynamically, bending, twisting, carrying, and moving things into position in order to fulfill a variety of roles within the body.

Tune in for all the details, and stay up to date with the latest developments by visiting https://engineering.cmu.edu/directory/bios/taylor-rebecca.html. 

Apr 12 2019

37mins

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Dropping Weight – Dr. Tro Kalayjian, Board-Certified Internal Medicine Physician and Weight Loss Expert – A Diet and Exercise Program That Produces Real Weight Loss, Reverses Medical Problems, and Improves Overall Heath

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Dr. Tro Kalayjian is a board-certified internal medicine physician and weight loss expert who has passionately devoted his life to bringing good health and wellness to everyone. Dr. Kalayjian delivers an interesting and useful overview of his methods to achieve weight loss and health improvement.

Dr. Kalayjian has a medical degree from Touro Medical College and he completed his internal medicine residency in the Yale New Haven Health System at Greenwich Hospital where he served as a chief medical resident. A prolific publisher, Dr. Kalayjian has released a wide variety of important case reports and findings in the areas of binge eating disorder, food addiction, and achalasia— a rare disorder that makes it very difficult for foods and liquids to pass into the stomach. His therapeutic focus includes obesity, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Dr. Kalayjian recommends a combination of intensive lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, stress management, and mental health care to many of his patients seeking improved health.

Dr. Kalayjian discusses the emotional and metabolic issues that could make weight loss more challenging for some. He recounts stories of patients who have run into difficulty losing weight even after undergoing dramatic procedures such as gastric bypass surgery, etc. As Kalayjian explains, there are many reasons why weight loss can be difficult and he works with patients that have diverse issues that present challenges for them.

Kalayjian provides a basic overview of his four-month program, starting with comprehensive lab work, an initial ninety-minute session and weekly follow-ups for up to eight weeks. Additionally, lab work is redone to assess changes, and subsequent consultations follow. Kalayjian monitors weight, body fat, blood pressure, body/fat/water mass, heart rate, glucose and more, to get a complete picture of a patient’s body and how it is functioning. He states his average weight loss for the program is about 35 pounds, with extremes of as little as four pounds lost, and 120 pounds as the maximum lost. Kalayjian discusses how his process first begins with figuring out what is causing the obesity in a patient, and only after reaching his conclusion can he then get them started on an appropriate diet, such as low fat, or low carb, ketogenic, etc., that will yield the results they are seeking. And while his patients are working toward their goal, Kalayjian also offers opportunities for them to socialize in various ways with others who are also seeking weight loss, to create a sense of community, one that provides support. He details the process as patients move into months three and four that may involve some fasting, dietary restrictions, time-restricted feeding, and exercise. Additionally, he talks about the problems people have when they plateau and some options, such as intermittent fasting and hunger assessments that may help them get past it and begin losing weight again.

The diet and nutrition expert details the important role that metabolism plays in weight loss. And he explains how some of the TV show weight loss programs that push fast weight loss have permanently damaged participants’ metabolism by approaching weight loss the wrong way. As he states, weight loss is a process and he advises one pound per week for most patients, to ensure a safe, effective, long-term strategy that can provide lasting results.

Kalayjian explains that the vast array of ‘eat more, move less,’ ‘count calorie,’ and other conventional programs and ideas really do not work for most people. Kalayjian’s goal is to provide a better way for his patients to find success in their weight loss plan, to lose the weight and keep it off for life. He recounts how his wife offered encouragement that nudged him to embark on his own personal weight loss journey, an experience that has helped him to better understand how to help others. He takes his patients’ journeys very personally and feels that if they fail, he has failed, so he makes it a point of never letting them fail, even if they have specific metabolic difficulties that may make their path to success a bit of a longer one. Kalayjian explains that diet and nutrition have been proven to not only impact weight loss, but also many other diseases and pre-disease conditions, and he is incredibly passionate about helping patients improve their health and be well.

Oct 26 2018

48mins

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The Hard to Swallow Truth of Esophageal Cancer and Disease States—Kelly Whelan, PhD—Temple University, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

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Millions of Americans experience symptoms of acid reflux or “heartburn” on a daily basis—that burning sensation in the chest that can be accompanied by a number of other unpleasant and sometimes seemingly unrelated symptoms. It’s a problem many people might brush off by popping a Tums, but there’s a darker side to acid reflux, which is that it can be a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma, a type of cancer that develops in the context of Barrett's esophagus, a condition in which the epithelial cells in the esophagus are displaced by tissue that more resembles intestinal tissue.

As a researcher with a background in cancer biology, Kelly Whelan, PhD, from Temple University is interested in further understanding the biology of the esophagus, how certain pathways help it to remain normal under homeostatic conditions, and what goes awry in states of disease, such as cancer and eosinophilic esophagitis, an allergic reaction to food.

She’s also interested in investigating the male and racial bias found in all esophageal diseases, how the type and quantity of a person’s mitochondria could be related to their esophageal disease state, whether or not there are non-invasive ways to determine a patient’s disease state, how to improve therapies for esophageal diseases, how the oral microbiome or even the lower GI tract microbiome could be influencing disease progression, and so much more.

Tune in for all the details.

Nov 14 2019

30mins

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On the Least-Talked-About Solution to Decreasing Climate-Changing Pollution—Mary Ellen Harte, PhD—Biologist, Author, and Biological Consultant

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Most of know that the climate is changing, and it’s changing rapidly--in ways that will continue to cause environmental degradation and extinction. Most of us also want to do something about it, but have a hard time seeing how we can really tackle such a big problem on the individual level. How can MY choices actually affect the future? After all, I can’t just decide to ban deforestation or switch everything over to clean energy. What is it that I CAN do?

According to biologist, author, and environmental consultant Mary Ellen Harte, PhD, the answer lies in a solution that’s just as important as protecting the forests and becoming global leaders in clean energy technology, but not talked about nearly as often: family planning. By preventing unintended pregnancies through free and effective family planning services, we can slow the growth of the population.

This approach will not only address the problem of climate-changing pollution, but also the relationship between population growth and stress, physical and psychological problems, and higher crime rates. In her work, Dr. Harte emphasizes the importance of environmental economics, and encourages people to seek out and vote for the political leaders who do the same. 

On today’s podcast, you will learn:

  • Why the issue of climate change is so politicized in the U.S., but not in other countries
  • Whether or not technology can address the magnitude of climate change that’s occurring
  • What will likely happen if the right solutions are implemented quickly, and what will likely happen if they aren’t


To learn more about how the environment is being affected by climate change, Dr. Harte recommends checking out The Daily Climate. To find a free online copy of the book she co-authored called Cool the Earth, follow this link http://www.cooltheearth.us/.

Dec 09 2019

31mins

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Microbiome Mechanics – Jonathan Hull, Head of Business Development at Thryve – Weight Loss, Probiotics, Microbiome Testing, and GI Health

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In this podcast, Jonathan Hull, Business Development Head at Thryve Inside (thryveinside.com), discusses probiotics weight loss, microbiome testing, the importance of gut health, and the latest evolution in microbiome products.

Hull talks about the early origins of Thryve, and explains how they grew from solely a microbiome testing company into a manufacturer of individualized probiotics designed for improving overall gut health. Hull describes the kinds of probiotics they offer, and how their offerings are based on testing results. As more people are discovering that GI health is an important key to overall health, new products are making their way to the marketplace, but it’s important to know which ones are right for you. Hull continues his discussion on gut health by discussing many various gastrointestinal conditions and gut distress. 

Hull expounds upon the latest evolution in microbiome products, and he explains how academic and business/industrial leaders alike are interested in expanding research of microbiome issues. Hull explains how the microbiome is incredibly influential with overall body health. Wrapping up, he discusses consumer-based genetic testing, and the ever-growing interest in microbiome issues.

In this podcast:


  • Which microbiome products could be right for you?
  • Genetic testing and microbiome testing—what can they tell you?
  • The expanding interest in gut health

Dec 06 2019

19mins

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Gut Microbiome – Dale R. Pfost, PhD, Director and Cofounder, Microbiome Therapeutics – The Microbiome, Gut to Brain Connections, Probiotics & Prebiotics

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Dale R. Pfost, PhD, Director and Cofounder, Microbiome Therapeutics, delivers an interesting overview of microbiome therapeutics, prediabetes treatment, and more.

Dr. Pfost has more than 25 years of solid leadership experience in the biotechnology industry. He has held many important executive positions at numerous respected companies, and was the Chief Executive of six biotechnology companies, most recently as the founding CEO of MicroBiome Therapeutics. Dr. Pfost earned a BS degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his PhD in physics from Brown University.

Dr. Pfost explains the premise of his company, Microbiome Therapeutics. As he states, the field of the microbiome encompasses a wide range of human health issues. With the increase in popularity of probiotic foods, clearly there is a strong interest in improving gut health through diet. Dr. Pfost states that through his 30 years of experience in the biotechnology field, the microbiome arena is one of the richest and broadest paradigm shifts in biotechnology and health food in particular.

The biotechnology expert talks in depth about cells, probiotics, and the processes that take place in our lower guts. He discusses caloric intake and “the loop” as he calls it, delving into the repopulation that takes place in the gut, using prebiotics, etc. to help the microbes produce short chain fatty acids. Continuing, he talks about the gut hormones, and the connection between the gut and brain. Dr. Pfost explains how it is important to increase the production of good things, such as short chain fatty acids, while decreasing the production of the bad things—such as hydrogen, gas, methane, and sulfide.

Dr. Pfost discusses intermittent fasting, in its various forms. And as he explains, you’re fasting not only yourself but the microbes as well. He discusses the keto diet and other nutritional aspects of various diets, and how they impact microbes.

In this podcast:

How prebiotics could help microbes produce short chain fatty acids

The benefits of probiotic foods

The connections between the gut and brain

Dec 06 2019

49mins

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Salivation Salvation—Dr. Kim Kutsch—CariFree

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Did you know that about half of the bottled water on the market has a pH of four? You may be wondering what that even means and why it matters. On today’s episode, Dr. Kim Kutsch, owner of CariFree, is welcomed back to the show to discuss what he’s learned over the course of his career as a dentist, and how it can greatly benefit your health.

After spending years “drilling and filling” cavity after cavity, Dr. Kutsch finally had enough: he knew he needed to fill in the educational gaps left by the dental school, which meant he needed to understand the root cause of cavities and the disease mechanism at play. Why do some people get so many cavities despite flossing and brushing every day, while others go their whole lives with less-than-ideal oral hygiene and not one cavity? Are genetics or environmental factors at play in dentistry?

“It all goes back to the pH in the mouth,” he says. He continues by discussing the interplay between the drop in pH (i.e. the increase in acidity) that occurs every time we eat or drink, and the body’s mechanism of compensating for that by coating the mouth and teeth with saliva, an alkaline solution that decreases acidity, bringing the oral microbiome—the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in the mouth—back to neutral pH, which is about 6.5. When this interplay becomes unbalanced, it can wreak havoc in the mouth. This means that the less saliva someone produces, the less protected their teeth. This is troublesome, considering the fact that roughly 70% of the U.S. population is on at least one prescription medication, and the number one side effect of all prescription medications is dry mouth—a decrease in the production of saliva.

Tune in to learn about Dr. Kutsch’s preventative approach to this problem and so much more, including:


  • What the CariFree toothpaste, rinse, and gel are composed of and why they are so effective at preventing cavities
  • How poor oral health and having caries (i.e. cavities) is a risk factor for fatal diseases
  • How the healthy oral microbiome functions in the mouth


Visit carifree.com to learn more.

Dec 06 2019

56mins

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How to Harmonize Humanity and the Planet - Gretchen Cara Daily, Ph.D.—Stanford Center for Conservation Biology

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You leave your house in the morning and are immediately hit with the acidic taste and smell of the thickest air you’ve ever experienced. You walk by ancient cathedrals and forests and lakes, only to notice them dissolving away and slowly dying from this thing called “acid rain.” For Gretchen Cara Daily, Ph.D., this became a part of her ordinary experience as a teenager growing up in Germany. At the time, millions of people were demonstrating in the streets, protesting the environmental degradation and corporate activities which were leading to the slow death of everything beautiful in their lives.

Dr. Daily was strongly impacted by these events, and she’s carried them with her as a source of motivation and insight throughout her life and career. She currently serves as Director of the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford University. “Looking back to my upbringing, we solved the problem of acid rain…and I feel we can rise to the task of changing the way we think about how we live on the planet, how we fit in with the rest of life, and we can crack open a path that harmonizes people and the planet, nature, the climate system, jobs, human well-being, so that’s what I’m focused on,” says Dr. Daily.

In today’s episode, she discusses the enormous value of investing in nature to secure vital natural infrastructure that contributes to our lives in ways we might not even acknowledge, but rely upon each day. This includes everything from our morning cups of coffee to our mental and physical health. She explains the goal of the global initiative called the Natural Capital Project, which is to shine a light on the connections between nature and our well-being, the causes of environmental problems, the importance of making education on environmental science accessible to everyone, and the need to quantify the value of nature in ways that can be integrated into financial and policy decision-making practices.

By tuning in, you’ll discover:

·  How to create better access to green space in otherwise totally urbanized environments, and how this can improve mental and physical health

·  What percentage of humanity now lives in cities, and the projected percentage by around 2050

·  How satellite images can indicate the economic status of a geographic region

Learn more by visiting https://naturalcapitalproject.stanford.edu/.

Dec 05 2019

21mins

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What’s in YOUR Gut? – Fedor Galkin, Project Manager at Insilico Medicine, Inc. – Advanced Study of the Microbiome

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Fedor Galkin, Project Manager at Insilico Medicine, Inc., discusses his work studying the microbiome, human genotypes, and aging/longevity.

Galkin graduated from Moscow State University with a degree in Bioengineering & Bioinformatics. His work focuses on human microbiome aging clocks based on deep learning. Interestingly, the microbiome can serve as an incredibly accurate biological clock, able to predict the age of many people within just years.

Galkin discusses the earliest microbiome aging clocks and recent advances, and the technology that is behind them. Some of these technologies can make assessments based on an individual’s blood biochemistry and gene expression levels, etc., but as he states there has never before been a clock that predicts age based on gut microbes. Galkin discusses their work in detail, discussing how they select and look at the microbes.

Galkin explains the correlations and organization in the microbes, and how with age, things fluctuate. He details how they observe the changes that show age, and how certain conditions, such as diabetes will make the gut microbes appear as a much older person. Continuing, the bioengineering expert talks about nutrients, and how supplements, etc. can impact the biological systems. And he explains how their work on the species level is ongoing, but that they hope to delve deeper into the functional and genetic level as well, in their continued study of the human microbiome.

In this podcast:

What is a microbiome aging clock?

How nutrients play a role in the gut microbiome

The role of supplements in biological health

Dec 02 2019

33mins

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Testing for Cancer – Gregory Kuehn, MBA, President and COO of Prescient Metabiomics – Colon Cancer, the Microbiome, Testing

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Gregory Kuehn, MBA, President and COO of Prescient Metabiomics, formerly Metabiomics, discusses their innovative work in colorectal cancer treatment and the development of an advanced stool test for cancer.

Kuehn holds an MBA from the University of Colorado and a BS from the College of William and Mary in molecular biology and computer science. Kuehn talks about their advanced work studying the microbiome to predict or associate with disease.

Kuehn discusses their work at Prescient Metabiomics, a pioneer in the development of human microbiome and metagenomic technology. Their groundbreaking research has lead to the development of a non-invasive stool test for the early detection of colon polyps as well as colorectal cancer based on advanced examination of the human gut microbiome. Kuehn talks in-depth about their early work in inflammatory bowel disease, that led them to their current work studying how to prevent colon cancer. Kuehn discusses the detail that they have gone into studying the microbiome, looking at the complex relationships that the microbiome has with the entire body. He talks about biomarkers, toxins, and the functional relationship between the gut microbiome and human health.

The cancer prevention researcher talks in detail about the various hypotheses that exist in their area of research, and why colon cancer has persisted. And Kuehn explains carcinogenesis and the early screening options.

In this podcast:

The mechanisms of cancer development

How the microbiome can potentially provide insight into disease development

Stool tests for cancer, how do they work

Dec 02 2019

23mins

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Sitting, Kneeling, and Backbending the Line—Dustin Lindblad—Yoga Slacklining

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You might be familiar with slacklining as the art of balancing and walking on what looks like a thin string between two anchor points, but it can actually involve much more than that, such as sitting, kneeling, laying down, backbending, side planking, squatting, and every move you might associate with yoga. How is that even possible? The answer might best be answered by yoga and slacklining teacher, Dustin Lindblad. She joins the podcast today to discuss how she became involved in slacklining, the myriad benefits she’s gained from slacklining, and why it’s not as esoteric or impossible as it might initially seem. In fact, most people who have a true desire to master it, can. Tune in to discover:

  • Why it’s important to be mindful of your breathing and how relaxed your body is while slacklining
  • What type of shoes Dustin Lindblad finds most helpful when slacklining
  • How to get started as a total beginner

Dec 02 2019

27mins

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“The Most Important Diseases You’ve Never Heard Of”—Peter Jay Hotez, M.D., Ph.D.—National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine

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“We call them neglected tropical diseases…but the truth is, they’re really diseases of extreme poverty; you ordinarily do not get a neglected tropical disease unless you live in extremely impoverished conditions where there’s environmental degradation, poor-quality housing, inadequate sanitation,” says Dr. Peter Jay Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He continues by explaining that contrary to what many people may think, these diseases are not rare, and they’re not found only in developing countries: they are global health issues found right here in the United States, and affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Despite these numbers, the major pharmaceutical companies aren’t focused on developing drugs or vaccines to combat their spread. As a result, these responsibilities fall on the nonprofit sector. Dr. Hotez discusses the efforts within this sector and by the National School of Tropical Medicine toward implementing vaccination for some of the most common neglected tropical diseases, including hookworm infection, Chagas disease, and schistosomiasis. In today's podcast, you will discover:

  • Where some of the most common neglected tropical diseases originate, how they are contracted, and what they do to the body
  • How the significant financial barriers to the development of vaccines in the nonprofit sector might be mitigated
  • Which neglected tropical disease is a major cofactor in Africa’s AIDS epidemic
  • How much progress has been made toward developing vaccines for neglected tropical diseases

Press play to hear the full conversation, check out Dr. Hotez’s book, Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases: The Neglected Tropical Diseases and Their Impact on Global Health and Development, and learn more by visiting https://www.bcm.edu/education/schools/national-school-of-tropical-medicine/.

Dec 02 2019

22mins

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A Conversation with The Monkey Doc on Host-Microbiome Interactions—Dr. Jonathan Clayton—Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska

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“I certainly believe that without our microbes, our immune systems wouldn’t be primed, we wouldn’t be able to digest many of the foods that we consume…and we wouldn’t be able to protect from pathogens, so they basically do it all,” says Dr. Jonathan Clayton, assistant professor (better known as “The Monkey Doc”) at the University of Nebraska.

Despite a growing amount of evidence suggesting that the human microbiome impacts us in significant ways, there’s still so much we don’t know. For instance, what can be learned about site-specific microbial communities within our body, or even throughout a single organ such as the skin? What can be said about the relationship between the gut microbiome and the brain, or between stress and the microbiome? How does diet impact the microbiome? How quickly can the microbiome change in response to different environmental stimuli? These are just a few of the questions that Dr. Clayton is interested in answering.

By tuning in, you’ll hear his take on all of this and more, including:

  • What insights were gained from Dr. Clayton’s biomedical research on the differences between the microbiomes of wild versus captive non-human primates
  • How dysbiosis and diversity is defined in terms of microbiota
  • What types of challenges are inherent in these areas of research, and where Dr. Clayton plans to direct future research

Nov 27 2019

43mins

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Minding Your Microbiome with Every Meal—Guru Banavar—Viome

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“In the developed world in the last few decades, there’s been a tremendous increase in the number of people who have chronic illness…if you look around you, every other person probably has some kind of chronic illness, whether it’s some kind of autoimmune disease, metabolic, neurologic…[or] cancer,” says Guru Banavar, Chief Technology Officer at Viome. The point he makes is hard to refute, but is it equally as hard to explain what’s contributing to the rise in chronic illness? According to Banavar, chronic illnesses are driven by the gut microbiome, and if for no other reason, that’s why we need to take a closer look at it. At Viome, chronic disease prevention is the central focus, and they believe that in order to do this, we first need to understand gene expression, and harness the power of the right kinds of foods and supplements—the kinds that work with and are required by the gut microbiome for the activation of important microbial pathways. The team at Viome is conducting microbiome research using stool samples from about 100,000 current customers and delivering app-based, personalized recommendations for what to eat to mind your microbiome. Tune in to discover:

  • How Viome can tell you which types of foods can turn on or off inflammatory pathways in your gut microbiome
  • What differs between the microbiomes of people who have a high versus low glycemic index, or normal GI phenotype versus irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • What we might learn from longitudinal studies of the microbiome currently being conducted by the team at Viome

Nov 27 2019

39mins

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An Analysis of Pancreatic Tumor Microbiomes—Florencia McAllister, MD—Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Center at the University of Texas

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Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressively malignant cancers that exist; despite all the knowledge we have about the mechanisms at play in pancreatic cancer and many attempts at finding a treatment that works, the survival rate is only nine percent in five years after diagnosis. In the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention at the University of Texas, Dr. Florencia McAllister’s goal is to change this by developing better preventative and therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. She is focused on understanding the interaction between the immune system and very early-stage cancer. How is it that cancer can emerge in the body yet remain undetected by the immune system? And if we can answer this question, can we also figure out how to change it? Part of this research involves a look at the microbiome of pancreatic tumors and a comparison to the microbiome of the gut. What, if any, are the associations between the gut and tumor microbiomes, and between the bacteria in tumors and the immune response? Answering these questions is the crux of Dr. McAllister’s work, and she joins the podcast today to discuss all the details. By tuning in, you will learn:

  • What Dr. McAllister and her team has learned by comparing the tumor microbiomes of long-term versus short-term survivors of pancreatic cancer
  • How the microbiome of pancreatic tumors differs from the microbiome of the rest of the pancreas
  • What causes someone to be at high risk for developing pancreatic cancer

Nov 26 2019

32mins

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Would You Trade Your Privacy for Information About Your Genome?—Kristen V. Brown—Futures of Health Reporter, Bloomberg News

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We’re living in an age of unprecedented access to genomic data; all we have to do is send off a sample of saliva in the mail to a company like 23andMe or Ancestry to get a comprehensive report containing information about our ancestral lineage, diseases we might pass on to our children, and diseases we might develop during our lifetime. There’s no question that understanding genomic data affords a great benefit to many people, but there’s a tradeoff that’s critical to acknowledge, and it’s one of privacy. Where does our information go once in the hands of these companies? Can it really be deleted at the press of a button, as we are led to believe?

If you have been under the impression that you have control over your genomic data, even after it’s been tested by a company, you aren’t alone. Most people don’t realize that once a sample of DNA undergoes health-related genomic data analysis, federal law dictates that it must be saved. In other words, it would be illegal for a company like 23andMe or Ancestry to delete it. If this were more widely understood by the public, it might change the frequency and ease with which we hand over our DNA. This might be particularly true if we were more cognizant of the fact that our DNA doesn’t just contain information about ourselves, but about those related to us. Kristen V. Brown, reporter with Bloomberg News, joins the podcast to discuss all of this and more, including:

  • What level of control you DO have over your genetic information, and how to exercise it
  • Why there is a federal law against the deletion of certain genomic information and genetic material
  • Where your data is likely to go once you send it to a private company like 23andMe or Ancestry

Nov 25 2019

19mins

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Disarming Cancer Cells with the Safest Drugs Possible—Robin Bannister, Ph.D.—Care Oncology Clinic

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“My reason for wanting to start the company was a very simple one actually, and a very personal one: my wife had cancer, she had breast cancer…misdiagnosed and then finally correctly diagnosed in 2005. She became metastatic in 2010,” says Robin Bannister, Founder and Director of Research and Development at Care Oncology Clinic.

Dr. Bannister had spent his entire professional life studying different pharmaceuticals and trying to understand the ways in which old drugs could be repurposed, but now there was a new level of urgency to his work. He knew he had to act quickly. To find the drug he was looking for, he first had to reduce the list of 5,000 or so drugs to a list that was more manageable, and he did this by focusing on those that had a long history of safe use and mild side effects, particularly in cancer patients.

The basis of the treatment provided at Care Oncology Clinic takes advantage of the Warburg effect—the metabolic processes used by cancer cells to stay alive and grow. The Care Oncology protocol employs drugs which, simply put, make it exceedingly difficult for cancer cells to survive by limiting the resources they use in order to defend themselves in harsh environments—environments created not only by the standard of care for cancer, but also the body’s own immune system. By tuning in to today’s episode, you will learn the details of this and more, including:

  • What an efflux pump is and how exactly it’s used by cancer cells
  • Why the standard of care is not perfect, but often has a part to play in the treatment of cancer
  • How the Care Oncology protocol can serve as an adjunct to the treatment for all cancer types

Locate the Care Oncology USA website at https://careoncology.com/.

Nov 25 2019

38mins

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Hearing What You Treat: Insight from an Uncommon Audiologist—Jennifer Conlin, Au.D.—Love to Hear Again Audiology

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You hear a sound, and you absolutely hate it; as a result, your brain prioritizes that sound, further and more deeply ingraining it in your brain. This experience creates a very negative emotional and physiological reaction in you, and could be triggered by any number of sounds commonly encountered in modern life—the sound of someone chewing gum, tapping, dripping water…you name it. There’s a name for this, and it’s misophonia. 

In addition to misophonia, Jennifer Conlin, Doctor of Audiology, has tinnitus, which is a condition that involves hearing a high-frequency tone that becomes chronic, causes a negative emotional response, and leads to a negative feedback loop in the brain. It might be hard to see the good in having both of these conditions, but it’s what ultimately led Dr. Jennifer Conlin to not only identify her speech-language pathology specialty and foster her love of audiology but help others through a myriad of auditory problems in her role as an audiologist at Love to Hear Again Audiology in Texas.

In this episode, you will learn:

· In what ways different brands of hearing aids differ from each other

· How artificial intelligence is being implemented in hearing aids, to include language translations and fall detection

· How tinnitus and other auditory conditions can be treated

· How a person’s hearing can impact their mental state, including the development of dementia, social withdrawal, depression, and chronic fatigue  

Tune in and visit love2hearagain.com to learn more.

Nov 22 2019

36mins

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Extracellular Vesicles: A Second Look at What Was Once Deemed Waste—Joy Wolfram, Ph.D.—The Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Lab, Mayo Clinic in Florida

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Not more than 10 years ago, the consensus among most scientists was that extracellular vesicles (EVs)—biological particles found in our urine, saliva, and throughout our bodies—were mere waste products with no role in communication between cells. Today, we know that’s simply not true: EVs certainly play a role in cell communication, but the extent to which they do so is still a topic of research. We also know that they have the potential to be used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, the identification of EVs in the blood can be diagnostic of cancer, and we know that metastatic cancer cells release EVs that are softer than other types of EVs. Additionally, EVs can be taken from fat tissue and used for therapeutic purposes.

This is just a fraction of what Joy Wolfram, Ph.D., Director of The Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Florida discusses on the podcast today. She also explains the work they are doing to synthesize nanoparticles which are capable of being modified in a way that allows them to transport therapeutic agents (e.g. cancer drugs, anti-inflammatory compounds) through the bloodstream and directly to the site of diseased tissue. By tuning in, you’ll learn about all of this and more, including:

  • What specific types of benefits can be conferred by nanomedicine
  • How an analysis of the sugars on the surface of EVs might predict whether a cancer is likely to metastasize in a patient
  • How an understanding of EVs could be applied to regenerative medicine

Nov 22 2019

31mins

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Food Allergy Fix—Dr. Richard Wasserman, M.D., Ph.D.—Dallas Food Allergy Center

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Hives, swelling of the eyes, mouth, or tongue, sneezing, wheezing, sudden vomiting, a sense of impending doom: these are just a few of the symptoms of an allergic reaction. For over 10 years, Dr. Richard Wasserman’s focus has been on developing a treatment for food allergies called oral immunotherapy (OIT), a method by which a very small amount of an allergen is given to an allergic individual as a way of prompting desensitization. Over time, the amount of allergen is gradually increased until the individual is able to consume a full, meal-sized portion of the allergen. To date, IOT has been used to treat allergies to 20 different foods, including peanuts, cashews, eggs, milk, wheat, chickpeas, and sunflower seeds. In today’s podcast, you will learn:

  • Why food allergy testing is often of no value or otherwise misleading
  • Risk factors for the development of food allergies
  • What exactly is going on when an allergic response occurs
  • Why the gradual increase in amount of allergen works to treat allergies and extremely rarely causes an allergic reaction

Dr. Richard Wasserman has a medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and completed a pediatric residency and fellowship training in bone marrow transplant recovery and immunology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Tune in to hear the full conversation. Learn more about food allergy by visiting  foodallergy.org.

Nov 22 2019

40mins

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The Solution to Antibiotic Resistance Lysin Lysin—Vincent A. Fischetti—The Fischetti Lab at Rockefeller University

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Antibiotic resistance—the ability of bacteria to survive even large doses of broad-spectrum antibiotics—is a growing problem in the modern world, one that threatens the safety of everyone on the planet. But this hasn’t always been the case; not more than 20 years ago, the idea of antibiotic resistance was not really on anyone’s radar, which is a testament to how quickly the problem has developed, and therefore how time-sensitive it is to develop a solution. According to Dr. Vincent A. Fischetti, head of the Fischetti Lab at Rockefeller University, as well as the results from phase 2 clinical trials which put it to the test, the solution lies in a bacteriophage enzyme called lysin.

On today’s episode, Dr. Fischetti explains how bacteriophages (commonly referred to as phages) kill bacteria, and how he and his team harnessed this knowledge in a way that’s led to the development of the first-ever alternative to antibiotics that’s been FDA-approved to enter phase 3 clinical trials. This potential treatment for bacterial diseases in humans could very well eliminate the daunting threat of antibiotic resistance. Dr. Fischetti brings an impressive amount of fascinating information to the conversation today. By tuning in, you’re bound to learn a number of things, including:

  • How significantly the use of antibiotics in farm animals (to fatten them up, treat them as food products, etc.) has contributed to antibiotic resistance
  • What bacteria do in order to avoid or resist being killed by a given antibiotic
  • Where antibiotics come from and how they are used by the organisms that create them
  • What the difference is between gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

Press play for all the details.

Nov 21 2019

49mins

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Skin & the Microbiome – Richard Andrews, SM, MS, President/CEO and Mark Sampson, Chief Scientific Officer, of Azitra – Skin Disease, Treatment and New Technologies

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Richard Andrews, SM, MS, President/CEO, and Mark Sampson, Chief Scientific Officer, of Azitra, a clinical-stage medical dermatology company, provide an insightful overview of their work.

Andrews has vast experience as a top executive, leading the operations, finance, and development for biotechnology firms primarily focused on novel products to combat inflammatory disease. And Dr. Sampson, recently of Botanix Pharmaceuticals, has immense experience in the development of preclinical strategies as well as clinical development plans for new, advanced antimicrobial indications. He is a seasoned and sought-after researcher.

The disease researcher, and executive, provide an overview of how Azitra strives to address serious skin diseases. Azitra combines various technologies designed to repair disease problems, and utilizes the microbiome to deliver those, thus adding to the therapeutic benefit. They talk about cancer-associated rash, and the various kinds of skin problems that they see. The dermatology experts explain the diversity in a healthy microbiome, and how there are, remarkably, up to a million different bacteria per square centimeter of skin. They explain how this network can be disrupted, which can lead to problems—dysbiosis, which is a microbial imbalance on or inside the body, impaired microbiota for example.

The researchers explain their goal to reset the balance of the skin microbiome to help protect against harmful bacteria and pathogens. And they provide a wealth of information on various cancers and the relationships to the microbiome.

In this podcast:

How the microbiome is related to skin issues

Cancer-associated rashes

Microbial imbalance

Nov 21 2019

31mins

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Traditional Medicine – Oscar Sierra, L.Ac, Buckhead Acupuncture Atlanta, Georgia – Herbs, Acupuncture, and Holistic Approaches to Health

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Oscar Sierra, L.Ac, a Nationally Board Certified Acupuncture Specialist (NCCAOM), Dipl. O.M., provides an overview of the current trends in modern acupuncture and many interesting facts about its beneficial aspects that you may not have known.

Sierra received a BS in Nutrition from the University of Georgia. He is certified in Reiki, and has intensely studied Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture via an apprenticeship for nearly half a decade with Chinese Medicine practitioners in Atlanta.

Sierra discusses the medical world’s interpretations of what is conventional medicine versus traditional medicine. As Sierra states, he practices traditional medicine, practices that are backed by thousands of years of written history, and a track record. Whatever works that is safe and effective for the patient is what Sierra focuses on. Sierra explains how ancillary compounds work, as he discusses the benefits of vitamins, such as vitamin C, and more. Sierra talks about medicinal plants for cancer treatment. And he outlines certain chemo drugs that are based on phytochemicals, and how they are useful, how they are derived, etc.

Sierra talks about common treatments they use at his facility in Atlanta. Additionally, he discusses the importance of attending to our basic three, which he describes as: adequate and balanced activity (physical, mental, emotional, spiritual), sleep and downtime, and our diet (not just what we eat but how we eat it). Herbs are great, but they cannot be the complete solution if the ‘basic three’ are not being cared for.

Sierra goes on to discuss many accounts of cancer patients, and other disease sufferers who have taken a more natural path to healing and have seen dramatic improvements. Sierra’s approach to healing is based on the patient rather than the disease. It’s a holistic, natural, patient-centered approach to medicine that focuses on prevention.

In this podcast:

How medicinal plants are used for cancer treatment

The current trends in modern acupuncture

The 3 basic areas we need to focus on to form a foundation for good health

Nov 21 2019

41mins

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