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Arts
Music
Performing Arts

Drummer Talk

Updated 3 days ago

Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Read more

Drummer Talk is a weekly podcast devoted to drums, drum technology, percussion, and many other drum-related topics. Features educator and Orlando drummer, Dave Kropf See www.drummertalk.org for show notes and more!

Read more

Drummer Talk is a weekly podcast devoted to drums, drum technology, percussion, and many other drum-related topics. Features educator and Orlando drummer, Dave Kropf See www.drummertalk.org for show notes and more!

iTunes Ratings

85 Ratings
Average Ratings
70
8
2
3
2

YOU GUYS ARE AWSOME!!!!!!!!!

By 1234567890qwertyuio - Jul 12 2010
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YOU GUYS ARE AWSOME!!!!!!! -WisconsonRULZ

Tony Camino from central MA

By Tony Geee - May 13 2010
Read more
Flam-tastic!! I feel like I'm with friends. RLRRLRLL x8 (fade out)

iTunes Ratings

85 Ratings
Average Ratings
70
8
2
3
2

YOU GUYS ARE AWSOME!!!!!!!!!

By 1234567890qwertyuio - Jul 12 2010
Read more
YOU GUYS ARE AWSOME!!!!!!! -WisconsonRULZ

Tony Camino from central MA

By Tony Geee - May 13 2010
Read more
Flam-tastic!! I feel like I'm with friends. RLRRLRLL x8 (fade out)

Listen to:

Cover image of Drummer Talk

Drummer Talk

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Drummer Talk is a weekly podcast devoted to drums, drum technology, percussion, and many other drum-related topics. Features educator and Orlando drummer, Dave Kropf See www.drummertalk.org for show notes and more!

Drummer Talk 259 – Music Theory Demystified

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Mrs. What Is Up, Shannon Kropf, joins us to help demystify music theory and why we drummers should care about it!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dan,
Hey guys, Just finished watching the companion video for episode 257 (drum programming) — great stuff! Would you consider doing an episode where you would break down the sonic elements of some classic drum sounds, and show how you would model those in your DAW? A possible format could be to play a snippet of an iconic tune from a genre, and then show how you would set up your DAW to achieve that sound. While I don’t have a DAW myself, I do have a Roland V kit, with its own dizzying array of settings. If I could see how you do this in your DAW, I think I could transfer that knowledge to my Roland module. Similarly, I’m guessing that an acoustic kit player could transfer that knowledge to figure out how to tune, mic, mix and apply effects to their kit. As always, thanks so much for what you do!

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  All About Bearing Edges (Part 1)

Oct 08 2015

1hr 28mins

Play

Drummer Talk 262 – Depression and The Artistic Temperament

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Dave and Troy discuss the realities of depression and its impact on musicians. Includes special guest, Mrs. What Is Up.

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dov:
Great episodes on bearing edges! One note, that might be helpful for someone who’s never operated a router before, is to make sure you’re feeding in the correct direction. I love these how-to episodes, as someone who’s into woodworking but hasn’t ever taken apart a drum. It’s great knowing the future options available to me! (Again, my first name is pronounced like “he dove straight into the bearing project before learning what he was doing”)

From Kevin:
Hey guys, love your podcast. Was wondering if you sell t-shirts?

Answer: You can get one by becoming a Drummer Talk Patron!

News

Topic Notes

From Debbie:

In podcast #261 you brought up the story of Travis Barker. I appreciated what you had to say about depression being real and not easy to deal with.

I’m a 44 year old woman and I have loved the drums since I was three years old. My older cousin was in a band and I used to sneak down and play around on his kit when he was in school. I joined 5th grade band but was disappointed to learn only kids who’d taken piano lessons were allowed to sign up for the drums. I ended up playing the trumpet for a semester and that was the end of my music career.

I wanted to play drums but there always seemed to be some barrier and at some point in my life I decided it was too late to try.

I went through a lot of trauma when I was younger and struggled for years with depression and an inability to concentrate. Well meaning people around me told me to look at the bright side, or that others had it worse than me so I should cheer up, or that I just needed to work harder or be more organized. For 43 years I did the best I could but a year ago (October 25, 2014 to be exact) I found myself standing in my brother’s house with his pistol in my hand. Thank God a couple of my friends tracked me down and helped me get to a hospital even though I resisted them for quite a few hours. I didn’t have insurance, I didn’t think it would help, and I was scared.

It turned out to be the best thing I could have done. I got help.  I spent ten days in the hospital and was then discharged to an outpatient program.

My treatment plan was the following:

  • Go through specialized post-trauma therapy
  • Take a couple different medications
  • Learn to play the drums

Yep. Drums were part of my therapy, right there on my discharge sheet.

Learning a new skill can counteract depression and music has all kinds of therapeutic elements. The drums are a physical instrument that requires my whole body to work in harmony. It was also helpful to tackle an activity I had convinced myself I didn’t deserve. I had thought that I wasn’t the right kind of person to be a drummer. By learning drums I was saying to myself and anyone else “I’m going to own my life. I’m going to do what I want to do.”

Walking into the drum shop for my first lesson was really hard. A seven year old boy walked out the door and hopped into his mom’s mini van with his sticks and music folder. I felt really out of place but I gutted it out and entered the store. A young, skinny, “musician type” guy behind the counter looked up. I cringed. When I mumbled something about being there for a lesson he was super encouraging. He told me all about my teacher, how much fun I was going to have, how drums take a lot of work and practice but that it’s worth it, etc. I relaxed. I was accepted even though I had felt like an intruder. I give a lot of credit to Donn Bennett Drums in Bellevue, WA for being so wonderfully encouraging to this unlikely drummer.

A year ago nothing was fun. Nothing held my interest. I wanted to die. Today all I want is a Tama Starclassic Birch/Bubinga kit (in Molten Brown Burst!) My drum teacher has one and there’s two in the shop. Troy knows what I’m talking about. Man those toms sound good.

So here I am still playing drums and getting ready to audition for the worship team at church. The routine, the physical nature of playing drums, the joy of mastering a groove or fill, or heck even just getting my feet and hands to play nicely with each other, all have boosted my confidence, given me something to be proud of and have been an integral part of my recovery. I’m doing well now although I still have a road ahead of me. I found Drummer Talk right away and have been listening as long as I’ve been drumming. I learn something from every podcast and really appreciate the upbeat and positive vibe of the show. Drummer Talk has played a significant role in my recovery.

Finally if you know anyone who is struggling with depression encourage them to get help. It’s usually really hard for the depressed person to ask for help themselves so help them get help. And you can tell them I said it’s totally worth it.

Debbie

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Off next week, then PASIC 2015 Recap on Nov 12

Nov 06 2015

1hr 30mins

Play

Drummer Talk 266 – NAMM 2016 Recap (Part 1)

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We’re back from our winter hibernation! We take a look at some of the most interesting gear out of NAMM 2016 on today’s show.

Mailbag

From Mark
Any tips for struggling learning double bass drum? Not getting it at all! Thanks
Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer

From Bobby

Hey I recently discovered your podcast. I am a percussion instructor in western Ky. I just wanted to say thanks for all the information. You guys talk about things I wasn’t aware I wanted to know. Can’t wait for more. Thanks!

From Bryan

Thanks for the show guys! I know the time and effort of putting on this show doesn’t equal the financial return (if any) but the service you two contribute to the drumming community is invaluable, in my opinion.

I really enjoyed the episodes on drum programming as it confirmed my desire to become re-united with midi technology. Back in the mid 90’s after graduating with degree in percussion I formed a what I called a midi-band where I programmed band parts using Performer and Band in a Box, and gigged solo playing a lead pan over top of the programmed parts. It provided a steady source of income and I never had to fire the bass player. I never admitted to my peers, my favorite part was the programming. Now with family and work responsibilities I don’t feel I play enough to knock out a couple passes on drumset in a recording session even though I know what I want to play in my head. Drum programming allows me to feel like I can still contribute some solid ideas to a project when the opportunity arises.

Another favorite episode is What not to wear. I was a little hesitant about pushing the play button on that one but glad I did – Great show! Even though I’ve moved on from playing and teaching full-time I still have a small bebop kit and all black attire ready to go. Being ready for the a last minute call for a gig is a hard habit to break. I drive a lot for work and between your podcast and I’d Hit That the miles go by quickly. Thanks again, congratulations, and I look forward to the next season!

News

Topic Notes

Tama

Pearl
Pearl’s NAMM Facebook Page

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Feb 04 2016

1hr 42mins

Play

Drummer Talk 261 – All About Bearing Edges (Part 2)

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Dave and Troy bring part 2 of our series on bearing edges by focusing on how to cut your own!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Chris
Dave & Troy,

I loved the episode on bearing edges. Between that and the refinishing podcasts, it’s making me want to dust off my old basswood Sonor Force 2001’s and refinish them. The toms are 12×10, 13×11 and 16×16. That seems really deep compared to the kits I’ve been playing on recently. Can you touch on how tom depth and bearing edge variations work together to produce certain sounds?

Also, the drums have a flat black lacquer finish I’m not crazy about. Would I be able to varnish over that or do anything to bring some life to the physical appearance?

Thanks!

Chris

News

Topic Notes

Tools

6 Part process

  1. Rough cut the shells
    • Using a caliper measure the thickness of your drum shell ( Use a digital caliper )
    • Set your router in the routing table and raise the bit height to ? of that measurement from below
    • Flush the shell against the bit so that it’s touching the blade and measure the distance between the blade and the bearing
    • repeat steps until you have the gap between the shell and the blade that you want
    • Lock your router and plug it in. Cut outside edge first: slowly ease on and off the bit using a clockwise motion. Cut inside edge next: slowly ease on and off the bit using counter clockwise motion.
  2. True the shells
    • Take a lumber crayon, and color the flat part of your edge, all the way around the shell.
    • Start sanding that edge of the shell until you see no more markings from your crayon.
    • Do this to both edges of the shell
    • check the evenness of the shell you may have to sand more or you may have to go back to the router and recut the edges again, then use the truing table to get that consistent flatness.
  3. Cut the inside
    • Set the height of the router bit to fit the inner edge profile you are trying to attain
    • Route inside of one drum shell, and determine if you need a bigger cut. to cut more material you must raise your router bit height.)
    • Once you have a desirable inside edge on your first shell, cut all the inside edges on all your drums
    • Adjust router bit slightly higher for thicker shells ( bass drums ) and cut the inside edge.
  4. Cut the outside
    • If your shells are finished or have a wrap – use ¾ inch blue painters tape around the outside of the shells ( clean your router bit with tweezers after each shell – make sure your router is turned off when you do it )
    • Set the height of the router bit for the outside edge profile you are trying to attain. In most cases, this will either be a very small cut (since we rough cut the outside edge already), or just slightly bigger than the rough cut edge.
    • Route outside of one drum shell, and determine if you need a bigger cut
    • Once you have a desirable outside edge on your first shell, cut all the outside edges on all of your drums including thick shells.
    • Adjust router bit slightly higher for thicker shells, and cut comparable outside edge to complete the bearing edge profile you desire.
  5. Match bass drum hoops
    • Cut inner edge of one side of both of your bass drum hoops.
    • Determine whether your bass drum claws have a rounded hook, or a flat style hook on them.
    • If flat is needed, leave the hoop as is. If round use a roundover bit
  6. Final finishing
    • Hand file bearing edge at wrap overlap (if you have drum wrap overlaps) making sure there are no sharp edges
    • Hand sand the inside edge, outside edge, and the apex of the drum with 320 grit sandpaper to finish the wood.

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Oct 23 2015

1hr 36mins

Play

Drummer Talk 267 – NAMM 2016 Recap (Part 2)

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We continue our series on new gear from NAMM 2016!

Opening Detritus

Mailbag

From Dan:
Hey guys! So happy you’re back on the air after your winter break! I have to admit that I was starting to get concerned and on the verge of sending you one of those “Are you OK?” emails. I’m glad that it was all just a case of being super busy.

I’m writing because I want to share a practice tip with my fellow listeners, one that I’ve found invaluable and doesn’t get mentioned as often as I would think. Namely, practicing in front of a mirror. If you step into a gym or dance studio, one of the first things you’ll notice is mirrors everywhere, in recognition that form has a direct impact on athletic and artistic performance. The same is certainly true for drumming.

So about a year ago I dug out an old mirror, spent about 10 bucks for materials at my local home center, and built myself an easel to hang the mirror from. That simple solution lets me monitor the quality and symmetry of my movements in a way I couldn’t otherwise do, every time I practice. As a bonus, it also lets me keep tabs on the funny faces I might be apt to make while playing, faces that I wouldn’t want to share with an audience! In short: 10 bucks well spent.

I hope others will find this helpful. As always, thanks so much for what you do for the drumming community.

Your friend, Dan
http://www.amazon.com/Crayola-Count-Washable-Window-Markers/dp/B001FQKPSU

Tom D
Regarding top 50 drummer list, I was surprised Stewart Copeland was not on the list. I was delighted to Mitch Mitchell on the list. I don’t think he gets mentioned enough when speaking of great drummers. Love the podcast!

Topic Notes

DW/PDP

Sakae

Gretsch

Yamaha

Sonor

Canopus

Ludwig

Dixon

Natal

Mapex

Gon Pops

Remo

Latin Percussion

Music from this week’s show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Mar 04 2016

1hr 24mins

Play

Drummer Talk 257 – Hands-On Drum Programming

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We continue our examination of drum programming with a demonstration on how to craft convincing drum patterns in a DAW. Be sure to watch the supplemental video!

Opening Detritus

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Max,
Hey! I just subscribed to your podcast but I was wondering if there’s any easy way to download and access older podcasts!

From Dov,
Great episode on drum programming! I’d like to share a few comments from my experience. I was in film school from 2004 to 2008, and used Pro Tools for all of my sound design and Foley/ADR work. I can attest that they have always been behind major OS releases, since long before Avid bought them. It is definitely annoying, but that one specific thing is not Avid’s fault. You would hope that they cared enough to test and certify against the betas and release an update to coincide with the public release. Betas have always been available to developers, and are now available even to the public, but alas, they care not. It’s an inconvenience to wait on the major OS updates, but even more problematic with the minor point releases, which you’re more likely to install without a second thought.

From Brady,
I recently got back into drumming after a 5 year hiatus and finding this podcast was an absolute blessing. I listened to every episode on iTunes in just a couple of weeks and was ecstatic to see a new episode up!

I have been kicking around the idea of diving into a DAW and trying to record some stuff from my Roland kit and the ‘DAWs in a nutshell’ was really helpful-as I was completely lost when looking at them online. Thanks for breaking it down from a drummer’s perspective.

Just wanted to drop you guys a line and tell you how much I appreciate this podcast and the wisdom, knowledge and advice that I have taken from it. Thanks, Brady P

PS- I bought a Tama Starclassic B/B a couple of weeks before I started to listen to the podcast and I love all the positive things I hear you guys say about it, and that Troy just bought one himself. I love that thing!

From Craig
Huge thanks to you guys for the refinishing drums episodes. It was truly the inspiration behind vision drum wrap. It all started with this show inspiring me to fix up my daughters old drums. I wanted something custom that was all her and started looking at the other wrap companies and just didn’t like what I was seeing. So I remembered a friend of mine had a really large flatbed printer that will print on anything up to 4″ thick. So we discussed many material options for strength and durability and came up with a new type of wrap. Here are some of the kits that have already been done just for locals that have really loved the product.

From Tom
Loved your Restoration show. Any recommendations for chrome paint on metal? Most of the highest rated ones I found on the Internet are for plastics. Thanks

From Pacemaker
Hey guys! welcome back, you’ve been missed this summer. I just came across this and it goes against everything i’ve seen about drum tuning. What’s your take?

News

Topic Notes

  • Drum Programing Plugins
  • Akai MPD18
  • Question: Could you make a complex track sound convincingly realistic if you imagine them being played by two separate drummers (as in a band like The Grateful Dead) as you compose? Thanks, and I can’t wait for the next part(s) in this series!

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!

Sep 24 2015

1hr 54mins

Play

Drummer Talk 256 – Drum Programming 101

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We’re back from Summer break with a fresh show talking about why we drummers should look at learning to program drums.

Opening Detritus

  • What have we been up to all Summer long??
  • We have a huge queue of transcriptions!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Jonas:
Hi, i’m a finnish guy and i just discovered your podcast and now it is all i listen to at work. Anyway, i am using a birch kit which i heard Dave also uses. Could you give me some tips on how to remove the ringing around the kit? Thanks:)

From Nicole
Hi Dave and Troy, Longtime listener and fan of the podcast – first time writer. While you are on your 2015 summer hiatus, I thought I would take a moment to suggest a future topic for the show. I would really enjoy a podcast dedicated to female drummers or women in percussion. Your show has mentioned and sometimes featured female voices (i.e. February 2015 interview with Staff Sergeant Jackie Jones), but there are definitely more male voices heard on the podcast.

This comes as no a surprise, turn on the TV and drummers in mainstream popular music are overwhelmingly male. Previous generations of girls and women were explicitly told they could not play drums because “it was an instrument for boys.” Thankfully, today more girls and women are picking up drum sticks than ever before AND organizations exist to help encourage women and girls to explore drumming. If as male hosts you feel apprehensive to tackle this topic, perhaps hosting a panel discussion that includes women with knowledge about female drummers can shed light on the exciting initiatives to “raise awareness about women percussionists” and “inspire women and girls of all ages to drum.”

I am a female percussionist and have been teaching drum set for 13 years. I currently teach at the Women’s Drum Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. My experience at the Women’s Drum Center has demonstrated that after being told drumming is not for them — girls and women are thankful for a safe space to explore their dream of drumming. My suggestion for this topic is not meant to divide the drumming community by gender, but simply to shine a brief spotlight on female drummers. Such insight might help the drumming community think about ways to be inclusive to all of it’s members…or at least see things from other drummers’ perspectives. Thanks for your all of your hard work on the podcast. It’s a tremendous resource that covers such a wide range of topics. I will continue to be an avid listener.

News

Topic Notes

  • Why bother learning drum programming?
    • This is the future (present?) of modern music production (especially if it’s not 100% rock oriented)
    • Drummers make the best programmers because we know what real drum patterns should sound like
    • There is more work to have out there!
  • Difference between the DAWs
    • Logic Pro X – $199
      • Best all-around tool and best bang for your buck.  Huge stock library complete with patches, samples, and loops. Great MIDI editor. Mac only
    • ProTools – $599
      • The industry standard for audio recording and editing with broad plugin support. Most widely-supported in studios. AVID is known for spotty customer service and the MIDI editor is lacking
    • Ableton Live – $449/$749
      • Best tool for audio manipulation, especially time-stretching and remixing. The interface is unique and colorful, but many of the parameters all look alike. Its unique workflow can make for a steep learning curve if you already know Logic or ProTools
      • We record DT in Ableton Live!
    • Reason – $399
      • 2nd best bang for your buck! Solid and extremely stable (due to its enclosed architecture) with great customer support. It’s siloed nature is also its greatest weakness: no outside plugin/library support (although they do have a proprietary plugin called rack extensions)! This really keeps it from being fully embraced by the professional community and keeps it feeling more like a consumer tool.
    • FL Studio – $737
  • MIDI vs Recorded Drums
    • Strengths
      • Infinite editability
      • Infinite sound tweakability
    • Weaknesses
      • Live drum parts can have a lot more energy, nuance, and realism
  • Common mistakes of drum programming
    • The 8-armed drummer
    • Not programming out phrases the way a drummer would actually play them
      • Too dependent on short loops
    • Lack of velocity editing
  • Drum Programing Plugins

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Drum Programming 201 (how to write convincing drum patterns in the DAW)

Sep 17 2015

1hr 54mins

Play

Drummer Talk 265 – Self Publishing

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We wrap up season 10 with an episode covering the tools you’ll need if you want to publish your own book!

Opening Detritus

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Dec 11 2015

1hr 33mins

Play

Drummer Talk 264 – Publishing 101

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Dave and Troy discuss the world of publishing on today’s episode by exploring a typical publishing contract.

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Tammy

Hey guys! In episode 2 there was discussion about what effect, if any, Katrina would have on music migration. As you saw displaced drummers looking for gigs in Memphis you said you wondered if ten years later music in Memphis would have more of a New Orleans influence. Well it’s 10 years later…any thoughts?

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!

Next Week:  Publishing 201

Dec 03 2015

1hr 14mins

Play

Drummer Talk 263 – PASIC15 Recap

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Prof Troy is back from PASIC15 and has the lowdown on this year’s convention.

Opening Detritus

  • We have a news guy! Welcome, Ben Andrews!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dan

Hey Troy & Dave, I want to thank you and Mrs. What Is Up for taking on the subject of depression, and for doing so in such a vulnerable and loving way. It was such a powerful episode that it prompted me to do something I’ve been meaning to do for a while now: to go to Patreon and become a contributor.

In the show, you talked about how musicians’ brains may be wired differently, and of the transformative power of playing music. This reminded me of a NOVA documentary called Musical Minds.

One of the people profiled in the documentary is Matt Giordano (time mark 20:35), who has been coping with Tourette syndrome his entire life, and has found that the only thing that can help him quiet his tics is drumming. At the end of the episode (time mark 50:00) we also see how Matt is using drumming to help others with Tourette’s. The whole documentary is fascinating, inspirational, and well worth a watch. Fair warning though: if you’ve ever had someone with special needs close to you in your life, you may just find it impossible to make it through this thing with dry eyes.

As always, God bless you for bringing this show so selflessly to the drumming community.

Your friend, Dan

From “Debbie”

Wow – I was completely humbled to see the topic this week. Thank you for addressing this! When Shannon talked about the dread of practice and that sometimes it’s so hard to simply get started I wanted to laugh, cry, and shout all at the same time. Literally the story of my life.

I am sure that there are folks who listened to this podcast who struggle with depression or know someone who does. I believe hearing it talked about as a part of your daily lives (Troy dealing with it in his community, Dave and Shannon dealing with it as a family) WILL help people realize they are not alone and I know that will spread hope. Thank You!

P.S. More of Mrs. What is Up! She’s great!!

News

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Thanksgiving holiday.  12/3 – Self-Publishing 101

Nov 20 2015

Play

Drummer Talk 273 – So you want to MD! Now what?

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If you’re ready to jump into the next level as a music director, be sure to check out today’s episode!

Opening Detritus

  • What happened to September’s show?
  • Gigs, gigs, and more gigs!
    • Rock of Ages
      • Wigs, Fake Cigs, and Drummer Gloves

Mailbag

From Lance

Hey Dave, been listening off and on for awhile now and wanted to get your opinion on something. I’ve been wanting to get back into playing drums and hopefully start doing some side gigs down the road. However, I need to practice as I am sure I will be extremely rusty and I would of course want to improve my skills. My house will not accommodate an acoustic drumset in regards to either space or volume for practicing. I’ve been starting to look at electronic sets. All I would need is something to practice on, so I’m trying to keep it as inexpensive as possible. I saw a Simmons sd100 for $200 but didn’t like how you can’t really adjust the spacing of the pads. I also saw the sd300 which would be just about perfect at $300. Do you have any suggestions on an inexpensive electric kit (really hoping to keep it under $300) for purely practice? I may actually use it for some midi work but that’s not my primary purpose. Just want to get something that feels as close as possible to an acoustic kit. Thanks! Lance

From Maximillam:

Hey, Dave & Troy! Been listening to the podcast for the past year – but thanks to the Archives I’ve probably heard close to 200 episodes. Thanks to both of you for the incredibly valuable information as well as the entertainment. I have a legal question and can’t think of anyone better to ask than the two of you, and would super-appreciate any kind of clarification on the matter! When transcribing drum parts, are we dealing with any copyrights/licensing fees/etc? Am I allowed to completely transcribe the drum parts for a whole tune and share it with the world? How about if I were to sell the transcriptions? Again, thanks to the two of you for going strong with this podcast. I’m an absolute fan. /Maximiliam Andersson

From Lynn

Hey guys, been a while since I wrote you, but still been listening. Question, so I was asked to sit in and sub for a drummer for a cover band. They do 80s and 90s rock. I am familiar with most of the songs, but many of them I’ve never actually played on drums. No practice and I have a week to learn 60 songs. I may be able to meet with the guitar player for a little bit. So my question is do I chart out the songs? Or is that bad? If I do chart them do you have a way you would use for 5 hours worth of music with is about 60 songs? You can use this question for podcast, but if you have time could you try to respond ASAP, I’m nervous about this, but excited too. I normally just play at church lately so I’m looking forward to playing out again. They are paying me $150. Thanks guys keep up the great work! Lynn

Topic – So You’re Ready to MD. Now What?

  • Why be the Music Director?
    • Power trip?
    • Attention to detail and genuine joy from keeping all the plates spinning
    • You must have patience!
  • Running the show
    • Situational Awareness
    • Multithreading
    • Knowing what all the other musicians are doing and should be doing
    • Cues and count-offs
  • Booking the band
    • Networking
      • Knowing players you can trust
    • Know all the details before you reach out to other players
      • Money
      • Gig Time(s)
        • Including rehearsals
      • Venue and Rehearsal Location
      • Gear the players will need to bring
        • Music Stands
        • Stand lights
        • Odd instruments
    • Dealing with W9’s
    • Contracts
  • Venue Details
    • Sound Needs
    • Stage Needs and Stage Plotting
      • Power Needs
      • Make a diagram in Keynote or Powerpoint!
    • Indoor/Outdoor
    • Directions
    • Load-In/Load-Out
    • Green Room
  • Rehearsals
    • Scheduling
    • Running the rehearsals
      • Timekeeping
      • Call times vs. start time
      • Breaks
  • Charts
    • Gathering the charts
      • PDF/iPad
      • iReal Pro
    • Knowing the arrangements, yes even the chord changes
    • Are you needing custom arrangements?
  • More money?
    • Add’l Percentage
    • Flat fee

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

Oct 13 2016

1hr 43mins

Play

Drummer Talk 272 – State of the Union (So What IS Up?)

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Dave and Troy pop in for a show to bring you up to speed with what’s been up this Summer.

Opening Detritus

  • The state of the union – what have Dave and Troy been up to?
  • What’s next for Drummer Talk? We want to hear from you!

News

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Aug 11 2016

Play

Drummer Talk 271 – Agents and Managers 301

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Prof. Troy covers band managers on today’s episode.

Mailbag

From James: I love Drummer Talk and have been listening for years. I want to go back to the very first episode you have available and download and listen to them—one by one, and in order— but I can’t figure out how to get to the very first episode in the archives and begin the process of downloading. Is there a link that will get me to this first episode? Thanks very much!

From Craig: Hey, guys! Loving all the information from Troy on the different management sources for bands and artist. The inspiration that your show gives is priceless. Since listening to your shows I have started playing Tama drums (starclassic). Started building custom drums, started making custom drum wraps, and becoming more involved with the local music scene. I can’t wait to see where your inspiration leads me next! Great jobs guys, Craig. Check out my Facebook pages for the drums.

News

Topic Notes

When To Hire A Manager
Just before or just after signing a record deal or a major contract.

The Role of the Personal manager

  • Advise and counsel the band/artist in all aspects. Think COO of a corporation

The areas that a manager should have experience in are. Touring, Project Management, Income, Contracts/Licensing, legal issues, strategy and visioning.

Artist Development ( think producer meets manager )

  • Objective eye on the band/artist sound, image, performance etc.
  • Objectively identify choke points in the artist development. IE weak musicianship or song writing skills and providing solutions
  • Provide objective improvements to live performances and strategies to create a smooth product.

Business development / Procurement

  • General meetings: getting meetings with . Labels, talent agencies, publishing, graphic/web development, legal, and other entities
  • Researching and validating suitability of the previous said individuals and professionals
  • Working in collaboration with other professional in your team. Ie legal council, talent agencies, graphic/digital media etc.

All Aspects from start to finish project management

  • Creating the task to-do list for project
  • Managing tasks to completion
  • Making the work/work-in-progress and making it visible
  • Managing the Calendar IE Radio promotion, new media (Internet), sales and marketing
  • Organizing transportation to and from said events

Touring

  • Helping you find other team members: Business manager, Tour Manager, Talent Agent, etc.
  • Working with other members of your team: Business manager, Tour Manager, Talent Agent, etc.

Monitoring Physical / Mental Health

  • Being the ring of defense between the artist and the rest of the world

Types of management firms

Small start ups

  • A friend, a business person, club owner, etc.
  • The intern: because drummers cannot afford business managers they get free interns usually music students.

Mid level management firms ( Cam )

  • People with a large amount of experience/power or influence but have not been able to break a major artist like lady gaga
  • Usually have a well developed network in the industry and can get general meetings easily

Big Leagues ( Q Prime management )

  • A least a decade of experience and with a few phone calls can make things happen
  • These management companies are very well established but are able to take a bigger chunk of the pie

Management Contracts

  • Exclusivity: They will want to be the only company worldwide
  • Key Persons : The person who signed you to the company is your direct representative
  • Terms of the agreement: Year’s / Cycles / Tours /

Paying The Manager ( Commissions )

  • 10-30 % of gross earnings
  • Have a well defined contract that clearly spells out what constitutes gross income Ie recording advances.

Types of Payment Structures

  • Deferred: working for free until money flows
  • Escalation : starts at 10 or 15% then escalates to 20% as more income comes
  • De Escalation: starts at 20% then falls to “X” when more income is available

Expenses

You must decide what is acceptable in terms of “reasonable expenses”

  • Typical expenses: transportation, mail, lodging, food ( within reason ) food for meetings,etc.
  • Do not allow: Rent, leases, office machines and equipment, car payments, entertainment memberships such as gyms/clubs etc.

Prorating & Limiting Expenses

  • Set monthly caps and single purchase maximums
  • Check the books monthly
  • Prorating: A manager has a big hit band with a larger budget. They then hide the AR expenses for their other bands they are shopping around by getting the more successful band to pay for it.
  • BK and the Montreal story

Resolving Disputes

  • Binding arbitration: the use of an impartial 3rd party arbitrator that imposes a resolution
  • Non- Binding Arbitration: impartial 3rd party arbitrator the determines liability
  • Mediation: 3rd party that tries to help everyone work through it.

Limited Power Of Attorney

  • What decisions can the manager make as to where or when the band band can play in case you are unreachable

Limited Power Of Attorney

Limiting the commission after the term of the contract expires

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Agents and Managers 401

Apr 15 2016

1hr 22mins

Play

Drummer Talk 270 – Agents and Managers 201

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We continue on our series on representation with a focus on business managers.

Mailbag

From Scott

Hey guys hope all is well in drummer talk land. First off I got to say I love the podcast! I just recently started listening maybe two weeks ago. I’m listening in semi reverse order which is fun because to hear Troy’s excitement to bring stickers to Pasic or Namm (which ever it was), comes after hearing about him forgetting to bring them. It’s like reading a suspense novel backwards lol.

Secondly, Troy please please please please do a segment on cutting snare beds. I have a few snares that I received from a now defunct custom company, on which I never thought the snare beds were correct and have had nothing but trouble with my snare wires seating properly. I loved the bearing edge segments due to how well you clearly described the tools and the process and I think hearing from you on what to do with snare beds would be enlightening.

Thanks very much guys for reading this and taking it into consideration. Keep up the great work and thanks for providing the drumming community with such a great resource. ~Scott “skipper” Gentry

News

Topic Notes

The role of a Business Manager in your career

  • A business manager is like a chief financial officer of your company. The key scope of the business manager handles all financial issues such as investments, financial planning, bookkeeping and accounting, asset management and administration, tax services, insurance, and royalty examinations.

Bookkeeping and Accounting

Some of the services of business manager does paying monthly bills, collecting royalty earnings, depositing money and monitoring your bank and credit accounts for discrepancies.

Some of the bills a BM my pay from your accounts

  • Rent or mortgage payments
  • Vehicle payments
  • Credit card bills
  • Personal services such as housecleaners, personal trainers, gardeners etc.
  • Insurance Bills, utilities such as water, power, sewer, and Internet

Touring Services and Financial Controls

  • Transportation cost such as airfare, tour bus etc.
  • Lodging such as hotels
  • Salaries and Per diem for band and crew members
  • Insurance for liabilities, missed shows breach of contracts etc.
  • Logistics such as trucking and transport of gear, sound equipment and stage needs
  • Fees and commissions for Agents, other managers, promoters, etc.
  • Fees for productions costs and rehearsals

Asset administration

  • Shopping for big ticket items such as Homes, cars, expensive gear etc. Your BM will let you know what you can afford or if certain items qualify for tax breaks, incentives and other tangible ways to be a wise steward of your financial resources.

Tax planning

This is broken into 3 main categories

  • Indemnify the appropriate business entity: Ie inc. LLC, S corp etc.
  • Planning and handling of Payroll and income taxes: IE w-2, 1099 etc. Also IRS audits etc. Meet with IRS and give over all records.
  • Estate planning: Wills and living wills, Trust funds, Life insurance, Gifting strategies etc. Generally BM’s work with estate attorneys

Auditing Rights

When, How, Time frames, records requests etc. You must discuss how you can request an audit. It’s not personal everyone in Hollywood audits everyone else. It’s a way to gain an understanding of what is really going on.

Power of attorney and limited Power of attorney

  • Never Grant Full Power of Attorney: with full power your BM can purchase houses and large items without your knowledge
  • Limited power of Attorneys grant your BM to represent you in IRS audits and prepare checks for you to sign
  • In some cases set up a petty cash system and make sure you look at it. In some cases add Lower limit credit cards. Amex is a favorite for this one.

Payments to your BM

  • Retainer: Generally from 500-5000 per month. depending on the success and monitory flow of the client.
  • Hourly Fees: $20-$1250 per hour depending on the service. Bookkeeping vs Forensic accounting
  • Commission on gross income. Usually 5% of guarantees and overages. insist on contracts with minimums and caps of commission.  

Hiring a business manager and what questions to ask

  • What is the size of the firm and how long has it been in business? Small firms 1-30 people and larger firms 50 -100. Bigger is not always better Bigger firms offer more services and dedicated teams such as forensic accounting and royalty audits. Smaller firms can give you a more personalized service. Many larger firms spend more time with their more successful ( read more billable hours) clients
  • Does the BM have an area of expertise such as musicians, comedians, professional speakers etc?  You don’t need to have a Music BM but the firm should have someone that your BM can consult with.
  • Will the BM handle your Tax returns
  • Does your BM have Personal Liability Insurance and how much. Ask to view the certificate
  • Has your BM or Firm ever been sued: Bigger firms can settle out of court to avoid successful judgments
  • Are you registered as an investment advisor? If yes, then the advisor owes you a fiduciary duty, which is a fancy way of saying that she must put your needs first. Investment professionals who aren’t fiduciaries are held to a lesser standard, called “suitability,” which means that anything they sell you has to be appropriate for you, though not necessarily in your best interest.
  • How will I pay for your services? The advisor should clearly state in writing how she will be paid for the services provided. The three basic methods of payment are: fees based on an hourly or flat rate; fees based on a percentage of your portfolio value, often called “Assets Under Management” (“AUM”); and commissions paid per transaction. How often you expect to trade, and whether you want your money pro-actively managed, will help determine which model works best for you.
  • What experience do you have? Find out how long the advisor has been in practice and where. Also ask if she has any professional certifications, licenses or designations. While these are signals of credibility, they don’t guarantee a successful relationship.
  • What services do you offer? The services offered can depend on a number of factors including credentials, licenses and areas of expertise. Some offer advice on a range of topics. Others may provide advice only in specific areas such as estate planning or tax matters
  • Is there anything in your regulatory record that I should know about? Part of your research should include conducting background checks on the professional you may hire. You can visit the Securities & Exchange Commission and FINRA websites or the State Securities website NASAA as well as the CFP Board. While some violations are non-starters (settlement of multiple customer complaints) others may be understandable (marketing materials not pre-approved; non-client or investment violations).
  • Do you have a financial interest in the entity that houses my account? This is your Madoff-prevention question. When interviewing advisors not associated with large brokerage or insurance companies, ask if they use an independent, third party custodian or clearing firm (this is the entity that produces your statements), which prevents the advisor from having direct custody of your assets and adds another level of security for your account. In the Madoff example, he was the investment advisor, broker-dealer, clearing agent and custodian for all of his client accounts.
  • Can you provide three references? Ask for two current clients whose goals and finances match your own, as well as a professional reference, like an accountant or estate attorney. Who are some of the other BM’s personal clients? not just clients the firm services but clients the BM you will be working with services
  • How often will we interact? What should you expect in terms of frequency of verbal, written and in-person communication? Also ask whether the BM will remain your primary contact. How approachable is your perspective BM? Will they take your calls? Do they get back to you within 24-48 hours

Common Business Manager & Financial Planner Designations:

  • CPA Certified Public Accountant (CPA) is an accounting professional who has passed the Uniform CPA examination and has also met additional state certification and experience requirements.
  • CFP certification: The Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards (CFP Board)requires candidates to meet what it calls “the four Es”: Education (Education (through one of several approved methods, must demonstrate the ability to create, deliver and monitor a comprehensive financial plan, covering investment, insurance, estate, retirement, education and ethics), Examination (a 10-hour exam given over a day and a half; most recent exam pass rate was 62.6 percent), Experience (three years of full-time, relevant personal financial planning experience required) and Ethics (disclosure of any criminal, civil, governmental, or self-regulatory agency proceeding or inquiry). CFPs must adhere to the fiduciary standard.
  • -CPA Personal Financial Specialist (PFS): The American Institute of CPAs offers a separate financial planning designation. In addition to already being a licensed CPA, a CPA/PFS candidate must earn a minimum of 75 hours of personal financial planning education and have two years of full-time business or teaching experience (or 3,000 hours equivalent) in personal financial planning, all within the five year period preceding the date of the PFS application. They must also pass an approved Personal Financial Planner exam.
  • Membership in the Membership in the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA): NAPFA maintains a high bar for entry: Professionals must be RIAs and must also have either the CFP or CPA-PFS designation. Additionally, NAPFA advisors are fee-only, which means that they do not accept commissions or any additional fees from outside sources for the recommendations they make. In addition to being fee-only, NAPFA advisers must provide information on their background, experience, education and credentials, and are required to submit a financial plan to a peer review. After acceptance into NAPFA, members must fulfill continuing education requirements. The stiff requirements make NAPFA members among the tiniest percentage of registered investment advisers, with only 2,400 total current members.

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Agents and Managers 301

Apr 08 2016

1hr 43mins

Play

Drummer Talk 269 – Agents and Managers 101

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We start part 1 of a 3-parts series on professional representation.

News

Topic Notes

  • A Talent Agent is a person or company that role is to find you the client work and jobs. Ie gigs, writing jobs, teaching jobs etc. 
  • A Business Manager handles your personal and company financial affairs. From income, expenses, retirement, asset purchases, taxes, financial planning etc.
  • A Manager handles the day to day operations of the band or artist.

The role of a Talent Agent in your career:

  • Procure work for you or your band that is mutually agreeable
  • Help you in constructing tours
  • Strategize aspects of touring that move your goals forward
  • How to package and sell the artist or band
  • Pricing for tickets and negotiating fees for live performances ( this includes radio and television
  • Collecting deposits and handling of venue fees

Agents and Territories

  • Agents in California are regulated by the state labour commission. Agents can be regulated by the AFM Sag and AFTRA these are known as franchised agents.
  • Territories usually by continent 

Qualities to look for in an agent and agency and what questions to ask

What kind of agency is it?

  • Boutique or specialized IE A specialized Internet talent agency – www.bigfra.me
  • Full stack agency like CAA or William Morris – music, film, television, product endorsements and literary speaking engagements. or expert role jobs
  • Major role agency IE the same agency that represents major artists that you could get packaged up with. IE Taylor Swift, Metallica, U2 or acts of that size etc. They have great relationships with promoters and can generally elevate you to the next level if you perform well.

Things to look for in a specific agent

  • How long has your agent been with their agency?
  • What kind of agencies have they worked with in the past?
  • How many clients does your agent manage / firm manage
  • Will the agent you are talking too be the real agent who books you

Red Flags

  • Beware those who want income from writing, endorsements, and other works that are not directly procured from the agent.
  • Beware agents that charge fees for mail, calls, copy, presentation preparation etc.
  • Agents that will book you everywhere or for anyone who asks for a fee
  • Agents that say this is the standard in the business and you should sign
  • Agent wants you to change drastically to become more commercial, many times to fit into a category that they control. Many times certain agents have developed networks that they will try and fit “warm bodies” into to generate income.
  • Agents that will charge a fee for housing to be with other artists

Approaching the Prospective Agent

  • As a rule agencies will generally reach out to management companies or record labels but that is not always the case.
  • You need to have a polished product with a provable and measurable amount of success.  Ie successful youtube channel, record contract, contracts with promoters, opening for a major act etc.
  • Should have at least 100,000 subscribers with at least a few hundred videos with an average of 350,000 views after 30 days
  • Have daily weekly metrics of how your videos perform

The fees and structures

  • The fees and structures gent fee’s are 10% of the gross money the agent generates.
  • The scope of the agreement: Exclusive, Duration of the contract 3-5 years not more than 5 years for a jr band
  • Rights to terminate (setting up goals and incentives for the agent)

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Agents and Managers 201

Apr 01 2016

Play

Drummer Talk 268 – NAMM 2016 Recap (Part 3)

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We wrap up our NAMM gear recap with part 3: cymbals, sticks, electronics, and some accessories.

Opening Detritus

  • Join Dave on PSN: DoktorTakt!

Topic Notes

Paiste

Zildjian

Sabian

Meinl

TRX

Dream Cymbals

Turkish

Soultone

Vic Firth

Promark

Vater

Regal Tip

Roland

NFUZD

Evans

Sound Synergies

Music From This Week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Mar 18 2016

1hr 30mins

Play

Drummer Talk 267 – NAMM 2016 Recap (Part 2)

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We continue our series on new gear from NAMM 2016!

Opening Detritus

Mailbag

From Dan:
Hey guys! So happy you’re back on the air after your winter break! I have to admit that I was starting to get concerned and on the verge of sending you one of those “Are you OK?” emails. I’m glad that it was all just a case of being super busy.

I’m writing because I want to share a practice tip with my fellow listeners, one that I’ve found invaluable and doesn’t get mentioned as often as I would think. Namely, practicing in front of a mirror. If you step into a gym or dance studio, one of the first things you’ll notice is mirrors everywhere, in recognition that form has a direct impact on athletic and artistic performance. The same is certainly true for drumming.

So about a year ago I dug out an old mirror, spent about 10 bucks for materials at my local home center, and built myself an easel to hang the mirror from. That simple solution lets me monitor the quality and symmetry of my movements in a way I couldn’t otherwise do, every time I practice. As a bonus, it also lets me keep tabs on the funny faces I might be apt to make while playing, faces that I wouldn’t want to share with an audience! In short: 10 bucks well spent.

I hope others will find this helpful. As always, thanks so much for what you do for the drumming community.

Your friend, Dan
http://www.amazon.com/Crayola-Count-Washable-Window-Markers/dp/B001FQKPSU

Tom D
Regarding top 50 drummer list, I was surprised Stewart Copeland was not on the list. I was delighted to Mitch Mitchell on the list. I don’t think he gets mentioned enough when speaking of great drummers. Love the podcast!

Topic Notes

DW/PDP

Sakae

Gretsch

Yamaha

Sonor

Canopus

Ludwig

Dixon

Natal

Mapex

Gon Pops

Remo

Latin Percussion

Music from this week’s show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Mar 04 2016

1hr 24mins

Play

Drummer Talk 266 – NAMM 2016 Recap (Part 1)

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We’re back from our winter hibernation! We take a look at some of the most interesting gear out of NAMM 2016 on today’s show.

Mailbag

From Mark
Any tips for struggling learning double bass drum? Not getting it at all! Thanks
Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer

From Bobby

Hey I recently discovered your podcast. I am a percussion instructor in western Ky. I just wanted to say thanks for all the information. You guys talk about things I wasn’t aware I wanted to know. Can’t wait for more. Thanks!

From Bryan

Thanks for the show guys! I know the time and effort of putting on this show doesn’t equal the financial return (if any) but the service you two contribute to the drumming community is invaluable, in my opinion.

I really enjoyed the episodes on drum programming as it confirmed my desire to become re-united with midi technology. Back in the mid 90’s after graduating with degree in percussion I formed a what I called a midi-band where I programmed band parts using Performer and Band in a Box, and gigged solo playing a lead pan over top of the programmed parts. It provided a steady source of income and I never had to fire the bass player. I never admitted to my peers, my favorite part was the programming. Now with family and work responsibilities I don’t feel I play enough to knock out a couple passes on drumset in a recording session even though I know what I want to play in my head. Drum programming allows me to feel like I can still contribute some solid ideas to a project when the opportunity arises.

Another favorite episode is What not to wear. I was a little hesitant about pushing the play button on that one but glad I did – Great show! Even though I’ve moved on from playing and teaching full-time I still have a small bebop kit and all black attire ready to go. Being ready for the a last minute call for a gig is a hard habit to break. I drive a lot for work and between your podcast and I’d Hit That the miles go by quickly. Thanks again, congratulations, and I look forward to the next season!

News

Topic Notes

Tama

Pearl
Pearl’s NAMM Facebook Page

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
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  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Feb 04 2016

1hr 42mins

Play

Drummer Talk 265 – Self Publishing

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We wrap up season 10 with an episode covering the tools you’ll need if you want to publish your own book!

Opening Detritus

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Dec 11 2015

1hr 33mins

Play

Drummer Talk 264 – Publishing 101

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Dave and Troy discuss the world of publishing on today’s episode by exploring a typical publishing contract.

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Tammy

Hey guys! In episode 2 there was discussion about what effect, if any, Katrina would have on music migration. As you saw displaced drummers looking for gigs in Memphis you said you wondered if ten years later music in Memphis would have more of a New Orleans influence. Well it’s 10 years later…any thoughts?

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show

In closing…

  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!

Next Week:  Publishing 201

Dec 03 2015

1hr 14mins

Play

Drummer Talk 263 – PASIC15 Recap

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Prof Troy is back from PASIC15 and has the lowdown on this year’s convention.

Opening Detritus

  • We have a news guy! Welcome, Ben Andrews!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dan

Hey Troy & Dave, I want to thank you and Mrs. What Is Up for taking on the subject of depression, and for doing so in such a vulnerable and loving way. It was such a powerful episode that it prompted me to do something I’ve been meaning to do for a while now: to go to Patreon and become a contributor.

In the show, you talked about how musicians’ brains may be wired differently, and of the transformative power of playing music. This reminded me of a NOVA documentary called Musical Minds.

One of the people profiled in the documentary is Matt Giordano (time mark 20:35), who has been coping with Tourette syndrome his entire life, and has found that the only thing that can help him quiet his tics is drumming. At the end of the episode (time mark 50:00) we also see how Matt is using drumming to help others with Tourette’s. The whole documentary is fascinating, inspirational, and well worth a watch. Fair warning though: if you’ve ever had someone with special needs close to you in your life, you may just find it impossible to make it through this thing with dry eyes.

As always, God bless you for bringing this show so selflessly to the drumming community.

Your friend, Dan

From “Debbie”

Wow – I was completely humbled to see the topic this week. Thank you for addressing this! When Shannon talked about the dread of practice and that sometimes it’s so hard to simply get started I wanted to laugh, cry, and shout all at the same time. Literally the story of my life.

I am sure that there are folks who listened to this podcast who struggle with depression or know someone who does. I believe hearing it talked about as a part of your daily lives (Troy dealing with it in his community, Dave and Shannon dealing with it as a family) WILL help people realize they are not alone and I know that will spread hope. Thank You!

P.S. More of Mrs. What is Up! She’s great!!

News

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In closing…

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Next Week:  Thanksgiving holiday.  12/3 – Self-Publishing 101

Nov 20 2015

Play

Drummer Talk 262 – Depression and The Artistic Temperament

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Dave and Troy discuss the realities of depression and its impact on musicians. Includes special guest, Mrs. What Is Up.

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dov:
Great episodes on bearing edges! One note, that might be helpful for someone who’s never operated a router before, is to make sure you’re feeding in the correct direction. I love these how-to episodes, as someone who’s into woodworking but hasn’t ever taken apart a drum. It’s great knowing the future options available to me! (Again, my first name is pronounced like “he dove straight into the bearing project before learning what he was doing”)

From Kevin:
Hey guys, love your podcast. Was wondering if you sell t-shirts?

Answer: You can get one by becoming a Drummer Talk Patron!

News

Topic Notes

From Debbie:

In podcast #261 you brought up the story of Travis Barker. I appreciated what you had to say about depression being real and not easy to deal with.

I’m a 44 year old woman and I have loved the drums since I was three years old. My older cousin was in a band and I used to sneak down and play around on his kit when he was in school. I joined 5th grade band but was disappointed to learn only kids who’d taken piano lessons were allowed to sign up for the drums. I ended up playing the trumpet for a semester and that was the end of my music career.

I wanted to play drums but there always seemed to be some barrier and at some point in my life I decided it was too late to try.

I went through a lot of trauma when I was younger and struggled for years with depression and an inability to concentrate. Well meaning people around me told me to look at the bright side, or that others had it worse than me so I should cheer up, or that I just needed to work harder or be more organized. For 43 years I did the best I could but a year ago (October 25, 2014 to be exact) I found myself standing in my brother’s house with his pistol in my hand. Thank God a couple of my friends tracked me down and helped me get to a hospital even though I resisted them for quite a few hours. I didn’t have insurance, I didn’t think it would help, and I was scared.

It turned out to be the best thing I could have done. I got help.  I spent ten days in the hospital and was then discharged to an outpatient program.

My treatment plan was the following:

  • Go through specialized post-trauma therapy
  • Take a couple different medications
  • Learn to play the drums

Yep. Drums were part of my therapy, right there on my discharge sheet.

Learning a new skill can counteract depression and music has all kinds of therapeutic elements. The drums are a physical instrument that requires my whole body to work in harmony. It was also helpful to tackle an activity I had convinced myself I didn’t deserve. I had thought that I wasn’t the right kind of person to be a drummer. By learning drums I was saying to myself and anyone else “I’m going to own my life. I’m going to do what I want to do.”

Walking into the drum shop for my first lesson was really hard. A seven year old boy walked out the door and hopped into his mom’s mini van with his sticks and music folder. I felt really out of place but I gutted it out and entered the store. A young, skinny, “musician type” guy behind the counter looked up. I cringed. When I mumbled something about being there for a lesson he was super encouraging. He told me all about my teacher, how much fun I was going to have, how drums take a lot of work and practice but that it’s worth it, etc. I relaxed. I was accepted even though I had felt like an intruder. I give a lot of credit to Donn Bennett Drums in Bellevue, WA for being so wonderfully encouraging to this unlikely drummer.

A year ago nothing was fun. Nothing held my interest. I wanted to die. Today all I want is a Tama Starclassic Birch/Bubinga kit (in Molten Brown Burst!) My drum teacher has one and there’s two in the shop. Troy knows what I’m talking about. Man those toms sound good.

So here I am still playing drums and getting ready to audition for the worship team at church. The routine, the physical nature of playing drums, the joy of mastering a groove or fill, or heck even just getting my feet and hands to play nicely with each other, all have boosted my confidence, given me something to be proud of and have been an integral part of my recovery. I’m doing well now although I still have a road ahead of me. I found Drummer Talk right away and have been listening as long as I’ve been drumming. I learn something from every podcast and really appreciate the upbeat and positive vibe of the show. Drummer Talk has played a significant role in my recovery.

Finally if you know anyone who is struggling with depression encourage them to get help. It’s usually really hard for the depressed person to ask for help themselves so help them get help. And you can tell them I said it’s totally worth it.

Debbie

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Off next week, then PASIC 2015 Recap on Nov 12

Nov 06 2015

1hr 30mins

Play

Drummer Talk 261 – All About Bearing Edges (Part 2)

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Dave and Troy bring part 2 of our series on bearing edges by focusing on how to cut your own!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Chris
Dave & Troy,

I loved the episode on bearing edges. Between that and the refinishing podcasts, it’s making me want to dust off my old basswood Sonor Force 2001’s and refinish them. The toms are 12×10, 13×11 and 16×16. That seems really deep compared to the kits I’ve been playing on recently. Can you touch on how tom depth and bearing edge variations work together to produce certain sounds?

Also, the drums have a flat black lacquer finish I’m not crazy about. Would I be able to varnish over that or do anything to bring some life to the physical appearance?

Thanks!

Chris

News

Topic Notes

Tools

6 Part process

  1. Rough cut the shells
    • Using a caliper measure the thickness of your drum shell ( Use a digital caliper )
    • Set your router in the routing table and raise the bit height to ? of that measurement from below
    • Flush the shell against the bit so that it’s touching the blade and measure the distance between the blade and the bearing
    • repeat steps until you have the gap between the shell and the blade that you want
    • Lock your router and plug it in. Cut outside edge first: slowly ease on and off the bit using a clockwise motion. Cut inside edge next: slowly ease on and off the bit using counter clockwise motion.
  2. True the shells
    • Take a lumber crayon, and color the flat part of your edge, all the way around the shell.
    • Start sanding that edge of the shell until you see no more markings from your crayon.
    • Do this to both edges of the shell
    • check the evenness of the shell you may have to sand more or you may have to go back to the router and recut the edges again, then use the truing table to get that consistent flatness.
  3. Cut the inside
    • Set the height of the router bit to fit the inner edge profile you are trying to attain
    • Route inside of one drum shell, and determine if you need a bigger cut. to cut more material you must raise your router bit height.)
    • Once you have a desirable inside edge on your first shell, cut all the inside edges on all your drums
    • Adjust router bit slightly higher for thicker shells ( bass drums ) and cut the inside edge.
  4. Cut the outside
    • If your shells are finished or have a wrap – use ¾ inch blue painters tape around the outside of the shells ( clean your router bit with tweezers after each shell – make sure your router is turned off when you do it )
    • Set the height of the router bit for the outside edge profile you are trying to attain. In most cases, this will either be a very small cut (since we rough cut the outside edge already), or just slightly bigger than the rough cut edge.
    • Route outside of one drum shell, and determine if you need a bigger cut
    • Once you have a desirable outside edge on your first shell, cut all the outside edges on all of your drums including thick shells.
    • Adjust router bit slightly higher for thicker shells, and cut comparable outside edge to complete the bearing edge profile you desire.
  5. Match bass drum hoops
    • Cut inner edge of one side of both of your bass drum hoops.
    • Determine whether your bass drum claws have a rounded hook, or a flat style hook on them.
    • If flat is needed, leave the hoop as is. If round use a roundover bit
  6. Final finishing
    • Hand file bearing edge at wrap overlap (if you have drum wrap overlaps) making sure there are no sharp edges
    • Hand sand the inside edge, outside edge, and the apex of the drum with 320 grit sandpaper to finish the wood.

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Oct 23 2015

1hr 36mins

Play

Drummer Talk 260 – All About Bearing Edges (Part 1)

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Professor Troy drops the knowledge in part 1 of our two-part series on bearing edges.

Opening Detritus

  • Shout out to our newest DT Patrons, Craig Parton, Samuel di Prete, Jonathan Winfrey, Brady Ponton, and Eric Ahern
  • We’re getting caught up on Patreon rewards!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Eric:

Hi Dave-

I’ve been an on and off listener to the podcast for the last two years or so, and I have to tell you that the last episode, featuring Mrs. What Is Up speaking about music theory, was probably my all-time favorite so far. It spurred me to finally donate to support the podcast.

I’m a 38 year old teacher of French and Spanish, and have been a (sometimes frustrated) life-long music learner. I could completely relate to that feeling of giving up on music when hitting a wall in learning music theory (and in my case notation). Growing up taking music classes in school, I was a failed saxophone player, then a failed guitarist, and finally a mediocre snare drummer. Later in life I finally got my hands on a drum kit and felt like I had found my instrument. I progressed and starting playing in bands, loving every minute of it. But the music theory cloud loomed over me like a fowl reminder of my inadequacy. As you so rightly said, it was like the other members of the band were speaking in a foreign tongue that I longed to understand. That spurred me to pick up a ukulele and learn some easy three-chord pop songs. Ukulele got me back into guitar, and the more I learned the more I wanted to learn. Now I still play drums, but I am also learning more and more music theory just by virtue of playing guitar, learning scales, song structure, keys, chord formation, etc. This knowledge has greatly benefited my drumming. Plus now I can shred on guitar in a Strokes cover band.

As a language teacher, the entire podcast I kept waiting for someone to make the analogy to language learning. In fact, I only ever made any progress in music once I started thinking about the steps I took in learning languages, which for some reason was always easier for me. When you made the comparison to learning German, I actually yelled out “Hell yes!”.

Sorry for the long-winded email; I just wanted to say thank you so much for this inspirational conversation, and for the resources that you, Shannon and Troy shared. It would be so great to hear another episode getting more into the details of theory with your lovely wife.

Best,
Eric

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Topic Notes

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In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
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Next Week:  All About Bearing Edges (Part 2)

Oct 16 2015

1hr 22mins

Play

Drummer Talk 259 – Music Theory Demystified

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Mrs. What Is Up, Shannon Kropf, joins us to help demystify music theory and why we drummers should care about it!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dan,
Hey guys, Just finished watching the companion video for episode 257 (drum programming) — great stuff! Would you consider doing an episode where you would break down the sonic elements of some classic drum sounds, and show how you would model those in your DAW? A possible format could be to play a snippet of an iconic tune from a genre, and then show how you would set up your DAW to achieve that sound. While I don’t have a DAW myself, I do have a Roland V kit, with its own dizzying array of settings. If I could see how you do this in your DAW, I think I could transfer that knowledge to my Roland module. Similarly, I’m guessing that an acoustic kit player could transfer that knowledge to figure out how to tune, mic, mix and apply effects to their kit. As always, thanks so much for what you do!

News

Topic Notes

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
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  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  All About Bearing Edges (Part 1)

Oct 08 2015

1hr 28mins

Play

Drummer Talk 258 – What Not To Wear

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Dave and Troy share tips for gigging attire.

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Dan
Hey Troy & Dave, It’s so great to hear have you guys back on the air after your hiatus — I was anticipating the show’s return all summer long.

At the beginning of episode 257, Troy mentioned that he’s been into acapella lately and is amazed by what beatboxers are doing today. I wanted to share with you that I recently discovered a professional acapella group named Home Free — these are the guys that won the 2013 season of the show ‘The Sing Off’.  As it happened, my wife and I were lucky enough to catch them in concert earlier this week. By far the biggest surprise was the beatboxer, Adam Rupp. While I’m certainly no expert, to my ears his abilities sound other-worldly.

It would be a hoot if someday you could have a beatboxer do a guest spot on the show and explain a little of how they do what they do. As always, thanks so much for what you do, and know that I get a happy ‘bump’ every Thursday knowing that a new episode of Drummer Talk is waiting for me on my podcast player. Dan

Blake Lewis Beatboxing

News

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
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  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Oct 01 2015

1hr 17mins

Play

Drummer Talk 257 – Hands-On Drum Programming

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We continue our examination of drum programming with a demonstration on how to craft convincing drum patterns in a DAW. Be sure to watch the supplemental video!

Opening Detritus

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Max,
Hey! I just subscribed to your podcast but I was wondering if there’s any easy way to download and access older podcasts!

From Dov,
Great episode on drum programming! I’d like to share a few comments from my experience. I was in film school from 2004 to 2008, and used Pro Tools for all of my sound design and Foley/ADR work. I can attest that they have always been behind major OS releases, since long before Avid bought them. It is definitely annoying, but that one specific thing is not Avid’s fault. You would hope that they cared enough to test and certify against the betas and release an update to coincide with the public release. Betas have always been available to developers, and are now available even to the public, but alas, they care not. It’s an inconvenience to wait on the major OS updates, but even more problematic with the minor point releases, which you’re more likely to install without a second thought.

From Brady,
I recently got back into drumming after a 5 year hiatus and finding this podcast was an absolute blessing. I listened to every episode on iTunes in just a couple of weeks and was ecstatic to see a new episode up!

I have been kicking around the idea of diving into a DAW and trying to record some stuff from my Roland kit and the ‘DAWs in a nutshell’ was really helpful-as I was completely lost when looking at them online. Thanks for breaking it down from a drummer’s perspective.

Just wanted to drop you guys a line and tell you how much I appreciate this podcast and the wisdom, knowledge and advice that I have taken from it. Thanks, Brady P

PS- I bought a Tama Starclassic B/B a couple of weeks before I started to listen to the podcast and I love all the positive things I hear you guys say about it, and that Troy just bought one himself. I love that thing!

From Craig
Huge thanks to you guys for the refinishing drums episodes. It was truly the inspiration behind vision drum wrap. It all started with this show inspiring me to fix up my daughters old drums. I wanted something custom that was all her and started looking at the other wrap companies and just didn’t like what I was seeing. So I remembered a friend of mine had a really large flatbed printer that will print on anything up to 4″ thick. So we discussed many material options for strength and durability and came up with a new type of wrap. Here are some of the kits that have already been done just for locals that have really loved the product.

From Tom
Loved your Restoration show. Any recommendations for chrome paint on metal? Most of the highest rated ones I found on the Internet are for plastics. Thanks

From Pacemaker
Hey guys! welcome back, you’ve been missed this summer. I just came across this and it goes against everything i’ve seen about drum tuning. What’s your take?

News

Topic Notes

  • Drum Programing Plugins
  • Akai MPD18
  • Question: Could you make a complex track sound convincingly realistic if you imagine them being played by two separate drummers (as in a band like The Grateful Dead) as you compose? Thanks, and I can’t wait for the next part(s) in this series!

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!

Sep 24 2015

1hr 54mins

Play

Drummer Talk 256 – Drum Programming 101

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We’re back from Summer break with a fresh show talking about why we drummers should look at learning to program drums.

Opening Detritus

  • What have we been up to all Summer long??
  • We have a huge queue of transcriptions!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Jonas:
Hi, i’m a finnish guy and i just discovered your podcast and now it is all i listen to at work. Anyway, i am using a birch kit which i heard Dave also uses. Could you give me some tips on how to remove the ringing around the kit? Thanks:)

From Nicole
Hi Dave and Troy, Longtime listener and fan of the podcast – first time writer. While you are on your 2015 summer hiatus, I thought I would take a moment to suggest a future topic for the show. I would really enjoy a podcast dedicated to female drummers or women in percussion. Your show has mentioned and sometimes featured female voices (i.e. February 2015 interview with Staff Sergeant Jackie Jones), but there are definitely more male voices heard on the podcast.

This comes as no a surprise, turn on the TV and drummers in mainstream popular music are overwhelmingly male. Previous generations of girls and women were explicitly told they could not play drums because “it was an instrument for boys.” Thankfully, today more girls and women are picking up drum sticks than ever before AND organizations exist to help encourage women and girls to explore drumming. If as male hosts you feel apprehensive to tackle this topic, perhaps hosting a panel discussion that includes women with knowledge about female drummers can shed light on the exciting initiatives to “raise awareness about women percussionists” and “inspire women and girls of all ages to drum.”

I am a female percussionist and have been teaching drum set for 13 years. I currently teach at the Women’s Drum Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. My experience at the Women’s Drum Center has demonstrated that after being told drumming is not for them — girls and women are thankful for a safe space to explore their dream of drumming. My suggestion for this topic is not meant to divide the drumming community by gender, but simply to shine a brief spotlight on female drummers. Such insight might help the drumming community think about ways to be inclusive to all of it’s members…or at least see things from other drummers’ perspectives. Thanks for your all of your hard work on the podcast. It’s a tremendous resource that covers such a wide range of topics. I will continue to be an avid listener.

News

Topic Notes

  • Why bother learning drum programming?
    • This is the future (present?) of modern music production (especially if it’s not 100% rock oriented)
    • Drummers make the best programmers because we know what real drum patterns should sound like
    • There is more work to have out there!
  • Difference between the DAWs
    • Logic Pro X – $199
      • Best all-around tool and best bang for your buck.  Huge stock library complete with patches, samples, and loops. Great MIDI editor. Mac only
    • ProTools – $599
      • The industry standard for audio recording and editing with broad plugin support. Most widely-supported in studios. AVID is known for spotty customer service and the MIDI editor is lacking
    • Ableton Live – $449/$749
      • Best tool for audio manipulation, especially time-stretching and remixing. The interface is unique and colorful, but many of the parameters all look alike. Its unique workflow can make for a steep learning curve if you already know Logic or ProTools
      • We record DT in Ableton Live!
    • Reason – $399
      • 2nd best bang for your buck! Solid and extremely stable (due to its enclosed architecture) with great customer support. It’s siloed nature is also its greatest weakness: no outside plugin/library support (although they do have a proprietary plugin called rack extensions)! This really keeps it from being fully embraced by the professional community and keeps it feeling more like a consumer tool.
    • FL Studio – $737
  • MIDI vs Recorded Drums
    • Strengths
      • Infinite editability
      • Infinite sound tweakability
    • Weaknesses
      • Live drum parts can have a lot more energy, nuance, and realism
  • Common mistakes of drum programming
    • The 8-armed drummer
    • Not programming out phrases the way a drummer would actually play them
      • Too dependent on short loops
    • Lack of velocity editing
  • Drum Programing Plugins

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next Week:  Drum Programming 201 (how to write convincing drum patterns in the DAW)

Sep 17 2015

1hr 54mins

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Drummer Talk 255 – Drum Kit Makeover Part 4: Veneers

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We wrap up our multi-part series on drum kit makeovers today by talking about veneers!

Opening Detritus

  • It’s the mid-season finale. We’ll be revisiting website features like reviews and transcriptions during the summer!

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Sebastian

I’m listening to your podcast over here in Germany. You guys really make my day on the way to work every morning. Thanks for keeping me inspired.
When you said you were spending the whole weekend on improving your mixing and mastering skills I thought: Holy Cow! One weekend for mixing AND mastering is like trying to repaint the Empire State Building AND the Rockefeller Center in two days… with a toothbrush.

So apart from drumming I’m also into recording, mixing and well, maybe a bit of mastering. I’m not a professional but I know how frustrating all that DAW-business (compressors, reverbs, headroom, panning, EQing aso) can be.

I discovered another great podcast that covers a lot of your problems with recording, mixing, producing, composing and mastering. It was very useful for me and I believe it might also be helpful for you. So I would like to share Kenal Osborne’s Recording Lounge Podcast for those interested in the topics mentioned above.

Here is the link to the podcasts on Itunes. It is free.

Kendal has done several shows that could be interesting for drummers. I recommend Episodes: 13,14 ,22, 24, 25, 26, 27, 46, 49, 50 and 51

I absolutely love the idea of making a drummertalk show about composing, producing, mixing and mastering. Maybe you could even contact Kendal and make an interview with him, because I think he has some great knowledge on this subject.

Enjoy your summer break!

PS @Dave: I also have a Tama Starclassic Performer Set.

From Dan

OK, I promise this will be my last comment (rant) on the Ludwig P-85 strainer.

Last week when you read my comment you kinda deviated from the its core message. I, like many, don’t feel that Ludwig needs to deviate from the core look/feel of their strainer. If they would only make it drum key operable instead of phillips screwdriver they would alleviate a major pet peeve. By all means, they can keep the classic look and feel but give us drummers (who shell out a premium for their great sounding shells) a small bit of modernity.

Keep up the great work  guys – your podcasts are “must listens”.

Cheers, Dan

News

Topic Notes – Veneers

Places To buy Materials

Sizing

  • Measure each drum’s circumference and add an additional 3” overlap. You want to work with a veneer piece no shorter than this measurement per drum.
  • Get the width that your veneer piece should be by measuring the drum’s depth.

Cutting

  • Just in case you’re working with a piece that isn’t wide enough to cover your entire drums depth.
  • Lay your veneer out and Pick an edge and set blue tape on both ends of the veneer.
  • Extend a square, just shy of the edge of the veneer, and lock it. Make a mark on the tape and mark the other end with the same setting on the square. These are cut marks.
  • Lay down the base piece of the cutting jig, tape down all four sides of the veneer to the jig but DONT tape over the cut marks we just made. Set the top of the jig over the portion of veneer you’re keeping, and match the straight edge to the two lines made earlier.
  • At the ends of the jig, Clamp the base and top piece together for added pressure.
  • Run a razor knife against the straight edge to make a slow…. continuous pass over the veneer.
  • The absolute key to a clean cut is to Change blades frequently.
  • Square up the the opposite edge of that veneer piece by repeating the same process. Apply tape pieces to the edge.. set and lock the square, make marks, secure it, align the jig, clamp, and cut it. Repeat this process to all the veneer pieces you’re dealing with.
  • Lightly and delicately sand the edges with 320 grade sand paper.

Seeming

  • Arrange the veneer sheets according to the grain pattern you’d like to see on the drum.
  • When matched up…flip the pieces over to their back side.
  • Pull two pieces together with your fingers..and apply vertical pieces of blue tape over the joint.
  • Work down the entire length of the seam and reinforce the seam with horizontal strips.
  • Do this to all seams that you’re working with.
  • Seaming the back of the veneer first….makes frontside seaming a simpler task.
  • Cut multiple pieces of veneer tape, 1 to 2 “ in length.
  • Dampen a paper towel with distilled water and wet the shiny side of the tape against the damp paper towel.
  • With the veneer front side up.. apply the strips of veneer tape, moist side down, spaced about an inch apart.
  • Every three or so pieces…put down a paper towel and roll a soda can over it.
  • Reinforce the seam with horizontal strips

Gluing

  • Remove the blue tape from the backside of the veneer.
  • Place the veneer Frontside down, and secure both ends of the veneer to a flat surface.
  • Mix 2 part epoxy as per directions taking note of set and curing times.
  • Be sure to coat the edges, and thoroughly epoxy the entire veneer.
  • Apply an even coat around the drum.
  • After the veneer and drum have dried for an hour or more, Remove the tape from the edges of the veneer..and Heat up a household iron to high heat.

Application

  • With a square, draw a straight line down the drum…this is an anchor line for the veneer.
  • Set the drum on the cymbal stand jigg…anchor line facing up.
  • Align the trimmed veneer end to the anchor line and secure the veneer’s position to the drum with blue tape.
  • Tightly wrap the veneer all the way around the drum.
  • Secure the overlap end with blue tape.
  • Pull the overlapping side tight, and flush a straight edge to the anchor line we made earlier on the drum. Clamp the square in place, and make continues passes with a razor until the overlapping piece detaches.
  • Cut only the overlapping piece…..the end that was trimmed earlier that we drew an arrow buy is left untouched.
  • Iron the two ends down to finish the adhering process.

Cleanup

  • Dampen a paper towel with distilled water,lightly coat the veneer tape, and pick it off.
  • You’ll be able to pick off a majority of the tape, but stubborn areas can be sanded off with 320 grit paper. -When you’re applying the distilled water, do not flood the veneers surface… just make sure you’re rag is damp.. not soaking wet
  • When the remaining veneer tape is sanded off, sand the entire drum with 320 for a consistent surface. -Fill any seam voids with wood putty.

Finishing Your Drums With A High Gloss Lacquer Finish

  • PREP THE SHELLS
    • Sand your drum shells with 220 grit paper, then 320 grit paper.
    • Wipe clean then Takk cloth your shells.
    • Protect the bearing edges with blue tape, and protect the inner shell with tinfoil.
  • SPRAY SEALER
    • Seal the pores of the wood and create a smooth base with lacquer sanding sealer.
    • Coat 1 gets 3 light passes and 20 minutes of drying.
    • Coat 2 gets 3 passes and an hour of drying.
    • Coat 3 also gets 3 passes and an hour of drying,
    • Coat 4 gets 3 passes and should dry overnight.
    • In the morning, very very lightly sand the drum with 320 grit paper.
    • Wipe it with a shop towel, and use a Takk cloth to wipe the drum.
  • SPRAY LACQUER – Lacquer takes place over the course of three days, repeating an identical schedule on each day.
    • Day 1: 3 light passes and 3 hours of drying. Tack cloth before coat 2, and make 3 passes and allow 3 hours for drying. -Tack cloth before the last coat of the day, make 3 passes, and allow the drum to dry overnight. Sink 400, 600, and 800 grit WET/DRY sandpaper in water overnight. Lay a weight on top to keep the paper submerged.
    • Day 2: lightly sand the drum with wet, 400 grit paper. Wipe the drum clean with a CLEAN towel, and move onto a light sanding of wet 600 grit paper. -Wipe the drum, and lightly sand with wet 800 grit paper. -Before moving onto coat 4 of lacquer, wipe your drum and tack cloth it. -Coat 4 gets 3 light passes and 3 hours of drying. -Tack cloth before coat 5, and make 3 light passes and allow 3 hours of drying. -Tack cloth before the last coat of the day, and apply 3 light passes and allow the drum to sit overnight. -Sink new sheets of 400, 600 and 800 grit WET/DRY sandpaper overnight.
    • Day 3: lightly sand the drum with wet, 400 grit paper. Wipe the drum, and move onto wet 600 grit. Wipe the drum, and lightly sand with wet 800 grit paper. -Before coat 7 of lacquer, wipe your drum and tack cloth it. -Coat 7 gets 3 light passes and 3 hours of drying. -Tack cloth the drum before coat 8, and spray 3 light passes and allow 3 hours of drying. -Tack cloth before the last coat of lacquer, and apply 3 light passes and allow the drum to sit overnight. -If you want to continue building lacquer coats…follow the daily shooting and sanding schedule. -Sink 400 through 2000 grit WET/DRY sandpaper overnight.
  • FINAL SANDING
    • In the morning, start with a light sanding of wet 400, and work through each grit until you’ve reached 2000, wiping the drum in between each grit.
    • After 2000 grit, wipe the surface clean before we polish the drum.
    • Have the drum rested on a padded surface.
    • Apply 3M car polish to a cotton rag or t-shirt.
    • Work in a small zone…and rub the polish into the drum In a circular motion.
    • Work with pressure until you’ve Built up a haze on the surface.
    • Flip the rag to a dry section and buff out the haze with moderate pressure.
    • Work in small zones until the entire drum has a mirror sheen.
    • Remove the inner prep material, and pull the protective blue tape from the bearing edge.

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

See you in the Fall!

Jun 11 2015

1hr 32mins

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Drummer Talk 254 – Drum Kit Makeover Part 3: Refinishing

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We dive into refinishing on part 3 of our series on drum kit makeovers!!

Opening Detritus

Drummer Talk Mailbag

From Rich:

Thank you Dave and Troy!

I’m totally geeking out on the refinishing series. I’ve been contemplating building an exotic wood kit from Keller shells so can’t wait for the show on veneering. Recovering my current (cheap Guitar Center Sound Percussion) kit, however, may be more realistic. I’ve replaced everything but the hardware, tung oiled the interior, and cleaned up the bearing edges. While not as punchy as I would like, my drum teacher is amazed at the sound quality. Dave jokes about Wal-mart contact paper, but before these shows I actually considered putting 3M carbon fiber automotive vinyl over the existing wrap. After listening to the re-wrapping show, I found that Bum Wrap Drum Company has some beautiful exotic wood wraps. Re-wrapping my current kit would certainly be easier than veneering new shells, but I don’t think I could ever get over the psychological hurdle of knowing that I’m playing crappy shells. I’d love your thoughts.

Rich

From Chris:

Dave and Troy, I love the podcast. It helps get me through the work week. In the past, Troy has mentioned music companies are always looking for technology specialists. Can you touch on ways to seek out these opportunities and maybe list off top music companies that are out there? From what I have seen, many companies are held by larger organizations and jobs may be posted under a different company than expected. I’d love to do something involving music, but have not been able to find anything in the Missouri area. Any ideas? Thanks! Chris

From Dan:

Greetings gentlemen. First off, if this podcast ever went off the air there’d be a void in my life that would, sadly, remain unfulfilled. So, do me (and drummers worldwide) the favour of keeping on doing what you’re doing! OK, enough butt-kissing… I just finished listening to and thoroughly enjoying episode 252. One thing that made me go “what the heck…” was the comment about how Ludwig replacement parts are so ubiquitous. This may be true with the exception of the P-85 strainer. I’ve called/emailed every drum part company I can find and no one makes a 2.5″ hole spaced aftermarket strainer. All of the P-85 style options won’t fit Ludwig’s spacing. I have an LM402 and an Acrolite and it drives me nuts that it’s not drum key operable. When you said they’ve been using this design for 60 years I believe it. If they would only get with the program every other drum company figured out 30+ years ago I (and many others) quit b****ing about it. I love Ludwig snares, but for the price they charge it’s frankly idiotic that they continue to use Phillips head screws instead of drum key screws. Rant over, thanks for reading.

News

Topic Notes

Places To buy Materials

Pre production – Remove all hardware, badges and vent holes

Staining your Drums

  • 2 easy types of stain
    WATER OR ALCOHOL? -Water based dyes are best when used over a raw shell.. like a keller shell for example. If you are staining a drum shell with an exotic veneer over it… you do not want to use water. Alcohol based dyes work great on unfinished, raw drum shells however they also work great on sealed drum shells and veneered drum shells.
  • 3 stages of staining
    • 1. Prepare the wood
    • 2. Mix the stain
    • 3. Stain the wood
    • 4. Optional seal in the wood
  • Water based stain – Very easy to mix and apply – Long work time
  • Alcohol based stain – Very easy to mix and apply- slightly shorter work time

Water Based Dye

  1. Sand with the grain of the drum, using 220 grit attached sanding block. Wipe the surface of the drum with a shop towel to remove the dust. Wipe a damp shop towel over the surface of the drum shell and let the drum dry for 30 minutes. Sand with 320 grit paper..sand the drum evenly then wipe clean with a shop towel. Prep inside of shell and bearing edge if necessary.
  2. Mix dye: The amount of water and dye needed varies according to drum quantity and how vibrant you want the color. -I recommend starting with 20 oz. to be safe. -Add drops of dye and stir the solution. Test the color on scrap wood.
  3. Wipe the dye into the drum with a sponge. An old CLEAN cotton T-shirt works well too. -Apply the dye evenly over the entire surface. -Run the sponge to the edge of the drum, but not over the bearing edge. The vaseline on the bearing edge will repel the dye, but can be smeared onto other areas of the drum if you’re not careful. -Allow the drum to dry to the touch before re-coating. Re-coat until happy with the color.

Alcohol Based dyes

  1. Sand the drum with 220 grit paper, and wipe clean with a shop towel. -Prep the inside of the shells. You do not have to add water to the surface of the shell as we did for our H20 based dye.
  2. Mix my dyes with denatured alcohol. -Recall the mixing steps from the water based section. (The only other thing different in my mixing, besides the denatured alcohol, is that I’m using two different dyes together)
  3. Apply the dye with a sponge or t-shirt. -After the first coat is dry to the touch, sand the drum with 320 grit paper. This is called a “sandback” and is great for figured or interesting looking woods. -Follow up with multiple coats of dye untill you are happy

Finishing your stained drums

  • Using Tung oil
    • Put the finish in a plastic container.
    • Rub the tung oil into the drum with a cotton rag for a first coat.  Make sure that this coat is light and you’re not using too much tung oil.
    • Drying time is going to vary according to weather conditions. so simply allow the drum to dry until it no longer looks and feels tacky.
    • Re-apply tung oil. When you get to coat three, start laying the finish on a little thicker than coats 1 and 2.
    • I recommend Building the sheen up with a minimum of four coats, and let the final coat sit overnight. (Sometimes I will do 6 to 10 coats)
    • To attain a satin look, knock the tung oil sheen down with 0000# steel wool.
    • Just like sanding a drum shells, you want to work in the direction of the grain and thoroughly smooth the entire drum With moderate pressure.
    • Rub lemon oil into the drum with a cotton t-shirt to recoup some sheen.
    • Remove the foil and tape from the inside of the drum and Let the drums sit overnight before moving onto lug layout and drilling.
  • Shoot with Hi Gloss Lacquer

Music from this week’s Show:

In closing…

  • Find out when new articles and next episodes hit by following us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/drummertalk) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/drummertalk)
  • Want to support Drummer Talk and help us to continue to bring news, reviews, articles, transcriptions, and videos to free to you? Please consider becoming a Drummer Talk patron. You can find out more information including patron rewards (like shout-outs, stickers, T-shirts, and more)  at drummertalk.org/support.  Patron levels start at just $1. Remember, every donation helps keep us on the air and ad free!
  • Have a topic suggestion or question for the show?  Let us know at www.drummertalk.org/contact

Next week: Drum Kit Makeover Part 4: Veneers

May 28 2015

1hr 38mins

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