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Rank #46 in Personal Journals category

Society & Culture
Personal Journals

Outlook

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #46 in Personal Journals category

Society & Culture
Personal Journals
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Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

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Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

iTunes Ratings

169 Ratings
Average Ratings
143
6
11
6
3

Amazing, inspiring life stories from around the world

By Elenitha2019 - May 16 2019
Read more
Listen... you won't regret it. The stories from around the world are amazing and humbling.

Love love love

By Tpitz7 - Mar 19 2019
Read more
I love love love this podcast.

iTunes Ratings

169 Ratings
Average Ratings
143
6
11
6
3

Amazing, inspiring life stories from around the world

By Elenitha2019 - May 16 2019
Read more
Listen... you won't regret it. The stories from around the world are amazing and humbling.

Love love love

By Tpitz7 - Mar 19 2019
Read more
I love love love this podcast.
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Outlook

Latest release on Jan 27, 2020

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Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Rank #1: I accidentally discovered that I’m a psychopath

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Dr Jim Fallon is a neurobiologist and has had a distinguished career at the University of California, studying Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and psychopathy. Psychopaths are people who lack emotional empathy, who don't feel love like other people, and who lie and manipulate as a matter of course. In 2006, Jim studied his own brain and made a disturbing discovery.

Image and credit: Dr Jim Fallon

Feb 08 2019

18mins

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Rank #2: The Triplets Separated by a Secret Study

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When Bobby Shafran met Eddy Galland and David Kellman at the age of 19, they knew something very strange was going on. The three young men were identical. It took years to uncover the secret psychological experiment, which they were all unknowingly a part of.

Image: (L) Eddy Galland, David Kellman, and (R) Robert Shafran - triplets separated at birth
Credit: Jerry Engel/New York Post Archives/Getty Images

Feb 04 2019

24mins

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Rank #3: Using a Tampon Nearly Killed Me

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Toxic shock syndrome is rare, but it did happen to American model Lauren Wasser when she was using tampons. She tells Emily Webb her remarkable story. (Photo credit: The Select 7.)

Jan 30 2019

20mins

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Rank #4: The black woman who cared for a Klansman

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Stephanie Summerville tells us about her eye-opening experience as a casual worker. It was her first job and it thrust her into a shocking situation. She was providing respite care for a terminally-ill man in her hometown of Evansville, in Indiana. As she looked around his bedroom she saw a white robe and a hood with eyeholes cut out. Stephanie was a young black woman and this was the unmistakable uniform of the Ku Klux Klan.

Presenter: Mariana Des Forges
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Stephanie Summerville
Credit: BBC

Jan 18 2020

26mins

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Rank #5: Life as a lone identical twin

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Identical twins David and John Loftus had an idyllic and happy childhood. They were so alike that as toddlers you could hardly tell them apart. They were very close growing up together. But after a cricket injury and subsequent brain scan, they discovered that John had a brain tumour. David struggled but he remained strong for his brother. John did beat the tumour, but contracted meningitis soon afterwards. During his treatment, a medical error left John in a coma. He died a few days later. After his death, David had to rebuild his life alone. He changed his career and eventually had a family of his own. He tells Emily Webb how he coped with John's death and how a book about his experience, Diary of a Lone Twin, is his love-letter to his brother.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Picture: Identical twins David and John Loftus
Credit: Courtesy of David Loftus

Jan 16 2020

22mins

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Rank #6: Escape From Abu Ghraib

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The man who said no to Saddam Hussein – in 1979, Iraqi scientist Hussain al-Shahristani was faced with an agonising decision: to help a dictator develop an atomic bomb or to spend his life in prison.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Picture of Saddam Hussein on a wall of Abu Ghraib prison
Credit: Benjamin Lowy

Jan 13 2019

26mins

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Rank #7: The North Korean Diver and the Octopus

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Park Myongho is a North Korean ex-military man who defected to the South, at huge risk with his family. He now works as a compressor diver making a dangerous living by catching octopuses under the sea where North meets South. (Photo credit: Moyoung Jin.)

Jan 28 2019

20mins

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Rank #8: Making Contact with a Remote Tribe

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In November 2018, the Sentinelese tribe in the Andaman Islands hit the headlines after an American missionary was killed by arrows as he attempted to approach their isolated island. Very few people have come close to this remote community, but one person who has is Indian anthropologist Dr Madhumala Chattopadhyay. She was part of a team from the Anthropological Society of India who made friendly contact with the tribe in 1991. She tells Rihanna Dhillon about their extraordinary trip.

Image: Making contact with people from North Sentinel Island
Credit: Madhumala Chattopadhyay

Jan 24 2019

14mins

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Rank #9: The secret world of our dying son

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When Mats Steen was a young child growing up in Oslo, he was diagnosed with a degenerative disease. His parents Robert and Trude were told it was unlikely Mats would survive long into his 20s, and that he'd become less mobile as time went on. The physical restraints of his illness meant that Mats spent more and more time at home, playing online games. He died when he was 25, and his parents worried that his life had been lonely and friendless.

Then, in the days before the funeral a mysterious group of people started arriving in Oslo. Robert and Trude didn't know them, but they seemed to know Mats extremely well. They were a close friendship group, the result of a second life Mats had been living in the online game World of Warcraft. Far from being isolated, Mats had been leading a vivid life through the portal of his computer screen.

A version of this story by Vicky Schaubert was first published in Norwegian by broadcaster NRK.

Presenter: Maryam Maruf
Producer: Harry Graham

Image: Mats Steen's avatar and Mats' father Robert Steen
Credit: Patrick da Silva Saether/NRK

Mar 24 2019

26mins

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Rank #10: I Learned My Mum's Identity via SMS

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In the last chaotic days of the Vietnam War, thousands of children were sent away to be adopted in safer countries. Four-year-old My Huong went to Australia and it would be many years before she returned to Vietnam and finally uncovered the extraordinary truth about her birth family.

Image: My Huong and her mother Ho Thi Ich
Credit: My Huong Le

Dec 31 2018

40mins

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Rank #11: A Sex Tape was Used to Silence Me

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Azerbaijani journalist Khadija Ismayilova was blackmailed with a sex tape after writing stories alleging corruption by Azerbaijan's leading politicians. She's also spent time in jail on what she says were trumped up charges, but tells Outlook how she stays positive.

Image: Khadija Ismayilova
Credit: Pacific Press/Getty Images

Jan 22 2019

20mins

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Rank #12: One of the ‘Most Dangerous People’ in the World

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The British doctor Judith Mackay was labelled by some in the tobacco industry as one of the three most dangerous people in the world. Judith saw so many patients in 1970s Hong Kong suffering from smoking-related diseases that she started campaigning, hard, against cigarettes.

Image and credit: Judith Mackay

Jan 09 2019

15mins

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Rank #13: My Life as a Millennial Yoruba Priestess

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Beyoncé, mermaids and Satan? Outlook Weekend is in Nigeria looking at the mysteries and misconceptions surrounding the traditional Yoruba religion – and what it takes to be a modern devotee of this ancient faith. Reporter Laeila Adjovi travels to the city of Ibadan to meet one of youngest women to become a traditional Yoruba priestess. Her name is Omitonade and her world is defined by deities, divination and mobile phones.

Reporter: Laeila Adjovi
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Omitonade Ifawemimo Egbelade
Credit: Laeila Adjovi

Jan 20 2019

26mins

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Rank #14: In bed with an assassin

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Jason P. Howe was a British conflict photographer covering the war in Colombia, when he met a young woman at a bus stop. Her name was Marilyn, and they started a relationship that would last several years.

Over time, it became clear to Jason that Marilyn had another life. She'd disappear at night on her motorcycle. People were scared of her, bars would empty when she entered them. Eventually, she would reveal a violent secret that was shocking even in the context of a warzone. Marilyn was an assassin for Colombian paramilitary forces.

Image: Jason Howe and Marilyn
Credit: Jason P. Howe

Jun 01 2019

26mins

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Rank #15: 'Honour' made my father a murderer

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At the age of 16 Amina was happy and in love with a local boy in Jordan. She dreamt of their wedding and future together. But then she discovered a secret about her sister, which brought 'shame' on her family and her father went to violent extremes to protect his family's so-called honour. Emily Webb hears this harrowing story through Amina's words and Norwegian journalist Lene Wold, who spent time with her to write a book called 'Inside an Honour Killing.'

Image: two women walking through an archway wearing hijabs
Credit: ashariat/Getty Images

May 15 2019

41mins

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Rank #16: What I found in the minds of serial killers

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In the 1970s John E. Douglas was a relatively young FBI agent who would travel around the US teaching police officers the bureau's tactics. John knew he was inexperienced compared to the seasoned detectives he was instructing. But he had an idea to accelerate his learning: go into prisons and speak to notorious serial killers. They weren't called 'serial killers' back then. John helped come up with the term. Through the interviews John was able to understand how the minds of these criminals worked and how it could be applied to solve open cases. But the gruelling work took its toll on John. Andrea Kennedy spoke to him about how it began to erode his mental health and very nearly cost him his life.

Image: murderer Edmund Kemper (left) with former FBI agent John E. Douglas (right)
Credit: supplied by John E. Douglas

Jul 06 2019

44mins

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Rank #17: An unlikely friendship in Guantanamo Bay

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In 2002, Mauritanian engineer Mohamedou Salahi was detained by American intelligence services. They believed he was a senior figure in al-Qaeda and took him to Guantanamo Bay, the notorious US prison camp. Mohamedou was held there for 14 years without charge, during which time he says he was tortured. A glimmer of light came in the form of an unexpected and life-changing friendship he would make with Steve Wood, one of his American guards.

Mohamedou Salahi has written about his experience in a book called 'Guantanamo Diary'.

Presented by Emily Webb
Produced by Mariana Des Forges

Image: Mohamedou Salahi and Steve Wood
Credit: Mohamedou Salahi

Aug 24 2019

47mins

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Rank #18: Interviewing Mumbai's Mafia Don

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When Hussain Zaidi started his journalistic career, his home city of Mumbai was caught up in a vicious mafia war. The men who ran the gangs wielded huge power over business, smuggling and the entertainment industry. As they fought for dominance the body count rose. Hussain was a crime reporter and he wanted to get the whole story, and so he embarked on a high risk mission to track down and interview the most dangerous criminals in the city. Eventually, his work would lead him to the most famous don of them all, Dawood Ibrahim.

His latest book is called Dawood's Mentor

Image: Dawood Ibrahim (yellow top)
Credit: The India Today Group/Getty Images

May 17 2019

26mins

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Rank #19: Eric Idle: My Life with Monty Python

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Eric Idle was part of the surreal sketch comedy group Monty Python who burst onto British television screens in the 1960s and changed the face of comedy. His autobiography is called 'Always Look on the Bright Side of Life'.

Image: Eric Idle
Credit: Robyn Von Swank

Dec 20 2018

24mins

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Saving my zoo from Australian wildfires

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Chad Staples is a zookeeper at Mogo Zoo in New South Wales in Australia, with giraffes, gorillas and even tigers in his care. In December 2019, the wildfires sweeping Australia closed in on the zoo, forcing Chad and his fellow keepers to battle for hours on end to put out the fires and usher the animals to safety, and Chad even took 25 of the smaller animals into his own house. Thanks to Chad’s quick thinking and the work of the zoo’s staff, all the animals have survived unscathed. Chad spoke to Jo Fidgen about his experience.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Photo: Chad Staples
Credit: Courtesy of Chad Staples

Jan 27 2020

9mins

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The daughter and the double agent

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As a young woman Ieva Lesinska was faced with an agonising choice. Defect to the US with her double agent father, or stay in Latvia with her mother and renounce him as a traitor. Ieva says it was like she was living in a spy movie, and a film has now been made about her life, it's called: 'My father, the spy.'

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Ieva Lesinska as a toddler with her father Imants Lesinski
Credit: Ieva Lesinska

Jan 25 2020

26mins

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I was a teenager at Auschwitz

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Holocaust survivor Dita Kraus is now 90 years old, but she was only 14 when she was taken to the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz in Poland. She worked in the children’s hut and she’s now known as the ‘librarian of Auschwitz’. Dita remembers being desperately hungry and cold, but along with her mother she survived her time there. After coming face to face with SS doctor Josef Mengele they were sent to Bergen-Belsen, another concentration camp, where she saw many people starving to death. Eventually the British army liberated the camp and they were freed, but Dita’s trials were not over. She tells Emily Webb her remarkable story. Dita has written a book about her experience called ‘A Delayed Life: The true story of the Librarian of Auschwitz’.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: June Christie

Photo: Dita Kraus
Credit: Courtesy of Dita Kraus

Jan 23 2020

41mins

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The student who became my son

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Teacher and principal Tim King was working in a school in Chicago when he met a student named Keith. Their relationship changed when Keith’s mother died after struggling with drug addiction and Tim knew he had to help. Eventually Keith moved in with Tim and although it wasn’t always smooth sailing, Keith finally got the chance to be a kid and Tim learnt how to be a dad. Today, they work together running schools to give other disadvantaged young people an education.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Photo: Teacher Tim King
Credit: Courtesy of Urban Prep Academies

Jan 22 2020

19mins

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Our secret tunnel that saved the city

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Edis Kolar guarded a lifesaving tunnel built in the basement of his family home during the siege of Sarajevo. The secret passage provided a safe way to move people and supplies in and out of the surrounded Bosnian city. Edis tells Outlook's Mariana Des Forges how he lived in the tunnel house for the whole war, alongside other soldiers and his grandmother who refused to leave, helping the thousands who crossed through the passage every day. When the war ended Edis turned his home into a museum to honour the ‘Tunnel of Hope’ that saved the city.

Presenter & Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Edis Kolar at the 'Tunnel of Hope'
Credit: BBC / Mariana Des Forges

Jan 21 2020

18mins

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The virtuoso musician detained as a child

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Today, Leon Bosch is one of the most respected classical double bass players in the world but as a teenager he was made a political prisoner in South Africa because of his peaceful resistance to the apartheid regime – an experience that has haunted him for most of his life. But that time in prison also drove him to commit to playing the double bass with a passion; he speaks to Jo Fidgen about how he has used his music to resist a system that said he would never amount to anything.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Nathan Gower

Picture: Double-bass player Leon Bosch
Credit: Photography Juno Snowdon / Art Direction Adam Hypki

Jan 20 2020

23mins

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The black woman who cared for a Klansman

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Stephanie Summerville tells us about her eye-opening experience as a casual worker. It was her first job and it thrust her into a shocking situation. She was providing respite care for a terminally-ill man in her hometown of Evansville, in Indiana. As she looked around his bedroom she saw a white robe and a hood with eyeholes cut out. Stephanie was a young black woman and this was the unmistakable uniform of the Ku Klux Klan.

Presenter: Mariana Des Forges
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Stephanie Summerville
Credit: BBC

Jan 18 2020

26mins

Play

Life as a lone identical twin

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Identical twins David and John Loftus had an idyllic and happy childhood. They were so alike that as toddlers you could hardly tell them apart. They were very close growing up together. But after a cricket injury and subsequent brain scan, they discovered that John had a brain tumour. David struggled but he remained strong for his brother. John did beat the tumour, but contracted meningitis soon afterwards. During his treatment, a medical error left John in a coma. He died a few days later. After his death, David had to rebuild his life alone. He changed his career and eventually had a family of his own. He tells Emily Webb how he coped with John's death and how a book about his experience, Diary of a Lone Twin, is his love-letter to his brother.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Picture: Identical twins David and John Loftus
Credit: Courtesy of David Loftus

Jan 16 2020

22mins

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I was shot while performing a vasectomy

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Dr Andrew Rynne is Ireland’s first vasectomy doctor. He was an advocate for contraceptive rights in the Republic of Ireland during the 1970s and 1980s - at one point even facing prison time for selling condoms without a prescription. One afternoon in 1990, a man burst into his doctor’s surgery while he was performing a vasectomy and pointed a gun at his head. The gunman fired at Dr Andrew several times, shooting him in the hip. The doctor narrowly escaped and the man turned out to be a disgruntled ex-patient. Dr Andrew later went to meet his attacker and make peace with him.

He appears in a new documentary called The Vasectomy Doctor.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Troy Holmes

Picture: Dr Andrew Rynne
Credit: Paul Webster

Jan 15 2020

20mins

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Forced to teach in a ‘re-education’ camp

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Sayragul Sauytbay is an ethnic Kazakh from Xinjiang in western China. In 2016, she was happily married with two children and loved her job as a head teacher at a kindergarten. But a year after – amidst a crackdown on Xinjiang’s predominantly Muslim population – she says she was summoned to teach in a different facility, one of many camps set up to “re-educate” Chinese Muslims like her. The Chinese government claims these camps offer voluntary education and training. But the UN has called them 'internment camps'; Sayragul calls them 'concentration camps'. She says she was held there, and was forced to teach Chinese propaganda under strict surveillance. Eventually she escaped the country to be with her family in Kazakhstan. But her ordeal wasn’t over; she faced trial and deportation back to China where she feared severe punishment for spilling state secrets. Sayragul tells Jo Fidgen her story.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Prisoners in blue boiler suits inside Xinjiang camp - photo posted to the WeChat account of the Xinjiang Judicial Administration, April 2017.

Jan 14 2020

29mins

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‘I’m going to say sorry to the whales’

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talian Fishmonger Vittorio Fabris was inspired to sail from Venice to Nantucket by his favourite book, Moby Dick. But his epic voyage didn’t exactly go to plan. He faced storms and seriously damaged his boat along the way, keeping himself going with the company of music and dolphins. With his destination in sight, disaster struck - but Vittorio wouldn't give up on his dream. He tells Jo Fidgen his story.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Alice Gioia and Nathan Gower

Picture: Vittorio Fabris
Credit: Fabio Fumagalli

Jan 13 2020

14mins

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The first beauty queen in a free South Africa

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Basetsana Kumalo is easily one of South Africa’s most recognisable celebrity figures. She shot to fame as Miss South Africa in 1994, just months after Nelson Mandela was elected president. Basetsana was the first black contestant to win the contest in the country's new "freedom era" and, by default, became the face of South Africa’s new democracy. After this Basetsana hosted one of the country's top lifestyle programmes and today she's a successful media entrepreneur. Her book is called: Bassie, My Journey of Hope.

Presenter: Andile Masuku
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Basetsana Kumalo at the SA Style Awards in Johannesburg.
Credit: Gallo Images / Contributor

Jan 11 2020

26mins

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How I built a billion dollar business

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Janice Bryant Howroyd became the first African-American woman to build a billion dollar business. Growing up in the segregated south of the US, she struggled to find a good job so she launched her own human resources company. It was a decision that would add her name to the history books.

Janice has published a book about her experiences called 'Acting Up.'

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Picture: Janice Bryant Howroyd
Credit: Lioncrest Publishing

Jan 09 2020

20mins

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The pianist who learnt to play on a paper piano

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Andrew Garrido was desperate to play the piano but lessons were expensive and his family couldn't afford them. Andrew, undeterred, made a keyboard out of paper and taught himself. A decade later and what he's achieved defies all expectations. Additional playing in this piece was by Duncan Hannant.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Alice Gioia

Picture: Andrew Garrido with his paper piano
Credit: Alice Gioia

Jan 08 2020

20mins

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My nightmares about the policeman who framed me

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Winston Trew came to England from Jamaica in the 1950s and joined a group that aimed to educate children from the Caribbean about their history and teach them pride. After one of their meetings, he was arrested and falsely accused of stealing handbags. He then spent nearly 50 years trying to clear his name.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Alice Gioia

Picture: Winston Trew
Credit: Alice Gioia, BBC

Jan 07 2020

19mins

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I prayed to God to make me a girl

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Abby Stein grew up in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in New York City, one of the most gender segregated societies in the world. Abby’s parents considered her their firstborn son but she was adamant that she was a girl. She has written a book about her experiences called ‘Becoming Eve.’

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Alice Gioia

Picture: Abby Stein
Credit: Courtesy of Abby Stein

Jan 06 2020

23mins

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The Welsh miner who made wrestling glamorous

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Adrian Street grew up in a mining town in South Wales, but he always loved dressing up. When he was a teenager he started working down the mines, but his dream was to become a wrestler. He was ridiculed by the other miners he worked with, but in the 1950s he moved to London to pursue his dream and "The Exotic Adrian Street" was born. His wrestling persona was a haughty androgynous character who would strut about the stage pouting and blowing kisses to the crowds when they abused him for his flamboyant style.

Presenter: Harry Graham

Picture: Wrestler Adrian Street at the mine he used to work at, with his father.
Credit: Getty Images Mirrorpix Contributor

Jan 04 2020

26mins

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Making horse-racing history in a hijab

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London teenager Khadijah Mellah had only been riding for four months when she became the first Muslim woman to win a prestigious British horse race. Despite being the youngest competitor, she rode to victory in the 2019 Magnolia Cup at the world-famous Goodwood Racecourse.
Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Emily Webb

Picture: Khadijah Mellah on a horse, smiling
Credit: Great British Racing

Jan 02 2020

15mins

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The Godfather of Hollywood sound

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Walter Murch is a superstar sound designer, who's worked on some of Hollywood's biggest films like The Godfather trilogy and Apocalypse Now. His work has immersed audiences in everything from the clattering trains of New York to the rhythmic helicopter rotors of the Vietnam war. Walter's avant-garde production techniques have changed the way cinema sounds. His story is featured in the documentary, Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Still from The Godfather
Credit: Getty Images/Paramount Pictures/Handout

Jan 01 2020

23mins

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2020 The power of sight

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To celebrate the arrival of 2020, we're featuring three fascinating stories about vision. See what we did there? But these people do not have 20:20 vision, there is nothing average about the way they view things.

Take Jason Padgett, after a severe brain injury he was left with the ability to 'see' maths. Everywhere he looked he could see mathematical shapes. Dr Kate Stone woke up from a coma shocked to the core about the way people saw her and Helena Ndume has a wonderful job, she helps to restore people's sight.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

Picture: Glasses and a wintry scene
Credit: Getty/ Pick Uppath

Dec 31 2019

40mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

169 Ratings
Average Ratings
143
6
11
6
3

Amazing, inspiring life stories from around the world

By Elenitha2019 - May 16 2019
Read more
Listen... you won't regret it. The stories from around the world are amazing and humbling.

Love love love

By Tpitz7 - Mar 19 2019
Read more
I love love love this podcast.