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Blockchain – Software Engineering Daily

Blockchain-related episodes of Software Engineering Daily.

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Blockchain Building with Daniel van Flymen

A blockchain is a data structure that provides decentralized, peer-to-peer data distribution. Bitcoin is the most well-known blockchain, but in the next decade we will see many more blockchains. Most listeners probably know that you could just fork the code of Bitcoin to start your own blockchain–but wouldn’t it be nice to know how to build a blockchain from scratch? Daniel van Flymen is the author of the Medium article Learn Blockchains by Building One. In his post, he walks you through how to write the code for a blockchain–just like any other web app. He starts with raw Python code, defines the data structures, and stands up his simple blockchain app on a web server to give a toy example for how nodes in a blockchain communicate. For me, this was a great article to read. I have reported on blockchains for over a year, but had not seen such a clear example with executable, simplified code. Stay tuned at the end of the episode for Jeff Meyerson’s tip about making the most of a new job: brought to you by Indeed Prime. To find all of our coverage of cryptocurrencies, download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS or Android to hear all of our old episodes. They are easily organized by category, and as you listen, the SE Daily app gets smarter, and recommends you content based on the episodes you are hearing. If you don’t like this episode, you can easily find something more interesting by using the recommendation system. The mobile apps are open sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to hack on, we would love to get your help! We are building a new way to consume software engineering content. We have the Android app, the iOS app, a recommendation system, and a web frontend–and more projects are coming soon. If you have ideas for how software engineering media content should be consumed, or if you are interested in contributing code, check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily, or join our Slack channel (there’s a link on our website)–or send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com The post Blockchain Building with Daniel van Flymen appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

56mins

12 Oct 2017

Rank #1

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Blockchains with Melanie Swan

Blockchains are the distributed ledger technology underlying bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. More broadly, a blockchain is a mechanism for updating truth states in distributed network computing, producing consensus trust and serving as a new form of general computational substrate. Melanie Swan is a science and technology innovator and philosopher at the MS Futures Group. She founded the Institute for Blockchain Studies, and is the author of Blockchain: Blueprint for a New Economy. Questions: What is a blockchain? How can we generalize the blockchain from bitcoin to other areas? How does every user maintain the entire transaction list when that list is gigantic and growing every day? How do Stellar and Ripple differ? What is Ethereum? Is there a social tension between having strong leaders like Vitalik Buterin and a decentralized ideal culture? Can you have a blockchain without mining? Can the blockchain be used to prevent the artificial intelligence nightmares of Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking? Links: Bitcoin/Blockchain Explained (SlideShare) Institute for Blockchain Studies Melanie Swan bio Melanie Swan on Twitter Bitcoin/Blockchain Technology Explained (YouTube) The post Blockchains with Melanie Swan appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

56mins

11 Aug 2015

Rank #2

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Blockchain Applications with Mike Goldin

Cryptocurrencies are not only a financial instrument–they are a new platform for building applications. The blockchain allows for new solutions to digital property management, micropayments, hedge fund incentives, and ad fraud. The cryptocurrency platforms with the most traction are Bitcoin and Ethereum. Bitcoin has no central leader and is going through some growing pains with governance issues. Ethereum is led by the charismatic Vitalik Buterin. Bitcoin and Ethereum are not competing instruments. They fulfill different technical purposes. Under current conditions of algorithm development and network infrastructure, neither Bitcoin nor Ethereum can accomplish the dreams that will one day be realized, because of the problem of distributing transaction information across nodes in the system. If we compared cryptocurrencies to the Internet, we would not even be in the days of dial-up yet. ConsenSys is a venture production studio that is working on several projects within the blockchain space. Mike Goldin is a software developer with ConsenSys and joins the show to talk about blockchain applications in 2017–where we are and where we are going. It was a wide ranging conversation and I hope to have Mike back in the future so we can go deeper on some of the topics we glossed over. The post Blockchain Applications with Mike Goldin appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

52mins

6 Apr 2017

Rank #3

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Cryptoeconomics with Vlad Zamfir

A cryptocurrency has a distributed ledger called a blockchain. The blockchain keeps track of every transaction that occurs across the cryptocurrency. This blockchain must stay up-to-date and verified–which requires someone in the network to do that validation. Bitcoin and Ethereum use the proof-of-work algorithm. Miners do computational work to validate the legitimacy of transactions across the network, and in return they are given cryptocurrency as a reward for that computational work. In the future, cryptocurrencies could move towards a proof-of-stake model. If you own a significant amount of cryptocurrency, you have incentive to keep the validity of the blockchain up to date. Proof-of-stake algorithms can be significantly less energy intensive. Vlad Zamfir is a researcher for the Ethereum Foundation, and he joins Haseeb Qureshi for a conversation about cryptoeconomics. This is an in-depth conversation between two active blockchain developers. We hope you enjoy it. You can send us feedback on the show by emailing me jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com or joining us on the Slack channel at softwareengineeringdaily.com/slack. The post Cryptoeconomics with Vlad Zamfir appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

1hr

28 Oct 2017

Rank #4

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Consensus Systems with Ethan Buchman

Consensus protocols are used to allow computers to work together. A consensus protocol lets different servers agree on the state of a system. For decades, these protocols have been used to establish consensus among database nodes, application servers, and other infrastructure that runs within an enterprise. More recently, new consensus protocols have been invented to allow cryptoeconomic systems to agree on the state of a financial system. The first cryptoeconomic consensus protocol to reach wide adoption was Nakamoto consensus–the proof-of-work system used for consensus of Bitcoin. Since then, other systems have been developed, with different tradeoffs in security, speed, and formal verifiability. Ethan Buchman is the CTO at Tendermint, a consensus system for blockchains. In addition to working on Tendermint, Ethan works on Cosmos, a network of blockchains. In this episode, we talk about different consensus systems–for centralized, trustworthy systems as well as for trustless systems like currencies. The post Consensus Systems with Ethan Buchman appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

57mins

26 Mar 2018

Rank #5

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Bitcoin Ecosystem with Andreas M. Antonopoulos

Andreas M. Antonopoulos is the author of several books about cryptocurrency engineering, including Mastering Bitcoin and Mastering Ethereum. In these books, Andreas lays out the systems of economics and computer science that underpin the two most mature decentralized monetary systems. When Andreas originally discovered the Bitcoin whitepaper, he had witnessed the repeated mismanagement of government-backed fiat currencies. Andreas has a Greek background, and the financial collapse of 2008 had led to an economic crisis in Greece. His firsthand observation of the weaknesses of centrally planned government currencies, together with a degree in computer science and distributed systems have made him a dedicated evangelist for Bitcoin. Andreas joins the show to discuss the Bitcoin ecosystem, and the relationship between decentralized cryptoeconomic systems and centralized corporations. Facebook has recently announced a cryptocurrency project called Libra, and Andreas suggests that Libra changes everything–not necessarily because Libra will make it to production, or because Libra itself will upend the world of finance–but because it allows us to further call into question the very nature of what makes a modern currency valuable and valid.  After all, if a large government has the right to back a currency, why shouldn’t a large corporation have that same privilege? Andreas is also a co-host of one of my favorite Bitcoin podcasts, Let’s Talk Bitcoin. Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com ANNOUNCEMENTS FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with. Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com. New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.    The post Bitcoin Ecosystem with Andreas M. Antonopoulos appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

53mins

16 Aug 2019

Rank #6

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Enterprise Smart Contracts with Marley Gray

We sign many different types of contracts throughout our lives. We sign a mortgage to get a loan for a house. When we go to the hospital, we sign a piece of paper that defines how our medical data can be shared between organizations. These pieces of paper represent our opting into an agreement that will be mediated and enforced by computer interactions. We can’t see the code behind those computer interactions, and we can’t verify that it is abiding by the contract we agreed to. Smart contracts allow for the programmatic execution of contractual agreements. Code is law, and there is less ambiguity. The most widely used smart contract platform is the Ethereum blockchain–but several large enterprises are creating their own smart contracts. Should all smart contracts be decentralized, or do enterprise consortium blockchains make sense? In this episode, Marley Gray from Microsoft joins the show to discuss enterprise smart contracts–why you would want to use them and how they can be architected. Marley has worked on banking and financial technology for over a decade and makes some strong arguments for why banks will adopt smart contracts and the timeline for how that might take place. We would love for you to fill out our listener survey at softwareengineeringdaily.com/survey. This will help us decide what other content to focus on. Of course–you can also send me an email at any time, jeff@softwaredaily.com. And in the meantime, if you are completely sick of cryptocurrencies, check out our back catalog of episodes at softwaredaily.com, or by downloading our apps, which have all of our episodes including our Greatest Hits, which is a curated set of the most popular shows. The apps will soon have offline downloads and bookmarking. The post Enterprise Smart Contracts with Marley Gray appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

48mins

29 Mar 2018

Rank #7

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Web3 with Fabian Vogelsteller

Most applications today run on a cloud provider like AWS. They are built with a framework like Ruby on Rails. They use a set of APIs like Stripe and Twilio for middleware services. This is the era of “web 2.0.” With decentralized systems, we are starting to get a feel for what “web 3.0” might feel like. The futuristic idea of “web 3.0” works off of the following idea: instead of using a centralized service owned by a single company, you might purchase your computation and storage from a network of nodes. The nodes will be running peer-to-peer software that competes on price. Fabian Vogelsteller works on Web3.js, a JavaScript library for interfacing with the Ethereum blockchain. He also works on Mist, a browser for Ethereum. Fabian joins the show to discuss the difference between decentralized apps and centralized apps—and to explain why we need to build a bridge between those two worlds. The post Web3 with Fabian Vogelsteller appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

46mins

14 Mar 2018

Rank #8

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Bitcoin Debates with Roger Ver

Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash are two cryptocurrencies with similar properties. But the supporters of each of these Bitcoin versions have strongly divergent opinions on the direction of the Bitcoin project. At the center of this debate is the subject of block size. Bitcoin’s block size determines how many transactions fit into each block that is mined. A larger block size leads to faster transactions and lower fees, but creates higher demands on mining hardware. A smaller block size leads to a slower on-chain network and higher fees but allows the full nodes on the network to be run on low performance hardware like Raspberry Pi. Bitcoin Cash has a large block size. Bitcoin Core has a smaller block size. Proponents of the smaller block size argue that Bitcoin’s scaling can be achieved by the off-chain “lightning network” solution. Roger Ver is a Bitcoin entrepreneur and investor. Since he discovered the currency, he has been buying it and evangelizing it. More recently, Roger has become an ardent supporter of Bitcoin Cash–emphasizing that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin. In this episode, Roger describes his economic ideology and explains why Bitcoin is so important to him. We explore how vested interests can shape the narrative and the direction of Bitcoin, and talk about the future of how corporations, governments, and individuals might be using cryptocurrencies. The post Bitcoin Debates with Roger Ver appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

55mins

20 Apr 2018

Rank #9

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Ripple with Greg Kidd

Ripple is a real-time settlement system, currency exchange, and remittance network by Ripple Labs. Greg Kidd is an advisor to Ripple Labs and Chief Risk Officer at Shift Payments. Questions What is a distributed payments protocol? How does Ripple’s consensus work? How does Ripple process transactions asynchronously? How does Ripple maintain correctness, agreement, and utility? What is a “last closed ledger? What is Ripple Labs? How are banks integrating with Ripple? What is a transaction lifecycle? Links Ripple Tech Talk with Chief Cryptographer David Schwartz How Ripple Works: Consensus Explained What is Ripple? The post Ripple with Greg Kidd appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

45mins

13 Aug 2015

Rank #10

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Ethereum Platform with Preethi Kasireddy

Ethereum is a decentralized transaction-based state machine. Ethereum was designed to make smart contracts more usable for developers. Smart contracts are decentralized programs that usually allow for some a transaction between the owner of the contract and anyone who would want to purchase something from the contract owner. For example, I could set up a smart contract where a listener sends my smart contract some ether and I send the listener a podcast episode automatically. Smart contracts can also interact with each other, to network together complex transactions. In the same way that web development has been made easier by PaaS and SaaS, smart contracts will make building financial systems simple. Preethi Kasireddy is a blockchain developer who writes extensively about cryptocurrencies. She joins the show to describe how the Ethereum platform works, including the steps involved in a smart contract transaction. This episode covers some advanced topics of Ethereum, and if you are out of your comfort zone, don’t worry–you aren’t alone. We have covered the basics of cryptocurrencies in detail, and we have also tackled more complex aspects of them in past episodes. Download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and Android to hear all of our old episodes. They are easily organized by category, and as you listen, the SE Daily app gets smarter, and recommends you content based on the episodes you are hearing. If you don’t like this episode, you can easily find something more interesting by using the recommendation system. The mobile apps are open sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to hack on, we would love to get your help! We are building a new way to consume software engineering content. We have the Android app, the iOS app, a recommendation system, and a web frontend–and more projects are coming soon. If you have ideas for how software engineering media content should be consumed, or if you are interested in contributing code, check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily, or join our Slack channel (there’s a link on our website)–or send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com The post Ethereum Platform with Preethi Kasireddy appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

50mins

11 Oct 2017

Rank #11

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Smart Contracts with Raine Revere

Smart contracts are programs that run on the Ethereum blockchain. A smart contract developer pays Ether to deploy the contract. When a contract is deployed, every full node on the Ethereum blockchain has a copy of the contract code in that node’s address space. Every full node needs to hold a copy of every smart contract. This allows every full node to process every call to any smart contract. If you want to call a smart contract, that contract will execute on every full node. When you call a smart contract, you are initiating a transaction. Like Bitcoin transactions, these Ethereum transactions get batched into blocks. Ethereum full nodes compete to solve the cryptographic puzzle associated with a block. But instead of mere financial transactions, these are computational transactions. Raine Revere is a smart contract engineer and cofounder at Maiden and she joins the show to describe smart contract creation and deployment. It’s a great introduction to some Ethereum fundamentals. To find all of our old episodes about cryptocurrencies, check out our apps in the iOS or Android app store. They have all 700 of our episodes, with recommendations, related links, discussions, and more. And it’s all open source–if you are looking for an open source project to contribute to, come check us out at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. We welcome all kinds of contributors–new developers and experts. Engineers and non-technical people. The post Smart Contracts with Raine Revere appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

45mins

7 Mar 2018

Rank #12

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Monopolies and Proof of Stake with Karl Floersh

Decentralized applications might someday offer alternatives to modern monopolies. Uber, Airbnb, Facebook, Amazon—all of these services could be recreated on a decentralized stack of technologies like Ethereum, IPFS, and Golem. Fully decentralized services could be more transparent, cheaper, and more efficient. But let’s be realistic. Today, even the simplest applications of fully decentralized blockchains don’t work as well as we need them to. Cryptokitties offered a glimpse into how a simple viral application can limit the throughput of Ethereum. And don’t forget that these technologies are in some ways still subject to centralization in their current form. Miners form the decentralized consensus layer—and that mining activity is physically centralized in large server farms. The decentralized future is possible. In order to get there, we need to make progress on the low-level tools that such a world will be built upon. This is the realization that today’s guest Karl Floersh had. Karl is a researcher for the Ethereum Foundation. He was initially excited about the prospect of decentralized apps—such as a decentralized Uber. But as he looked more closely at the space, he realized how early we are, and how much work there is to be done on foundational technologies. Proof of Stake is the central topic of discussion in today’s conversation with Karl. Proof of Stake is a consensus mechanism that is an alternative to Proof of Work. In Proof of Work, miners race to validate blocks of transactions. This results in duplicated effort and perhaps wasted energy. In Proof of Stake, validators are chosen to approve transactions. These validators lock up an amount of currency that they are willing to “stake.” If a validator acts badly, the validator will lose their entire stake. This mechanism could be more efficient—and we will explain why that is in this episode. If Proof of Stake works, it could lead to a faster, truly decentralized Ethereum blockchain. That’s a remarkable potential outcome. The post Monopolies and Proof of Stake with Karl Floersh appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

53mins

12 Mar 2018

Rank #13

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Stablecoins with Rune Christensen

Upcoming events: A Conversation with Haseeb Qureshi at Cloudflare on April 3, 2019 FindCollabs Hackathon at App Academy on April 6, 2019 A currency can fulfill numerous financial use cases. One use case is store of value: currency holders can reliably expect their currency to maintain some value, though that value may fluctuate over time. Another use case is speculation: currency holders are owning currency in the hope that the market price of the currency will increase over time. Bitcoin is a useful store of value and an instrument for speculation. However, Bitcoin still does not fulfill the financial use case that most people need from a currency: price stability. The price of Bitcoin fluctuates rapidly, making it difficult to use Bitcoin for small purchases such as coffee. Imagine you want to buy a cup of coffee with Bitcoin. The coffee shop owner needs to offer the option to sell you that cup of coffee using Bitcoin as the medium of exchange. This owner must denominate the price of that coffee as some number of Bitcoin. Since the price of Bitcoin fluctuates so rapidly, the coffee shop owner needs to adjust the price of that cup of coffee constantly in order to make sure that the coffee is cheap enough for the consumer to want to buy it, but expensive enough to make a profit. It is hard to assign prices to market goods in terms of Bitcoin because the currency is in constant flux. Even though many of us would like to use Bitcoin in our everyday lives, most marketplaces are denominated in US dollars or other currencies because a marketplace needs a stable currency in order to operate. Rune Christensen is the CEO of MakerDAO, a system that provides a price-stable cryptocurrency. MakerDAO is an elegant set of currencies, collateralized debt, smart contracts, and other incentive tools that result in the creation of several transparent, decentralized financial instruments. Rune joins the show to talk about the importance of stablecoins and how MakerDAO has engineered a decentralized currency that has maintained stability even through tumultuous market conditions. The post Stablecoins with Rune Christensen appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

1hr 8mins

3 Apr 2019

Rank #14

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Smart Contract Security with Emin Gün Sirer

A smart contract is a program that allows for financial transactions. Smart contracts are usually associated with the Ethereum platform, which has a language called Solidity that makes it easy to program smart contracts. Someday, we will have smart contracts issuing insurance, processing legal claims, and executing accounting transactions. Smart contracts involve money, and they are likely to transact with cryptocurrencies. That makes them ripe targets for attackers. What are the vulnerabilities of smart contracts? What can we do to ensure the safety of a high throughput, automated financial system? In today’s episode, Haseeb Qureshi talks to Emin Gün Sirer, a professor at Cornell University where he is co-director of the Initiative for Cryptocurrencies and Contracts. They discuss how smart contracts work and how to secure them. Haseeb and Emin are both working full-time on cryptocurrencies, which makes for a detailed technical discussion. In our previous episode about the DAO hack, Emin Gün Sirer was one of the protagonists of the story. You can find that episode as well as all of our old episodes by downloading the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and for Android. We also have several other episodes with Haseeb. The post Smart Contract Security with Emin Gün Sirer appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

1hr

20 Oct 2017

Rank #15

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Scaling Ethereum with Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon

Cryptocurrency infrastructure is a new form of software. Thousands of developers are submitting transactions to Bitcoin and Ethereum, and this transaction volume tests the scalability of current blockchain implementations. The bottlenecks in scalability lead to slow transaction times and high fees. Over the last twenty years, engineers have learned how to scale databases. We’ve learned how to scale Internet applications like e-commerce stores and online games. It’s easy to forget, but there was a time when those systems didn’t perform well either. Scaling a blockchain is different than scaling a relational database or a microservices infrastructure. Blockchains are peer-to-peer databases with an append only ledger shared by thousands of nodes. With different scalability solutions, there are tradeoffs between decentralization, scalability, and security. As an example, in Bitcoin, the core developers are working towards the deployment and adoption of the lightning networks. Some would argue that this approach favors scalability over decentralization. Today’s show is about scaling Ethereum. Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon are developers who are part of Prysmatic Labs, a team building a sharding implementation for the Go Ethereum client. In this episode, we discuss Ethereum’s approaches to scaling, including sharding and Plasma. The post Scaling Ethereum with Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

47mins

1 Jun 2018

Rank #16

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IPFS Design with David Dias

The Interplanetary File System (IPFS) is a decentralized global, peer-to-peer file system. IPFS combines ideas from BitTorrent, Git, and Bitcoin, creating a new way to store and access objects across the Internet. When you access an object on almost any website, you are accessing the object via a location address—a URL. The URL tells you where to find the object. If the object is a photo on Facebook that you are linking to, the URL will have an address somewhere on Facebook. Other objects that we access through URLs include web pages, videos, and JavaScript import packages. URLs seem natural to us. You look up an object based on where that object is being stored. Why would you do anything differently? A downside of location addressing is that if the location disappears, you can no longer access that object. If a government decides to censor a website that I wanted to visit, the government can shut down access to the server where that website sits, and my link will break. This happened in Turkey—where Wikipedia was shut down last year. Objects in IPFS are content addressed—you access an object by giving IPFS a cryptographic hash of the object, and IPFS will find someone on the network who has a copy of that object and give you access to it. To look up a webpage in an IPFS browser, you put the content address in the address bar. When the HTML for that page is received, that page might have lots of other content-addressed files referred to on the page. Your browser can also grab all of those content-addressed files from the IPFS P2P network. In this episode, David Dias explains how IPFS is designed. David is an engineer at Protocol Labs, the company building out IPFS. This episode is a great companion to our previous show with Juan Benet, the creator of IPFS. The post IPFS Design with David Dias appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

54mins

6 Apr 2018

Rank #17

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The Business of Decentralization with Anthony Diiorio

Anthony Diiorio was involved with Ethereum from the earliest days. He was one of the first people to see the Ethereum ideas presented by Vitalik Buterin, and he invested deeply in Ethereum–both financially and by helping to establish the early Ethereum community. Anthony started Decentral in 2014, which is a hub for his projects in the cryptocurrency space, the most impactful project being Jaxx. Jaxx is a blockchain wallet that can hold multiple different cryptocurrencies. It works by connecting a small client-side application to remote full nodes. The user interface is simple, and Jaxx maintains the full node instances that the small client-side application connects to. We discuss the architecture of Jaxx in more detail during this episode. We also talk about Anthony’s background–which includes a wide range of businesses: marketing, patio door manufacturing, real estate, and eventually blockchains. Anthony had a wealth of information to provide around entrepreneurship–both inside and outside of the blockchain space. If you are looking for all 700 episodes of Software Engineering Daily, check out our apps on the iOS or Android app store. We’ve got tons of episodes on blockchains, business, distributed systems, and tons of other topics. If you want to become a paid subscriber to Software Engineering Daily, you can hear all of our episodes without ads–you can subscribe at softwaredaily.com. And all of the code for our apps is open source. If you are looking for an open source community to be a part of, come check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. The post The Business of Decentralization with Anthony Diiorio appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

31mins

20 Mar 2018

Rank #18

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Ethereum with Aaron Davis

Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud, or third-party interference. Aaron Davis works on MetaMask, which brings Ethereum apps to the web browser. In this monologue episode, Aaron dives deep into the Ethereum internals, philosophy, and developer experience. Questions How does a blockchain represent a Merkle tree? Can a blockchain represent a state transition system or Turing Machine? Why isn’t Bitcoin’s scripting language Turing complete? What is Ethereum? How does Ethereum compare to Bitcoin? What is the story behind Ethereum? What is a smart contract? Is a smart contract the same as a server? Can Ethereum be used to prevent a malicious AI from developing? Why is Ethereum important? Links Ethereum Home Page Ethereum White Paper MetaMask Vitalik Buterin on Singularity 1 on 1 Vitalik Buterin on Future Thinkers Podcast The post Ethereum with Aaron Davis appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

42mins

16 Aug 2015

Rank #19

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Epicenter Cryptocurrencies with Brian Fabian Crain

Podcasting about cryptocurrencies is a strange occupation. You get emails all the time from companies doing a token sale that you would never want to be affiliated with. You get angry tweets from anonymous Twitter accounts that are on one side of the Bitcoin scaling debate. You get to interview extreme personalities, and the technical discussions can be highly educational. Brian Fabian Crain started the Epicenter podcast four years ago. Podcasting about cryptocurrencies allows a podcaster to report on a wide range of areas: economics, software, philosophy–and the stories within the blockchain world itself. Epicenter is one of my favorite podcasts about cryptocurrencies because Brian is always prepared enough to ask sophisticated questions. In this episode, we talked about ICOs–when does an ICO make sense? It seems that many token economies could function just as well without a token involved. We discussed the scaling approaches of Bitcoin and Ethereum–why are these two blockchains taking very different approaches to their scaling plans? And we talked about Chorus, the company that Brian founded to build infrastructure for proof-of-stake cryptocurrencies. I enjoyed talking to Brian about all these different subjects, and look forward to having him on again in the future. The post Epicenter Cryptocurrencies with Brian Fabian Crain appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

53mins

30 Apr 2018

Rank #20