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Blockchain – Software Engineering Daily

Updated 4 days ago

Technology
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Blockchain-related episodes of Software Engineering Daily.

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Blockchain-related episodes of Software Engineering Daily.

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iTunes Ratings

19 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
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Cover image of Blockchain – Software Engineering Daily

Blockchain – Software Engineering Daily

Latest release on Feb 25, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 4 days ago

Rank #1: Blockchain Building with Daniel van Flymen

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A blockchain is a data structure that provides decentralized, peer-to-peer data distribution. Bitcoin is the most well-known blockchain, but in the next decade we will see many more blockchains. Most listeners probably know that you could just fork the code of Bitcoin to start your own blockchain–but wouldn’t it be nice to know how to build a blockchain from scratch?

Daniel van Flymen is the author of the Medium article Learn Blockchains by Building One. In his post, he walks you through how to write the code for a blockchain–just like any other web app. He starts with raw Python code, defines the data structures, and stands up his simple blockchain app on a web server to give a toy example for how nodes in a blockchain communicate.

For me, this was a great article to read. I have reported on blockchains for over a year, but had not seen such a clear example with executable, simplified code.

Stay tuned at the end of the episode for Jeff Meyerson’s tip about making the most of a new job: brought to you by Indeed Prime.

To find all of our coverage of cryptocurrencies, download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS or Android to hear all of our old episodes. They are easily organized by category, and as you listen, the SE Daily app gets smarter, and recommends you content based on the episodes you are hearing. If you don’t like this episode, you can easily find something more interesting by using the recommendation system.

The mobile apps are open sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to hack on, we would love to get your help! We are building a new way to consume software engineering content. We have the Android app, the iOS app, a recommendation system, and a web frontend–and more projects are coming soon. If you have ideas for how software engineering media content should be consumed, or if you are interested in contributing code, check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily, or join our Slack channel (there’s a link on our website)–or send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Spring Framework gives developers an environment for building cloud native projects. On December 4th-7th, SpringOne Platform is coming to San Francisco. SpringOne Platform is a conference where developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the Spring ecosystem and beyond. Speakers at SpringOne Platform include Eric Brewer (who created the CAP theorem), Vaughn Vernon (who writes extensively about Domain Driven Design), and many thought leaders in the Spring Ecosystem. SpringOne Platform is the premier conference for those who build, deploy, and run cloud-native software. Software Engineering Daily listeners can sign up with the discount code SEDaily100 and receive $100 off of a Spring One Platform conference pass. I will also be at SpringOne reporting on developments in the cloud native ecosystem. Join me December 4th-7th at the SpringOne Platform conference, and use discount code SEDaily100 for $100 off your conference pass.


Indeed Prime flips the typical model of job search and makes it easy to apply to multiple jobs and get multiple offers. Indeed Prime simplifies your job search and helps you land that ideal software engineering position. Candidates get immediate exposure to top companies with just one simple application to Indeed Prime. Companies on Prime’s exclusive platform message candidates with salary and equity upfront. Indeed Prime is 100% free for candidates – no strings attached. Sign up now at indeed.com/sedaily. You can also put money in your pocket by referring your friends and colleagues. Refer a software engineer to the platform and get $200 when they get contacted by a company…. and $2,000 when they accept a job through Prime! Learn more at indeed.com/prime/referral.


You want to work with Kubernetes but wish the process was simpler. The folks who brought you Kubernetes now want to make it easier to use. Heptio is a company by founders of the Kubernetes project, built to support and advance the open Kubernetes ecosystem. They build products, open source tools, and services that bring people closer to ‘upstream’ Kubernetes. Heptio offers instructor-led Kubernetes training, professional help from expert Kubernetes solutions engineers, as well as expert support of upstream Kubernetes configurations. Find out more at heptio.com/sedaily. Heptio is committed to making Kubernetes easier for all developers to use through their contributions to Kubernetes, Heptio open source projects, and other community efforts. Check out Heptio to make your life with Kubernetes easier at heptio.com/sedaily.

The post Blockchain Building with Daniel van Flymen appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 12 2017

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #2: Blockchains with Melanie Swan

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Blockchains are the distributed ledger technology underlying bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.

More broadly, a blockchain is a mechanism for updating truth states in distributed network computing, producing consensus trust and serving as a new form of general computational substrate.

Melanie Swan is a science and technology innovator and philosopher at the MS Futures Group. She founded the Institute for Blockchain Studies, and is the author of Blockchain: Blueprint for a New Economy.

Questions:

  • What is a blockchain?
  • How can we generalize the blockchain from bitcoin to other areas?
  • How does every user maintain the entire transaction list when that list is gigantic and growing every day?
  • How do Stellar and Ripple differ?
  • What is Ethereum?
  • Is there a social tension between having strong leaders like Vitalik Buterin and a decentralized ideal culture?
  • Can you have a blockchain without mining?
  • Can the blockchain be used to prevent the artificial intelligence nightmares of Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking?

Links:

The post Blockchains with Melanie Swan appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 11 2015

56mins

Play

Rank #3: Blockchain Applications with Mike Goldin

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Cryptocurrencies are not only a financial instrument–they are a new platform for building applications. The blockchain allows for new solutions to digital property management, micropayments, hedge fund incentives, and ad fraud.

The cryptocurrency platforms with the most traction are Bitcoin and Ethereum. Bitcoin has no central leader and is going through some growing pains with governance issues. Ethereum is led by the charismatic Vitalik Buterin.

Bitcoin and Ethereum are not competing instruments. They fulfill different technical purposes. Under current conditions of algorithm development and network infrastructure, neither Bitcoin nor Ethereum can accomplish the dreams that will one day be realized, because of the problem of distributing transaction information across nodes in the system.

If we compared cryptocurrencies to the Internet, we would not even be in the days of dial-up yet.

ConsenSys is a venture production studio that is working on several projects within the blockchain space. Mike Goldin is a software developer with ConsenSys and joins the show to talk about blockchain applications in 2017–where we are and where we are going. It was a wide ranging conversation and I hope to have Mike back in the future so we can go deeper on some of the topics we glossed over.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view or download the transcript for this show.

Sponsors


Have you been thinking you’d be happier at a new job? If you’re dreaming about a new job and have been waiting for the right time to make a move, go to hired.com/sedaily. Hired makes finding work enjoyable. Hired uses an algorithmic job-matching tool in combination with a talent advocate who will walk you through the process of finding a better job. Check out hired.com/sedaily to get a special offer for Software Engineering Daily listeners–a $600 signing bonus from Hired when you find that great job that gives you the respect and salary that you deserve as a talented engineer.


Software engineers know that saving time means saving money. Save time on your accounting solution — use FreshBooks cloud accounting software. FreshBooks makes easy accounting software with a friendly UI that transforms how entrepreneurs and small business owners deal with day-to-day paperwork. Get ready for the simplest way to be more productive and organized, and most importantly, get paid quickly. FreshBooks is offering a 30-day, unrestricted free trial to Software Engineering Daily listeners. To claim it, just go to FreshBooks.com/SED and enter SOFTWARE ENGINEERING DAILY in the “How Did You Hear About Us?” section.


Incapsula can protect your API servers and microservices from responding to unwanted requests. To try Incapsula for yourself, go to incapsula.com/sedaily and get a month of Incapsula free. Incapsula’s API gives you control over the security and performance of your application–whether you have a complex microservices architecture or a WordPress site, like Software Engineering Daily. Incapsula has a global network of over 30 data centers that optimize routing and cache your content. The same network of data centers that are filtering your content for attackers are operating as a CDN, and speeding up your application. To try Incapsula today, go to incapsula.com/sedaily and check it out.

The post Blockchain Applications with Mike Goldin appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 06 2017

57mins

Play

Rank #4: Cryptoeconomics with Vlad Zamfir

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A cryptocurrency has a distributed ledger called a blockchain. The blockchain keeps track of every transaction that occurs across the cryptocurrency. This blockchain must stay up-to-date and verified–which requires someone in the network to do that validation.

Bitcoin and Ethereum use the proof-of-work algorithm. Miners do computational work to validate the legitimacy of transactions across the network, and in return they are given cryptocurrency as a reward for that computational work.

In the future, cryptocurrencies could move towards a proof-of-stake model. If you own a significant amount of cryptocurrency, you have incentive to keep the validity of the blockchain up to date. Proof-of-stake algorithms can be significantly less energy intensive.

Vlad Zamfir is a researcher for the Ethereum Foundation, and he joins Haseeb Qureshi for a conversation about cryptoeconomics. This is an in-depth conversation between two active blockchain developers. We hope you enjoy it.

You can send us feedback on the show by emailing me jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com or joining us on the Slack channel at softwareengineeringdaily.com/slack.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

The post Cryptoeconomics with Vlad Zamfir appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 28 2017

59mins

Play

Rank #5: Consensus Systems with Ethan Buchman

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Consensus protocols are used to allow computers to work together. A consensus protocol lets different servers agree on the state of a system. For decades, these protocols have been used to establish consensus among database nodes, application servers, and other infrastructure that runs within an enterprise. More recently, new consensus protocols have been invented to allow cryptoeconomic systems to agree on the state of a financial system.

The first cryptoeconomic consensus protocol to reach wide adoption was Nakamoto consensus–the proof-of-work system used for consensus of Bitcoin. Since then, other systems have been developed, with different tradeoffs in security, speed, and formal verifiability.

Ethan Buchman is the CTO at Tendermint, a consensus system for blockchains. In addition to working on Tendermint, Ethan works on Cosmos, a network of blockchains. In this episode, we talk about different consensus systems–for centralized, trustworthy systems as well as for trustless systems like currencies.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


Sumo Logic is a cloud-native, machine data analytics service that helps you Run and Secure your Modern Application. Even if you have tools already, it’s worth checking out Sumo Logic and seeing if you can leverage your data even more effectively, with real-time dashboards and monitoring, and improved observability – to improve the uptime of your application and keep your day-to-day runtime more secure. Check out sumologic.com/sedaily for a free 30-day Trial of Sumo Logic, to find out how Sumo Logic can improve your productivity and your application observability–wherever you run your applications. That’s sumologic.com/sedaily.


LiveRamp is one of the fastest growing companies in data connectivity in the Bay Area, and they are looking for senior level talent to join their team. LiveRamp helps the world’s largest brands activate their data to improve customer interactions on any channel or device. The LiveRamp team thrives on mind-bending technical challenges. LiveRamp members value entrepreneurship, humility, and constant personal growth. If this sounds like a fit for you, check out softwareengineeringdaily.com/liveramp.

The post Consensus Systems with Ethan Buchman appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 26 2018

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #6: Enterprise Smart Contracts with Marley Gray

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We sign many different types of contracts throughout our lives. We sign a mortgage to get a loan for a house. When we go to the hospital, we sign a piece of paper that defines how our medical data can be shared between organizations. These pieces of paper represent our opting into an agreement that will be mediated and enforced by computer interactions. We can’t see the code behind those computer interactions, and we can’t verify that it is abiding by the contract we agreed to.

Smart contracts allow for programmatic execution of contractual agreements. Code is law, and there is less ambiguity. The most widely used smart contract platform is the Ethereum blockchain–but several large enterprises are creating their own smart contracts. Should all smart contracts be decentralized, or do enterprise consortium blockchains make sense?

In this episode, Marley Gray from Microsoft joins the show to discuss enterprise smart contracts–why you would want to use them and how they can be architected. Marley has worked on banking and financial technology for over a decade, and makes some strong arguments for why banks will adopt smart contracts, and the timeline for how that might take place.

We would love for you to fill out our listener survey at softwareengineeringdaily.com/survey. This will help us decide what other content to focus on.

Of course–you can also send me an email at any time, jeff@softwaredaily.com. And in the meantime, if you are completely sick of cryptocurrencies, check out our back catalog of episodes at softwaredaily.com, or by downloading our apps, which have all of our episodes including our Greatest Hits, which is a curated set of the most popular shows. The apps will soon have offline downloads and bookmarking.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Today’s sponsor is Datadog, a cloud-scale monitoring and analytics platform. Datadog integrates with more than 200 technologies so you can gain deep visibility into every layer of your stack – and any other data you’re interested in tracking. For example, you can use Datadog’s RESTful API to collect custom metrics from your favorite crypto data sources, and analyze trends in Ethereum prices over time. Start a 14-day free trial and as a bonus, Datadog will send you a free T-shirt! softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.

The post Enterprise Smart Contracts with Marley Gray appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 29 2018

53mins

Play

Rank #7: Web3 with Fabian Vogelsteller

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Most applications today run on a cloud provider like AWS. They are built with a framework like Ruby on Rails. They use a set of APIs like Stripe and Twilio for middleware services. This is the era of “web 2.0.”

With decentralized systems, we are starting to get a feel for what “web 3.0” might feel like. The futuristic idea of “web 3.0” works off of the following idea: instead of using a centralized service owned by a single company, you might purchase your computation and storage from a network of nodes. The nodes will be running peer-to-peer software that competes on price.

Fabian Vogelsteller works on Web3.js, a JavaScript library for interfacing with the Ethereum blockchain. He also works on Mist, a browser for Ethereum. Fabian joins the show to discuss the difference between decentralized apps and centralized apps—and to explain why we need to build a bridge between those two worlds.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Do you think blockchain technology is only used for cryptocurrency? Think again. ConsenSys develops tools and infrastructure to enable a decentralized future built on Ethereum, the most advanced blockchain development platform. ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. Listeners, why continue to build the internet of today when you can build the internet of the future on the blockchain? ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


Today’s sponsor is Datadog, a cloud-scale monitoring and analytics platform. Datadog integrates with more than 200 technologies so you can gain deep visibility into every layer of your stack – and any other data you’re interested in tracking. For example, you can use Datadog’s RESTful API to collect custom metrics from your favorite crypto data sources, and analyze trends in Ethereum prices over time. Start a 14-day free trial and as a bonus, Datadog will send you a free T-shirt! softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog


Users have come to expect realtime. They crave alerts that their payment is received. They crave little cars zooming around on the map. They crave locking their doors at home when they’re not at home. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to making your app “realtime.” PubNub makes it simple, enabling you to build immersive and interactive experiences on the web, on mobile phones, embedded into hardware, and any other device connected to the Internet. With powerful APIs, and a robust global infrastructure, you can stream geolocation data, send chat messages, turn on your sprinklers, or rock your baby’s crib when they start crying (PubNub literally powers IoT cribs). 70 SDKs for web, mobile, IoT, and more means you can start streaming data in realtime without a ton of compatibility headaches, and no need to build your own SDKs from scratch. And lastly, PubNub includes a ton of other realtime features beyond realtime messaging, like presence for online/offline detection, and access manager to thwart trolls and hackers. Go to PubNub.com/sedaily to get started. They offer a generous sandbox tier that’s free forever (until your app takes off).

The post Web3 with Fabian Vogelsteller appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 14 2018

51mins

Play

Rank #8: Bitcoin Debates with Roger Ver

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Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash are two cryptocurrencies with similar properties. But the supporters of each of these Bitcoin versions have strongly divergent opinions on the direction of the Bitcoin project. At the center of this debate is the subject of block size.

Bitcoin’s block size determines how many transactions fit into each block that is mined. A larger block size leads to faster transactions and lower fees, but creates higher demands on mining hardware. A smaller block size leads to a slower on-chain network and higher fees, but allows the full nodes on the network to be run on low performance hardware like Raspberry Pi.

Bitcoin Cash has a large block size. Bitcoin Core has a smaller block size. Proponents of the smaller block size argue that Bitcoin’s scaling can be achieved by the off-chain “lightning network” solution.

Roger Ver is a Bitcoin entrepreneur and investor. Since he discovered the currency, he has been buying it and evangelizing it. More recently, Roger has become an ardent supporter of Bitcoin Cash–emphasizing that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin.

In this episode, Roger describes his economic ideology, and explains why Bitcoin is so important to him. We explore how vested interests can shape the narrative and the direction of Bitcoin, and talk about the future of how corporations, governments, and individuals might be using cryptocurrencies.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to making your app “realtime.” PubNub makes it simple, enabling you to build immersive and interactive experiences on the web, on mobile phones, embedded into hardware, and any other device connected to the Internet. With powerful APIs, and a robust global infrastructure, you can stream geolocation data, send chat messages, turn on your sprinklers, or rock your baby’s crib when they start crying (PubNub literally powers IoT cribs). 70 SDKs for web, mobile, IoT, and more means you can start streaming data in realtime without a ton of compatibility headaches, and no need to build your own SDKs from scratch. Go to PubNub.com/sedaily to get started. They offer a generous sandbox tier that’s free forever (until your app takes off).


The TEALs program is looking for engineers from across the country to volunteer to teach computer science in high schools. Work with a computer science teacher in the classroom to bring development concepts to life through teamwork and determination. If you’d like to learn more about the Microsoft’s TEALs program or submit your volunteer application, go to tealsk12.org/sedaily.


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.

The post Bitcoin Debates with Roger Ver appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 20 2018

1hr 2mins

Play

Rank #9: Ripple with Greg Kidd

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Ripple is a real-time settlement system, currency exchange, and remittance network by Ripple Labs.

Greg Kidd is an advisor to Ripple Labs and Chief Risk Officer at Shift Payments.

Questions

  • What is a distributed payments protocol?
  • How does Ripple’s consensus work?
  • How does Ripple process transactions asynchronously?
  • How does Ripple maintain correctness, agreement, and utility?
  • What is a “last closed ledger?
  • What is Ripple Labs?
  • How are banks integrating with Ripple?
  • What is a transaction lifecycle?

Links

The post Ripple with Greg Kidd appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 13 2015

45mins

Play

Rank #10: Ethereum Platform with Preethi Kasireddy

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Ethereum is a decentralized transaction-based state machine. Ethereum was designed to make smart contracts more usable for developers. Smart contracts are decentralized programs that usually allow for some a transaction between the owner of the contract and anyone who would want to purchase something from the contract owner.

For example, I could set up a smart contract where a listener sends my smart contract some ether and I send the listener a podcast episode automatically. Smart contracts can also interact with each other, to network together complex transactions. In the same way that web development has been made easier by PaaS and SaaS, smart contracts will make building financial systems simple.

Preethi Kasireddy is a blockchain developer who writes extensively about cryptocurrencies. She joins the show to describe how the Ethereum platform works, including the steps involved in a smart contract transaction. This episode covers some advanced topics of Ethereum, and if you are out of your comfort zone, don’t worry–you aren’t alone.

We have covered the basics of cryptocurrencies in detail, and we have also tackled more complex aspects of them in past episodes. Download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and Android to hear all of our old episodes. They are easily organized by category, and as you listen, the SE Daily app gets smarter, and recommends you content based on the episodes you are hearing. If you don’t like this episode, you can easily find something more interesting by using the recommendation system.

The mobile apps are open sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to hack on, we would love to get your help! We are building a new way to consume software engineering content. We have the Android app, the iOS app, a recommendation system, and a web frontend–and more projects are coming soon. If you have ideas for how software engineering media content should be consumed, or if you are interested in contributing code, check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily, or join our Slack channel (there’s a link on our website)–or send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


The octopus: a sea creature known for its intelligence and flexibility. Octopus Deploy: a friendly deployment automation tool for deploying applications like .NET apps, Java apps and more. Ask any developer and they’ll tell you it’s never fun pushing code at 5pm on a Friday then crossing your fingers hoping for the best. That’s where Octopus Deploy comes into the picture. Octopus Deploy is a friendly deployment automation tool, taking over where your build/CI server ends. Use Octopus to promote releases on-prem or to the cloud. Octopus integrates with your existing build pipeline–TFS and VSTS, Bamboo, TeamCity, and Jenkins. It integrates with AWS, Azure, and on-prem environments. Reliably and repeatedly deploy your .NET and Java apps and more. If you can package it, Octopus can deploy it! It’s quick and easy to install. Go to Octopus.com to trial Octopus free for 45 days. That’s Octopus.com


Every second your cloud servers are running, they are costing you money. Stop paying for idle cloud instances and VMs. Control the cost of your cloud with ParkMyCloud. ParkMyCloud automatically turns off cloud resources when you don’t need them. Whether you are on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud, it’s easy to start saving money with ParkMyCloud. You sign up for ParkMyCloud, you connect to your cloud provider, and ParkMyCloud gives you a dashboard of all your resources–including their costs. From the dashboard, you can automatically schedule when your different cloud instances get turned on or off – saving you 65% or more. Additionally, you can manage databases, auto scaling groups and set up logical groups of servers to turn off during nights and weekends when you don’t need them–and you can see how much money you are saving. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily to get $100 in free credit for ParkMyCloud for SE Daily listeners. ParkMyCloud is used by McDonald’s, CapitalOne, and Fox, and saves customers tens of thousands of dollars every month. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily, and cut the cost of your cloud today.


Who do you use for log management? I want to tell you about Scalyr, the first purpose built log management tool on the market. Most tools on the market utilize text indexing search, which is great… for indexing a book. But if you want to search logs, at scale, fast… it breaks down. Scalyr built their own database from scratch: the system is fast. Most searches take less than 1 second. In fact, 99% of their queries execute in <1 second.  Companies like OKCupid, Giphy and CareerBuilder use Scalyr. It was built by one of the founders of Writely (aka Google Docs). Scalyr has consumer grade UI, that scales infinitely. You can monitor key metrics, trigger alerts, and integrate with PagerDuty. It’s easy to use and did we mention: lightning fast. Give it a try today. It’s free for 90 days at softwareengineeringdaily.com/scalyr.


Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.

The post Ethereum Platform with Preethi Kasireddy appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 11 2017

57mins

Play

Rank #11: Smart Contracts with Raine Revere

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Smart contracts are programs that run on the Ethereum blockchain. A smart contract developer pays Ether to deploy the contract. When a contract is deployed, every full node on the Ethereum blockchain has a copy of the contract code in that node’s address space.

Every full node needs to hold a copy of every smart contract. This allows every full node to process every call to any smart contract. If you want to call a smart contract, that contract will execute on every full node.

When you call a smart contract, you are initiating a transaction. Like Bitcoin transactions, these Ethereum transactions get batched into blocks. Ethereum full nodes compete to solve the cryptographic puzzle associated with a block. But instead of mere financial transactions, these are computational transactions.

Raine Revere is a smart contract engineer and cofounder at Maiden and she joins the show to describe smart contract creation and deployment. It’s a great introduction to some Ethereum fundamentals.

To find all of our old episodes about cryptocurrencies, check out our apps in the  iOS or Android app store. They have all 700 of our episodes, with recommendations, related links, discussions and more. And it’s all open source–if you are looking for an open source project to contribute to, come check us out at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. We welcome all kinds of contributors–new developers and experts. Engineers and non-technical people.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Do you think blockchain technology is only used for cryptocurrency? Think again. ConsenSys develops tools and infrastructure to enable a decentralized future built on Ethereum, the most advanced blockchain development platform. ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. Listeners, why continue to build the internet of today when you can build the internet of the future on the blockchain? ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


QCon.ai is a software conference for full-stack developers looking to uncover the real-world patterns, practices, and use cases for applying artificial intelligence/machine learning in engineering. Come to QCon.ai in San Francisco, from April 9th – 11th 2018–and see talks from companies like Instacart, Uber, Coinbase, and Stripe. These companies have built and deployed state of the art machine learning models–and they come to QCon to share their developments. The keynote of QCon.ai is Matt Ranney, a Sr. Staff Engineer at UberATG (the autonomous driving unit at Uber)–and he’s an amazing speaker–he was on SE Daily in the past, if you want a preview for what he is like. I have been to QCon three times and it is a fantastic conference. What I love about QCon is the high bar for quality–quality in terms of speakers, content, peer sharing as well as the food and general atmosphere. QCon is one of my favorite conferences, and if you haven’t been to a QCon before, make QCon.ai your first. Register for QCon.ai and use promo code SEDAILY for $100 off your ticket. 


Sumo Logic is a cloud-native, machine data analytics service that helps you Run and Secure your Modern Application. If you are feeling the pain of managing your own log, event, and performance metrics data, check out sumologic.com/sedaily. Even if you have tools already, it’s worth checking out Sumo Logic and seeing if you can leverage your data even more effectively, with real-time dashboards and monitoring, and improved observability – to improve the uptime of your application and keep your day-to-day runtime more secure. Check out sumologic.com/sedaily for a free 30-day Trial of Sumo Logic, to find out how Sumo Logic can improve your productivity and your application observability–wherever you run your applications. That’s sumologic.com/sedaily.

The post Smart Contracts with Raine Revere appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 07 2018

52mins

Play

Rank #12: Monopolies and Proof of Stake with Karl Floersh

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Decentralized applications might someday offer alternatives to modern monopolies. Uber, Airbnb, Facebook, Amazon—all of these services could be recreated on a decentralized stack of technologies like Ethereum, IPFS, and Golem. Fully decentralized services could be more transparent, cheaper, and more efficient.

But let’s be realistic. Today, even the simplest applications of fully decentralized blockchains don’t work as well as we need them to. Cryptokitties offered a glimpse into how a simple viral application can limit the throughput of Ethereum. And don’t forget that these technologies are in some ways still subject to centralization in their current form. Miners form the decentralized consensus layer—and that mining activity is physically centralized in large server farms.

The decentralized future is possible. In order to get there, we need to make progress on the low-level tools that such a world will be built upon. This is the realization that today’s guest Karl Floersh had. Karl is a researcher for the Ethereum Foundation. He was initially excited about the prospect of decentralized apps—such as a decentralized Uber. But as he looked more closely at the space, he realized how early we are, and how much work there is to be done on foundational technologies.

Proof of Stake is the central topic of discussion in today’s conversation with Karl. Proof of Stake is a consensus mechanism that is an alternative to Proof of Work. In Proof of Work, miners race to validate blocks of transactions. This results in duplicated effort and perhaps wasted energy. In Proof of Stake, validators are chosen to approve transactions. These validators lock up an amount of currency that they are willing to “stake.” If a validator acts badly, the validator will lose their entire stake.

This mechanism could be more efficient—and we will explain why that is in this episode. If Proof of Stake works, it could lead to a faster, truly decentralized Ethereum blockchain. That’s a remarkable potential outcome.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Today’s sponsor is Datadog, a cloud-scale monitoring and analytics platform. Datadog integrates with more than 200 technologies so you can gain deep visibility into every layer of your stack – and any other data you’re interested in tracking. For example, you can use Datadog’s RESTful API to collect custom metrics from your favorite crypto data sources, and analyze trends in Ethereum prices over time. Start a 14-day free trial and as a bonus, Datadog will send you a free T-shirt! softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog


Do you think blockchain technology is only used for cryptocurrency? Think again. ConsenSys develops tools and infrastructure to enable a decentralized future built on Ethereum, the most advanced blockchain development platform. ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. Listeners, why continue to build the internet of today when you can build the internet of the future on the blockchain? ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


Users have come to expect realtime. They crave alerts that their payment is received. They crave little cars zooming around on the map. They crave locking their doors at home when they’re not at home. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to making your app “realtime.” PubNub makes it simple, enabling you to build immersive and interactive experiences on the web, on mobile phones, embedded into hardware, and any other device connected to the Internet. With powerful APIs, and a robust global infrastructure, you can stream geolocation data, send chat messages, turn on your sprinklers, or rock your baby’s crib when they start crying (PubNub literally powers IoT cribs). 70 SDKs for web, mobile, IoT, and more means you can start streaming data in realtime without a ton of compatibility headaches, and no need to build your own SDKs from scratch. And lastly, PubNub includes a ton of other realtime features beyond realtime messaging, like presence for online/offline detection, and access manager to thwart trolls and hackers. Go to PubNub.com/sedaily to get started. They offer a generous sandbox tier that’s free forever (until your app takes off).


Your enterprise produces lots of data, but you aren’t capturing as much as you would like. You aren’t storing it in the right place, and you don’t have the proper tools to run complex queries against your data. MapR is a converged data platform that runs across any cloud. MapR provides storage, analytics, and machine learning engines. Use the MapR operational database and event streams to capture your data. Use the MapR analytics and machine learning engines to analyze your data, in batch or interactively–across any cloud, on premise, or at the edge. MapR’s technology is trusted by major industries like Audi, which uses MapR for its connected vehicles. MapR also powers Aadhar, the world’s largest biometric system. To learn more about how MapR can solve problems for your enterprise, go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/mapr to find whitepapers, videos, and ebooks. Whether you are an oil company like Anadarko, a major FinTech provider like Kabbage, or a business in any other vertical, MapR can leverage the high volumes of data produced within your company. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/mapr and find out how MapR can help your business take full advantage of its data. 

The post Monopolies and Proof of Stake with Karl Floersh appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 12 2018

59mins

Play

Rank #13: Smart Contract Security with Emin Gün Sirer

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A smart contract is a program that allows for financial transactions. Smart contracts are usually associated with the Ethereum platform, which has a language called Solidity that makes it easy to program smart contracts. Someday, we will have smart contracts issuing insurance, processing legal claims, and executing accounting transactions.

Smart contracts involve money, and they are likely to transact with cryptocurrencies. That makes them ripe targets for attackers. What are the vulnerabilities of smart contracts? What can we do to ensure the safety of a high throughput, automated financial system?

In today’s episode, Haseeb Qureshi talks to Emin Gün Sirer, a professor at Cornell University where he is co-director of the Initiative for Cryptocurrencies and Contracts. They discuss how smart contracts work and how to secure them. Haseeb and Emin are both working full-time on cryptocurrencies, which makes for a detailed technical discussion.

In our previous episode about the DAO hack, Emin Gün Sirer was one of the protagonists of the story. You can find that episode as well as all of our old episodes by downloading the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and for Android. We also have several other episodes with Haseeb.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily.


Every second your cloud servers are running, they are costing you money. Stop paying for idle cloud instances and VMs. Control the cost of your cloud with ParkMyCloud. ParkMyCloud automatically turns off cloud resources when you don’t need them. Whether you are on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud, it’s easy to start saving money with ParkMyCloud. You sign up for ParkMyCloud, you connect to your cloud provider, and ParkMyCloud gives you a dashboard of all your resources–including their costs. From the dashboard, you can automatically schedule when your different cloud instances get turned on or off – saving you 65% or more. Additionally, you can manage databases, auto scaling groups and set up logical groups of servers to turn off during nights and weekends when you don’t need them–and you can see how much money you are saving. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily to get $100 in free credit for ParkMyCloud for SE Daily listeners. ParkMyCloud is used by McDonald’s, CapitalOne, and Fox, and saves customers tens of thousands of dollars every month. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily, and cut the cost of your cloud today.


When your application is failing on a user’s device, how do you find out about it? Raygun lets you see every problem in your software and how to fix it. Raygun brings together crash reporting, real user monitoring, user tracking, and deployment tracking. See every error and crash affecting your users right now. Monitor your deployments, to make sure that a release is not impacting users in new ways. And track your users through your application to identify the bad experiences they are having. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun, and get a free 14 day trial to try out Raygun and find the errors that are occurring in your applications today. Raygun is used by Microsoft, Slack, and Unity to monitor their customer facing software. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun and try it out for yourself.


Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.

The post Smart Contract Security with Emin Gün Sirer appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 20 2017

1hr 6mins

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Rank #14: Scaling Ethereum with Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon

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Cryptocurrency infrastructure is a new form of software. Thousands of developers are submitting transactions to Bitcoin and Ethereum, and this transaction volume tests the scalability of current blockchain implementations. The bottlenecks in scalability lead to slow transaction times and high fees.

Over the last twenty years, engineers have learned how to scale databases. We’ve learned how to scale Internet applications like e-commerce stores and online games. It’s easy to forget, but there was a time when those systems didn’t perform well either.

Scaling a blockchain is different than scaling a relational database or a microservices infrastructure. Blockchains are peer-to-peer databases with an append only ledger shared by thousands of nodes. With different scalability solutions, there are tradeoffs between decentralization, scalability, and security. As an example, in Bitcoin, the core developers are working towards deployment and adoption of lightning network. Some would argue that this approach favors scalability over decentralization.

Today’s show is about scaling Ethereum. Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon are developers who are part of Prysmatic Labs, a team building a sharding implementation for the Go Ethereum client. In this episode, we discuss Ethereum’s approaches to scaling, including sharding and Plasma.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily.


Airtable is hiring creative engineers who believe in the importance of open-ended platforms that empower human creativity. Check out jobs at Airtable by going to airtable.com/sedaily.


GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.

The post Scaling Ethereum with Raul Jordan and Preston Van Loon appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jun 01 2018

53mins

Play

Rank #15: IPFS Design with David Dias

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The Interplanetary File System (IPFS) is a decentralized global, peer-to-peer file system. IPFS combines ideas from BitTorrent, Git, and Bitcoin, creating a new way to store and access objects across the Internet.

When you access an object on almost any website, you are accessing the object via a location address—a URL. The URL tells you where to find the object. If the object is a photo on Facebook that you are linking to, the URL will have an address of somewhere on Facebook. Other objects that we access through URLs include web pages, videos, and JavaScript import packages.

URLs seem natural to us. You look up an object based on where that object is being stored. Why would you do anything differently?

A downside of location addressing is that if the location disappears, you can no longer access that object. If a government decides to censor a website that I wanted to visit, the government can shut down access to the server where that website sits, and my link will break. This happened in Turkey—where Wikipedia was shut down last year.

Objects in IPFS are content addressed—you access an object by giving IPFS a cryptographic hash of the object, and IPFS will find someone on the network who has a copy of that object, and give you access to it.

To look up a webpage in an IPFS browser, you put the content address in the address bar. When the HTML for that page is received, that page might have lots of other content-addressed files referred to on the page. Your browser can also grab all of those content-addressed files from the IPFS P2P network.

In this episode, David Dias explains how IPFS is designed. David is an engineer at Protocol Labs, the company building out IPFS. This episode is a great companion to our previous show with Juan Benet, the creator of IPFS.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to making your app “realtime.” PubNub makes it simple, enabling you to build immersive and interactive experiences on the web, on mobile phones, embedded into hardware, and any other device connected to the Internet. With powerful APIs, and a robust global infrastructure, you can stream geolocation data, send chat messages, turn on your sprinklers, or rock your baby’s crib when they start crying (PubNub literally powers IoT cribs). 70 SDKs for web, mobile, IoT, and more means you can start streaming data in realtime without a ton of compatibility headaches, and no need to build your own SDKs from scratch. Go to PubNub.com/sedaily to get started. They offer a generous sandbox tier that’s free forever (until your app takes off).


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


The TEALs program is looking for engineers from across the country to volunteer to teach computer science in high schools. Work with a computer science teacher in the classroom to bring development concepts to life through teamwork and determination. If you’d like to learn more about the Microsoft’s TEALs program or submit your volunteer application, go to tealsk12.org/sedaily.


GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.

The post IPFS Design with David Dias appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 06 2018

1hr

Play

Rank #16: The Business of Decentralization with Anthony Diiorio

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Anthony Diiorio was involved with Ethereum since the earliest days. He was one of the first people to see the Ethereum ideas presented by Vitalik Buterin, and he invested deeply in Ethereum–both financially and by helping to establish the early Ethereum community. Anthony started Decentral in 2014, which is a hub for his projects in the cryptocurrency space, the most impactful project being Jaxx.

Jaxx is a blockchain wallet that can hold multiple different cryptocurrencies. It works by connecting a small client-side application to remote full nodes. The user interface is simple, and Jaxx maintains the full node instances that the small client-side application connects to. We discuss the architecture of Jaxx in more detail during this episode.

We also talk about Anthony’s background–which includes a wide range of businesses: marketing, patio door manufacturing, real estate, and eventually blockchains. Anthony had a wealth of information to provide around entrepreneurship–both inside and outside of the blockchain space.

If you are looking for all 700 episodes of Software Engineering Daily, check out our apps on the iOS or Android app store. We’ve got tons of episodes on blockchains, business, distributed systems, and tons of other topics. If you want to become a paid subscriber to Software Engineering Daily, you can hear all of our episodes without ads–you can subscribe at softwaredaily.com. And all of the code for our apps is open source. If you are looking for an open source community to be a part of, come check out github.com/softwareengineeringdaily.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


Do you think blockchain technology is only used for cryptocurrency? Think again. ConsenSys develops tools and infrastructure to enable a decentralized future built on Ethereum, the most advanced blockchain development platform. ConsenSys has hundreds of web3 developers that are building decentralized applications, focusing on world-changing ideas like creating a system for self-sovereign identity, managing supply chains, developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more. Listeners, why continue to build the internet of today when you can build the internet of the future on the blockchain? ConsenSys is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralized web. Learn more about Consensys projects and open source jobs at consensys.net/sedaily.


QCon.ai is a software conference for full-stack developers looking to uncover the real-world patterns, practices, and use cases for applying artificial intelligence/machine learning in engineering. Come to QCon.ai in San Francisco, from April 9th – 11th 2018–and see talks from companies like Instacart, Uber, Coinbase, and Stripe. These companies have built and deployed state of the art machine learning models–and they come to QCon to share their developments. The keynote of QCon.ai is Matt Ranney, a Sr. Staff Engineer at UberATG (the autonomous driving unit at Uber)–and he’s an amazing speaker–he was on SE Daily in the past, if you want a preview for what he is like. I have been to QCon three times and it is a fantastic conference. What I love about QCon is the high bar for quality–quality in terms of speakers, content, peer sharing as well as the food and general atmosphere. QCon is one of my favorite conferences, and if you haven’t been to a QCon before, make QCon.ai your first. Register for QCon.ai and use promo code SEDAILY for $100 off your ticket. 

The post The Business of Decentralization with Anthony Diiorio appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 20 2018

35mins

Play

Rank #17: Ethereum with Aaron Davis

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Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud, or third-party interference.

Aaron Davis works on MetaMask, which brings Ethereum apps to the web browser. In this monologue episode, Aaron dives deep into the Ethereum internals, philosophy, and developer experience.

Questions

  • How does a blockchain represent a Merkle tree?
  • Can a blockchain represent a state transition system or Turing Machine?
  • Why isn’t Bitcoin’s scripting language Turing complete?
  • What is Ethereum?
  • How does Ethereum compare to Bitcoin?
  • What is the story behind Ethereum?
  • What is a smart contract?
  • Is a smart contract the same as a server?
  • Can Ethereum be used to prevent a malicious AI from developing?
  • Why is Ethereum important?

Links

The post Ethereum with Aaron Davis appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 16 2015

42mins

Play

Rank #18: Epicenter Cryptocurrencies with Brian Fabian Crain

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Podcasting about cryptocurrencies is a strange occupation. You get emails all the time from companies doing a token sale that you would never want to be affiliated with. You get angry tweets from anonymous Twitter accounts that are on one side of the Bitcoin scaling debate. You get to interview extreme personalities, and the technical discussions can be highly educational.

Brian Fabian Crain started the Epicenter podcast four years ago. Podcasting about cryptocurrencies allows a podcaster to report on a wide range of areas: economics, software, philosophy–and the stories within the blockchain world itself. Epicenter is one of my favorite podcasts about cryptocurrencies because Brian is always prepared enough to ask sophisticated questions.

In this episode, we talked about ICOs–when does an ICO make sense? It seems that many token economies could function just as well without a token involved. We discussed the scaling approaches of Bitcoin and Ethereum–why are these two blockchains taking very different approaches to their scaling plans? And we talked about Chorus, the company that Brian founded to build infrastructure for proof-of-stake cryptocurrencies.

I enjoyed talking to Brian about all these different subjects, and look forward to having him on again in the future.

Transcript

Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript.

Sponsors


Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily.


Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily.


Airtable is hiring creative engineers who believe in the importance of open-ended platforms that empower human creativity. Airtable is a uniquely challenging product to build, and they are looking for creative frontend and backend engineers to design systems on first principles— like a realtime sync layer, collaborative undo model, formulas engine, visual revision history, and more. Check out jobs at Airtable by going to airtable.com/sedaily.


GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.

The post Epicenter Cryptocurrencies with Brian Fabian Crain appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 30 2018

1hr

Play

Rank #19: Ethereum with Gavin Wood

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“Nature, technology, and society ultimately will favor the more efficient, the better working systems.”

Ethereum is a decentralized platform for applications that are guaranteed to run exactly as expected via smart contracts.

Gavin Wood is a Co-founder and the Director of Development at Ethereum.

Questions

  • What is a distributed application?
  • What are the properties of a smart contract?
  • Are there any notable differences between the ether mining system and the Bitcoin mining system?
  • From the standpoint of a developer who wants to build something on the Ethereum platform, how do you get started?
  • How does Ethereum coordinate computation across the network?
  • Why are parts of the bitcoin community skeptical of Ethereum?

Links

Sponsors

Digital Ocean is the simplest cloud hosting provider. Use promo code SEDAILY for $10 in free credit.

Hired.com is the job marketplace for software engineers. Go to hired.com/softwareengineeringdaily to get a $600 bonus upon landing a job through Hired.

The post Ethereum with Gavin Wood appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 19 2015

53mins

Play

Rank #20: Decentralization: Ethereum, Bitcoin, and IPFS with Karl Floersh

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Almost a year ago, Software Engineering Daily aired a week of shows about decentralized technologies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and IPFS. Bitcoin has established itself as a stable network, but it can only be used for financial transactions. Ethereum is a global computer built on a blockchain, but it does not have the adoption of Bitcoin. IPFS is a distributed data store with an incentivization layer where you can pay strangers to store your content.
Today’s guest is Karl Floersh, an engineer working on decentralized technology. Karl has written several posts about how to build decentralized applications, as well as how the future might look once these decentralized technologies have gotten traction.

Sponsors

Braintree makes it easy to accept payments in your app or website. Select from a range of client and server SDKs and integrate payments ASAP. Check out braintreepayments.com/sedaily to check out Braintree and support Software Engineering Daily. Wealthfront is the automated investment service that manages your investments online. Check out wealthfront.com/sedaily to get your first $15,000 managed for free, as a listener of Software Engineering Daily.

The post Decentralization: Ethereum, Bitcoin, and IPFS with Karl Floersh appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 17 2016

1hr

Play