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Afropop Worldwide

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Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

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Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

iTunes Ratings

146 Ratings
Average Ratings
129
4
5
5
3

Love this show!

By Nebbish in the Negative Zone - Jul 25 2018
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Great introduction to so many artists and styles! Keep up the great work!

Excellent

By Sallenicar - Oct 09 2017
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I came here because of influence of Afro in Latin America. Bamba Mejicana.

iTunes Ratings

146 Ratings
Average Ratings
129
4
5
5
3

Love this show!

By Nebbish in the Negative Zone - Jul 25 2018
Read more
Great introduction to so many artists and styles! Keep up the great work!

Excellent

By Sallenicar - Oct 09 2017
Read more
I came here because of influence of Afro in Latin America. Bamba Mejicana.

Listen to:

Cover image of Afropop Worldwide

Afropop Worldwide

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

Congolese Music - The Fifth Generation

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In the early 2000s, Afropop told the story of “Four Generations” in Congolese music—from rumba and rumba-rock to soukous and ndombolo. Now time has marched on, and once again, thrilling new sounds are emerging from Kinshasa and its global diaspora. We’ll hear hyperkinetic roots-rock from Jupiter and Okwess, Fally Ipupa’s embrace of the current Afrobeats trend, experimental innovations from Pierre Kwenders in Montreal, and more. We’ll also speak with Congolese music connoisseur Lubangi Muniania for insights into the latest trends from one of Africa’s greatest musical powerhouses.

Produced by Banning Eyre

APWW PGM #777

Apr 26 2018

59mins

Play

The Cumbia Diaspora: From Colombia to the World

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Move over salsa and merengue–cumbia is the most popular music in Latin America. Today, cumbia is played from the borderlands of Texas down the spine of the Andes to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. In this Hip Deep edition, we find out how cumbia left Colombia in the ‘60s and ‘70s and traveled to other countries. Everywhere it went, it transformed itself, adapting to its new environment. In Peru, it mixed with psychedelic guitar effects and Andean sounds to become chicha. In Argentina, it became the expression of a new generation of restless youth in the burgeoning slums of Buenos Aires. And in Mexico, it became so instilled in the local culture that some have forgotten that it came from Colombia in the first place. Through extensive interviews with experts and musicians, we discover how cumbia and its many transformations tell us the story of Latin America in the late 20th century.

Produced by Marlon Bishop.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW PGM #606
11-10-2016

Nov 10 2016

59mins

Play

Beneath The Music: An African History of Bass

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[APWW #586] [Originally aired in 2010]

This week, Afropop celebrates one of the true unsung heroes of African music: the bass. Join us as we slap, pop and thump our way across the African diaspora with our ears tuned to those fat sounds beneath the music and the funky men who make them. Our tour of the global low end will begin with an exploration of virtuosic bass wizardry in Cameroon. Then, we’ll go to Cuba to find out how bassist Israel “Cachao” Lopez invented mambo with the well-placed pluck of a finger. After that, we’ll stop by Detroit and hear how the innovations of funk bass playing got the whole world dancing. Special guests include Cameroon native Richard Bona, thought by some to be the best bassist alive today, and Bakithi Kumalo, one of Africa’s premier bassists and the man behind the groove on Paul Simon’s Graceland. Produced by Marlon Bishop.

Jan 07 2016

59mins

Play

Hip Deep in Mali: Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako

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Hip Deep in Mali: Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako
Airdate: 5/19/2016
#731 Produced by Banning Eyre

This program presents a musical portrait of Bamako in the wake of crisis. In 2012-13, Islamists occupied the north and a coup d’etat threatened a recent history of functioning democracy. With borders restored and a new elected government in place, we find musical life returning with festivals, nightclub shows and street weddings. But that picture hides darker realities. Ethnomusicologist Lucy Duràn has been studying the oral transmission of music in various countries, notably among griot families in Mali. With her guidance, we explore the precarious lives of griots in today’s Bamako, focusing on the upbringing and education of children in these hereditary families of historian-entertainers. Elders and traditionalists say the griot tradition has been corrupted beyond hope, and even advise their young to pursue different professions. Others persist, within an environment where growing religious conservatism puts increasing pressure on the lives and careers of all musicians. We meet three extraordinarily talented griot children. We hear music and reflections from kora master Toumani Diabaté and his massively popular songwriting son, Sidiki. And we get a fascinating historical perspective from Gregory Mann, professor of history at Columbia University.

May 19 2016

59mins

Play

African Music at the Crossroads

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Afropop producer Banning Eyre takes us on a surprise-filled tour of his 30-some years of covering African music. Through conversations with Georges Collinet and producer/agent/DJ Rab Bakari, the program reflects on how the world, the music, the culture and the media have changed and keep on changing throughout Africa and the diaspora. Along the way we hear some of the tunes that have most inspired Banning and Georges, sample the latest Afrobeats and Naija pop, and speculate on where African music is heading next. Great music, provocative thinking!

Produced by Banning Eyre.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

[APWW #740]

Distributed 6/15/2017 [Originally aired in 2016]

Jun 15 2017

59mins

Play

Shake It Fo Ya Hood New Orleans Bounce

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New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians. But if you've rolled through New Orleans on pretty much any night in the last 30 years, you've probably heard another sound—the clattering, booming, hip-shaking, chant-heavy roll of bounce, a form of hip-hop music, dance and culture unique to the Crescent City. Pulling from the national mainstream but remaking it the way that only New Orleans can, bounce has become a sonic touchstone for an entire generation of residents. For this Hip Deep edition, Afropop digs into the close-knit scene, talking to dancers, producers, MCs, and managers from over 30 years of bounce, all to explore the beat that drives New Orleans—and to find out what it means to the people who bring it to life. Produced by Sam Backer and Jessi Olsen.

Nov 01 2018

59mins

Play

Music Of The Harlem Renaissance

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[APWW #226] [Originally broadcast in 1996]

The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s was an astounding explosion of African-American cultural innovation, producing art, literature, poetry, and of course, fantastic music. In honor of Black History month, we are encoring our tribute to this magnificent period. We’ll hear from stars like Mamie Smith, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, as we use their music to explore the often-fraught history of Manhattan’s heights.

Feb 18 2016

59mins

Play

Tropical Soul Of Jorge Ben Jor

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Jorge Ben Jor first began to experiment with fusions of samba, bossa nova, rhythm ‘n’ blues and soul in the early 1960s. Together with Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, he participated in the watershed cultural movement, Tropicália, in the late 1960s. In the 1970s, he further explored Afro-Brazilian history and culture in a series of popular albums that have since become key points of reference for a contemporary neo-soul movement. Jorge Benjor continues to be an active presence in Brazilian popular music. He grants us a rare interview to tell his story. The program is produced by Sean Barlow and co-produced with Christopher Dunn, author of Brutality Garden: Tropicália and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture (University of North Carolina Press, 2001) as part of Afropop Worldwide’s “Hip Deep” series

Aug 11 2016

58mins

Play

A Visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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In our visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, we go beyond the handful of artists who have achieved international careers and dive into the local scene. We visit azmaribets, down-home music clubs featuring vivacious women artists and their ensembles of traditional players. We catch Mimi and Besat live. Competition between the leading music producers in Addis is fierce: We visit the recording studio of Abegasu Shiote, who breaks down the Ethiopian pop sound track by track, and for the finale, we attend a performance by the revered elder singer of the classic Addis sound--Mamoud Ahmed.

Produced by Sean Barlow.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW PGM #532

Distributed 3/23/2017
[Originally aired in 2007]

Mar 23 2017

59mins

Play

Crabs With Brains

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#704 Crabs With Brains
Produced by: Jesse Brent
Airdate: 4/28/16

In the early 1990s, mangueboys and manguegirls stimulated fertility in the veins of Recife, Brazil. They were interested in hip-hop, the collapse of modernity, chaos and marine predator attacks (mainly sharks). Armed with boundless creativity, they turned one of the world’s most poverty-stricken cities into one of Brazil’s greatest centers of culture. Mangue artists mixed hip-hop, Jamaican raggamuffin and punk rock with traditions from Brazil’s northeast like maracatu and embolada. In this program, we explore the legacy of the mangue bit movement and its biggest star, Chico Science of Nação Zumbi. We also take a look at a new generation of adventurous musicians in Recife. Join us as we connect the good vibrations of the mangue with the world network of pop!

Apr 28 2016

59mins

Play

Jamaica - Big A Yard, Big Abroad

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Since the 1960s in Jamaica, iconic figures such as Bob Marley have gathered in backyards to write reggae anthems that conquered world charts. The yard remains a cornerstone in Jamaican culture. Musicians withdraw from the violence of the city to create and play songs in their yards. In Jamaican patois, “mi yard” means “my home,” and many songs, proverbs and colloquialisms hinge on the word “yard.” More even than the music itself, the yard evokes a state of mind and a physical space wherein artists create amid the warmth of acoustic sound, raw emotion of voices and a collective energy. In this program, we move yard to yard in Jamaica, listening to acoustic music being written and recorded, smelling trees and flowers, and meeting legendary artists like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Cedric Myton of the Congos, Kiddus I, Robbie Lyn, Viceroys, or Nambo Robinson, as well as a number of young and emerging reggae artists like JAH9, Var, and Derajah, who grew up and found their artistic voices in ghetto yards. You've never heard Jamaica sound like this before!

Produced by Elodie Maillot and Banning Eyre.
APWW PGM #753

Mar 01 2018

59mins

Play

The (New) Sound Of Afro Paris

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Paris has been a thriving capital for African music for decades. Since the 1980s, many major musicians such as Mory Kanté, Khaled and Amadou and Mariam launched their international careers there. Today, as migration patterns evolve, borders tighten and the world becomes increasingly connected via the Internet, Paris remains more than ever a city of encounters and innovations for artists of African origin. With new generations experimenting and new audiences emerging, the term “world music” has lost relevance as artists explore outside geographic and industry-dictated boundaries. In this program, we explore the new "Afropolitan" sounds of Paris, from concert halls to studios, from the heart of the city to immigrant neighborhoods in the banlieues. We hear from Mauritanian singer Noura Mint Seymali, and instrumentalists Ballake Sissoko and Lansiné Kouyaté exploring alongside classically trained French musicians. We catch up with Nigerian Afrobeat pioneer Tony Allen to hear about his life in Paris and his new jazz project, drop in on a recording session with young Algerian raï singer Sofiane Saidi, and meet Sudanese flautist Ghandi Adam, who provides a musical platform for migrants and refugees with his Lamma Orchestra. The sounds of tomorrow are in the making in Paris today!

Produced by Elodie Maillot and Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW #769

Distributed 12/21/2017

Dec 21 2017

59mins

Play

The Cumbia Diaspora - From Colombia to the World

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Move over salsa and merengue–cumbia is the most popular music in Latin America. Today, cumbia is played from the borderlands of Texas down the spine of the Andes to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. In this Hip Deep edition, we find out how cumbia left Colombia in the ‘60s and ‘70s and traveled to other countries. Everywhere it went, it transformed itself, adapting to its new environment. In Peru, it mixed with psychedelic guitar effects and Andean sounds to become chicha. In Argentina, it became the expression of a new generation of restless youth in the burgeoning slums of Buenos Aires. And in Mexico, it became so instilled in the local culture that some have forgotten that it came from Colombia in the first place. Through extensive interviews with experts and musicians, we discover how cumbia and its many transformations tell us the story of Latin America in the late 20th century.

APWW # 606

[Produced by Marlon Bishop. Originally aired Jan. 3, 2011]

Jul 11 2019

59mins

Play

Reimagining Jazz in Africa: Cape Town Cosmopolitans and Beyond

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In recognition of the recent death of South African maestro Hugh Masekela, we revisit a program that touches on one of his earliest musical landmarks, The Jazz Epistles.

It’s no secret that the distant roots of American jazz lay in Africa. But how did Afro-America’s revolutionary sound reshape African music? On this Hip Deep edition, we examine how African artists found a modern, global voice using jazz as inspiration. Author Carol Muller tells the story of Abdullah Ibrahim, whose prolific career was launched with “Duke Ellington Presents the Dollar Brand Trio” followed by “Anatomy of a South African Village Suite.” We dig into the political significance of the U.S. State Department tours of Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, and how their visit to Africa underscored the greater fight for social justice for blacks around the world. Senegalese music scholar Timothy Mangin explains West Africa's attraction to American big band music. Finally, jazz and African music scholar Ingrid Monson tells the story of jazz in Ethiopia and Nigeria, and how this American tradition sculpted the sounds of such luminaries as Mulatu Astatke and Fela Kuti.

Feb 01 2018

59mins

Play

Time Travel Through Afro-Paris

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Since at least the 1980s, when this program first aired, Paris has been one of the most important incubators of African music on the planet. That’s why we’ve visited there to take the pulse so often. On this program, we look back on 30 years of adventures with African music in Paris. We’ll hear studio sessions with Congolese guitar ace Diblo Dibala and zouk stars Kassav, interviews, live concerts, and that special ambiance that only Paris can provide.

APWW #770

Jan 24 2019

59mins

Play

More African Guitars

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The guitar music of Africa is eternal! Despite the rise of Afrobeats, Afro-house, hip-hop and techno, the continent still turns out inventive and thrilling string pickers. This music-rich program features shredding desert-rock axemen and filigree griot guitarists from Niger and Mali, as well as new sounds from the Congo, Zimbabwe and Madagascar. We’ll also travel to rural Botswana to meet itinerant guitarists who have gained a worldwide following through eye- and ear-popping YouTube videos. Some of their new music is now out on a unique compilation called I’m Not Here to Hunt Rabbits. We’ll hear the sweet, raw sounds and their surprising stories, and discover a whole new way of playing the world’s most versatile string instrument.

Aug 23 2018

59mins

Play

La Bamba: The Afro-Mexican Story

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Much has been made of Mexico’s rich Spanish and indigenous heritage, but until recently, there’s been little talk of Mexico’s so-called “third root”: Africa. Africans came to Mexico with the Spanish as soldiers and slaves – so many that by 1810, the black population of Mexico was equal to that of the United States. Today, African heritage persists throughout Mexico, yet for a variety of reasons, black history has long been silenced. In this Hip Deep episode, we use music to explore that history as we take a road trip across the country in search of sonic traces of Afro-Mexico. We visit the state of Veracruz to learn the history of the Afro-Mexican son jarocho sound, made famous by Ritchie Valens’ 1958 hit cover of "La Bamba," a traditional jarocho tune. Then, we visit the Costa Chica of Guerrero, where Afro-Mexican communities are fighting for government recognition to help preserve faltering musical traditions. And we’ll stop by the Golden Age halls of Mexico City, where the Afro-Cuban danzón thrives far from its ancestral home in Havana. Along the way, we hear from top scholars in the field such as Ben Vinson III and Alejandro Madrid, as well as Afro-Mexican music stars past and present, from Los Cojolites to Las Cafeteras. ¡Que padre!

Produced by Marlon Bishop.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW PGM #658
Originally Aired 8/25/2013
Distributed 5/11/2017

May 11 2017

59mins

Play

The Invisible Line - Haiti and the Dominican Republic

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The island of Hispaniola, located in the western Caribbean, is divided in two by an invisible line that snakes down its central mountain range. On one side is Haiti, the other the Dominican Republic: one colonized by the French, the other by Spain. The island was the first place in the Americas colonized by Europeans, and was the place where trans-Atlantic slavery was first implemented. It was also home to the first--and only--successful slave revolt when Haiti rebelled against France in 1791. Yet there has frequently been a tremendous amount of tension between the two countries. For decades, Eurocentric elites in the Dominican Republic have painted Haitians as inferior and threatening. Today, there is an uproar around the issues of Haitian immigration to the D.R., and politicians who are lobbying to build a wall between the two countries.

Despite the conflicts, Dominicans and Haitians are linked by deeply interwoven histories, economies and cultures. In this episode of Afropop Worldwide, we tell the story of the relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic through music, from the Haitian Revolution to the 1937 massacre perpetrated by Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo. We also visit a batey community in the sugarcane fields, where residents play Haitian-Dominican gagá music, explore the relationship between race and music on the island, and meet young people using music to bring the people of Hispaniola closer together.

Produced by Marlon Bishop

APWW #760

Feb 14 2019

59mins

Play

Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacen is Walking

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Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacén is Walking
Matanzas, Cuba has long been regarded as the source (la fuente) of many rich Afro-Cuban folkloric traditions. These ceremonial and secular Afro-Cuban musics are, for the most part, alive and well, and being documented for the first time by Matanceros themselves, rather than exclusively by Havana-based or non-Cuban imprints. The Matanzas record label and artist collective, Sendero Music/El Almacén, faces several challenges: oversight from the state, limited access to resources, curating which groups to record while paradoxically convincing the folkloric community of the value of their endeavors, and the conundrum of establishing meaningful connections outside of Cuba to disseminate the city’s music to the world. #726
Airdate: 10/13/2016
Producer: Harris Eisenstadt

Oct 13 2016

59mins

Play

Shake It Fo Ya Hood: Bounce, New Orleans Hip-Hop

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*Music in this show contains some explicit language*

New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians. But if you've rolled through New Orleans on pretty much any night in the last 30 years, you've probably heard another sound—the clattering, booming, hip-shaking, chant-heavy roll of bounce, a form of hip-hop music, dance and culture unique to the Crescent City. Pulling from the national mainstream but remaking it the way that only New Orleans can, bounce has become a sonic touchstone for an entire generation of residents. For this Hip Deep edition, Afropop digs into the close-knit scene, talking to dancers, producers, MCs, and managers from over 30 years of bounce, all to explore the beat that drives New Orleans—and to find out what it means to the people who bring it to life.

Produced by Jessi Olsen and Sam Backer.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

[APWW #761]

Distributed 8/31/2017

Aug 31 2017

59mins

Play

Luiz Gonzaga The King of Baiao

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Sweet accordion riffs, the steady twang of the triangle, and the off-beat pounding of the zabumba drum make forro a favorite for all Brazilians. The infectious tunes and syncopated beats have been described as "a mixture of ska with polka in overdrive." This edition of Afropop Worldwide's Hip Deep will profile forro creator Luiz Gonzaga--from the wanderlust that led him from his rural birthplace in northeastern Brazil to a pumping career in the capital, Rio de Janeiro, in the 1940s. Conversations with Brazilian artists, recorded on location in the forro capital of Recife, following in Gonzaga's footsteps. Co-produced by Harvard's Megwen Loveless.

APWW #457

Oct 03 2019

59mins

Play

Carnival in Brooklyn

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On this program, we follow Caribbean steel-pan bands and Haitian rara groups through their preparations for Brooklyn's West Indian Day Parade and Carnival, into the special jouvert celebration that kicks off carnival with revelers and performing groups dancing through the pre-dawn streets of Brooklyn; to the intense Panorama steel-pan competition, the daylight parade and beyond. We also hear how members of these Caribbean communities keep their cultural activities alive and thriving despite the considerable challenges they are facing in a rapidly gentrifying city.

APWW #739

Sep 19 2019

59mins

Play

Off the Beaten Track - Burkina Faso, Malawi, and Beyond

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This program ventures into corners of Africa we rarely hear from, guided by adventurous field recordists and crate diggers. The Zomba Prison Project is a set of recordings by inmates at a maximum security prison in Malawi, currently the poorest nation on earth. The project’s debut CD was nominated for a Grammy Award. Here, we speak with the producer, Ian Brennan, and hear tracks from a new volume of soulful, even heartbreaking, songs from the prison. We then go back to the 1960s and ‘70s in the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta) to sample a gorgeous set of newly revealed recordings by Volta Jazz, Dafra Star, Les Imbattables Leopards and more. We hear from Florent Mazzoleni, the author and intrepid vinyl collector behind the new box set, Bobo Yéyé: Belle Époque in Upper Volta.

Produced by Banning Eyre.

APWW #738

Sep 12 2019

59mins

Play

Bolsonaro Is and Isn't

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If Americans hear about Brazil's president Jair Bolsonaro at all, he's usually described as a "Brazilian Donald Trump." But on this week's CloseUp, we step out of the American bubble, and look at who Bolsonaro is, who his targets are, and how he rose to power. We also hear the first round of songs written to protest his hard, right-wing politics.

Sep 10 2019

24mins

Play

Randy Weston, A Jazz Life with the African Ancestors

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Jazz legend, Randy Weston left us on September 1, 2018. He, more than any contemporary jazz artist, understood, honored and explored the roots of American music in Africa. He lived there, traveled there often, and spoke of his connections to his African ancestors in every interview during his 92 years. In this program, we revisit our musical conversation with Weston in 1998, and sample some of his late solo piano recordings.

APWW #789

Produced by Banning Eyre

Sep 05 2019

59mins

Play

Jamaica, Big A Yard, Big Abroad

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Since the 1960s in Jamaica, iconic figures such as Bob Marley have gathered in backyards to write reggae anthems that conquered world charts. The yard remains a cornerstone in Jamaican culture. Musicians withdraw from the violence of the city to create and play songs in their yards. In Jamaican patois, “mi yard” means “my home,” and many songs, proverbs and colloquialisms hinge on the word “yard.” More even than the music itself, the yard evokes a state of mind and a physical space wherein artists create amid the warmth of acoustic sound, raw emotion of voices and a collective energy. In this program, we move yard to yard in Jamaica, listening to acoustic music being written and recorded, smelling trees and flowers, and meeting legendary artists like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Cedric Myton of the Congos, Kiddus I, Robbie Lyn, Viceroys, or Nambo Robinson, as well as a number of young and emerging reggae artists like JAH9, Var, and Derajah, who grew up and found their artistic voices in ghetto yards. You've never heard Jamaica sound like this before!

Produced by Elodie Maillot and Banning Eyre

APWW PGM #753

Aug 29 2019

59mins

Play

Ring the Alarm: A History of Sound System Culture

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In Jamaica, sound systems are more than just a stack of speakers blasting the latest tunes to an eager crowd. Over the last 70 years, they have come to represent the most common way that Jamaicans experience music. Sound systems have touched all levels of society in Jamaica, determining the island’s popular taste and profoundly influencing the daily lives of its citizenry. This program explores the evolution of sound system culture, from the Jamaican genesis of the 1940s to its gradual impact on diaspora communities, and ultimately, its undeniable influence on the popular culture of nations overseas.

Produced by David Katz and Saxon Baird.

APWW #758

Aug 22 2019

59mins

Play

French Afro-Colonial Memory and Music

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France has a pretty unique relationship to its former colonies, sharing a strong common history and a common language, but also painful episodes not really taught at school—neither in France nor in Africa.

In France and in French-speaking African countries today, there is a new generation of artists and promotors who are ready to tell history with music. They are unearthing unknown periods of French colonial history. In this show, we'll hear about dark times of Franco-African history, specifically from Cameroon before its independence.

We'll dig into memories and secrets, and hear echoes from the tropical forest where bodies and facts were hidden, with artists who are tackling fault lines of France's colonial past and unearthing harsh reality with sweet voices such as singer Blick Bassy who released a new album 1958, a tribute to the freedom fighter Rubem Um Nyobe.

Aug 20 2019

25mins

Play

Afropop Worldwide - The Origin Story

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As Afropop Worldwide marks the week of its 30th anniversary on the public airwaves, we take a look at the story that led up to the program’s creation. We hear excerpts from the podcast A Show of Hearts profiling the program’s founders Sean Barlow and Banning Eyre. And host Georges Collinet recalls his audition for the job that has shaped three decades of his storied life. And of course, we will hear highlights from the music that has made Afropop Worldwide one of the longest running music programs in public radio history.

Produced by Banning Eyre

APWW #791

Aug 15 2019

59mins

Play

Barrio Colón to Brooklyn

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The clave cuts the air, the drums triangulate in endless conversation, the singers push their voices over the rhythm, competing with daring improvisations, while a pair of dancers tease and provoke, shifting across the small space between singers and drummers: This is an Afro-Cuban rumba, a communal form of Afro-Cuban folkloric music that continues to be a crucial part of the musical life of New York City. From the inclusive to the exclusive, we also experience an original group interpreting Afro-Cuban sacred music through jazz explorations. In this podcast, we hear from two Cuban musicians, Anier Alonso and Melvis Santa, who are adding their unique voices to the New York Afro-Cuban music scene, pushing things forward with tireless creative energy.

Produced by Ricardo Luiggi and Morgan Greenstreet.
Photo by Carla A. Tomassini Quijano www.carlaojo.com

Hear full interviews, in Spanish with Anier and Melvis:
https://soundcloud.com/zonalibredjs/anier-alonso-entrevista https://soundcloud.com/zonalibredjs/melvis-santa-entrevista

Aug 06 2019

18mins

Play

Doing It For the Art: Manolo Raps in Cape Verde

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At the 2019 Atlantic Music Expo in Cape Verde, Afropop's Sebastian Bouknight met Manolo, a longtime rapper who is trying to find a foothold in the country's overcrowded music scene.

Jul 23 2019

26mins

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The Cumbia Diaspora - From Colombia to the World

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Move over salsa and merengue–cumbia is the most popular music in Latin America. Today, cumbia is played from the borderlands of Texas down the spine of the Andes to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. In this Hip Deep edition, we find out how cumbia left Colombia in the ‘60s and ‘70s and traveled to other countries. Everywhere it went, it transformed itself, adapting to its new environment. In Peru, it mixed with psychedelic guitar effects and Andean sounds to become chicha. In Argentina, it became the expression of a new generation of restless youth in the burgeoning slums of Buenos Aires. And in Mexico, it became so instilled in the local culture that some have forgotten that it came from Colombia in the first place. Through extensive interviews with experts and musicians, we discover how cumbia and its many transformations tell us the story of Latin America in the late 20th century.

APWW # 606

[Produced by Marlon Bishop. Originally aired Jan. 3, 2011]

Jul 11 2019

59mins

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Afropop Goes to the Grammys

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Reporter Dan Rosenberg takes us to the Grammy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles and speaks to the nominees in the World Music category, Fatoumata Diawara, Bombino, The Soweto Gospel Choir, Seun Kuti and Yiddish Glory, about how they are using their voices to combat human rights abuses, political corruption, genocide and violence against women.

Jul 09 2019

24mins

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More African Guitars

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The guitar music of Africa is eternal! Despite the rise of Afrobeats, Afro-house, hip-hop and techno, the continent still turns out inventive and thrilling string pickers. This music-rich program features shredding desert-rock axemen and filigree griot guitarists from Niger and Mali, as well as new sounds from the Congo, Zimbabwe and Madagascar. We’ll also travel to rural Botswana to meet itinerant guitarists who have gained a worldwide following through eye- and ear-popping YouTube videos. Some of their new music is now out on a unique compilation called I’m Not Here to Hunt Rabbits. We’ll hear the sweet, raw sounds and their surprising stories, and discover a whole new way of playing the world’s most versatile string instrument.

APWW #786

Produced by Banning Eyre

Jul 04 2019

59mins

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Remembering Oliver Mtukudzi EXTENDED VERSION

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Zimbabwe’s Oliver Mtukudzi, one of the most beloved singer/composer/bandleaders out of Africa in the last century, died in Harare on Jan. 23 2019 after a long battle with diabetes. Tuku, as his fans knew him, composed countless songs that cut to the heart of life in Zimbabwe, from its struggle for freedom in the 1970s through the rocky road of independence ever since. In this program, we look back at our conversations with Tuku going back to our first visit to Zimbabwe in 1988, and hear his wonderful music at various points in his epic career. We also speak with his biographer, ethnomusicologist Jennifer Kyker, and take a deep dive into what made Tuku music so special and the stories behind some of his most important songs. Produced by Banning Eyre.

This is the EXTENDED VERSION (1:04:15)

Jun 27 2019

1hr 4mins

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Lazarus - Messenger of Hope

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The plight of albinos in Africa is a sad story. Occult beliefs make them the targets of kidnapping, killing and mutilation. But in Malawi, an exceptionally talented street musician named Lazarus is making a stand in defence of fellow albinos, and he's doing it with music. Lazarus's debut album Stomp the Devil will be released in August, 2019. Producer Banning Eyre takes us inside Lazarus's life and music and explores his surprising tale of survival and activism.

This is the season premiere of Afropop Closeups--shorter pieces made specifically for podcasting, which will come out every other week over the summer.

Jun 26 2019

24mins

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The Hidden Blackness of Flamenco

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Flamenco as we know it was “born” in Spain in the mid-19th century. But for centuries before that, Roma (Gitanos, Gypsies) had been living in Spanish cities, often rubbing shoulders with the descendants of Africans (Moors), who had been there as both citizens and slaves going back to Medieval times and earlier. This overlooked pre-history of flamenco is explored in Miguel Angel Rosales’s groundbreaking film Gurumbé: Afro-Andalusian Memories. In this program, we meet Rosales, flamenco dancer and scholar Meira Goldberg, and dancer Yinka Esi Graves and learn to hear flamenco in a new way. We also meet maverick flamenco artist Raul Rodriguez, inventor and master of the tres flamenco. Rodriquez’s solo concert, sampled in this program, is a tour de force and an anthropology master class, all in one. Produced by Banning Eyre.

Jun 20 2019

59mins

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What's New at WOMEX

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The annual WOMEX gathering is a feast for the eyes and ears. At the 2018 edition in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, over 300 artists performed in 60 official showcases. Afropop Worldwide recorded both intimate exclusive sessions and official showcases. We also interviewed globetrotting artists: Moonlight Benjamin (Haiti/France), Dawda Jobarteh(Gambia/Denmark), Tita Nzebi (Gabon/France) and Serge Ananou (Benin/France). And, we collected a load of new releases from artists you know, like Salif Keita, and some you don’t, but will be happy to discover. This is our second WOMEX 2018 program, a music-filled hour of music and impressions from the world’s greatest gathering of global music movers and shakers.

Produced by Banning Eyre.

APWW #796

Jun 13 2019

59mins

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From Haiti to the World

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From Paris to New Orleans and Boston, Haitian musicians are shaking up the music scene. The island’s powerful Africa-rooted culture—from celebratory rara and sensuous kompa to the deep well of vodun songs—has become a global force. In this program, we spend time with racine music veteran Lolo Beaubrun of Boukman Eksperyans, and his rising star son, Paul Beaubrun, both on a swing through New England. We also meet Paris-based Moonlight Benjamin, and hear recent New Orleans-tinged music from Lakou Mizik and RAM. Finally, we meet Tjovi Ginen, a pan-African band featuring the provocative and humorous spoken words of Boston-based Haitian educator and animator Daniel Laurent. A romping update on all things Haitian.

[APWW #806]

Produced by Banning Eyre.

Jun 06 2019

59mins

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Pedras, Melos, and Radiola - Brazilian Reggae in Sao Luis do Maranhao

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São Luís do Maranhão is one of the poorest and most ethnically-diverse cities in Brazil. In this old slave port, located in the far northeast of the country, a thriving reggae scene has wielded disproportionate influence since the 1970s, based on an overarching taste for obscure roots reggae from the Jamaican countryside and vintage lover’s rock from the urban spaces of black Britain. The music spread through the local sound systems, known as radiolas, fueling a bolero-like dance style which has contributed to the construction of a unique local identity in a city now dubbed the “Brazilian Jamaica.” Produced in São Luís by David Katz, this program explores how reggae became embedded in São Luís’ consciousness, cutting across boundaries of race, class, age, gender and language.

Photo © David Katz​

APWW #805

May 23 2019

59mins

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