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Rank #36 in Nature category

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The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #36 in Nature category

Science
Natural Sciences
Nature
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The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

Read more

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

iTunes Ratings

47 Ratings
Average Ratings
43
3
0
1
0

One of the good ones!

By Frog_Lady - Dec 14 2016
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Long-time listener here, keep it up! The episode on Standing Rock has been my favorite so far.

Great podcast

By Fthuuh - Aug 24 2015
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This is exactly what I was looking for! Absolutely love it

iTunes Ratings

47 Ratings
Average Ratings
43
3
0
1
0

One of the good ones!

By Frog_Lady - Dec 14 2016
Read more
Long-time listener here, keep it up! The episode on Standing Rock has been my favorite so far.

Great podcast

By Fthuuh - Aug 24 2015
Read more
This is exactly what I was looking for! Absolutely love it
Cover image of The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Latest release on Jul 01, 2020

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The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

Rank #1: EOC 183: The Wolves of Denali

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Today’s guest is a filmmaker working to document the complex situation unfolding in Denali National Park surrounding the management of this area’s wolf population. Ramey Newell is the documentary filmmaker behind the new film “A Good Wolf”.

Aug 22 2019

41mins

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Rank #2: EOC 135: Songs for the Indigenous Revolution: Raye Zaragoza on Water and Womanhood

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We have covered the events of Standing Rock in many ways, interviewing filmmakers, historians rally marchers, and water protectors on the front lines. But today you will hear from a woman who’s music has cemented a moment in history and created a reverberation of action on a global scale. Raye Zaragoza is a young, multi-talented activist at the forefront of the movement for indigenous rights and environmental justice. Her music has redefined the “protest song” and sparked meaningful dialogue around empathy for the earth as well as empathy for each other. Raye’s music has been featured on various outlets like Daytrotter, Jam in the Van, Indian Country Media Network, and most recently by Cyndi Lauper on Spotify. In this episode you will hear clips from some of my favorite tracks as well as Raye’s words on the ties between culture and land, and finding strength in womanhood through the power of song.

Dec 06 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #3: EOC 151: A special episode from the March for Science in Denver brought to you by the Majority Villain Podcast

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As many know, the March for Science is a grassroots, all volunteer-organized event, celebrating science across the nation and it serves as a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Recent policy suggestions and changes have caused heightened worry among scientists, and the incredible and immediate outpouring of support has made clear that these concerns are also shared by countless people around the world. If you missed one of these recent events near you, but were curious what it’s all about, the fabulous folks from the Majority Villain podcast attended the March for Science-Denver and shared their episode with us to bring to listeners of Eyes on Conservation.

May 02 2018

56mins

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Rank #4: EOC 030: Vaquita Conservation in Mexico with “Mr. Vaquita” Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho

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Episode Summary: Today on the show we’re talking with Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho who is the head of marine mammal conservation and research for the National Institute of Ecology and Climate... Read more » The post EOC 030: Vaquita Conservation in Mexico with “Mr. Vaquita” Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho appeared first on Wild Lens.

Jun 24 2015

59mins

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Rank #5: EOC 195: The Wonderful World of Wetlands

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When we think of wetlands, most of us see them as ghostly swamps where spiders have huge webs that look like banshee in veils, or the dangerous Dead Marshes through which Gollum led Frodo in the Lord of the Rings. However, wetlands are not at all these dangerous, murky, smelly, marshy areas. In fact they are the most cheerful places full of life and activity. It’s where life gravitates to, where human settlements started and where wildlife will gravitate around as well. These marshes, swamps and lagoons are a critical part of our natural environment. Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world comparable to rain forests and coral reefs. But sadly today, they are disappearing 3 times faster than our forests. A meagre 6% of the Earth’s surface is covered by wetlands whereas 31% of the earth’s surface still has forests. And yet people don’t seem to appreciate them in the same way, don’t love them as much as forests. They are hardly considered even important. 


In this episode, a young wildlife presenter and film-maker, Aishwarya Sridhar from India, talks to Mr. Debi Goenka and Mr. Nikhil Bhopale about the importance of wetland eco-systems in a world plagued by climate crisis. Mr. Goenka has been working towards the protection of mangroves and wetlands for over 35 years of his life. He is the executive trustee of Conservation Action Trust (a non-governmental organisation in India) engaged in environmental protection and he’s the force behind the recent policy protecting the Indian mangroves. 


On the other hand, Mr. Nihil Bhopale is an educationist, conservationist and an author, having written a book on the birds of the Indian subcontinent. He is the founder of Green Works Trust, an NGO pioneering environmental education in India. 


They discuss the role of wetlands, the crisis facing them and the need to protect them urgently. 


"Crescents" by Ketsa used via Creative Commons Licensing from the Free Music Archive.

Mar 11 2020

51mins

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Rank #6: EOC 189: The Trees Are Coming!

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Zeima Kassahun and I have been friends for a really long time - pretty much most of our lives. You wouldn't know it then, but we've somehow managed to not only stay best friends, but we've both ended up in environmental professions as adults.

Zeima works as a community planting manager for a non-profit organization in the Presidio of San Francisco called Friends of the Urban Forest or FUF. Friends of the Urban Forest has planted more than 60,000 trees, totaling almost half of the city’s street tree canopy. Their mission is to help individuals and neighborhood groups plant and care for street trees and sidewalk gardens in San Francisco in order to improve the city by beautifying neighborhoods, cleaning the air, and reducing polluted stormwater runoff.

FUF Community Planting Manager Zeima Kassahun

About every month, FUF employees gather with a consistent group of dedicated volunteers and host planting days, where after much coordination and planning, trees are planted in previously identified sidewalk spaces. I met Zeima at one of these plantings and got to follow her around as we discussed green gentrification, the need for more diversity in environmental professions and all the intricacies of her job.

Nov 20 2019

41mins

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Rank #7: EOC 016: Studying the Egyptian Vulture in Ethiopia and the Middle East with Evan Buechley

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Episode Summary: Today’s episode of the podcast is a continuation of this month’s theme of vulture conservation across the globe. Our guest is PhD candidate at the University of Utah,... Read more » The post EOC 016: Studying the Egyptian Vulture in Ethiopia and the Middle East with Evan Buechley appeared first on Wild Lens.

Mar 18 2015

56mins

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Rank #8: EOC 018: Texas Horned Lizard Research with Rachel Granberg

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Episode Summary: In today’s episode of the podcast we’ll hear from Texas Horned Lizard expert Rachel Granberg. Rachel shares with us her vast knowledge of this fascinating little animal, and... Read more » The post EOC 018: Texas Horned Lizard Research with Rachel Granberg appeared first on Wild Lens.

Apr 01 2015

39mins

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Rank #9: EOC 149: Plight of the Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk

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Hurricane Maria was the worst storm to hit Puerto Rico in over 80 years, arriving only two weeks after Hurricane Irma passed just north of the island. The effects of these storms on Puerto Rican families — and the island’s infrastructure — will take many years to heal. The effect on the wildlife inhabiting this island was also, not surprisingly, equally devastated. When the Peregrine Fund’s team of biologists surveyed the population of Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawks in 2017, they found 75 birds comprising 16 breeding pairs in four locations on the island. Following hurricanes Irma and Maria, the population was down to just 19 individual birds. Nearly 75 percent of the subspecies was lost. Matt Podolsky sat down with Russel Thurstrom at the Peregrine Fund to learn more about this discovery and the actions being taken to prevent this species from blinking out.

Apr 18 2018

32mins

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Rank #10: EOC 171: 100 Years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

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Today we are going to learn about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a piece of legislation that the Trump administration is attempting to dismantle 100 years after it was passed.  We are presenting for you in today's episode a presentation given by the Chief Network Officer of the National Audubon Society, David Ringer.  David highlights the key role played by the Audubon Society in the passage of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act 100 years ago, and discusses how Audubon is currently working to ensure that this and other important protections for birds and our environment are maintained. David gave this presentation back in November of 2018 as Audubon was winding down it’s celebration of the 100 year anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act - but this message remains equally critical now, at the start of the new year.  While our current political situation can be downright depressing, it’s important to remember that we do have options for making our voices heard.

Jan 16 2019

48mins

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Rank #11: EOC 022: Monitoring Seabirds in Extreme Isolation with Mikaela Howie

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Episode Summary: Today’s episode of the podcast is about seabird monitoring in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. This is a long term research and monitoring effort that has been going... Read more » The post EOC 022: Monitoring Seabirds in Extreme Isolation with Mikaela Howie appeared first on Wild Lens.

May 06 2015

40mins

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Rank #12: EOC 169: Livin' On a Prairie!

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Most endangered species are easy to see in peril. There simply aren’t very many of them, and we struggle to see them in the areas where they’re from. Others aren’t so clear. Take, for example, the black-tailed prairie dog. It seems like they’re everywhere, and yet, their numbers are some of the lowest they’ve every been. This isn’t just bad news for the prairie dog. It’s bad news for animals like the black footed ferret, and a whole host of other animals who either feed on prairie dogs or rely on their burrows for shelter. Meet Deanna Meyer, the Executive Director of Prairie Protection Colorado, the group working to relocate prairie dogs from certain eradication in places like the City of Castle Rock’s Promenade Shopping Mall in Colorado. While only a fraction of these animals were able to be saved by Deanna and her team, the ones that did make it to the relocation area just outside of Sedalia have no idea how lucky they are. And maybe we don't either. Find out more about Deanna and the whole team of Prairie Protection Colorado at prairieprotectioncolorado.org and prairieprotectioncolorado@gmail.com. Show music by The Humidors. Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions via Creative Commons Licensing.

Dec 19 2018

56mins

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Rank #13: EOC 193: Wildfires to Wildflowers: Ildiko Polony and Eco-Activism

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In this era of climate crisis and extinction crisis, it’s not hard to feel like there’s nothing we can do to stop these cascading and devastating global environmental trends. Some activists have taken the motto "Think globally, act locally" to heart.


In this episode, Kristin Tieche talks to Ildiko Polony, an environmental activist who is the founder of a new organization called Wildfires to Wildflowers, whose mission is to restore California lands for climate stability and reach carbon negativity by 2046.


Kristin joins Ildiko for a hike on Ring Mountain in Marin County, California. Ildiko shares her extensive knowledge of native plants and invasive species, and is joined by naturalist Paul Bouscal as they hike the mountain and interpret the landscape along the way.


For Ildiko, reconnecting and restoring natural habitat is the most effective and rewarding way to create positive change in the face of our planet's most pressing environmental crises.


For more information, please visit: https://www.wildfirestowildflowers.org/

Jan 31 2020

1hr 2mins

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Rank #14: EOC 179: Ecology in the City

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Crima Pogge is a professor of Biology and Ecology at City College of San Francisco. In this episode, Kristin Tieche lets you be a student again, as she takes you along on her class with Crima: Ecology of the Mendocino Coast. You’ll visit a harbor seal rookery, a dune ecosystem, and a redwood forest. In 2016, San Francisco voters made City College of San Francisco free for residents, providing life-long learners an opportunity to continue their education with zero financial risk. Crima describes the civic value of the ecology classes she teaches for San Franciscans, and their accessibility to all types of learners.   Also interviewed is Kristin’s classmate Hilda Ngan, who teaches us about red abalone.   Learn more about Crima Pogge here: https://sites.google.com/a/mail.ccsf.edu/aboutcrima/   Learn more about City College of San Francisco here: https://www.ccsf.edu/   Closing music: Orange+Blue by Chris Collins.   Support Eyes on Conservation by become a Patron:   https://www.patreon.com/WildLensCollective

Jun 14 2019

43mins

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Rank #15: EOC 014: Vulture Research and Conservation in East Africa with Corinne Kendall

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Episode Summary: Today’s episode of the show is all about vultures. Our guest is Corinne Kendall, whose doctoral research on vultures in East Africa has played a critical role in... Read more » The post EOC 014: Vulture Research and Conservation in East Africa with Corinne Kendall appeared first on Wild Lens.

Mar 04 2015

48mins

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Rank #16: EOC 173: Exploring the Impact of Climate Change on Indigenous Communities

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EOC podcast contributor Emma Tyrell interviewed representatives from indigenous communities all around the globe for this special episode of the show.  Climate change affects every community in a different way, and the variety of perspectives presented here show the scope of issues that indigenous communities are already facing.  These interviews also show the resiliency of indigenous communities, discussing how traditional knowledge can help communities adapt for the change that is coming.

Feb 20 2019

25mins

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Rank #17: EOC 015: The Vultures of Southeast Asia with Yula Kapetanakos

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Episode Summary: We are continuing this month’s theme of vulture conservation around the world with an interview with Yula Kapetanakos. Yula’s doctoral research involved the use of a unique method for... Read more » The post EOC 015: The Vultures of Southeast Asia with Yula Kapetanakos appeared first on Wild Lens.

Mar 11 2015

40mins

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Rank #18: EOC 023: The Science Communicators: Jason Goldman

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Today on the podcast we are talking with Jason Goldman, a science communicator who found his passion for science writing and sharing stories while working on his PhD research in... Read more » The post EOC 023: The Science Communicators: Jason Goldman appeared first on Wild Lens.

May 13 2015

52mins

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Rank #19: EOC 170: The Unsettling Link Between Violence Against Women and Climate Change

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Kristy Oriol and Paul Bancroft recently co-authored an article on the surprising and unsettling link between climate change and violence against women and their words serve as some of the earliest discussions surrounding this important topic. Oriol and Bancroft work to provide victims of domestic and sexual violence and child abuse with safety, advocacy, support and education services through the non-profit, the Tahoe Safe Alliance.  Learn how increasing knowledge of these connections could simultaneously work to dismantle rape culture and remedy the climate crisis.

Jan 02 2019

41mins

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Rank #20: EOC 180: Bright Green Lies - Exposing the True Cost of Renewable Energy with Filmmaker Julia Barnes

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Julia Barnes is the young filmmaker behind the award-winning feature documentary Sea of Life.  Julia has been working on a new film project for the past two years, and she just launched a crowdfunding campaign – which means you can become a part of this new film, called Bright Green Lies.

Jul 17 2019

42mins

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EOC 203: Climate Change, National Security, and Covid-19 in the Trump Administration

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“My focus was on the impact of environmental and climate change on national security, a growing concern of the military and intelligence communities… The White House blocked the submission of my bureau’s written testimony [because] the analysis did not comport with the administration’s position on climate change.” – Rod Schoonover, July 2019.

Dr. Rod Schoonover was a tenured professor when he went to work for the United States intelligence community in 2009. His task was to investigate the science behind climate change and assess any risk associated to national security. One of a handful of intelligence analysts doing work on climate change, the results and prognosis were troubling. Regardless, Schoonover at least had the assurance that he would have an apolitical space to do his job. That all changed in June of 2019 when he was asked to testify in front of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence about the national security concerns from climate change that lie ahead in the coming years.

The night before his testimony he was notified that the Trump administration was blocking his testimony from taking place at all. After ongoing negotiations throughout the evening, Schoonover was reluctantly permitted to give a brief summary of his 11 page report. The report, unfortunately, was never entered into official record. But, you can still read it here.

Watch Dr. Rod Schoonover’s National Security and Climate Change testimony here. His comments begin at minute 12:50.

https://www.c-span.org/video/?461413-1/national-security-climate-change

Music used in this episode by The Great Turtle.

Jul 01 2020

47mins

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EOC 202: Love The Oceans

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Oceans are the lifeline of our blue planet and they cover nearly ¾ of the Earth’s surface. And on June 8th we celebrated World Oceans Day. Who doesn’t love the ocean right? Beaches, the lovely breeze, the feel of sand beneath your feet, the wildlife. So, wildlife film-maker and presenter, Aishwarya Sridhar talks to Francesca Trotman, managing director and founder of Love The Oceans.

Love the Oceans is a non-profit marine conservation organisation working in Jangamo Bay, Mozambique since 2014. LTO is working to protect and study the diverse marine life found here, including many species of sharks, rays and the famous humpback whales. They use research, education and diving to drive action towards a more sustainable future. Their ultimate goal is to establish a Marine Protected Area for the Inhambane Province in Mozambique, achieving higher biodiversity whilst protecting endangered species. 


Francesca Trotman holds a Masters in Marine Biology. Francesca has always had a passion for marine life and is an emerging leader in the ethical tourism space. An avid diver since the age of 13 with a keen interest in all aspects of marine life, Francesca is particularly passionate about sharks. Results orientated, she constantly encourages people to consider conservation in everyday life and take a greener approach to modern living. As the founder she likes to stay close to the research and community, overseeing the majority of programs on the ground in Mozambique.

Let the sound of waves and ocean breeze lift your spirits as you listen to this podcast from your home!!

Love The Ocean Social Media

Instagram: @lovetheoceans

Twitter: https://twitter.com/lovetheoceans

Facebook: https://facebook.com/lovetheoceansorganisation

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/love-the-oceans

Website: https://lovetheoceans.org/

Music used: Bumbling Bumbling by Pictures of the Floating World

https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Pictures_of_the_Floating_World/Bumbling/Bumbling

Jun 17 2020

40mins

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EOC 201: China's Wet Market Workover

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The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on our relationship with wildlife. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is zoonotic, which means it originated in an animal. Experts believe the virus emerged in bats then jumped to an intermediary host, possibly pangolins, before infecting humans. Evidence suggests that the virus made the first leap from animal to human in a wet market in Wuhan China where a wide variety of wild animals, including bats, crocodiles, wolf puppies, giant salamanders, snakes, rats, peacocks, and porcupines, were being bought and sold. 


That market was temporarily shut down and the city of Wuhan has vowed to end the sale of wild animals within its borders. However, the threat of a new pandemic looms. All over the world, humans are creating perfect conditions for zoonotic disease emergence. Not only are people trafficking wildlife for food, traditional medicine, and trinkets all over the world, we are destroying wilderness, forcing wild animals and people closer together. 


In the months since the COVID-19 pandemic swept the globe, scientists, conservationists, and world leaders have called for a crackdown on the sale of wild animals. However, few countries have taken meaningful steps to do so. The Chinese government said it would ban the sale of several species of wild animals, but left exemptions for wildlife products sold for use as traditional medicine. 


In this episode, environmental journalist Annie Roth speaks with Rachel Nuwer about what the future of our relationship with wildlife might look like in a post-pandemic world.


Song used in today's show: Postman Jack by Lobo Loco via Creative Commons Licensing.


There is more of this conversation! For full access, visit patreon.com/wildlenscollective.


This episode was produced by Annie Roth. For more of her work, please visit rothreporting.com. For more information about Rachel Nuwer and her work, please visit rachelnuwer.com.

Jun 03 2020

26mins

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BONUS: COVID-19 and the Appalachian Trail - Common Land

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Common Land is a radio documentary series that explores the creation stories behind protected areas. Season Two of Common Land will be focused on the Appalachian Trail, and production was scheduled to start in March of 2020.  Unfortunately, the spread of COVID-19 has forced us, along with many others hoping to thru-hike the entire 2,200-mile-long trail, to postpone their trips.  In this bonus episode of the show, we explore the motivations behind those seeking to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail, and examine how the spread of COVID-19 has affected these hikers, as well as the trail itself.

May 28 2020

47mins

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EOC 200: Our “Tiger King” Reality Check

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Documentary producer Nate Ford invites two big cat experts to weigh in on the record breaking documentary series, “Tiger King.” Did you watch the show and fall in love with tigers? Find out ways to get involved in big cat conservation and learn how to impact legislation (like, right now) by supporting the Big Cat Safety Act. Are you tired of hearing your neighbor talk about getting a pet tiger? Tune in to find out the legitimate reasons why that is a TERRIBLE idea. Then, go tell your neighbor. And then, consider moving.

Kimberly Craighead is the co-founder of the Kaminando Habitat Connectivity Initiative, where her team collects data on wild jaguars in Panama through the use of camera traps. One of her main goals is to empower local Panamanians as well as conservationists around the world to participate in preserving suitable natural environments for the jaguar. Tune in to hear about her treks in the jungle and the touching story about a tapir that was captured in a village in Panama, and how the villagers responded. To learn more about Kimberly's work, visit Kaminando.org.

Amy Gotliffe is the Director of Conservation for the Oakland Zoo, which has provided “forever homes” to rescued big cats for years. They continue to push the limit of what a zoo can be by sparking ideas and fostering a global response to animal conservation. Amy gives pointers on how to get involved in the stewardship of a species you love and expands on the myriad of ways in which we can maximize small personal decisions for a global impact. Grab your favorite stuffed animal and sequined jacket…EOC takes on the Tiger King!

Music by David Bashford (via Bloc Films)

May 20 2020

38mins

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EOC 199: Shedding Light on Bats and Covid-19

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In today’s episode of Eyes on Conservation, filmmaker Kristin Tieche invites two women in bat conservation who appear in her upcoming feature documentary about bats, The Invisible Mammal


Dr. Winifred Frick is the Chief Scientist at Bat Conservation International and an Associate Research Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UC Santa Cruz. Dr. Frick has studied the ecology and conservation of bats for nearly 20 years and has worked around the globe on bat conservation, including projects in Mexico, Rwanda, Guinea, Fiji, and Jamaica. With nearly 1,400 species, bats are the second most diverse group of mammals on earth, yet many species are threatened by the forces of global change.


Corky Quirk is the founder of NorCal Bats, an organization that provides care for injured

bats and educational programs for libraries, school, nature programs, fairs and other

events throughout the region. Corky has been working intensely with native bats since

2004 and has educated thousands of people. She is permitted through the CA Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA to work with injured and orphaned bats, and returning them to the wild. She keeps a captive colony of non-releasable bats for use in education.


How has the coronavirus pandemic disrupted bat conservation? On April 10, 2020, the US Government suspended all bat research across the country, in an effort to curtail the spread of the virus. Frick and Quirk discuss how the new restrictions have affected their work, dispel new myths that have arisen about bats and their connection to coronavirus, and explain why protecting bat biodiversity and bat habitat around the world (and in your backyard) is so important.


Important links:


The Invisible Mammal:

http://www.theinvisiblemammal.com/


Bat Conservation International:

http://www.batcon.org/


NorCal Bats:

http://norcalbats.org/


Yolo Basin Foundation:

http://yolobasin.org/


EcoHealth Alliance:

https://www.ecohealthalliance.org/


Bracken Cave

https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/species/bats/bat-watching-sites/bracken-cave-preserve.phtml

May 06 2020

48mins

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EOC 198: Covid-19 Roundtable

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Happy Earth Day!


Talk to us! What's your favorite quarantine activity? Call the voicemail! 208-917-3786


Join Wild Lens Collective members and EOC producers for a Covid-19 Roundtable on Earth Day roundtable talking about how the Coronavirus has affected all of our lives, our work, and most importantly - the environment. For a full list of show notes including web links, articles, and MEMES discussed in today's show - head over to the show notes page at www.wildlensinc.org/eoc198!

Apr 22 2020

1hr 3mins

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EOC 197: Mammalz is "Twitch for Nature"

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It’s Startup meets YouTube meets Twitch meets National Geographic. You know what? To really understand you’re just going to have to check it out yourself! www.mammalz.com.

Co-founders Rob Whitehair and Alex Finden (Happy birthday!) tell the story of how this brand new tech startup began, and what truly makes it a one-in-a-million platform.

From the Mammalz Website:

“Founded by wildlife filmmakers Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; an app- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference. 

The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public. 

Rob Whitehair, Co-Founder and CEO Rob is a 20 year veteran of the natural history film industry. He is a multi-award-winning filmmaker, producer, and executive who has directed, produced and shot films for broadcast and theatrical markets worldwide. He is known throughout the industry for his vision, leadership, inspiration and his ability to take seemingly impossible ideas and turn them into a reality. Mammalz is the culmination of Rob’s dream to create a next-generation media platform that will connect people on a global scale through their love for nature. 

Alexander Finden, Co-Founder and COO Inspired by the underwater world, Alex is a highly creative, award-winning wildlife filmmaker, Divemaster, YouTube channel manager, Twitch content editor, and operational guru. He is known for being a master of details, turning ideas into actions, and keeping calm in the storm. Alex is fascinated with portable live-streaming technologies and plans to encourage outdoor streaming as one of the most popular content types on Mammalz.”

Music used in today’s show, “Questing” and “Green Iver” from Ari de Niro on the Free Music Archive via Creative Commons Licensing.


Real Mammalz audio from real Mammalz users: Day's Edge Productions, The Great Mexican Bird Resurvey Project. Ben Zino, How to find rare winter salamanders. Dusty Hulet, Friction Fire with Ford Thunder Erickson. Billy Heaney, In search of the killer whale. Kathryn Chalk, Ever seen a cricket present the weather forecast. Angus Hamilton, Stop, Drop and Roll! The Brookesia Chameleons of Madagascar. Jim Michael, A torrent of snow geese. Renee Sweaney, Our resident kestrals.

Apr 08 2020

1hr 26mins

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EOC 196: Ayana Young, For the Wild

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Turn down the lights, pour yourself a beverage, and tune your ears to the smooth offerings of Ayana Young, host and author of the podcast and book, For the Wild. Ayana visits with Matthew Podolsky about how she got started in activism going all the way back to her childhood poetry. Ayana is no stranger to speaking truth to power. A graduate of the Occupy movement, she went on to live the camper life, traveling at home and abroad in a quest to understand this crazy world just a bit better.

To read about her book, listen to her amazing podcast, and for links to her social media visit her website at https://forthewild.world/

Music used in today’s show: “As I Was Saying” by Lee Rosevere, “Forgotten Landscape” by Daniel Birch, and “Variation Waldheim” by Blue Dot Sessions from the Free Music Archive via Creative Commons Licensing.

For a list of the show notes, please visit the website www.wildlensinc.org/eoc196

Mar 25 2020

1hr 2mins

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EOC 195: The Wonderful World of Wetlands

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When we think of wetlands, most of us see them as ghostly swamps where spiders have huge webs that look like banshee in veils, or the dangerous Dead Marshes through which Gollum led Frodo in the Lord of the Rings. However, wetlands are not at all these dangerous, murky, smelly, marshy areas. In fact they are the most cheerful places full of life and activity. It’s where life gravitates to, where human settlements started and where wildlife will gravitate around as well. These marshes, swamps and lagoons are a critical part of our natural environment. Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world comparable to rain forests and coral reefs. But sadly today, they are disappearing 3 times faster than our forests. A meagre 6% of the Earth’s surface is covered by wetlands whereas 31% of the earth’s surface still has forests. And yet people don’t seem to appreciate them in the same way, don’t love them as much as forests. They are hardly considered even important. 


In this episode, a young wildlife presenter and film-maker, Aishwarya Sridhar from India, talks to Mr. Debi Goenka and Mr. Nikhil Bhopale about the importance of wetland eco-systems in a world plagued by climate crisis. Mr. Goenka has been working towards the protection of mangroves and wetlands for over 35 years of his life. He is the executive trustee of Conservation Action Trust (a non-governmental organisation in India) engaged in environmental protection and he’s the force behind the recent policy protecting the Indian mangroves. 


On the other hand, Mr. Nihil Bhopale is an educationist, conservationist and an author, having written a book on the birds of the Indian subcontinent. He is the founder of Green Works Trust, an NGO pioneering environmental education in India. 


They discuss the role of wetlands, the crisis facing them and the need to protect them urgently. 


"Crescents" by Ketsa used via Creative Commons Licensing from the Free Music Archive.

Mar 11 2020

51mins

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EOC 194: Bathsheba Demuth

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https://www.patreon.com/WildLensCollective

Send us a voice note or even a regular ole email to info@wildlensinc.org!

On this episode of EOC, I spoke with author and environmental historian, Bathsheba Demuth. Demuth is an Assistant Professor at Brown University who specializes in the intersection between humans, ecosystems, ideas, and history. We talked over Skype while Demuth was in Fairbanks as the professor was performing research for her new book. Her first book is titled Floating Coast, An Environmental History of the Bering Strait. NPR called it “A deeply studied, deeply felt book that lays out a devastating but complex history of change, notes what faces us now, and dares us to imagine better.”

As we proceed I will note that I spoke with Professor Demuth from the university library, so it can be a little loud in the background at times. I can promise you, however, that this will be one of the most compelling and interesting accounts of the history of whaling that you have ever heard.

Demuth was drawn to the arctic in her formative years, even living in the Yukon for two years – doing all the things you’re imagining right now: tracking bears, fishing salmon, and yes, even husky mushin’. And no, I’m not making that up. She’s that for-real.

Special thanks to Bathsheba Demuth for taking the time to share with us about her experiences and research from her book, Floating Coast, and recounting her findings around Soviet Whaling in the Bering Strait. For information about Professor Demuth visit her website at http://www.brdemuth.com/ and for stunning images from the arctic, check out her Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/brdemuth/. She is also on Twitter @brdemuth.

For a full list of this episode’s links, and contributors including music used in this show, please visit the show note’s page at www.wildlensinc.org/eoc194.

Music used via Creative Commons licensing. Running on Empty by Poddington Bear, Ben Bolt; In the Gloaming by Bohumir Kryl, and Failed Moments by Ari de Niro.

Feb 26 2020

47mins

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EOC 193: Wildfires to Wildflowers: Ildiko Polony and Eco-Activism

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In this era of climate crisis and extinction crisis, it’s not hard to feel like there’s nothing we can do to stop these cascading and devastating global environmental trends. Some activists have taken the motto "Think globally, act locally" to heart.


In this episode, Kristin Tieche talks to Ildiko Polony, an environmental activist who is the founder of a new organization called Wildfires to Wildflowers, whose mission is to restore California lands for climate stability and reach carbon negativity by 2046.


Kristin joins Ildiko for a hike on Ring Mountain in Marin County, California. Ildiko shares her extensive knowledge of native plants and invasive species, and is joined by naturalist Paul Bouscal as they hike the mountain and interpret the landscape along the way.


For Ildiko, reconnecting and restoring natural habitat is the most effective and rewarding way to create positive change in the face of our planet's most pressing environmental crises.


For more information, please visit: https://www.wildfirestowildflowers.org/

Jan 31 2020

1hr 2mins

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INTRODUCING: Common Land - Episode 1: Morley's Vision

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Common Land is a new radio documentary-style podcast series produced by the Wild Lens Collective. The series takes a deep dive into the history, science and politics behind the creation of one particular patch of protected land. Season one tells the creation story behind a unique stretch of the Snake River Canyon in Idaho, that is home to the highest nesting densities of birds of prey anywhere in North America. Here we present our first episode of the show, which tells the story of Morley Nelson, the man who spent an entire lifetime advocating for the protection of this unique canyon system.

Jan 30 2020

30mins

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EOC 192: Jon Kasbe, When Lambs Become Lions

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When Lambs Become Lions

If you haven't already, please head over to www.patreon.com/wildlenscollective and make a donation to expand the work we’re doing here. As one of the longest running conservation podcasts around, we are uniquely positioned to do some incredible work in the future, but it will require additional funding. So, if you can manage even a buck a show – your donation will fuel that work, and it even come with perks!

Join Eyes on Conservation’s Matthew Podolksy in an interview with Jon Kasbe, director of the documentary “When Lions Become Lambs”, winner of the Tribeca Film Festival’s Best Editing award in a Documentary.

Jon Kasbe spent much of his 20s in Kenya chronicling the lives and hardships of not only the rangers protecting endangered elephants in the region, but also the difficult decisions poachers make to support their families. Kasbe tells their stories with disciplined impartiality. However, viewers may struggle to remain emotionally unwavering as you are dropped into the shoes of a community bursting with complexities, each person doing what it must to survive.

Special thanks to When Lions Become Lambs director, Jon Kasbe. For more information about the film, please visit www.whenlambs.com. Music in today’s show via the Free Music Archive through Creative Commons licensing. “Gradual Sunrise” by David Hilowitz, and “Siesta” by Jahzzar. And if you haven’t made a pledge to our show, please head over to our patreon.com/wildlenscollective page, and lastly – be sure to send us a voicemail to info@wildlensinc.org. We really want to hear from you!

https://www.instagram.com/whenlambs/?hl=en

https://www.facebook.com/whenlambs/

For full a full list of today’s show notes, including web links and music selections, head over to www.wildlensinc.org/eoc192.

Jan 15 2020

44mins

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EOC 191: A Very Wild Lens Christmas

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Happy Holidays from the EOC team!

Tune in to listen to a very light, candid, fun installment of the award winning Eyes on Conservation podcast with hosts Sarinah Simons, Kristin Tieche, Matthew Podolsky, and Gregory Haddock as we talk space-bound dinosaurs, whales, recycling, fundraising, and brushfires. It’s a tornado of holiday cheer!

lease, if you can, consider a gift donation to the cause of bringing the stories you care most about to the foreground at www.patreon.com/wildlenscollective Your donation makes this work possible.

Music from https://filmmusic.io

"Holiday Weasel" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)

License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Dec 19 2019

1hr 15mins

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EOC 190: Eco-Fascism

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In an article dated August 7, 2019, GQ magazine defined ecofascism as “a belief that the only way to deal with climate change is through eugenics and the brutal suppression of migrants.” It’s a philosophy that has roots in the American environmental movement dating back to the 1800s, right down to the creation of our national parks system.


Let’s start off with the recent events that inspired me to produce this episode. On August 3rd 2019, a shooter in El Paso, Texas killed 20 people at a Walmart near the border with Mexico. Nineteen minutes before the first 911 call, a hate-filled, anti-immigrant manifesto appeared online, that was strangely called “An Inconvenient Truth.” In the document, the author makes his horrific case for ethnic cleansing as a solution to the climate crisis. I asked myself, could the shooter’s deadly words and actions have been inspired by the rhetoric that has been spoken, and tweeted, by the 45th President of the United States, who has verbally attacked communities of color on more than one occasion.


After the El Paso tragedy, I started reading articles that referred to the term “ecofascism.” There seemed to be more than one example of racially motivated terrorist attacks in the news, from Christchurch, New Zealand, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Poway, California. But none so directly connected to the climate crisis as the El Paso shooting, which made me deeply concerned about the ways in which humans will react when the crisis worsens. Will it bring out the best in humanity? Or the worst? I began to think more deeply about the foundations of America. Post-colonial American history seems to be filled with examples of eco-fascist ideas and acts.


The American Declaration of Independence refers to indigenous people as “Merciless Indian Savages,” and yet this is still a document that Americans celebrate every year. The principles of Manifest Destiny and Eminent Domain made way for a government led genocide. Children being separated from their parents, put in detention centers, and even killed by the American government, these practices are also not a new. From the slave trade to Indian Residential Schools, American history has already set precedents. Every single day that we wake up, we are living out our lives on stolen land. This is our history. It’s history that we shouldn’t turn away from, no matter how hard it is to look at it.


I know this is a dark subject, but it’s an important one. If we don’t look directly at our shadow selves, how will we ever heal?

Dec 04 2019

1hr 10mins

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EOC 189: The Trees Are Coming!

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Zeima Kassahun and I have been friends for a really long time - pretty much most of our lives. You wouldn't know it then, but we've somehow managed to not only stay best friends, but we've both ended up in environmental professions as adults.

Zeima works as a community planting manager for a non-profit organization in the Presidio of San Francisco called Friends of the Urban Forest or FUF. Friends of the Urban Forest has planted more than 60,000 trees, totaling almost half of the city’s street tree canopy. Their mission is to help individuals and neighborhood groups plant and care for street trees and sidewalk gardens in San Francisco in order to improve the city by beautifying neighborhoods, cleaning the air, and reducing polluted stormwater runoff.

FUF Community Planting Manager Zeima Kassahun

About every month, FUF employees gather with a consistent group of dedicated volunteers and host planting days, where after much coordination and planning, trees are planted in previously identified sidewalk spaces. I met Zeima at one of these plantings and got to follow her around as we discussed green gentrification, the need for more diversity in environmental professions and all the intricacies of her job.

Nov 20 2019

41mins

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Long Time Listener, First Time Caller

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Have you ever been listening to the EOC podcast and thought, "My goodness, EOC is like butter in my ears"? And then a second thought quickly came across your mind, "Good grief, I need to tell them this"? Now you can! In fact, we wish you would! Let the floodgates open to breaking down the wall between all of us. Send us your thoughts to info@wildlensinc.org and we might air your voice on the show! Not sure how? No sweat. This minisode will tell you exactly how. Because, you're important, and you've got amazing ideas. Share them with the rest of the class! Because your call is very important to us.


Sounds from Freesound.org and Music by Komiku from Freemusicarchive.org all via Creative Commons Licensing.

Nov 14 2019

2mins

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EOC 188: City Grazing

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Today’s episode is all about goat grazing. Not only are goats absolutely adorable, they also reduce fire hazard, support native plant growth and soil health, and their poop is an amazing aid in carbon sequestration. Here in San Francisco, if you think you have a growing fire hazard in your backyard, an organization called City Grazing will bring a herd of goats to you, to chomp away at the invasive blackberry bushes and ivy that could fuel the fire. City Grazing’s executive director Genevieve Church speaks with producer Kristin Tieche on Mount Sutro, an open space preserve on a hillside next to University of California San Francisco (otherwise known as UCSF), where years of extreme drought have created a real fire hazard. The goats have been hired to munch away at the ground cover that could fuel a wildfire and endanger nearby residents.

Check out their website at citygrazing.org

From City Grazing’s website: “City Grazing is a San Francisco-based goat landscaping non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable land management and fire risk reduction through outreach, education, and implementation of goat grazing. An environmentally beneficial solution to weed control, we rent out goats to clear public and private land. Whether you have an acre or an overgrown backyard, our goats would be eager to eat your weeds and aid in fire prevention naturally. When they are not out on the job our herd lives on pasture in San Francisco’s Bayview district between the SF Bay Railroad and Bay Natives Nursery.”

Produced and created by Kristin Tieche. Edited by Gregory Haddock. All music used in today’s show is by Ketsa and the Free Music Archive via Creative Commons Licensing.

If you haven’t made a pledge to our Patreon page, yet, I encourage you to do so. Producing this content takes a lot of time and hard work. And to do it on a regular basis, we need regular support. So please head over to Patreon.com/WildLensCollective and choose a pledge level. Your support will help us take this podcast to new heights. Thank you.

Nov 06 2019

35mins

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EOC 187: Bering Sea Days

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For one week each year the tiny island of St. Paul holds its annual Bering Sea Days. It’s a celebration of the local biology and ecology, and a week of experimental learning and activities for the k-12 students on the island. Scientists from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Regional Office come to the region known as the Pribilof Islands. The program, developed by the Aleut Community of St. Paul Island Tribal Government and St. Paul School, opens up kids to learning about one of the most magical biological regions on Earth – their own backyard.

Please support the Eyes on Conservation podcast! Visit: https://www.patreon.com/WildLensCollective

http://wildlensinc.org/eoc-single/bering-sea-days/

Oct 23 2019

51mins

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iTunes Ratings

47 Ratings
Average Ratings
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One of the good ones!

By Frog_Lady - Dec 14 2016
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Long-time listener here, keep it up! The episode on Standing Rock has been my favorite so far.

Great podcast

By Fthuuh - Aug 24 2015
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This is exactly what I was looking for! Absolutely love it