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Add Passion and Stir

Updated about 9 hours ago

Arts
Food
News
Politics
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Add Passion and Stir: Big Chefs, Big Ideas is the weekly Share Our Strength podcast about people who are changing the world. Each week, Billy Shore, the founder and chairman of Share Our Strength, has a conversation with a guest from the culinary world and an industry thought leader creating a thought-provoking discussion. As much as food has become a source of pleasure and celebration, it’s amazing how food is central to our health, environment, educational achievement, sustainability, and overall quality of life.

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Add Passion and Stir: Big Chefs, Big Ideas is the weekly Share Our Strength podcast about people who are changing the world. Each week, Billy Shore, the founder and chairman of Share Our Strength, has a conversation with a guest from the culinary world and an industry thought leader creating a thought-provoking discussion. As much as food has become a source of pleasure and celebration, it’s amazing how food is central to our health, environment, educational achievement, sustainability, and overall quality of life.

iTunes Ratings

65 Ratings
Average Ratings
63
1
1
0
0

Morning

By Sahar_1205 - Dec 07 2016
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Great podcast for my commute 😊

Perfect

By #fannumberone - Oct 25 2016
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Exactly the kind of discussions we should be having in this day and age!

iTunes Ratings

65 Ratings
Average Ratings
63
1
1
0
0

Morning

By Sahar_1205 - Dec 07 2016
Read more
Great podcast for my commute 😊

Perfect

By #fannumberone - Oct 25 2016
Read more
Exactly the kind of discussions we should be having in this day and age!

Listen to:

Cover image of Add Passion and Stir

Add Passion and Stir

Updated about 9 hours ago

Read more

Add Passion and Stir: Big Chefs, Big Ideas is the weekly Share Our Strength podcast about people who are changing the world. Each week, Billy Shore, the founder and chairman of Share Our Strength, has a conversation with a guest from the culinary world and an industry thought leader creating a thought-provoking discussion. As much as food has become a source of pleasure and celebration, it’s amazing how food is central to our health, environment, educational achievement, sustainability, and overall quality of life.

TURN GUILT INTO ACTION: TWENTY-SOMETHINGS LEADING THE CHARGE

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Do you have to be a certain age to solve a problem in your community? Does it take a specific level of experience to see someone in need and offer to help? In this powerful episode of Add Passion and Stir, hear from two young people from the next generation of leaders. Millennial chef Bobby Pradachith (Thip Khao) and recent college graduate and anti-hunger advocate Alana Davidson (University of New Hampshire) join Share Our Strength founders Billy and Debbie Shore to share how they are already making big impacts in their communities. When Alana discovered that a quarter of her college classmates struggled with hunger, she sprang into action by contacting the governor and the dean of students. “I couldn’t sit on the number,” she says. “I had to do something about it.” Her efforts resulted in Swipe It Forward, a stigma-free meal donation program for any student experiencing food insecurity. Chef Bobby leads his unique Lao restaurant – the only one in DC - with bold and authentic menu options that both intrigue American diners and minimize food waste. “We don’t hold back,” he promises.


Despite their accomplishments, both millennial superstars remain driven to increase their impact going forward. Chef Bobby is inspired by his family’s culture and work ethic, and plans to increase his involvement with helping those less fortunate both here and in Laos. The secret to his continued success will be persistence. “If you have goals, you have to work hard at them,” he says. Alana is looking forward to graduate school at Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and a future working on federal food policy. “Nutrition is never one of the national priorities,” she laments. “Food is used as a tool to keep people in poverty… How can we have a conversation around nutrition that isn’t polarized or too political because we all have to eat.” Host Billy Shore agrees. He describes the military concept of a ‘show of force,’ but posits, “What if our show of force was: We’re going to have the strongest generation in history because we’re going to feed them and educate them… We’re going to invest in kids and health and nutrition and access to food for everyone. Now that’s a pretty different way than most people think of a show of force, but I think there’s an opportunity there to wake people up. These issues really do affect our nation’s strength.”


Listen and be inspired by these two young visionaries who are changing the world.

Jul 26 2017

36mins

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From Kitchen to Courtroom: Dealing With Race in America

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How do we achieve lasting social and racial justice in America? Children’s advocate and social justice icon Hubie Jones and Sweet Home Café (at the National Museum of African American History and Culture) executive chef Jerome Grant talk with Billy Shore about their perspectives on race in America and commitment to living purpose-driven lives. “On to the stage came Dr. King and he went into this oratory that absolutely blew me away... By the time I left Jordan Hall, I felt that I was levitating,” Jones recalls about the night in 1956 that helped set the course of his life. Grant shares a similar experience about opening Sweet Home Café. “Walking in that cafeteria the day before opening and seeing these murals on our walls, seeing these awesome quotes, the picture of the Woolworth dine-in boycott… You see the resiliency of us as African Americans and what we contributed to American society. There’s no feeling like that at all,” describes Grant.

Both guests share their perspectives on our increasingly divisive culture and finding a path forward. “We have a lot more work to go with the [racial] divide that’s going on now. Mostly we need to learn more about each other and not be afraid of each other,” says Grant. At age 85, Jones is well-known for mentoring thousands of young social justice advocates throughout the years. “Leaders have to be available, leaders have to be accessible - what are we doing for these young leaders to take over, stand on our shoulders and make a difference?,” he challenges.

Listen to this engaging conversation between someone who works for one of the most important museums in America and another who has lived the history it represents.

Jun 12 2019

55mins

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The Social Entrepreneur: Business That Builds Community

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How can business and entrepreneurial principles be used to solve social problems? In this episode, Pace University Lubin School of Business Dean Neil Braun sits down with SALIDO founder and CEO Shu Chowdhury to talk about business, technology and social entrepreneurship. “[There is] emotional satisfaction in helping people at the most interesting stage of life,” says Braun, a long-time Share Our Strength board member. Serial entrepreneur Chowdhury wants community building to be part of the DNA of his company. One of SALIDO’s values is community service. “If someone can’t care about someone they don’t know because it’s the right thing to do, it often happens that they can’t connect with what you’re actually trying to do,” he explains.

After a distinguished career as an entertainment executive that included stints as Chairman and CEO of Viacom Entertainment and President of the NBC Television Network, Braun uses his vast experience in business to help a diverse student body including many from underserved communities. “They’ve overcome more adversity just to get to college than I have in my entire life and I am so inspired by them. They have found the inner strength to deserve a chance,” he says. No Kid Hungry supporter Chowdhury credits his parents for instilling a philanthropic and entrepreneurial spirit in him. They emigrated from Calcutta, built successful businesses and started a family foundation. His latest venture is improving restaurant technology systems to be more functional for restaurant workers at all levels. “When you make someone’s life easier and you help them do a better job… that can have a pretty awesome net impact on not just society but the individual,” he says.

Listen to this important conversation that mixes insights from the business world with the desire to create social impact.

Jul 18 2018

52mins

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The Courage to Lead

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The over 250 remarkable guests on more than 140 episodes of Add Passion and Stir have shared great wisdom, poignant personal experiences and true inspiration. To create a fresh experience for our listeners, we have curated this powerful content into some brand new episodes with themes like leadership, diversity and inclusion, national security, food equity and child hunger. This first episode is a compilation of expert views on leadership, including Former Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, United States Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Congressman Jim McGovern, Civil Rights legend Hubie Jones, Panera Founder Ronn Shaich, and social change pioneer Bill Novelli.

Tune in for perspectives on effective leadership from an all star lineup of seasoned and successful leaders.

“One of the things that I think all of us can do is to model civil discourse and respect for others - for people we don't agree with necessarily. We have to be able to listen to each other and to figure out how we can compromise and work together.” - Jeanne Shaheen

“At some point somebody has to have the political courage and say, ‘No, that's not right, that’s not true’... And at some point in time, you have to say, ‘You know what? We're not playing that game... We're playing the game of getting problems solved in this country.’” - Tom Vilsack

“[Martin Luther King, Jr.] was basically starting with taking us to school... Then he took it to political rally and then he took it to church and by the time I left Jordan Hall, I was so elevated... That was the night that sealed my commitment to work for social justice and racial justice in this society and that I was going to lead a purpose-driven life.” - Hubie Jones

“I got in this to make a difference in the world. It seemed to me that business was an actually a more powerful way to make a difference in the world.” - Ron Shaich

“I go home every night with a song in my heart because [my MBA students] understand that there's more than one bottom line. Sure, they may go to Google, they may go to a Goldman Sachs, but they're going to make a difference.” - Bill Novelli

Jul 10 2019

22mins

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Genius Knows No Boundaries

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What is causing the failure of leadership in our government and society? Former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell and famed restaurateur Danny Meyer (Union Square Hospitality Group, Shake Shack) join host Billy Shore to discuss a variety of issues ranging from immigration, urban renewal, educational opportunity and the reasons for the current crisis in our political culture. “All of us in life constantly face divided loyalties. Where are your obligations? The problem with many political leaders is they lose sight of the proper hierarchy of obligations and loyalties,” says Mitchell. “[It’s the] confluence among self-interest, the interests of our guests and the interests of the city. Investing in people and places and organizations that can lift the whole,” explains Meyer about his own hierarchy of obligations when he applies his signature approach of opening new restaurants in transitional neighborhoods.

When the conversation turns to immigration, Mitchell discusses the history and the opportunities it presents for the United States. “You have to think about how much our country has benefited from immigration; how immigrants have brought new life, new energy, new views. Genius knows no language, no race, no religion… but it tends to flourish where there is freedom and opportunity,” he says. Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group understands that immigrants are the backbone of the restaurant industry and its commitment to help them succeed. “I think what our industry needs to work on quite a bit is how do we elevate [immigrant workers beyond entry level], how do we give you the tools,” says Meyer, noting that they offer English as a Second Language programs to their employees to help them increase their economic potential.

Listen to three of the most accomplished leaders in their respective fields deliver a master class on the critical issues facing our nation.

Sep 18 2018

40mins

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Cultivating Authenticity and Scaling Excellence

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How does authenticity drive success? Philz Coffee CEO Jacob Jaber and Neighborhood Restaurant Group Beverage Director Greg Engert join Debbie and Billy Shore to discuss good coffee, craft beer and how to build businesses that are part of the fabric of their communities. Both guests cite authenticity - in the people they hire, the products they serve, and the experiences they provide for guests - as the basis for the success of their organizations. “The best service is when it’s done from the heart and authentic,” Jaber believes. Engert thinks that just having craft beer on the menu is not enough. “The hard part is echoing the passion of the producer through service and product knowledge,” he says. “The flavors become more vibrant when you wed the intellectual to the more visceral pleasures of drink.”

Both guests built their businesses with community in mind. Jaber’s father started Philz out of his grocery store in San Francisco and now they have 48 stores and growing. “If you want to do it right, you have to not worry about scalability and just focus on excellence,” says Jaber. Engert agrees. “[They] are places for people who live near each other to get together, share food and drink and get to know each other and learn from each other,” says Engert of Neighborhood Restaurant Group’s 19 establishments.

Tune in to this conversation and hear the passion that these two guests bring to their crafts, their customers and their communities.

Sep 12 2018

58mins

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Moving the Mountain: Marketing Social Change and Making It Last

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What is the key to creating sustainable social impact? Social change pioneer Bill Novelli and Washington DC restaurateur and chef Erik Bruner-Yang (Maketto, Brothers and Sisters, Spoken English) sit down with Debbie and Billy Shore to discuss cultural identity, community engagement and lasting social impact. As the former architect of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Novelli built a social marketing program that successfully challenged big tobacco’s overwhelming political and cultural influence. “One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned in my life is that we can move the mountain… but we’ve got to start by saying, ‘we can do it,’” says Novelli. “We need to change social norms and expectations,” he continues. Bruner-Yang thinks the solutions to intractable social issues like gun violence require long-term inter-generational thinking. “If you’re 40-plus, your mind is made up. America can be and has been at the forefront of social change. Some of these big issues you have to just skip a generation,” he observes.

As a professor in the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, Novelli sees the promise of the next generation of leaders. “I go home every night with a song in my heart because they understand that there’s more than one bottom line. They want purpose. They want to work in an organization that doesn’t just have a profit, but also cares about people and the planet,” he says. Long-time No Kid Hungry supporter Bruner-Yang describes how his former passion for music translated into owning restaurants. “It’s a lot of the same tangibles. You get to be creative, you’re entertaining people, you’re using a lot of the same thought processes,” he notes.

Listen in as these two guests discuss talk about how their values have motivated them to lead purpose-driven lives.

Mar 13 2019

43mins

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Flipping the Script: Rewriting the Story of Urban Youth

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How do we find opportunities where others see only problems? The BASE founder and president Robert Lewis Jr. and Mida chef and owner Douglass Williams join host Billy Shore for an enlightening conversation about using love and generosity to build community and create generational change. Lewis started The BASE as a way to re-imagine pathways to success for urban youth. “Language matters… we don’t use language around ‘at-risk, disadvantaged and underserved.’ Our young folks are ‘untapped, great and resilient,’” he says. Williams agrees that words can help change minds and hearts. “If everybody just picked up a book about something that they’ve never read before, that would solve 90% of the racism, 90% of the problems we have. It’s just about educating yourself,” he says.

Both guests discuss how their personal experiences have shaped the work they do today. Williams talk about having a serious illness as a child and how his world travels have shaped his perspective. “It’s humbling because you see how other people live… that’s what changes your mind, that’s the mind switch. You cannot unsee the truth,” he explains. Lewis tells personal stories of the racism and violence he endured growing up in the projects in Boston. “People said ‘mother had me at 17, welfare, growing up in the projects, no dad, somebody already wrote the story.’ And we turned around and I guess we kicked that story.” Now he is helping inner city youth because he believes all kids deserve opportunities.

Share in this uplifting conversation that illuminates the impact of sharing the spirit of generosity and love.

Mar 06 2019

45mins

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IF NOT US, THEN WHO? THE WAY TO END CHILDHOOD HUNGER IN AMERICA

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What would happen if an entire industry banded together to solve a problem? According to the two leaders on this episode of Add Passion and Stir, the industry would completely solve that problem. John Miller, CEO of Denny’s and Amanda Hite, Co-founder and CEO of Be The Change Revolutions think that the restaurant industry can end child hunger in America. Hite describes the industry as “massive, powerful and influential.” “We’re the industry that feeds people for a living,” says Miller. “Shouldn’t we be involved in being the solution to ending child hunger in America. If not us, then who?” Podcast hosts Share Our Strength founders Billy and Debbie Shore agree. “We can’t wait for the tipping point; we have to force it,” Debbie believes.

Both guests are heavily involved with Dine Out for No Kid Hungry, a restaurant-led campaign that raises funds for No Kid Hungry’s work on getting more kids access to school breakfasts, school lunches and summer meals. Denny’s has been a participant for many years, raising over $4M for hungry kids. “The infrastructure of Dine Out makes it easy,” says Miller. “You see the need, you see the kids, you see the difference you’re making.” Hite, who created a social media company because she was impressed by the internet’s ability to bring communities together and ignite for change, sees the power of all the participating restaurants’ networks and fan bases coming together. “You’ll see 200M social media impressions on Dine Out,” she reports. “The Dine Out map broke!”

When Billy Shore asks Miller and Hite about the role of partisan politics in fighting child hunger, they are adamant that politics should play no role. Miller believes we can make the case with “stubborn facts” to get people with different political believes working side by side. “These are our children, the next generation of children. They are struggling. They need their voices heard. And they don’t have a chance unless [we] feed them…,” he says. “Those are the facts, so we just have to come together and solve it.”

Listen to see how the restaurant industry and others can make kids’ voices heard.

Aug 02 2017

34mins

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DISRUPTING TO INNOVATE: UNEXPECTED SOLUTIONS

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Sometimes disrupters come from unexpected places. In order to solve our major social problems like poverty, hunger and education, we need innovation and new thinking to solve them on a grand scale. Would you expect a bankrupt nonprofit to have the answer? Or a restaurant that opens in an unpopular part of town?

In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, two provocative thinkers share their creative strategies with host Billy Shore. Entrepreneur, author and activist Dan Pallotta is known for the creation of multi-day charitable events like the Breast Cancer 3-Day walks and AIDS Rides, as well as his iconic TED talk on how the way we think about charity is dead wrong. Boston restauranteur Garrett Harker restaurateur makes a practice of using his restaurants to activate up-and-coming neighborhoods and empower staff members to engage in this community revitalization. Billy Shore, founder and CEO of Share Our Strength and an innovator himself, asks Pallotta and Harker about how they use their respective platforms to disrupt norms. Pallotta uses his platform as a founder of nonprofits to voice his disagreement with society’s expectations of them. “Nonprofits should not be hamstrung,” he says, by things like an inability to spend money on fundraising or donors’ requirements of low overhead. “Nonprofits have the capacity to radically disrupt the world in a short period of time… We need to unleash their power to address massive social problems.” Harker uses the unlikely platform of placing a restaurant in a transitional neighborhood to transform a community and develop staff members. “We realized how galvanizing it can be to put together a staff and make it part of your mission not just to take care of people, but to help elevate a community and a neighborhood.” With restaurants such as Eastern Standard in Kenmore Square and Branch Line in Watertown, his twin goals of striving to be the best and positively impacting the neighborhood have led to many successes.

Listen to the episode and marvel that the answers to our biggest social problems may not come from the usual suspects, and get inspired to disrupt norms yourself.

May 31 2017

25mins

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HEALTHY FOOD OR A HOSPITAL VISIT? HEALTH CARE IN AMERICA

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Could we end the debate about health care by focusing on healthy food? What will it take for our country to address the root of our health problems? In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, two experts who improve health from very different perspectives chat with Share Our Strength founders Billy and Debbie Shore about the role of healthy lifestyle choices on our nation’s health. Randy Oostra is President and CEO of Promedica, a mission-driven, not-for-profit, nationally distinguished health care system serving northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. Promedica has initiatives outside health care settings that aim to keep people from needing health care services. Rocco DiSpirito is a James Beard award winning chef, health advocate, coach and author of 12 cookbooks that illustrate how healthy and delicious are not mutually exclusive. Rocco has personally coached, advised and fed thousands of clients who want to lose weight and be healthy. Both experts believe that prevention is more effective that treatment, and both have seen many examples of this in their own work. Randy talks about a grocery store Promedica worked to build in a food desert which offers everything from job training to financial counseling to healthy cooking classes and is changing lives in that community. Rocco speaks of the “mass awakening” among consumers and chefs regarding healthier food and lifestyles, and how food providers have had to be responsive to these needs. “Most people want to make a good choice,” he says. “It’s up to us to provide them with an endless amount of good choices.” Randy feels that our nation’s health care model is fundamentally wrong and that we need to take a decades-long view when we consider how to fix it. “We have been tweaking a model that doesn’t work. …If we could go back and change [how Medicare and Medicaid were structured in the 1960s], we would shift the balance toward primary care and mental health services… The fact that we don’t provide a base level of coverage to every American doesn’t make any sense.” He believes we need to start now to change the system into what we want it to be in 20 years. However, this will continue to be tremendously difficult due to the many diverse stakeholders in the economic engine of our health care system. How do your own choices impact your health? Listen to how these leaders have seen people change their lives and their futures by making healthier choices.

May 17 2017

25mins

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Financial Inclusion: The Key to Overcoming Global Poverty

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What’s keeping three billion people from climbing out of poverty? Accion President and CEO Michael Schlein and New York restaurateur Roni Mazumdar talk with Billy Shore about the importance of financial inclusion and creating an economic system that works for everyone. “It’s really hard to imagine anyone working their way out of poverty without some of the most basic financial tools—a safe place to save, access to credit, efficient payments, insurance,” says Schlein. Accion provided capital that helped young entrepreneur Mazumdar save his first business after hurricane Sandy devastated the region. “People don’t realize how important it is to survive that first year… Within two weeks, I had the money to continue to operate,” he recounts.

Schlein explains Accion’s market-based strategy for investing in financial technology companies and the people they ultimately help. “We’re a nonprofit, but we’re a big believer in harnessing the capital markets to change the world,” he explains. Mazumdar talks about his personal philanthropic initiative to alleviate poverty in India by improving access to education for girls. “There is a human being [in India] who is no different than I am. I happen to be in a position that is far more fortunate, so therefore, it’s imperative that I do something,” he says.

Listen to this engaging conversation about helping the billions of people who are invisible to the financial system that many of us take for granted.

Sep 11 2019

50mins

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Finding Passion: Make Every Day the Best Day

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Have you ever wondered how people who motivate others stay motivated themselves? In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, two high-powered changemakers talk about what drives them as they inspire those around them. Dr. Clint Mitchell, Principal at Mount Vernon Woods Elementary School in Fairfax, VA works in a low-income community school. In a career that has unusually high turn-over (statistics say most teachers will quit after three to five years) Mitchell finds he has to hire teachers who are passionate about the work and willing to go the extra mile for underprivileged kids. “It’s my job to keep them positive,” he says. Relating it to passion in the cooks he hires, Zack Mills, chef at Wit & Wisdom in Baltimore, jokes, “It’s a slight craziness. You have to be slightly off to be that passionate.” Host Billy Shore asks his two guests how they themselves avoid burnout. Chef Mills considers himself lucky because he’s always had a passion for cooking and enjoys helping those who work for him achieve success. He uses the Japanese term Kaizen - trying to be better than the day before - to describe his philosophy for work and life. “We’re always learning. If we think we’re not learning anymore, then we’re in the wrong place,” he concludes. Dr. Mitchell echoes that sentiment. “I tell my teachers, ‘every single day we get a fresh start and the kids get a fresh start. So every single day, make that day the best day.’”

Both Mitchell and Mills are long-time supporters of the No Kid Hungry campaign. Mitchell is on the frontlines of the battle against childhood hunger in our schools; 91% of the kids in his district receive free or reduced meals. “When kids are hungry, they shut down. It becomes a behavior issue…but the root cause is hunger,” he points out. Mills recently participated in a No Kid Hungry impact trip in Northern Virginia. He says there is nothing like bearing witness to the kids in need and the work that is being done to help them. “Everybody was so passionate about making sure the children were fed. I wanted to get even more involved after that,” he says.

Get back to basics through this conversation about school hunger with two changemakers who not only share their own passion, but bring it out in others.

Nov 22 2017

43mins

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Real Help for Real People

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When so many things feel out of our control in this world, how can we provide tangible help to people in need? Changemakers Michael Babin (Neighborhood Restaurant Group, Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture) and Meghan Ogilvie (Dog Tag, Inc., Dog Tag Bakery) are giving people skills and tools to find meaning and purpose. In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, Babin and Ogilvie describe what drives them to serve their communities and bring opportunities to deserving kids, adults and military service members. “The people who need good food the most are the ones least likely to ever have it show up on their plates,” says Babin. To address this need, his nonprofit Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture brings mobile farmers markets to low-income neighborhoods, runs farm camps for kids, and trains military veterans as farmers. His 16 Washington, DC restaurants also source their food from sustainable farms in the region.

Ogilvie’s Marine father once told her: “You’ll find your way to serve.” She found it in Dog Tag, Inc, a nonprofit with a fellowship program for military service members, spouses and caregivers that offers a Certificate in Business Administration from Georgetown University and real-life work experience in their bakery. “We are igniting the human spirit and finding purpose again,” she says of their graduates. Dog Tag Bakery also sources much of its supplies from veteran-run businesses in the DC area.

Don’t feel helpless – be empowered to help on-the-ground organizations like these provide real help for people in need in your community.

Oct 04 2017

43mins

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Come Together: Uniting People Through Food And Opportunity

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How do we unite different cultures in the midst of a polarizing political climate? In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, George Washington University professor of leadership Louis Caldera and Rose Previte, owner of Compass Rose and Maydān in Washington DC, talk about culture, leadership and the potential for diversity to drive positive change in the US. Both guests believe diversity is our greatest strength. “As long as we’re true to our principles of equality, and people can develop their talents through education and contribute something, then that’s what we need to do,” says Caldera, the son of Mexican immigrants who became Secretary of the Army. He emphasizes how our country benefits when the brightest people in the world want to come here to be educated. “The growing diversity of this country will become more politically active and they’re going to say, ‘I don’t fear people who come from places like where I come from because I’m a contributing American,’” he predicts. Previte’s restaurants are a celebration of diversity inspired by her upbringing with a Lebanese mother and Sicilian father and her own extensive travels. “The street food [at Compass Rose] is the great equalizer, it’s where everyone whether rich or poor…come together over food,” she says.

Both guests come from families where food and hospitality were focal points. Previte remembers how her diverse family educated others about they were through food. Caldera, who grew up poor in Southern California at a time when the Latino community was still small, believes shared meals are important for building strong families and communities. However, shared meals can be difficult with the work schedules in low-income families, so he advocates for supports like minimum wage, family assistance and opportunities for education.

Listen to this conversation between two leaders who understand diversity as a strength that builds positive social change.

Apr 25 2018

58mins

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OUR TOUGHEST PROBLEMS REQUIRE OUR TOUGHEST TALENT

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How much do you think about how you contribute to society? Is it important for you to help others and give back? Two social sector advocates whose deep values and empathy guide their own career paths discuss the importance of doing good. Dan Cardinali, CEO of Independent Sector, and Bren Herrera, Cuban private chef and lifestylist, chat about food, culture, personal transformations, and their deep passion for helping others with Billy Shore, founder and CEO of Share Our Strength, on this episode of Add Passion and Stir.

Cardinali, a champion for the social sector (nonprofit and philanthropic institutions), reveals its vastness: 1.5 million institutions that employ 1 in 10 Americans and serve or engage 1 in 4. However, that impact is often overlooked and there is a misperception that the sector is weaker and less effective than the private sector. “Nonprofit and philanthropic institutions are critically important to America because they often are working on those issues that neither government nor market strategies are able to address,” says Cardinali. “In many regards, they are much more effective than either government or business can be, yet they are often looked at as being subpar to those two institutions.”

This perceived second-class standing of social sector organizations also affects the individuals who choose to work there who are, according to Cardinali, “extraordinarily heroic folks willing to suppress their own desires for wealth and praise in service of bettering the community.” Based on her own transformational path from law to life coaching, Herrera agrees. “Our purpose in life is not to make money… it’s to do the best that we can to make our global community a better place,” she believes. However, she also poses the question of how to attract bright young people into the sector. Shore feels it is critical for young people to know the social sector is a viable option. Speaking about Share Our Strength, he says, “Having the best people in the country feel like, ‘this is a place I want to be,’ becomes very important to our ability to succeed.” Cardinali reinforces this point. “Many social sector institutions take on the most difficult and intractable problems in the world – and you want the… best talent addressing the most difficult challenges.”

All three participants agree that food can play an important role in improving our society. Herrera shares stories of how food can heal and connect people from her chef experience and world travels. Cardinali describes how Independent Sector is using dinners to bring people with disparate views together to bridge differences and find common ground. Shore comments that food sits in the intersection of so many social issues.

Jun 21 2017

38mins

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Can the Secret Sauce That Built a $6B Business Save Our Politics?

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What do business and politics have in common in today’s climate? Panera Bread Founder and Chairman of the Board Ron Shaich and FoodCorps Co-Founder and CEO Curt Ellis discuss how responsible leadership can inform both business and politics and the central role that food could play. “One of the most powerful things we can do as leaders is first, tell ourselves the truth,” says Shaich. “The hardest part of making decisions is the uncertainty that occurs… You need to project the confidence to everybody to get them over the hurdle while you yourself are unsure.” Ellis describes a key leadership moment when FoodCorps began developing a whole new realm of business skills to address the supply side of school food. “The decision to say: ‘We believe we have the ability to get good at something we’re not yet good at’ was a real decision to put ourselves out there,” he believes.

Ellis sees the power of food in addressing political problems. “Food is this place where so many of the challenges that we must learn how to solve in our country intersect. Food is the place where social justice and racial justice meet environmental sustainability and public health,” he says. Shaich laments the problems created by short-term thinking in business and politics. “We need to examine why our politics has gotten so short term, so coarse and so ‘it’s my way or the highway,’” he says. “Unless we can solve that, we’re not going to be the country in the future that we’ve been in the past.”

Get inspired as two leaders who have found ways to change the world through food share their advice on leadership and making a lasting impact.

Jan 16 2019

1hr 3mins

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Get Dirty and Get Involved!

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Is sustainable farming the key to restoring our planet? On this episode of Add Passion and Stir, American Farmland Trust President and CEO John Piotti and Chef John Mooney (Bell Book & Candle, NYC; Bidwell, DC) talk with host Billy Shore and producer Paul Woodhull about the far-reaching impact of building a more sustainable food system. “If we don’t get farming right, we can’t have a sustainable future,” says Piotti. Chef Mooney’s restaurants use aeroponic rooftop gardens, which combine hydroponics with vertical growing techniques to grow fresh, pesticide-free produce. “It really suits us well to be able to do what I want to do as a chef and have it on location. [Staff] also get to learn and maintain, which gives them a little better sense of where our food comes from, which translates into the guest experience,” he notes.

Preserving farmland is one of the most important functions of American Farmland Trust. “Farmland itself plays a huge role in environmental protection,” explains Piotti. “But you can’t think about only the farm. You have to think about the farming practices that occur on that land and you have to think about the farmers who are stewards of that land,” he says. Well-known for his commitment to sustainability, Chef Mooney also owns Kakele House, an organic farm and event space on the North Shore of Oahu. “For me it’s a lifestyle and not a job,” he says. Piotti touts the benefits that small, diversified farms like Kakele House have on communities.

Listen in as these two guests discuss the meaning of sustainability and its impact on environmental, social and economic vitality.

Jun 06 2018

49mins

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Come Together: Uniting People Through Food And Opportunity

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How do we unite different cultures in the midst of a polarizing political climate? In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, George Washington University professor of leadership Louis Caldera and Rose Previte, owner of Compass Rose and Maydān in Washington DC, talk about culture, leadership and the potential for diversity to drive positive change in the US. Both guests believe diversity is our greatest strength. “As long as we’re true to our principles of equality, and people can develop their talents through education and contribute something, then that’s what we need to do,” says Caldera, the son of Mexican immigrants who became Secretary of the Army. He emphasizes how our country benefits when the brightest people in the world want to come here to be educated. “The growing diversity of this country will become more politically active and they’re going to say, ‘I don’t fear people who come from places like where I come from because I’m a contributing American,’” he predicts. Previte’s restaurants are a celebration of diversity inspired by her upbringing with a Lebanese mother and Sicilian father and her own extensive travels. “The street food [at Compass Rose] is the great equalizer, it’s where everyone whether rich or poor…come together over food,” she says.

Both guests come from families where food and hospitality were focal points. Previte remembers how her diverse family educated others about they were through food. Caldera, who grew up poor in Southern California at a time when the Latino community was still small, believes shared meals are important for building strong families and communities. However, shared meals can be difficult with the work schedules in low-income families, so he advocates for supports like minimum wage, family assistance and opportunities for education.

Listen to this conversation between two leaders who understand diversity as a strength that builds positive social change.

Aug 29 2018

58mins

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Community and Friendship and Family

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Why are personal connections the key to success? In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, Jennifer Eddy (Founder and Executive Director of Root in Salem, MA) and Michael Pagliarini (Chef and Owner of Giulia and Benedetto in Boston) discuss how success is so often predicated on having strong social ties within a community. A No Kid Hungry supporter, Chef Pagliarini sees his restaurants as invaluable pieces of the communities they serve. “When a restaurant can feel like it is part of a community where the community has a sense of ownership of that restaurant, that’s when it’s working,” he says. Eddy sees the same dynamic at Root, a non-profit social enterprise that serves at-risk and disconnected youth through culinary and life skills training programs. “At the end of their 5-hour shift, [participants] all sit down for a family meal together. I think is probably one of the most powerful parts of Root…They suddenly have a community and a friendship and a family,” she says.

Pagliarini also sees the strong community that happens in a restaurant kitchen. “The sense of comradery in a kitchen is one of the most galvanizing forces that keeps people coming back,” he explains. In addition to learning “wrap-around” skills such as interviewing, financial literacy and teamwork, students at Root take on an externship in a busy kitchen at a local restaurant where they often become a valuable member of that restaurant community. “50-60% of young people that go through externships end up getting job offers from the [restaurant] where they worked,” Eddy notes.

Listen to how two social entrepreneurs explain the importance of strong community. 

Jun 20 2018

53mins

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Johanna Mendelson Forman and Noobtsaa Philip Vang on Conflict Cuisine

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How does food both create conflict and provide a foundation for cultural integration and inclusion? American University professor and Stimson Center Distinguished Fellow Johanna Mendelson Forman and Foodhini founder Noobtsaa Philip Vang join hosts Debbie and Billy Shore to discuss gastrodiplomacy in the US and abroad. “Refugee food… is very popular and growing because this is the way you learn that the people who are villainized and made into statistics are not that – they are human beings,” says Forman, who teaches the wildly popular course in ‘Conflict Cuisine.’ Vang founded Foodhini to provide opportunities for refugees and immigrants to make a living through sharing their culture’s food. “All the different communities of diaspora, it’s all the same: they go to a new place, they don’t have anything, but one of the things they do still have is their food,” he says.

This ‘perfect pairing’ of guests has worked together for years: Forman acts as a business mentor for Vang and Vang serves as advisor on several of Forman’s class projects. “You hit the industry at a time when there was a greater consciousness about refugees and the power that food has, and you’ve done such an incredible job,” Forman tells Vang. Vang is appreciative of her support – both personal and professional. “[Foodhini] is how I see the world should be… creating a place where food and culture is not overlooked,” he believes.

Hear how food can create conflict but also how it can bring communities together on this intriguing episode of Add Passion and Stir.

Dec 03 2019

46mins

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Dan Giusti and Angela Jerabek on Unlocking the Potential of Our Schools

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How do we transform the way kids experience school? Former head chef Dan Giusti, the founder and CEO of Brigaid, and Angie Jerabek, the founder and executive director of the BARR Center, join hosts Debbie and Billy Shore to share their insights on driving culture change in our nation’s schools. “The personal interaction, whether it’s in a restaurant or in a school, is always going to be more important than the food itself,” insists Giusti. “You need to build relationships. You’ve got to have relationships from staff to student, student to student and staff to staff,” agrees Jerabek.

Both guests emphasize that the talent already exists within schools. “We’re hesitant to have outside people come in. We really want to train the current staff because then we know it’s going to become part of the culture,” explains Jerabek. “One thing that’s always stood out to me is that we’ve had high school kids literally say to the cafeteria staff ‘I didn’t even like this meal today, but we see that you’re really putting a lot of work in. Thank you,’” says Giusti.

Tune in for this in-depth conversation about two transformative organizations working to improve the school experience for our nation’s kids.

Nov 13 2019

49mins

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Is There an American Cuisine? with Chef Ann Cashion and Historian Paul Freedman

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Is there such a thing as American cuisine? James Beard Award-winning chef Ann Cashion and Yale history professor and author Paul Freedman have a thought-provoking discussion about the intersection of food, restaurants and American culture with and hosts Debbie and Billy Shore. Freedman’s newest book, American Cuisine and How It Got This Way, explores the evolution from regionalism to the standardization of food in the 20th century and how that trend is reversing. “Homogenization, standardization, industrial food… that’s the main trend in American history for the 20th century,” he explains. Cashion describes the “active educational process” she used to have with her customers about using seasonal and sustainable food on her menus. “People are more in tune with what it means these days, and are more supportive of it,” she says.

“Sylvia’s, the famous African American restaurant in Harlem, reflects not only the history of African American cuisine but the great migration of African Americans to the north,” explains Freedman, author of Ten Restaurants That Changed America. “I was in the kitchen of a Ramada Inn in Jackson, Mississippi, working with a total African American staff. It was such a great learning experience because so many of them just cooked by feel, no recipes,” recounts Cashion about one of her first restaurant jobs.

Listen to this engaging conversation about food, history and culture in America. 

Oct 30 2019

37mins

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The World Is Not What You Think: Milk Street’s Chris Kimball and WGBH’s Jon Abbott

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What is the media’s responsibility to keep us informed? WGBH president and CEO Jon Abbott and culinary personality and Milk Street founder Christopher Kimball join host Billy Shore in Boston to discuss the intersection of education, media and culture. “This is not about a sound bite, this about having a conversation with people,” explains Abbott about the role of WGBH, a Boston public radio station and member station of National Public Radio and Public Radio International. Kimball agrees with the importance of the media message. “If you manage your media business strictly to make a profit, Julia Child and Mr. Rogers are not going to be on television,” he says.

Kimball, the creator of popular PBS programs America’s Test Kitchen and Milk Street Television, talks about exploring international food culture. “It’s always changing, that’s what’s exciting; the world isn’t what you thought,” he notes. “That’s what public media is really all about, revealing and exploring and giving people a sense that there’s always something to learn,” concludes Abbott.

Listen to this engaging conversation as three thought leaders discuss the pitfalls and possibilities of the information age.

Oct 16 2019

45mins

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Why We Need Immigrants as Much as Immigrants Need Us, with Sasha Chanoff and Chickadee Chef John DaSilva

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Where would we be without immigrants? RefugePoint founder and executive director Sasha Chanoff and Chickadee owner and executive chef John daSilva join host Billy Shore in Boston to discuss the hardships faced by immigrants and refugees and the promise and strength they bring to their new homes. “Refugees do revitalize cities - like Lewiston, Maine, or St. Louis, Missouri - that were on the decline and Somalis and Bosnians moved in and started businesses,” Chanoff explains. “Immigrant workers make up 30% of the workforce [at Chickadee]. If you take away 30% of the workforce in a workforce-depleted industry, the effects would be devastating,” observes daSilva.

Chanoff shares a harrowing tale about rescuing hundreds of massacre survivors in war-torn Congo early in his career. “I was struck viscerally by this idea that if I could play a very small role in helping somebody who had gone through a lot of trauma and terror, and often lost so much in their lives… that was the most important thing I could do,” he says. “These people working for me are just doing the best that they can, working as hard as they can. How could we turn our backs on them? We need them,” concludes daSilva.

Join in this engaging conversation between two guests who share their personal perspectives on how immigrants and refugees make us all stronger.

Sep 25 2019

46mins

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Financial Inclusion: The Key to Overcoming Global Poverty

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What’s keeping three billion people from climbing out of poverty? Accion President and CEO Michael Schlein and New York restaurateur Roni Mazumdar talk with Billy Shore about the importance of financial inclusion and creating an economic system that works for everyone. “It’s really hard to imagine anyone working their way out of poverty without some of the most basic financial tools—a safe place to save, access to credit, efficient payments, insurance,” says Schlein. Accion provided capital that helped young entrepreneur Mazumdar save his first business after hurricane Sandy devastated the region. “People don’t realize how important it is to survive that first year… Within two weeks, I had the money to continue to operate,” he recounts.

Schlein explains Accion’s market-based strategy for investing in financial technology companies and the people they ultimately help. “We’re a nonprofit, but we’re a big believer in harnessing the capital markets to change the world,” he explains. Mazumdar talks about his personal philanthropic initiative to alleviate poverty in India by improving access to education for girls. “There is a human being [in India] who is no different than I am. I happen to be in a position that is far more fortunate, so therefore, it’s imperative that I do something,” he says.

Listen to this engaging conversation about helping the billions of people who are invisible to the financial system that many of us take for granted.

Sep 11 2019

50mins

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Racism in America and the Road Ahead

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The third installment in our series of curated episodes revolves around our painful legacy of racism in America and how we can overcome it. Guests that include MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient Dr. Joe Marshall; Chef Tanya Holland; social justice champion Reverend Jim Wallis; thought leader and businessman Robert Lewis, Jr.; Chief of Staff to former Boston Mayor Kevin White, Ira Jackson; and Grantmakers In Health (GIH) President and CEO Faith Mitchell speak powerfully and thoughtfully about our shameful past, our difficult present, and a more hopeful and just future. 

Check out the original episodes by following the links below.

“I remember we were angry and my mom was like, ‘You win with love. If you're locked up or arrested, you can't do anything in life.’ … So I made a commitment in my life that I was going to be part of shifting this narrative of folks who are poorer and black and brown communities in a different way.” – Robert Lewis, Jr. (March 6, 2019) http://addpassionandstir.com/flipping-the-script-rewriting-the-story-of-urban-youth/

“I would accompany 37 yellow school buses along with the police commissioner every morning [in 1972] from Bayside up to a Dorchester Heights and South Boston High School, where those black kids would be greeted by an angry mob that was yelling the ‘n’ word at them and throwing bananas and occasionally bricks at the windows. That's how violent and ugly it was.” – Ira Jackson (December 12, 2018) http://addpassionandstir.com/leading-a-city-back-from-despair-the-community-leaders-who-rebuilt-boston/

“It's just, ‘you can't do it, you can't do it, you can't do it.’ And even when you show you can, the real believers are the ones of us who were actually doing it. So we're always fighting that… I always say being black in America is like you start in this hole and you're continually climbing out of this hole.” – Dr. Joe Marshall (October 18, 2016) http://addpassionandstir.com/gang-violence-prevention-and-cure/

“For me, what I notice about racism – what I find most painful - is when people have low expectations of you and they don't expect you to be intelligent or ambitious or resourceful. And that's hard. You know, that judgement is a big hurdle. What can you do about that?” – Chef Tanya Holland (October 18, 2016) http://addpassionandstir.com/gang-violence-prevention-and-cure/

“My questions took me to the city [Detroit] - a white kid going to black churches for the first time and taking jobs alongside young men just like me, but they were black and I was white. I realized that we were all born in Detroit but had been raised in different countries… My worldview, as they say, has been changed by being places I was never supposed to be.” – Reverend Jim Wallis (May 17, 2019) http://addpassionandstir.com/racial-injustice-the-soul-of-america-is-at-stake-part-1/

“There are many Americans who not only don't know about disparities, but in general think that we have the best medical care in the world because that's what we've been told. In fact, among developed countries, we're near the bottom… One of the reasons we're near the bottom is that we have big differences in things like mortality and morbidity once you get past the surface and look at the details of the American population.” – Faith Mitchell (May 16, 2018) http://addpassionandstir.com/bringing-the-love-equity-in-healthcare/

Aug 28 2019

42mins

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Taking the Hate Out of Hate Speech about Immigration

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The second installment in our series of curated episodes revolves around the controversial topics of diversity and immigration. Guests that include renowned chef and humanitarian Jose Andres, former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, Oxfam America’s president and CEO Abby Maxman, former Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera, and president and CEO of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Marco Davis share personal stories and impactful insights about America’s complicated and painful history with diversity.

Check out the original episodes by following the links below.

“You have to think about how much our country has benefited from immigration and how immigrants have brought new life, new energy, new views.” -- former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell (Sep 18, 2018) http://addpassionandstir.com/genius-knows-no-boundaries/

“Nobody wants to leave the comfort of their homes, the place they belong. They don't want to go to a faraway land that they don't know. Let's provide those people the reason why they should be successful, where they are, where they live.” -- Jose Andres (Oct 18, 2016) http://addpassionandstir.com/the-secret-killer-of-4-million-women-and-children/

“I think that the diversity that our nation has is a tremendous asset and the truth is it's only going to grow in diversity because of the smaller, smaller planet that we occupy. And that's a good thing.” -- former Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera (April 25, 2018) http://addpassionandstir.com/come-together-uniting-people-through-food-and-opportunity/

“We know that [immigration and refugee issues] requires political will and a lot of other things, but we're working tirelessly at all angles - whether it's behind the scenes or in those public spaces - to call out the, the unacceptables and the things that we really need to change.” -- Oxfam America president and CEO Abby Maxman (November 29, 2017) http://addpassionandstir.com/make-it-personal-the-names-and-stories-behind-the-numbers/

“This is the situation in America, for better or worse, it's changing right now in these last couple of years. But the reality is that even as people are starting to have more conversations about race, ethnicity, diversity, we don't have a common vocabulary. We don't have a common understanding about the issue.” -- Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute president and CEO Marco Davis (May 30, 2018) http://addpassionandstir.com/proximity-point-solving-problems-by-getting-closer/

Aug 09 2019

28mins

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The Courage to Lead

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The over 250 remarkable guests on more than 140 episodes of Add Passion and Stir have shared great wisdom, poignant personal experiences and true inspiration. To create a fresh experience for our listeners, we have curated this powerful content into some brand new episodes with themes like leadership, diversity and inclusion, national security, food equity and child hunger. This first episode is a compilation of expert views on leadership, including Former Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, United States Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Congressman Jim McGovern, Civil Rights legend Hubie Jones, Panera Founder Ronn Shaich, and social change pioneer Bill Novelli.

Tune in for perspectives on effective leadership from an all star lineup of seasoned and successful leaders.

“One of the things that I think all of us can do is to model civil discourse and respect for others - for people we don't agree with necessarily. We have to be able to listen to each other and to figure out how we can compromise and work together.” - Jeanne Shaheen

“At some point somebody has to have the political courage and say, ‘No, that's not right, that’s not true’... And at some point in time, you have to say, ‘You know what? We're not playing that game... We're playing the game of getting problems solved in this country.’” - Tom Vilsack

“[Martin Luther King, Jr.] was basically starting with taking us to school... Then he took it to political rally and then he took it to church and by the time I left Jordan Hall, I was so elevated... That was the night that sealed my commitment to work for social justice and racial justice in this society and that I was going to lead a purpose-driven life.” - Hubie Jones

“I got in this to make a difference in the world. It seemed to me that business was an actually a more powerful way to make a difference in the world.” - Ron Shaich

“I go home every night with a song in my heart because [my MBA students] understand that there's more than one bottom line. Sure, they may go to Google, they may go to a Goldman Sachs, but they're going to make a difference.” - Bill Novelli

Jul 10 2019

22mins

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From Kitchen to Courtroom: Dealing With Race in America

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How do we achieve lasting social and racial justice in America? Children’s advocate and social justice icon Hubie Jones and Sweet Home Café (at the National Museum of African American History and Culture) executive chef Jerome Grant talk with Billy Shore about their perspectives on race in America and commitment to living purpose-driven lives. “On to the stage came Dr. King and he went into this oratory that absolutely blew me away... By the time I left Jordan Hall, I felt that I was levitating,” Jones recalls about the night in 1956 that helped set the course of his life. Grant shares a similar experience about opening Sweet Home Café. “Walking in that cafeteria the day before opening and seeing these murals on our walls, seeing these awesome quotes, the picture of the Woolworth dine-in boycott… You see the resiliency of us as African Americans and what we contributed to American society. There’s no feeling like that at all,” describes Grant.

Both guests share their perspectives on our increasingly divisive culture and finding a path forward. “We have a lot more work to go with the [racial] divide that’s going on now. Mostly we need to learn more about each other and not be afraid of each other,” says Grant. At age 85, Jones is well-known for mentoring thousands of young social justice advocates throughout the years. “Leaders have to be available, leaders have to be accessible - what are we doing for these young leaders to take over, stand on our shoulders and make a difference?,” he challenges.

Listen to this engaging conversation between someone who works for one of the most important museums in America and another who has lived the history it represents.

Jun 12 2019

55mins

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A First Lady Breaks New Ground in the Fight to Save Our Kids

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How do we inspire resiliency and hope in the kids who need them the most? First Lady of Massachusetts Lauren Baker and Boston restaurateur Chris Himmel (Grill 23, Post 390, Harvest, Bistro du Midi) join host Billy Shore for a heartfelt conversation about how creating positive experiences can have a profound impact on underprivileged kids. Baker discusses her work for the Wonderfund, which partners with the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families to provide comfort and dignity to children. These comforts can be as simple as buying a young boy in foster care a baseball glove. “He was able to play little league, engage with his friends, and be part of his community. That’s a moment that really matters for a child,” she explains. Himmel is very intentional about finding causes that he and his restaurants can support that have a direct impact on kids. “If you really care, you can find a way to make a difference. What we get is so much more because our team sees first-hand the difference they can make,” he says of the hands-on programs his restaurants support, including exposing hundreds of kids to farms with Green Growers and the Boys & Girls Club.

First Lady Baker feels that all children deserve support. “No child is responsible for trauma that happens. Kids are dependent on the adults in their lives for survival and when the adults aren’t able for whatever reason to provide for them, the child is the one who suffers,” she says. Himmel feels that immigrants are another vulnerable group who deserve support. “From my standpoint, we couldn’t operate without people who were able to immigrate into our country. If there is additional red tape that prevents additional people from being able to come to our country and make a life for themselves, it’s not just hurting them, it’s hurting our industry and subsequently a lot of other industries,” he believes.

Listen to these two committed children’s advocates discuss their motivations and the impact that simple acts can have on a child’s life.

Jun 05 2019

45mins

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Rethinking the “Cost” of Nutrition Programs

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Is food the key to solving our healthcare crisis? In this episode marking the two-year anniversary of Add Passion and Stir, Congressman Jim McGovern of Massachusetts and Washington DC Chef Todd Gray (Equinox, Manna) discuss nutrition as the root cause of our spiraling healthcare costs and the role of Congress with Debbie and Billy Shore. “Food is medicine. What we eat determines our health outcomes in a whole range of areas,” says Congressman McGovern. “We are cooking and operating our restaurant in the way that we are living our lives. I have so many customers changing the way they eat for a multitude of reasons many of them health reasons,” says five-time James Beard Foundation nominee Gray of his healthy vegetable-forward menus that have established him as a leader in the DC sustainable food movement.

McGovern wants to reframe the debate over food programs like SNAP from how much they cost to how much they save. “If we can show you over a ten-year period that you could actually save money, then why would [The Congressional Budget Office] score it as a cost? Hunger and food insecurity in Massachusetts costs about $2.4B a year in avoidable health care costs,” he says. The guests agree that hunger is ultimately a political problem. “We have the food, we have the money, we have the knowledge of what we need to do, we have the infrastructure… we have everything but the political will,” explains McGovern.

Listen to these powerful anti-hunger crusaders talk about how they fight for healthier communities.

May 29 2019

43mins

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Refusing to Quit on the Road to Ending Childhood Hunger

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What can Chefs Cycle teach us about finding our strength? Recorded after the rain-soaked second day of Chefs Cycle 2019, Billy Shore discusses riding 300 miles in three days with Cathartes principal Jeff Johnston, ZAZU Kitchen & Farm chef/owner Duskie Estes, chef Elizabeth Falkner and Add Passion & Stir producer Paul “Woody” Woodhull. Woodhull, who is new to cycling, was inspired. “One thing I was told when I went out on a training ride was… you can shift and make it feel like you’re on a level road. For hungry kids, there’s no button they can push to level the road,” he notes. Johnston, an experienced rider, also found the experience meaningful. “It was challenging, but at the same time, you’re feeding kids, you’re doing the right the thing while you’re out riding through the vineyards,” he says.

Estes and Falkner point out that Chefs Cycle does as much for the chef community as it does for No Kid Hungry. “It’s not just that you got the chefs who are cyclists - you are making cyclists out of the chefs,” says Estes. “I hope this can be really inspirational for younger folks getting into the business knowing that if you’re taking care of yourself, then you can better take care of other people,” explains Falkner.

Listen in and experience the commitment and camaraderie that makes Chefs Cycle a powerful event for the riders and the kids they are helping to feed.

May 22 2019

50mins

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Can the Secret Sauce That Built a $6B Business Save Our Politics?

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Billy Shore and Producer Paul "Woody" Woodhull are riding 300 miles in 3 days in Santa Rosa to help raise millions of dollars to end childhood hunger in America today so we are offering a reprise of this fascinating discussion. If you want to support the Chef Cycle ride and No Kid Hungry Please click on this link ( https://tinyurl.com/WoodyTurns62 ), to learn how you can join me in the fight to end childhood hunger here in the United States. Every $1 you donate can help connect a child with up to 10 meals.

What do business and politics have in common in today’s climate? Panera Bread Founder and Chairman of the Board Ron Shaich and FoodCorps Co-Founder and CEO Curt Ellis discuss how responsible leadership can inform both business and politics and the central role that food could play. “One of the most powerful things we can do as leaders is first, tell ourselves the truth,” says Shaich. “The hardest part of making decisions is the uncertainty that occurs… You need to project the confidence to everybody to get them over the hurdle while you yourself are unsure.” Ellis describes a key leadership moment when FoodCorps began developing a whole new realm of business skills to address the supply side of school food. “The decision to say: ‘We believe we have the ability to get good at something we’re not yet good at’ was a real decision to put ourselves out there,” he believes.

Ellis sees the power of food in addressing political problems. “Food is this place where so many of the challenges that we must learn how to solve in our country intersect. Food is the place where social justice and racial justice meet environmental sustainability and public health,” he says. Shaich laments the problems created by short-term thinking in business and politics. “We need to examine why our politics has gotten so short term, so coarse and so ‘it’s my way or the highway,’” he says. “Unless we can solve that, we’re not going to be the country in the future that we’ve been in the past.”

Get inspired as two leaders who have found ways to change the world through food share their advice on leadership and making a lasting impact.

May 15 2019

1hr 3mins

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Happier Cows Make More Milk: The Fight to Save Small Farms

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Can technology save small-scale agriculture? Big Burrito Restaurant Group corporate chef Bill Fuller and Rivendale Farms general manager Christine Grady join hosts Debbie and Billy Shore from their hometown of Pittsburgh to talk about food and the future of sustainable agriculture. Grady describes robotic milking systems that allow for 15% more milk from less-stressed cows. “If the cows are getting anxious, that affects the yield and the quality of the milk,” she says. Fuller was on the cutting edge of the sustainable food movement in Pittsburgh twenty years ago. “It was great to watch this transition and transformation and ride along with it. It was really sort of beautiful,” he says.

“So many aspects of our community start to unravel and fray as a result of the disappearance of small farms,” observes Billy Shore. Fuller asks Grady, “Farmers in general are really conservative and slow to change. What are your thoughts on getting farmers to adopt the new technology?” Grady responds that the key may be young farmers. “One of the things that’s incredibly important is to attract the younger generation into farming… You actually need to attract a new workforce that is more interested in looking how to innovate,” she explains.

Listen to this important conversation about the confluence of technology, innovation and sustainability.

May 08 2019

44mins

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Democracy in Peril: Senator Bob Kerrey and chef Tom Colicchio on the Integrity of our Nation

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Is our divided political culture energizing or suppressing democracy? Former Nebraska Governor and US Senator Bob Kerrey and renowned chef, restaurateur and food activist Tom Colicchio join Billy Shore to discuss the politics of hunger, public education and our eroding democracy. “The real problem in the food system is [it doesn’t] permit the kind of innovation that will produce a different outcome. You’ve got to create a system whereby the innovators who want to deliver healthy food have an opportunity to get in the door and be successful,” explains Kerrey. Colicchio agrees and talks about the insights he gained from his wife’s (Laurie Silverbush) groundbreaking film about hunger in America, A Place at the Table. “People aren’t hungry in this country because of famine, war or drought. We have enough food to feed people. We don’t have enough political will to feed people,” he notes.

Kerrey sees parallels to our failing education system and worries that the American dream is out of reach for a large portion of the population. “It’s a big distraction looking at these people who bought their kids’ way into college. It’s a moral problem and it’s an economic problem,” he says, referencing the recent college entrance scandal. Colicchio wants to reframe the discussion around free tuition. “12 years isn’t enough anymore - we need to provide 14 years of public education,” he believes. 

Hear these two dynamic guests discuss why engaged citizens are the key to the survival of our democracy.

May 01 2019

40mins

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When Good Is Not Good Enough: Scaling Social Impact

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How do you help social entrepreneurs spread their ideas? Bridgespan Group co-founder and managing partner Jeff Bradach and Bambara Kitchen & Bar executive chef David Bazirgan join host Billy Shore to talk about impact investing and helping non-profits scale to create transformative change. “So much of scaling is about how you create that feeling that has people acting on their own in ways that are aligned and consistent with the vision [that] makes a difference in the world,” explains Bradach. Bazirgan practices a similar philosophy in his kitchen. “I’ve always tried to create a good culture of teamwork, respect and keeping an open dialogue. Lead by example, [practice] good communication, and get buy-in,” he advises.

Bradach cautions that creating large-scale change isn’t as simple as just replicating good ideas. “There’s other virtues of scale, but I do think there’s an underappreciation of that unique, radically local experience that is deeply embedded in community,” he observes. Bazirgan is a big advocate for community nonprofits, and is preparing to ride in his first ChefsCycle for No Kid Hungry event. “I’ve always been one to just say ‘yes’ to everything. We have such an opportunity to give back and provide and support,” he says.

Join us for this conversation that explores the dynamics of social change and the true potential of nonprofits to make transformative change.

Apr 24 2019

45mins

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What Doesn't Break You Makes You Stronger

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What is the catalyst that makes us want to make a difference? Teach For America DC region Executive Director Adele Fabrikant and Rose’s Luxury head chef Seth Wells join Debbie and Billy Shore to discuss educational inequality, developing leadership and service to community. Fabrikant talks about her 20-year career in public education. “When you see the inequities that you see when you teach in the South Bronx after growing up as privileged as I did, you cannot walk away, you cannot turn and go back to the originally scheduled programming,” she explains about her early experience with Teach For America. Wells is currently preparing for his first Chefs Cycle for No Kid Hungry. “I’m at a point now where there’s always more to learn in the business, but I would like to be able to give back to the community through what I do and make that part of my mission,” he declares.

Fabrikant tells a story about struggling to teach a young boy with extreme anger issues in the South Bronx. “One of the most challenging things is the self-doubt. I feel like that was my loss,” she laments. Wells understands the sentiment within the context of his own work and uses it to become a better chef and leader. “If you feel that comfortable that you’re crushing your job every single day, I don’t know what that feels like. I think self-doubt is important. It’s part of becoming a leader,” he says.

Get personal with these two guests as they discuss how leaders develop their skills and what drives them to want

Apr 17 2019

50mins

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Arianna Huffington: Sound Asleep and Still Changing The World

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Why is sleep the best remedy for just about everything? Billy Shore sits down with Thrive Global Founder and CEO Arianna Huffington and pastry chef and North Fork Table & Inn owner Claudia Fleming to talk about the effects of stress and exhaustion on creativity, productivity and health. “90% of the health care problems we deal with are stress-related and preventable,” says Huffington. “If your life is just about productivity and there is no joy, there is something wrong,” she explains, talking about how her Thrive Global platform helps people improve their well-being and performance. Fleming is aware of her own tendency to overwork. “You can literally never stop. You can stay all night, but if you don’t say ‘I’m leaving’, you can hang out all the time and not be very productive,” she says.

Huffington also discusses how technology and our acrimonious political climate are creating additional stress that can be crippling. “There is absolutely no benefit in living in a perpetual state of outrage. We need to be very protective of our energy and use it wisely, use it to bring about change rather than simply venting,” she advises. Fleming sees her role as a chef as innately political. “Food is politics. You can’t get away from the fact that agribusiness runs a good portion of our government,” she explains.

Listen to this thoughtful discussion on the dangers of exhaustion and burnout and recalibrate your understanding of creativity, productivity and performance.

Apr 10 2019

43mins

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Putting People Over Politics in the Nation’s First Presidential Primary State

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How do we help the most vulnerable build on their own strengths? Families in Transition-New Horizons founder and president Maureen Beauregard and Moxy chef and owner Matt Louis join host Billy Shore for the second live episode recorded at the Music Hall Loft in Portsmouth, NH, to talk about addiction, mental health, homelessness, and the role healthy food can play for those who are struggling. “When we look at hunger and homelessness, we need to look at the ‘why’ of it and stop judging and calling people names. Can we build on their strengths?,” asks Beauregard. Louis makes it point to use his strengths for good causes. “Always say yes. For whatever reason, the world has made [chefs] more popular then we should be. But it’s a very powerful place to be if you can harness that and use it the right way,” he explains.

Beauregard recounts her own powerful story of perseverance growing up in the foster care system and how it drives her work with Families in Transition-New Horizons. “I can remember what it felt like to be hungry, to be lonely, and it leaves such a hollow feeling inside,” she recalls. Louis applies the same values to his restaurants and the people who work for him. “How can I make their quality of life better while retaining them in what can be a very challenging industry?,” he asks.

Feel the emotion of this personal and heart-felt discussion that illustrates the impact we can have on solving hunger and homelessness.

Apr 03 2019

40mins

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