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Hot & Bothered: A Dissent Climate Podcast

Updated about 1 month ago

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A podcast on climate politics for the 99%, brought to you by Dissent magazine.

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A podcast on climate politics for the 99%, brought to you by Dissent magazine.

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
35
1
0
1
1

Appreciate their perspective

By james.t.schwartz - May 07 2020
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I really appreciate the perspective this podcast brings. Love it!

Glad you’re back!

By TommyJWFresh - Oct 23 2018
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So glad you’re back, and please don’t leave! Love your framing, politics, and grace in dealing with a complicated subject. Glad the production has bumped up a notch too!

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
35
1
0
1
1

Appreciate their perspective

By james.t.schwartz - May 07 2020
Read more
I really appreciate the perspective this podcast brings. Love it!

Glad you’re back!

By TommyJWFresh - Oct 23 2018
Read more
So glad you’re back, and please don’t leave! Love your framing, politics, and grace in dealing with a complicated subject. Glad the production has bumped up a notch too!
Cover image of Hot & Bothered: A Dissent Climate Podcast

Hot & Bothered: A Dissent Climate Podcast

Latest release on Jun 25, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Rank #1: Why Environmentalism Needs Class Politics

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We know—it’s been a long, hot summer without us, but the Hot & Bothered team is dipping its toes back in the rising waters of international climate politics with a special project to close out 2017.

As we warm up for season two, we’re excited to launch a special, three-part miniseries in collaboration with Cited, an award-winning documentary radio show out of the University of British Columbia. Over the course of these next three broadcasts, Kate and Daniel will be joining Cited producers Sam Fenn, Josh GD, and Gordon Katic to talk environmentalism, jobs, climate migration, indigenous sovereignty, and more. Here’s episode 1.




In the early 1990s, a pathbreaking activist named Judi Bari sought to ally forest workers and environmentalists in the Pacific Northwest against predatory Wall Street investors. What can we learn from her story today?

Kicking off a three-part series, Kate joins Sam and Josh to tell the story of tree spiking, a Texas millionaire, and the Northern Spotted Owl. Along the way, we hear from documentary filmmaker Mary Liz Thomson and University of Oregon sociology professor John Bellamy Foster about how activist Judi Bari worked to overcome the antagonisms between loggers and Earth First environmentalists through working-class solidarity.

Then, in the second half of the hour, Sam talks to independent forester Herb Hammond about how forest management could help mitigate climate change on a massive scale.

If you like what you’re hearing, subscribe to the Hot & Bothered feed on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to get all three parts of our series with Cited and to catch up on season one. And while you’re at it, tune into more excellent recent episodes from Cited, including a prizewinning documentary on a Vancouver heroin clinic and a series on mass incarceration in collaboration with Jacobin’s The Dig.

Special thanks to the Cited team for producing this series and to the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions for partnering.

Read (and watch) more:

Bellamy Foster, John. “The Limits of Environmentalism Without Class: Lessons from the Ancient Forest Crisis of the Pacific Northwest,” Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, vol. 4, no. 1 (March 1993), pp. 11-41.

Who Bombed Judi Bari? Directed by Mary Liz Thomson. Hokey Pokey Productions, 2012.

Hammond, Herb. “Good Jobs require Healthy Ecosystems and Healthy Communities” 21 November 2014. Unpublished Conference Paper. Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-BC. 2017. Web.

Plus: Catch up on Kate’s recent reporting on Puerto Rico, Trumpism, and the ongoing COP23 climate talks at In These Times and The Intercept.

Hot & Bothered is hosted by Kate Aronoff and Daniel Aldana Cohen and produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Browse the full archive here.

The post Why Environmentalism Needs Class Politics appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Nov 17 2017

59mins

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Rank #2: Hot & Bothered Podcast: What the Climate Doomsayers Get Wrong

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Facing a deluge of doom-and-gloom reporting on the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kate and Daniel get together to put things in perspective—and, along the way, manage to find hope for a more equal, low-carbon future.

Continue the conversation on Twitter: tag us @KateAronoff, @aldatweets, @dissentmag, and #hotbotheredclimate. You can find links to all the articles mentioned in this episode, and lots more related reading and listening, below. And if you like what you’re hearing, please subscribe to Dissent. You’ll get our latest issue, featuring a special section on housing, and plenty more great Kate and Daniel content in the months to come.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Further reading

At Davos, bosses paint climate change as an opportunity (Alex Whiting, Reuters)

California just adopted its boldest energy target yet: 100% clean electricity (David Roberts, Vox)

The left vs. a carbon tax (David Roberts, Vox, 2016)

A Green New Deal is on the ballot in Washington state this year (David Roberts, Vox)

Kate: Climate Change Policy Is Proving Difficult To Enact Even in Liberal States with Democratic Control (The Intercept)

Endorsers of Yes on 1631

The Green Jobs Revolution Needs to Include All of Us (Audrea Lim, The Nation)

The Economy During Wartime (J.W. Mason, Dissent)

“Unhappy with what the military was paying for steel, Bernard Baruch, head of the First World War–era War Industries Board informed U.S. Steel chairman Elbert Gary that if prices didn’t come down, the government would simply take the industry over. When an incredulous Gary asked how U.S. Steel could be managed without its top executives, Baruch replied, ‘Oh, we’ll get a second lieutenant or somebody to run it.’”

Kate: Is Nationalization an Answer to Climate Change? (The Intercept)

Dems damp down hopes for climate change agenda (Timothy Cama and Mike Lillis, The Hill)

Kate: Valuing the World, with Mariana Mazzucato (Dissent)

“A carbon-neutral city will require innovation in mobility, nutrition, and how we build houses—all sorts of different areas. At the bottom of that are questions about how to transform government instruments. . . .”

Daniel: It Gets Wetter (Dissent)

“No matter what the earth system’s tipping points ultimately are, every fraction of a degree of warming that we avoid means saving millions of lives.”

Kate: The U.S. Decided to Show Up for the U.N. Climate Conference — to Lobby for Coal (The Intercept, 2017)

“Of the 17 operational large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) facilities worldwide, the vast majority funnel captured carbon dioxide back into oil extraction, or ‘enhanced oil recovery.’ That fact that has led some to coin the acronym CCUS: Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage, a nod to the fact that captured emissions aren’t always stored.”

The World We’ve Built (Jedediah Purdy, Dissent)

“The scientists’ warning is addressed to ‘humanity’ . . . On one level, the phrases name a bare fact.

“On another level, the ‘humanity’ that the self-described ‘world scientists’ address does not exist. There is no ‘we’ that could take the actions that the scientists call for. . . . To face the Anthropocene, humans would need a way of facing one another. We would need, first, to be a we.”

Explainer: How ‘Shared Socioeconomic Pathways’ explore future climate change (Carbon Brief)

Video: Resisting Extractivism and Climate Change (Panel at “The Future of the Left in the Americas,” hosted by Dissent, NACLA, and the New School)

Daniel: The Last Stimulus (Jacobin)

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast: What the Climate Doomsayers Get Wrong appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Oct 23 2018

1hr 2mins

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Rank #3: Hot & Bothered Podcast #11: A Just Transition for New York State? With Franchelle Hart

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We’re just under one month into the Trump regime and prospects for curbing climate change feel bleak. ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson has been confirmed as Secretary of State, the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines look like unkillable zombies, and the EPA is closer to the chopping block than ever.

Still, the resistance is alive and well. As thousands flood into the streets to stop a draconian Muslim travel ban and attacks on civil liberties, a coalition of grassroots groups in New York is showing what climate policy might look like in the age of Trump. New York Renews—a coalition of 104 labor, racial justice, green, and community groups from across the state—showed up in Albany this week to pressure Governor Andrew Cuomo into putting climate justice into the budget, allocating state funding for everything from green jobs to infrastructure development in low-income communities.

To hear more about this campaign, we caught up with Franchelle Hart, Executive Director of Open Buffalo, a member of the New York Renews one of the organizations leading efforts for a just transition in upstate New York. Before coming to Open Buffalo, Franchelle worked for years on both state and federal policy, and with 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East. She has served as a board member for the Western New York Area Labor Federation and President for the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists’ Buffalo Chapter.

What with the stench of the Trump regime starting to sink in more fully, Kate and Daniel appreciate your loving and constructive feedback bigly—particularly about Daniel’s dad jokes. Tweet your scathing critiques, your deepest fears and your future show ideas to #HotBotheredClimate. Note: we’ll be taking a hiatus after this episode to prepare for our bigger, better second season. That’s right—we’re going refresh the show, find some more funding, and get ready to come out more often. In the meantime, don’t delete Hot & Bothered. There might just be a mid-hiatus episode sometime soon.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Writing Climate Justice into the Budget

Karen Dewitt, Climate change activists urge Cuomo to go further (WBFO 88.7)

Rebecca Nathanson, Can This New York State Campaign Finish What the Paris Climate Talks Started? (The Nation)

New York Renews

Open Buffalo

Buffalo Billion

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast #11: A Just Transition for New York State? With Franchelle Hart appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Feb 15 2017

49mins

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Rank #4: Hot & Bothered Podcast #10: Into the Abyss

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With Donald Trump at the White House doorstep, we do something different this month. The show features four brief interviews with leaders from across the climate movement on how they’re interpreting this unique moment—and what they plan to do about it.

First up, Daniel speaks to Kert Davies, founder of the Climate Investigations Center. Before that, Kert was the chief architect of the Greenpeace web project ExxonSecrets, launched in 2004, which helped expose the oil giant ExxonMobil’s funding of organizations and individuals who work to discredit the validity of climate science and delay climate policy action. Next, Kate talks to Desiree Kane. Desiree is a journalist and a Miwok organizer who has lived out at Standing Rock fighting the Dakota Access pipeline for the last several months, and just arrived in D.C. She’s joining up with #District13, a partially Hunger Games-inspired hub of millennial resistance there to Trump’s agenda.

Daniel then turns to Cindy Wiesner. Cindy is the National Coordinator of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance (GGJ), a network of U.S.-based grassroots groups building an agenda for power for working and poor people and communities of color. She is also Co-Chair of the Climate Justice Alliance (CJA) and a leading organizer of the #ItTakesRoots coalition. And Kate closes by interviewing May Boeve, executive director of 350.org—a movement that has profoundly transformed climate organizing in the U.S. and around the world.

The clouds are gathering above, but we’re hanging on to the silver linings. Tweet your flinty determination, the climate justice campaigns you’re watching, and any leftover Moscow mischief jokes to #HotBotheredClimate.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Apocalinks

Energy Firms in Secretive Alliance With Attorneys General (Eric Lipton’s 2014 New York Times report on Scott Pruitt and the Republican Attorney Generals Association)

Kate: Either Rex Tillerson Lied Under Oath, Or He Doesn’t Know How Fossil Fuel Subsidies Work (In These Times)

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast #10: Into the Abyss appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Jan 20 2017

1hr 23mins

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Rank #5: Hot & Bothered Podcast: Why Food Doesn’t Cure Hunger, with Raj Patel

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With half of the planet on lockdown, many people around the world have been suddenly confronted with an issue they’re not used to thinking about in political terms: food. From empty supermarket shelves sparking fears of shortages, to farmers dumping out lagoons’ worth of milk, to endless lines forming outside of food banks and migrant workers facing threats of pay cuts, the coronavirus pandemic has put the contradictions of our global food system on full display. 

And who better to help us parse those contradictions than the veteran food writer, scholar, and activist Raj Patel? On this week’s show, Kate and Daniel talk to Patel about the hunger crisis and the current pandemic; climate-friendly agriculture; labor actions ranging from the Great Cowboy Strike of 1883 to Instacart; and much more. 





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

“Seven out of the ten worst-paying jobs in America are in the food system,” says Patel. “Those workers are now seen as essential and nonetheless are being thrown in harm’s way with little to no protection.”

Yet this is also fueling a new wave of worker militancy, he says—if not yet on the scale that followed the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. 

“The high point of US strike activity happened after the 1918 pandemic,” says Patel. That is, until the New Deal: then, “every year of the New Deal, there were more and more strikes… In fact, the sign of success of the New Deal was increasing confrontation and polarization.” 

Even if today’s strikes are still on a far smaller scale, Patel says, “this a moment in which [food workers] are recognizing, as their forebears have, the power that they have compared to Wall Street. And that to me is a good sign for democracy.”

If you like the episode and want to hear more from Kate and Daniel, sign up as a monthly member at patreon.com/hotbotheredclimate today. It’s thanks to those who are able to contribute that we’re able to make the podcast free for anyone to listen to. 

Paying members will get access to perks like a monthly happy hour with Kate, Daniel, and friends, a free ebook of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal by Kate Aronoff, Alyssa Battistoni, Daniel Aldana Cohen, and Thea Riofrancos, and much more. And as a special thank you to everyone who’s able to pitch in right away, supporters who sign up by May 1 will automatically get bumped up to the next subscription tier. 

So don’t hesitate: sign up on Patreon today.

Further reading

Dumped Milk, Smashed Eggs, Plowed Vegetables: Food Waste of the Pandemic (David Yaffe-Bellany and Michael Corkery, New York Times)

White House Seeks To Lower Farmworker Pay To Help Agriculture Industry (Franco Ordoñez, NPR) 

A Green New Deal for Agriculture (Raj Patel and Jim Goodman, Jacobin)

The Long New Deal (Raj Patel and Jim Goodman, The Journal of Peasant Studies)

COVID-19 and the Crisis in Food Systems (iPES Food, Communiqué)

Food Chain Workers Alliance

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast: Why Food Doesn’t Cure Hunger, with Raj Patel appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Apr 16 2020

1hr 4mins

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Rank #6: Hot & Bothered Podcast #8: Why Climate Justice Means Racial Justice, with Dawn Phillips

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In the eighth episode of Hot & Bothered, we get two perspectives on the crucial links between racial justice and climate justice. First, Kate travels to Standing Rock to talk to Native organizers there about their recent victory and what the growing movement against Trump can learn from the water protectors.

Then, Daniel speaks with Dawn Phillips, Program Director at Causa Justa-Just Cause, a multiracial, grassroots organization building community leadership to achieve justice for low-income San Francisco and Oakland residents. Dawn, who has a background in environmental justice organizing and serves as Chair of the Steering Committee of the Right to the City Alliance, explains how gentrification and the housing crisis are intertwined with environmental racism and systematic disinvestment in communities of color, not just in the Bay Area but across the country.

As we were wrapping up this episode, we learned that Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson is first in line to be Secretary of State in the Trump administration. We’ll be discussing all that and much more in our next few episodes, so stay tuned. Until then, keep sending us your questions, comments, and thoughts how we might still stave off climate dystopia at #HotBotheredClimate.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Climate and Racial Justice, From Coast to Coast

Kate: A People’s Victory at Standing Rock (In These Times)

Development Without Displacement: Resisting Gentrification in the Bay Area (Causa Justa-Just Cause)

Daniel: The Urban Green Wars (Jacobin)

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast #8: Why Climate Justice Means Racial Justice, with Dawn Phillips appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Dec 12 2016

1hr 3mins

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Rank #7: Hot & Bothered Podcast: Building Power in a Time of Monsters, with Waleed Shahid

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The last two months have seen the left come closer than it has in decades to nominating a U.S. presidential candidate, only to end in stinging defeat. In Congress, Democratic leaders have been on the back foot in negotiating record stimulus spending amid a historic crisis. For the U.S. left, in other words, the current moment in many ways looks like one of defeat. 

Still, says Waleed Shahid, “The progressive movement is dominating the ideas conversation in the Democratic party, which was not the case five years ago.” Shahid, a veteran of Bernie Sanders’s first presidential campaign in 2016 and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s upset run in 2018, is now the communications director for Justice Democrats and a leading voice of left-wing realignment in the Democratic Party. 

On this week’s show, Kate and Daniel talk to Shahid about how the broad left can still shape the party after the Bernie Sanders campaign; why primarying matters; whether the climate movement needs to abandon the “Green New Deal” label; and what it takes more broadly to build power in a time of monsters.  





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

If you like the episode and want to hear more from Kate and Daniel, sign up as a monthly member at patreon.com/hotbotheredclimate today. It’s thanks to those who are able to contribute that we’re able to make the podcast free for anyone to listen to. 

Paying members will get access to perks like a monthly happy hour with Kate, Daniel, and friends, a free ebook of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal by Kate Aronoff, Alyssa Battistoni, Daniel Aldana Cohen, and Thea Riofrancos, and much more. And as a special thank you to everyone who’s able to pitch in right away, supporters who sign up by May 1 will automatically get bumped up to the next subscription tier. 

So don’t hesitate: sign up on Patreon today.

Further reading

Kate: The Urgent Message of Negative Oil Prices (The New Republic) 

Waleed Shahid: Joe Biden, Here’s How to Earn Our Support (The Nation)

The Realigners: An Interview with Waleed Shahid of Justice Democrats (Joshua Leifer, Dissent)

Democrats Are Handing Donald Trump The Keys To The Country (Zach Carter, Huffington Post)

Democrats fight Green New Deal attacks on stimulus (Timothy Cama and Nick Sobczyk, E&E News)

The COVID-19 pandemic will change everything – for better or worse (Christine Berry, Verso blog)

Colossus Wears Tweed (Quinn Slobodian, Dissent)

Generation Climate Change (Varshini Prakash, Ezra Klein Show)

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast: Building Power in a Time of Monsters, with Waleed Shahid appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Apr 23 2020

1hr 1min

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Rank #8: Hot & Bothered Podcast: Climate Politics in the Time of Coronavirus

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Still hot… still bothered… and now facing a global crisis rivaled only by the climate emergency itself. Kate Aronoff and Daniel Aldana Cohen are back with a new season of Hot & Bothered, the podcast on climate politics for the 99%, hosted by Dissent magazine. Every Thursday, they’ll be joined by friends and special guests far and wide, to make sense of the catastrophe(s) unfolding around us and think through what comes next. 

For the first episode, Kate and Daniel catch up on the onslaught of the last several weeks: the mounting toll of the coronavirus pandemic, with its deep racial and economic disparities; the equally alarming economic fallout; and what a green stimulus could look like in response. They also worry about the devastation threatened by likely climate disasters in the coming months— not to mention the Trump administration and local right-wing lawmakers using COVID-19 as a pretext to further slash regulations on fossil fuels. 

If you like the episode and want to hear more from Kate and Daniel, sign up as a monthly member at patreon.com/hotbotheredclimate today. It’s thanks to those who are able to contribute that we’re able to make the podcast free for anyone to listen to. 

Paying members will get access to perks like a monthly happy hour with Kate, Daniel, and friends, a free ebook of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal by Kate Aronoff, Alyssa Battistoni, Daniel Aldana Cohen, and Thea Riofrancos, and much more. And as a special thank you to everyone who’s able to pitch in right away, supporters who sign up by May 1 will automatically get bumped up to the next subscription tier. 

So don’t hesitate: sign up on Patreon today.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Further reading:

A Green Stimulus to Rebuild Our Economy (Medium)

Daniel: Covid-19 and Eco-Apartheid (Medium)

Memo: Green Industrial Policy for Domestic and Global Climate Justice Is Popular (Daniel Aldana Cohen, Thea Riofrancos, Billy Fleming, and Jason Ganz, Data for Progress)

Kate: Green Jobs Are the Answer to the Coronavirus Recession (The New Republic)

Kate: The Democrats Screwed Up (The New Republic)

The Climate and Environmental Rules Being Rolled Back During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Amy Westervelt, Drilled News)

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast: Climate Politics in the Time of Coronavirus appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Apr 09 2020

37mins

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Rank #9: Hot & Bothered: Building Power, with Naomi Klein, Jane McAlevey, and Julian Brave NoiseCat

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This podcast episode is part of a special mini-series on Designing the Green New Deal. The Hot & Bothered podcast will return from a hiatus next Thursday, April 9. Tune in with Kate and Daniel for weekly episodes on how we tackle climate change amid the coronavirus emergency.

To win a Green New Deal, we need to deepen and expand mass movements and coalitions. Last fall at the University of Pennsylvania, we organized a massive conference on Designing a Green New Deal, with contributions by academics, journalists, organizers, and designers. In this four-part mini-series, we bring you audio of the discussions.

This episode, we start with our keynote panel, featuring author Naomi Klein, union organizer and author Jane McAlevey, and the journalist and vice president of Data for Progress, Julian Brave NoiseCat. They debate strategies for building a fighting mass movement led by workers that’s strong enough and wise enough to win a Green New Deal.

The current coronavirus crisis makes these debates more relevant than ever. As we struggle to get the health emergency under control, we must also begin planning the recovery. What do political mobilization and economic reconstruction look like in the face of a climate emergency?

Daniel, Kate, and special guest (and conference co-organizer) Billy Fleming introduce the episode. The conference was co-hosted by the McHarg Center for Urbanism and Ecology and the Socio-Spatial Climate Collaborative, or (SC)2.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Further reading

Coronavirus Capitalism — and How to Beat It (Naomi Klein, Intercept)

Why Unions Matter – Excerpt from A Collective Bargain: Unions, Organizing, and the Fight for Democracy (Jane McAlevey)

The House on Magnolia Street: How a group of homeless mothers took on a housing crisis (Julian Brave NoiseCat, California Sunday

The post Hot & Bothered: Building Power, with Naomi Klein, Jane McAlevey, and Julian Brave NoiseCat appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Apr 01 2020

1hr 32mins

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Rank #10: Hot & Bothered Podcast #9: A Holiday Gift for Climate Wonks, with Kevin Ummel

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Daniel’s map for “Carboniferous” in “Nonstop Metropolis: A New York Atlas” by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro (University of California Press, 2016). Cartography: Molly Roy; artwork: Bette Burgoyne. Underlying data from Kevin Ummel, adapted from research he did for the Center for Global Development. Courtesy of University of California Press. Click here to view the full map.

Just in time for a season of holiday excess, Daniel spends the ninth episode of Hot & Bothered indulging in some heavy data wonkery, while Kate gets the week off. First, he touches on fears among scientists that the Trump administration could actually erase or conceal key climate data. Daniel’s colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania are helping lead an effort to safeguard this valuable material through their #datarefuge campaign (see links below).

Next is Daniel’s feature interview with Kevin Ummel, which reveals why the rich have such high carbon footprints, just what kinds of consumption really drive carbon emissions, how urban density does (and doesn’t) make a difference, and what all this means for developing ethical climate policies, like a properly designed carbon tax. Indeed, if we are still perfecting our knowledge of the climate system, we’re at a much earlier stage in the social science of carbon emissions—figuring out which social and spatial factors are most important. Kevin Ummel is a data scientist and environmental economist based in Colorado. He was formerly a Research Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and  a Visiting Senior Associate at the Center for Global Development. He currently consults for organizations like the Citizens’ Climate Lobby and the World Resources Institute. Kevin and Daniel collaborated on a map of New York’s per capita carbon emissions that was published this October, alongside an essay of Daniel’s, in Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas.

You know a melancholy Santa Claus will be listening carefully to our bonus episode as he circles above the melting North Pole in the early hours of December 25, trying to find a solid patch of ice near his workshop to land his sleigh. He might even be as shocked as you to find Daniel closing the episode with a passionate plea for optimism. But he’ll certainly be convinced. And with that jolly thought, happy holidays from Hot & Bothered. See you in 2017.





Check out the full Hot & Bothered archive here. Hot & Bothered is produced by Colin Kinniburgh. Music: Mercurias Meet Victor Rice, “Carregar (Instrumental),” courtesy of Total Running Time.

Protecting climate data from Trump’s anti-science administration

University of Pennsylvania #datarefuge project

Environmental Data and Governance Initiative

Climate Mirror

End of Term Harvest

Consumption-accounting of carbon emissions

Kevin Ummel, “Who Pollutes?”, Center for Global Development

Kevin Ummel, “Household Impact Study”, Citizens’ Climate Lobby

Daniel Aldana Cohen, “Petro-Gotham, People’s Gotham,” excerpt at The Leap Blog with map “Carboniferous,” developed with Kevin Ummel’s data

Daniel Aldana Cohen on urban climate emissions on Forecast podcast

Fun bonus holiday link:

Kate Aronoff, “Star Wars Goes to the Countryside,” Jacobin

The post Hot & Bothered Podcast #9: A Holiday Gift for Climate Wonks, with Kevin Ummel appeared first on Dissent Magazine.

Dec 21 2016

1hr 9mins

Play