Cover image of Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins
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Rank #49 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Updated 2 days ago

Rank #49 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty
Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

iTunes Ratings

89 Ratings
Average Ratings
83
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.

iTunes Ratings

89 Ratings
Average Ratings
83
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.
Cover image of Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Latest release on Jan 21, 2020

All 186 episodes from oldest to newest

S04 Episode 184 | THE ENDERY, DEADSTOCK ALPACA + BUILDING SYSTEMS AROUND LEFTOVERS

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In episode 184, Kestrel welcomes Kelly Phenicie + Ellen Saville, the cofounders of The Endery, to the show. A brand born in Lima, Peru, The Endery plays with color using quality fibers to create lifelong knits that would otherwise have become waste.

“And just the whole manufacturing system has always been built around making what you need or want, rather than using what already exists. So, it is a lot of work to get people to think and work differently. There’s certainly not a blueprint for using deadstock, so we really just have to learn as we go.” -Kelly Phenicie, Cofounder of The Endery

On this week’s show, Kelly and Ellen share more about how their work in the knitwear industry led them to want to find a creative way to address the excess and leftovers building up around them. Ellen breaks down some of the reasons why for The Endery, they believe alpaca is one of the most sustainable fibers.

Also, Kestrel, Kelly and Ellen discuss what makes a garment last in your wardrobe, and whether colorful designs can tout qualities like versatility and longevity. When it comes to their design process, Kelly and Ellen share more on the ways they are getting innovative, to be able to recycle their designs, depending on what deadstock yarn is available to them at any given time.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Green Design Link, separate company that Kelly owns and operates that specializes in producing hand knits on a large scale for sustainable clothing brands

  • Inca Tops, an alpaca mill that Ellen does consulting work for

  • In Peru alone, at least 15+ tons of yarn leftovers are piling up from different yarn suppliers and factories every year

  • “It's about going offscript with fashion manufacturing and encouraging color to be unruly, clashing and expressive. To make stuff that makes us feel good about ourselves, the way we buy and the mark we leave on our society and earth. All of it packaged into a killer knit.”

This week's episode is brought to you by Dough, a one stop shop to discover products by women-owned brands. As a member, you'll unlock thousands of dollars in discounts and drive your purchase power back into the hands of women. Get your exclusive 50% off and become a Dough member today!

Jan 21 2020

41mins

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Episode 183 | SVN SPACE + HOW THE HEMP PLANT CAN FEED, HOUSE, CLOTHE AND HEAL YOU

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In episode 183, Kestrel welcomes Megan Villa, the cofounder and creative content director of Svn Space, to the show. A female-focused multimedia platform, Svn Space is dedicated to educating the mainstream on the lifestyle benefits of Hemp, and how the plant can feed you, house you, clothe you, heal you and beautify you.

“We were kind of dumbfounded when we realized how incredible hemp is — you know, it has over 25,000 known uses. Like our motto is: hemp is a plant that can feed you, house you, clothe you and heal you, which is pretty incredible that one plant can do all of that.” -Megan Villa, Cofounder + Creative Content Director of Svn Space

On this week’s show, Megan breaks down more on why she and her cofounders are pushing to rebrand hemp, and give it a modern facelift. On their platform, they strive to showcase clear, easy-to-digest information, in an effort to “reverse stigmas, reveal the truth, and modernize the perception of this often-misunderstood plant”.

In addition to sharing some of the 25,000 known uses of the hemp plant, Megan clears the air on some of the confusion around hemp and CBD when it comes to labeling amidst today’s minimally regulated space.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

This week's episode is brought to you by Dough, a one stop shop to discover products by women-owned brands. As a member, you'll unlock thousands of dollars in discounts and drive your purchase power back into the hands of women. Get your exclusive 50% off and become a Dough member today!

Jan 15 2020

40mins

Play

S04 Episode 182 | UNITED BY BLUE ON REMOVING 2 MILLION LBS OF TRASH, USING SALVAGED BISON FIBER + QUITTING SINGLE USE PLASTIC

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In episode 182, Kestrel welcomes Brian Linton, the founder of United By Blue, to the show. A sustainable apparel brand, United By Blue removes one pound of trash from U.S. oceans and waterways for every product sold.

“This year, we’ll have sold over a million products for the first time, and we’ll pick up, therefore, over a million pounds of trash next year.” -Brian Linton, Founder of United By Blue

On this week’s show, Brian shares more on what led him to have such an interest in ocean conservation from a young age. Turns out, he wasn’t hanging out on the beach, hiking in the woods, or spending tons of time outdoors — he was spending time in his bedroom with his 30 fish tanks, learning about the importance of clean water for their survival.

Kestrel and Brian also talk about how much United By Blue has evolved over the last decade since they launched, and what they are focusing on moving forward. One of UBB’s newest initiatives is the #QuitSingleUsePlastic pledge, where they are working to remove plastic from their supply chain, including poly bags, bubble wrap sleeves, fabric roll packaging and more.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • UBB has removed over 2 million pounds of trash from oceans and waterways through their 1 for 1 pledge to shoppers (1 product purchased = 1 pounds of trash removed)

  • #QuitSingleUse Pledge

  • BisonShield Collection, outerwear and accessories made with salvaged American Bison fiber

  • Ethical manufacturing at UBB is just as critical as the materials they use — “We accomplish this by partnering with factories that hold the highest standards for facilities and personnel, with the third-party certifications to back it up.”

  • UBB on Instagram >

This week's episode is brought to you by Dough, a one stop shop to discover products by women-owned brands. As a member, you'll unlock thousands of dollars in discounts and drive your purchase power back into the hands of women. Get your exclusive 50% off and become a Dough member today!

Jan 08 2020

47mins

Play

S04 Episode 181 | ELIZABETH CLINE + THE CONSCIOUS CLOSET

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In episode 181, Kestrel welcomes New York-based author, journalist, and expert on consumer culture, fast fashion, sustainability and labor rights, Elizabeth Cline, back to the show. You may already know of Elizabeth from her widely read book, Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion; and she recently released a follow-up book called The Conscious Closet: A Revolutionary Guide to Looking Good While Doing Good.

“The book in a lot of ways is very informed by moving away from fast fashion — so, really remembering that clothing is not a disposable good, because it just requires too many resources and too much energy to create.” - Elizabeth Cline, Author of Overdressed + The Conscious Closet

On this week’s show, Elizabeth shares with us what she’s been working on, as well as her perspective on how much the fashion industry has shifted, since the last time she was on the show, almost 4 years ago.

Kestrel + Elizabeth dive into some of the inspiration and details about her new book, The Conscious Closet. For Elizabeth, a lot of what drove the direction for her new book was her education on the secondhand market globally, and how clothing cannot be considered a disposable product.

Also, in this chat, Elizabeth reveals some of her favorite ways to personally build a conscious closet.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • “I understand the power of personal style because of conscious fashion, not in spite of it.”

  • “And over time, it became more about, ‘wait — if we question the industrial food system, then the result of that, is that we also get to rebuild our food culture,’ and that is what’s happening with fashion — we are deciding as a community that clothing can be about more than mindless consumption and chasing the lowest price and buying whatever companies tell us to buy.”

  • The Buyerarchy Of Needs by Sarah Lazarovic

  • Some of Elizabeth’s favorite places to shop secondhand online: Poshmark, thredUp + The RealReal

  • LA FRIENDS | Get Tickets for The Conscious Closet event featuring Elizabeth Cline at The Helms Design Center on October 27th from 2-4pm

Oct 24 2019

42mins

Play

S04 Episode 180 | HUSTON TEXTILE COMPANY + BRINGING MANUFACTURING BACK TO AMERICA

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In episode 180, Kestrel welcomes Kat + Ryan Huston. the cofounders of Huston Textile Company, to the show. With a focus on making high quality, small-batch cloth, Huston Textile Company uses vintage American-made machines in their manufacturing process.

“The main concept for me, at least as a kid, that I took away was — you can’t expect to have a manufacturing job in the U.S. if you’re constantly buying things that are manufactured outside of the U.S.” - Ryan Huston, Cofounder of Huston Textile Company

On this week’s show, Kat and Ryan share more on their backstory, and how anticipating the birth of their first child was what instigated them to go down this path of manufacturing textiles in the United States. They also explain more on the sorts of challenges they face on a regular basis, going against the grain, and using vintage machines.

For Kat + Ryan, the goal is the build out an entirely local / region textile chain from the fiber to the finished textile, and while they are able to source some fibers in the U.S. currently, they are consistently working further toward this big dream.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Oct 17 2019

37mins

Play

S04 Episode 179 | FAIR TRADE USA + SHOPPER RECOGNITION OF THE LABEL TODAY

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In episode 179, Kestrel welcomes Maya Spaul Johnson, the Vice President of Apparel and Home Goods at Fair Trade USA, to the show. Certifying and promoting fair trade products, Fair Trade USA enables sustainable development and community empowerment by cultivating a more equitable global trade model that benefits farmers, workers, fishermen, consumers, industry, and the earth.

“I joined Fair Trade in 2004 — like 7% of people knew what Fair Trade was in the surveys we would do and the marketing testing, and now we’re over 60% of people in North America recognize that Fair Trade label.” - Maya Spaul, VP of Apparel and Home Goods at Fair Trade USA

On this week’s show, Maya shares more on her background and how ethnobotany eventually led her to Fair Trade. She also guides us through a bit of history on Fair Trade USA, and how much the organization has grown and evolved over the last 21 years.

Also, Maya shares more on where we are at today with shopper recognition of the Fair Trade label. Kestrel + Maya talk about how bigger, so-called mainstream brands are now offering Fair Trade certified products today. Kestrel asks Maya whether she believes these brands are testing the waters with Fair Trade for their shoppers, or if they are truly in it for the long haul.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Ethnobotany, what Maya originally studied / is trained in; it’s basically the study of people and their relationship to plants and agricultural systems

  • Over Fair Trade USA’s 21 years in operation, companies have contributed over $500 million back to families in 72 countries that grow or produce these products

  • About 40 million certified products made in Fair Trade factories have been sold

  • At the end of last year (2018), about $11 million dollars in additional income had actually gone back to the factories

  • “You know, the retail landscape is changing so fast, and what I am seeing is that the companies that are investing in sustainability, they’re investing in a better product, in an innovative product — they are winning.”

  • We Wear Fair Trade campaign lookbook, styled by Rachel Wang

  • Explore products that are Fair Trade certified >

Oct 10 2019

35mins

Play

S04 Episode 178 | LOLI + ZERO WASTE BEAUTY FROM FOOD WASTE

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In episode 178, Kestrel welcomes Tina Hedges, the founder of LOLI Beauty, to the show. Short for “Living Organic Loving Ingredients,” LOLI is the first ZERO Waste beauty brand that is completely waterless and uses food grade reusable containers and compostable plastic to package their products.

“I had a crisis of consciousness. I said to myself, wow — for 15 years, in the big corporate beauty world, my whole job was to come up with ideas of products, develop them, position them, and convince you that this was the holy grail, and then whatever ingredient I was talking about in that product was going to transform your skin and your life.” - Tina Hedges, Founder of LOLI Beauty

On this week’s show, Tina shares more on her background in the corporate beauty industry, as well as how growing up in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica influenced her beliefs around the ingredients we use in products.

She also shares more on what led her to build LOLI, and what she felt like was missing from the mainstream beauty market. For LOLI, less is more when it comes to products (they build products for multiple purposes), and their packaging is built on a foundation of sustainability and asking a ton of questions.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Most beauty brands out there are making their products of 80-95% water while creating tons of waste along the way.

  • In the beauty industry, the packaging usually costs more than what’s in the actual product.

  • “192 billion beauty packages end up in landfills a year.”

  • LOLI’s Plum Elixir — “the ultimate multitasker” — it replaces your moisturizer, your serum, you can use it on your face and your hair, your lips, your neck, your nails.

  • MadeSafe, certification body that LOLI uses to certify all of their ingredients and products

  • LOLI’s Date Nut Brûlée — “miracle melting balm” — can be a solid oil cleaner, works like an aquaphor or vaseline, can minimize scars or stretch marks, or be used for chapped lips and elbows

  • Tina’s top go-to products: Chamomile Lavender Water + Plum Elixir

  • From the intro — “25 Of The Funniest Signs From The Global Climate Strike” via Reconsidered Newsletter

CURIOUS TO TRY LOLI?

Tina has offered you 20% OFF your first purchase. Use the code CONSCIOUS20

Sep 29 2019

40mins

Play

S04 Episode 177 | NEW YORK TIMES STYLE + SUSTAINABILITY WITH ELIZABETH PATON

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In episode 177, Kestrel welcomes Elizabeth Paton, a reporter for The New York Times Styles section, to the show. Covering the fashion and luxury sectors in Europe, Lizzie’s writing focuses on business, tech and sustainability, along with Fashion Week coverage from London, Milan and Paris.

“For me, it’s about being fair in my reporting, but it’s also about not being afraid of blowback from a brand for writing the truth.” - Elizabeth Paton, Reporter For New York Times Style

On this week’s show, Lizzie shares more on her background, and how she originally planned to be a lawyer, but the recession among other events led her to become a fashion journalist.

Kestrel + Lizzie also dive deeper into some of her articles on The New York Times, including her writing about whether using prison labor in fashion supply chains can be ethical, and her questions around the new Fashion Pact.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 19 2019

34mins

Play

S04 Episode 176 | ANACT TOWELS + THE POWER OF HEMP

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In episode 176, Kestrel welcomes Brianna Kilcullen, a sustainability and supply chain expert + the founder of ANACT, to the show. A brand new sustainable towel company, ANACT is all about taking simple acts to make an impact.

“I chose hemp because it has these natural performance features that don’t need any manipulation with putting a chemical or a treatment or a finish on it. And so it made sense to me to use earth’s natural resources to solve these problems.” - Brianna Kilcullen, Founder of ANACT

On this week’s show, Brianna shares more on her journey into sustainability, and how she built her own role at Under Armour, to become the first full-time sustainability employee on their team.

She also walks us through the inspiration behind ANACT — basically, her search for a solution for smelly towels. :)

Brianna explains several of the superpowers of hemp, and where we are currently in the United States when it comes to the industrialization of hemp.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 12 2019

44mins

Play

S04 Episode 175 | ELIZA SLOANE JEWELRY, SCALING AS A MAKER + ULTIMATE CREATIVE FREEDOM

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In episode 175, Kestrel welcomes Sloane, the founder and makers behind Eliza Sloane Jewelry, to the show. Handcrafting jewelry for over 7 years, and collecting crystals and sea glass for over 20, Sloane is a master maker, and creates all of her cast pieces for Eliza Sloane Jewelry from recycled metals.

“I just think that not boxing ourselves in or pigeon-holing ourselves too much — that’s just what ultimate creative freedom is.” - Sloane, Founder + Maker Behind Eliza Sloane Jewelry

On this week’s show, Sloane shares more of her journey, and how an internship sourcing vintage gems in New York City motivated her to build an Etsy shop, and eventually inspired her to start making her own jewelry.

Sloane dives into more on how surfing inspires her creative work, and vice versa — and how they seem to feed each other consistently, helping her maintain a fluidity in both her lifestyle and creative work.

Kestrel and Sloane also chat about the idea of scaling, how complicated it can be, and the challenges that come with it when you are the actual maker behind the brand.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 06 2019

40mins

Play
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