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Rank #26 in Fashion & Beauty category

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Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #26 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty
Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
82
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
82
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.

Listen to:

Cover image of Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

Rank #1: S02 Episode 59 | PATAGONIA, FAIR TRADE + THE FASHION REVOLUTION

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In episode 59, Kestrel had the opportunity to visit the Patagonia Headquarters in Ventura, CA to record an in-person interview with 2 key players in the Patagonia game. Helena Barbour is the Senior Director of Global Sportswear at Patagonia, and Thuy Nguyen is the Manager of Social Responsibility and Special Programs. The two have played a large role in building out Patagonia's Fair Trade initiative - in conjunction with Fair Trade USA - in recent years. 

In light of Fashion Revolution Day this year, and a continued hope to instigate more respect for the people who make our clothes, this chat is focused heavily on the concept and implementation of Fair Trade initiatives in the garment supply chain. Kestrel asks Thuy and Helena to share more about the evolution of the program at Patagonia, including their thoughts on where they started and where they have come. In addition, they discuss the logistics of how the Fair Trade program works, and how it has the potential to help support local communities around the world.

Kestrel brings "scalability" to the table again, and Thuy and Helena provide their insight on the scalability of fair trade manufacturing, and how collaboration is key to the future success of this program. When it comes to storytelling, the three discuss how complicated it still is to bring up the sustainable fashion conversation with an inclusive, nonjudgemental approach. To close, Thuy and Helena each share their ideas on how we can continue to work on small ways of bringing a more conscious approach to what we wear.

Apr 23 2017

33mins

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Rank #2: S01 Episode 44 | ANDREW MORGAN + THE TRUE COST

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Episode 44 | ANDREW MORGAN + THE TRUE COST

Jan 11 2017

38mins

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Rank #3: S02 Episode 53 | NATURAL DYES + BOTANICAL COLORS

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In episode 53, our first episode of Season 2, Kestrel connect with natural dye guru Kathy Hattori. As the founder of Botanical Colors, Kathy works to bring natural dyeing processes to larger scale production facilities, and also collaborates with designers on small batch dye projects.

In this chat, Kathy breaks down the big differences between conventional and natural dyes, and the scaleability of the latter. Also, Kestrel and Kathy talk about "brilliance of dyes," and how this can be interpreted differently, depending on your relationship with color and its meaning.

Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) are the chemicals that Kathy mentioned have extremely harmful effects. Research has shown that - when washed - NPEs are released from clothing and in turn, discharged into our waterways, where they turn into the even more toxic and hormone-disrupting chemical nonylphenol (NP).

More on Greenpeace's Detox program here >

Mar 14 2017

36mins

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Rank #4: S02 Episode 85 | THE GOOD TRADE + SOCIAL GOOD

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In episode 85, Kestrel welcomes AmyAnn Cadwell, the Cofounder & Editor-in-Chief of The Good Trade, to the show. A digital media company featuring brands, products & ideas dedicated to social good, The Good Trade is known for its elevated aesthetics and accessible writing style. 

"We're all on different places on the spectrum, and our goal is to really come meet people where ever they are with maybe that next step or that helpful story or that helpful point of action that kind of meets them right where they are." -AmyAnn, cofounder of The Good Trade

Throughout this chat, AmyAnn shares her interesting path into the conscious fashion and lifestyle world. She also shares her thoughts on what social good means to her, and how she's building it into the framework of The Good Trade. 

Also, AmyAnn shares insight into creating a platform with aesthetics in mind, and the importance she and her team place on visuals within their storytelling.

Here are a few of the things brought up throughout this chat:

________________

This week's episode is brought to you by GlobeIn, who deliver joy by empowering and connecting remarkable, remote artisans to mindful customers. They are known for their ARTISAN BOX, a monthly subscription featuring exclusive, handcrafted products from global artisans. 

Interested in trying it out? Get $10 off any GlobeIn Premium Box Subscription with promo code: CONSCIOUSCHATTER.

Oct 25 2017

31mins

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Rank #5: S03 Episode 134 | REFORMATION + THEIR NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH THREDUP

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In episode 134, Kestrel welcomes Kathleen Talbot, the VP of Operations + Sustainability at Reformation, to the show. A revolutionary lifestyle brand, Reformation offers thoughtfully produced clothing at an affordable price–a reminder that being green shouldn’t mean sacrificing style and quality.

“If you’re confident and you’re motivated to really manage the impact of your product and really your product’s whole life cycle, you shouldn’t be afraid of growth. You should be really trying to maximize that because by growing our business, by reaching a bigger consumer base, we’re actually magnifying our impact." - Kathleen Talbot, VP of Operations + Sustainability at Reformation

In this episode, Kathleen shares more on the origins of Reformation, and how they are an act + iterate company. For Reformation, they’re all about testing to try to reduce their impact - when they discover that something isn’t working and/or reducing their footprint, they shift right away and try something else.

Kathleen also shares more on how Reformation believes that growth isn’t something they shy away from - instead they lean into it, and believe that growth - if done in the right way - can only expand their impact exponentially.

Throughout this chat, Kestrel + Kathleen talk specifically about the resale market, and Reformation’s recently launched partnership with ThredUp to help close their loop.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • “Up to 90% of the clothing that is thrown away is before the end of its useful life and can be reused, and only a fraction of stuff is getting recycled.”

  • According to ThredUp’s 6th annual Resale Report released this last April, they stated that by 2022, the resale market will hit $41 billion.

  • ThredUp’s Report outlines that RESALE is growing 24 times faster than RETAIL.

  • ThredUp’s Report says that 1 in 3 women (18 years of age and older) shopped secondhand last year.

  • Reformation Vintage Shop in Los Angeles

  • Vestiaire Collective, another resale platform Kathleen mentioned that Ref has partnered with in the past

  • Depop, another resale platform Kathleen mentioned that Ref has partnered with in the past

FROM THE INTRO:

Kestrel is traveling with Remake on their Made In Mexico trip this upcoming week. Alongside students from California College of Arts, the group will travel to Mexico City and Oaxaca, with the intention to meet directly with garment workers and artisans to hear their personal stories.

If you are interested in following along on the journey, you can watch Kestrel’s Instagram @consciouschatter or Remake’s @remakeourworld.

Oct 03 2018

31mins

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Rank #6: S03 Episode 141 | SUSTAINABLE STYLING + CURATING THE MINIMALIST WARDROBE SHOP

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In episode 141, Kestrel welcomes Lauren Engelke, a professional sustainable stylist, blogger + the curator of The Minimalist Wardrobe Shop, to the show. A new project, TMW Shop offers a curated collection of quality garments, perfect to help build a minimalist wardrobe.

“I never expected this in a million years, but the major pain point was shopping — and a lot of the clients that I worked with had actually almost over minimalized their wardrobe. And they had come so far from big wardrobes to a paired down, lean wardrobe that they were afraid to shop again.” - Lauren Engelke, Sustainable Stylist + Curator of TMW Shop

In this episode, Lauren shares more on how she started questions some of the realities of the fashion industry, through her work as a stylist. Whether it was overproduction or the chemicals in the apparel she was steaming, she realized firsthand the disconnects between her values and what was happening behind-the-scenes in the industry.

After giving herself a crash course in sustainable fashion, Lauren redefined her work moving forward as a sustainable stylist.

Also, Lauren shares more about her work with The Minimalist Wardrobe, and helping curate their recently launched discovery platform. One of the coolest tools offered on The Minimalist Wardrobe’s Shop is a Before-You-Buy Checklist to help you determine whether or not you really need the item before you buy it.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

This Week's Sponsor is BUFFY. Buffy makes comforters that are better for you and the earth, using skin-friendly lyocell fabric and fluffy fill made from 100% recycled water bottles.

Interested in Buffy’s products? For $20 off your Buffy comforter, visit Buffy.co and enter the promo code CHATTER.

Nov 20 2018

27mins

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Rank #7: S02 Episode 73 | SLOW FACTORY, FASHION + POLITICS

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In episode 73, Kestrel welcomes Céline Semaan Vernon, the CEO of Slow Factory to the show. Slow Factory is a mission-driven independent fashion label & lab that creates beautiful accessories, clothes and jewelry while directly supporting environmental and humanitarian causes. All work is fair-trade and manufactured with eco-friendly ink and fabrics.

"Fashion activism is the practice of using fashion as a means of social change. It merges popular styles of dress, from clothing and shoes, to headwear and accessories, with efforts to implement social and political change. Fashion activism can be used as a form of protest, whether expressing dissent or support." -"Fashion Activism" by Céline, Wikipedia

Throughout this chat, Céline shares insight into what fashion activism means to her, and why buzz words aren't enough in pushing for change in the fashion industry. She also shares her thoughts on the open web - unfiltered/unorganized information - and how she is an open web actovate.

Kestrel asks Céline about her creative process and what inspires her collections. Céline explains that leaving her annual collections somewhat open-ended allows for more of an ability to react in a creative way to political or cultural situations that arise. 

"You can't be creative in a vacuum ... well, you can but then you're completely disconnected from what's happening."

Below are a list of other ideas, blog posts or organizations that were discussed throughout this chat:

  • Overview effect
  • Fashion Activism (Céline's Wikipedia entry)
  • Read "Fair Trade Is Not Enough" on Slow Factory
  • Read "Open Web" on Slow Factory
  • ANERA
  • Are We There Yet? #WeAreHome Documentary -> You can watch here! 

Aug 02 2017

32mins

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Rank #8: S01 Episode 03 | WATER

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Episode 03 | WATER

Mar 04 2016

33mins

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Rank #9: S01 Episode 49 | FABSCRAP + REUSING TEXTILE WASTE

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Episode 49 | FABSCRAP + REUSING TEXTILE WASTE

Feb 15 2017

34mins

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Rank #10: S03 Episode 136 | THE MINIMALIST WARDROBE

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In episode 136, Kestrel welcomes Sebastian Juhola, the creator of The Minimalist Wardrobe, to the show. A platform and popular Instagram, The Minimalist Wardrobe is meant to help people minimize their wardrobes, with a focus on ethical and sustainable values.

“Minimalism brings instant results for your personal life. It has those practical effects right away, in addition to sustainability and the environment. It also helps you personally in tremendous ways.” - Sebastian Juhola, Founder of The Minimalist Wardrobe

In this episode, Kestrel gets the chance to connect with Sebastian about what led him to start @theminimalistwardrobe Instagram. Surprisingly, he started it on a whim for fun, and at one point in 2017, left it dormant for several months. Now, the account is growing an average of 500 followers per day.

Throughout this chat, Kestrel asks Sebastian to share his insight as to what storytelling + social media tactics are resonating with The Minimalist Wardrobe audience. Also, they discuss the potential that minimalism has in bringing a more mainstream audience to the sustainable fashion conversation.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • The Minimalist Wardrobe Community on Facebook

  • “Minimalism is a good way to get the masses excited about this [sustainability] because they can feel instant results.”

  • “I think it’s human nature that we crave instant results.”

SUGGESTED READING

“Why Does So Much Ethical Fashion Look The Same?” by Whitney Bauck on Fashionista

Oct 17 2018

30mins

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Rank #11: S01 Episode 04 | MADE IN USA

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Episode 04 | MADE IN USA

Mar 12 2016

26mins

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Rank #12: S01 Episode 32 | CHRISTY DAWN + MAKING DEADSTOCK LOVELY

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Episode 32 | CHRISTY DAWN + MAKING DEADSTOCK LOVELY

Oct 18 2016

32mins

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Rank #13: S02 Episode 55 | SLOW FOOD + FASHION, CROSS POLLINATION + THE QUESTION OF SCALE

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In episode 55, Kestrel welcomes Summer Rayne Oakes to the show. Known as “the first eco model”, Summer's experiences and knowledge go far beyond her notable look. With an education focused on ecology and entomology (the study of insects), she has worked in 2 distinct realms of the sustainability conversation: food and fashion.

Kestrel asks Summer for insight on what the fashion world could potentially learn from the food world, and vice versa. They discuss regenerative agriculture, the politics of slow food and fashion, and how technology may help and/or hinder the future of fashion.

Another theme that resonates throughout this chat is the idea of scaling, how it's been ingrained into our culture, and why scalability has become synonymous with success.

For more on Summer's current projects, you can check out her book SUGARDETOX.ME, and her website Homestead Brooklyn, which helps us become more connected to nature while living in a city. 

Mar 28 2017

57mins

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Rank #14: S01 Episode 05 | WASTE

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Episode 05 | WASTE

Mar 23 2016

36mins

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Rank #15: S03 Episode 125 | COLLECTIVE CLOSETS

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In episode 125, Kestrel welcomes Laurinda Ndenzako, the cofounder of Collective Closets, to the show. A womenswear label based + made in Melbourne, Collective Closets was built off of Laurinda + her sister Fatuma's African - Australian identities.

"As far as Collective Closets go, we always say that we don't have all the answers, but we definitely want to be part of that conversation - we want to be part of that movement as well to leave a positive impact. And it all starts at home - and sometimes, just the smallest changes make the biggest impact." -Laurinda Ndenzako, Cofounder of Collective Closets

In this episode, Laurinda shares more on the origins of Collective Closets, and how while she and her sister Fatuma were trained outside of fashion, both of their parents made clothing at home, and that was something that influenced them growing up. 

A large part of the spark that pushed Laurinda + Fatuma to build Collective Closets was a family trip to Nairobi. According to Laurinda, the brand blossomed out of she and her sister being really proud of their African Australian culture, and embracing the chance to have a voice to tell their own story.

Additionally, throughout this show, Kestrel + Laurinda talk more specifically about the way that Collective Closets always shares a thought provoking piece to outline the inspiration behind each collection. As Laurinda explains, this storytelling component is a massive part of their brand and the way they connect on a larger level with their shoppers, family, friends and beyond.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Grandma’s Finest Vintage, first company Laurinda + Fatima started (reworked vintage items
  • Masai shuka, traditional check fabric originating in East Africa, and worn by the Masai people (a staple used in each of Collective Closets' collections)
  • MPENZI WANGU/DEAR ME Collection (most recent collection) “This was her life. Not the life she had dreamed of, not a life her younger self would ever have imagined or desired, but the life she was living, with all it’s complexities. This was her life, built with care and attention, and it was good.” Kim Edwards The latest collection titled Mpenzi Wangu or Dear Me is inspired by the way in which our past's shape our personal evolution. If you had the opportunity to speak with your younger self what would you say? Have you shed your skin or does she still live within?
  • "I think people are not looking for cookie cutter fashion anymore."

Suggested Listening"Why A Drop Of 4 Degrees Made A Big Difference For A Garment Maker's Bottom Line"

Aug 06 2018

39mins

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Rank #16: S04 Episode 168 | THREDUP + THE MASSIVE RISE OF RESALE

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In episode 168, Kestrel welcomes Erin Wallace, the brand director at thredUp, to the show. The world’s largest tech-powered resale marketplace, ThredUp’s platform gives you the chance to buy and sell high-quality secondhand clothes.

“I mean if everyone in the U.S. bought just 1 item used instead of new this year, it would save around 6 billion pounds of carbon emissions, which is the equivalent of taking half a million cars off the road for an entire year.” -Erin Wallace, Brand Director at thredUp

On this week’s show, Erin shares more on how the secondhand world brought her into the sustainability conversation — she got her start working at Crossroads years ago. We also chat about the thrill of the hunt when it comes to secondhand, and how we both got into thrift shopping, in search of those extra special pieces that nobody else would have.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • thredUp processes up to 100,000 items per day

  • At this time, thredUp lists over 2 million unique items on their website

  • “We have definitely felt the Marie Kondo effect. We had an 80% spike in our clean-out kits, when ‘Tidying Up’ aired on Netflix.”

  • Choose Used, thredUp’s partnership with Olivia Wilde + Conscious Commerce

  • The Circular Fashion Fund, 501(c)(3) under thredUp, that invests in the next generation of non-profits and businesses pushing to transform the fashion industry

  • thredUp’s 2019 Resale Report

Jul 09 2019

29mins

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Rank #17: S01 Episode 50 | THINK DIRTY + THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN BEAUTY

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Episode 50 | THINK DIRTY + THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN BEAUTY

Feb 22 2017

28mins

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Rank #18: S03 Episode 118 | FIBERSHED + REGENERATIVE TEXTILE SYSTEMS

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In episode 118, Kestrel welcomes Rebecca Burgess, the founder of Fibershed, to the show. A globally recognized project, Fibershed is working to address and educate the public on the environmental, economic and social benefits of de-centralizing the textile supply chain.

"What are we doing? What is our consumption doing to other people's cultures?"  -Rebecca Burgess, founder of Fibershed 

In this episode, Rebecca shares more on her exceptional and unexpected path into working in the textile industry. For her, it all started with agriculture, and a happenstance loom that happened to exist at her former university.

For Rebecca, she has continued to uncover and discover so many more intricacies of the textile system through her curiosity and drive to consistently ask more questions.

Throughout this chat, Rebecca also shares more in depth information on the power that farmers and ranchers hold today to turn around the health of our soil, while becoming climate change heroes.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Rebecca realized what a fibershed is while she was living in Southeast Asia: "a Fibershed is like a watershed or a food shed - it's a strategic geography that clothes you."
  • "I think there's a danger in abstracting the wearer from the source of the material."
  • Paige Green, photographer Rebecca partnered with in the early stages of building out Fibershed
  • Prototype Wardrobe, project Rebecca developed in 2010 (the beginnings of Fibershed), where she worked with the community around her to develop and wear a prototype wardrobe whose dyes, fibers and labor were sourced from a region no larger than 150 miles from the project’s headquarters
  • Carbon Farming: decarbonizing the atmosphere + re-carbonizing our soils is a process Rebecca has been working diligently on educating farmers, ranchers and larger brands about, in an effort to help them maximize their carbon capture
  • "Everyone who manages a farm or a ranch has the potential of being a complete climate hero."
  • North Face x Fibershed Climate Beneficial Wool project
  • Drawdown, book by Paul Hawken - Rebecca shares how overall, regenerative farming is really how we are going to be able to reverse global warming
  • "Bare ground is what you want to avoid in carbon farming."
  • Gabe Brown, farmer in North Dakota who has been sequestering massive amounts of carbon into his soil through his regenerative farming approach, using cover crops of diverse species that he calls chaos gardens
  • Climate Beneficial Wool, supports fiber production that measurably contributes to balancing the carbon cycle
  • Natural Resource Conservation Service
  • Comet, tool that allows Fibershed and/or farmers model different scenarios, to help them determine how they can maximize their carbon capture
  • Citizen Science Soil Sampling Protocol, developed with UC Davis - it's a toolkit that allows the rancher to take their own soil samples, and they send them to the lab to receive carbon data in their soil per acre (it also allows the farmer or rancher to understand how much carbon they are actually sequestering)
  • The Fibershed blog, stories from their producer program
  • The Fibershed Affiliate Directory, provides a point of connection to the grassroots network of communities organizing around regional fiber systems
  • Post Colonial Bandaid Strategies: "it's like we're rich white people with money and we're going to invest in things that make us feel better in developing countries, and we're going to invest in big global technologies that have high returns and scale really quickly." Rebecca believes that people of means need to be investing in community-based infrastructure.

Artist Alert From Intro:

Rachel Ignotofky is an author and illustrator, who creates exceptionally stunning systems-oriented artwork, connected to the earth, science and women.

If you're a visual learner like me, her artwork can truly help paint a clear explanation of some of the wonders of the planet and beyond.

Jun 12 2018

59mins

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Rank #19: S02 Episode 91 | PROUD MARY + ARTISAN MADE VS ETHICAL PRODUCTION

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In episode 91, Kestrel welcomes Harper Poe, the founder of Proud Mary, to the show. By partnering with global artisans to design modern goods using age-old techniques, Proud Mary grants local artisans an exponentially larger audience, while bolstering the creative industry within their communities.

"People are going to keep buying clothes - that's not going to slow down, I don't think ... I think it's hard from a marketing point of view when both of those things are lumped together because artisan made and factory production are two very different things." -Harper Poe, founder of Proud Mary

Throughout this episode, Kestrel and Harper discuss the evolution of Proud Mary, and the newest direction Harper has taken the company in shifting to a direct-to-consumer model. They also explore the intricate differences between artisan made and ethical factory production, especially when it comes to whether or not this is something shoppers are paying close attention to. 

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

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This week's Conscious Chatter episode is brought to you by: Soluna Collective, an eco and ethical design company that makes products for your home. As a company, they respect the environment and the people living in it.

INTERESTED IN CHECKING IT OUT? Use promo code CONSCIOUSCHATTER for an exclusive 15% discount off of your Soluna Collective order!

Dec 05 2017

30mins

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Rank #20: S03 Episode 110 | BUY GOOD FEEL GOOD + ELEVATING ACCESS FOR SHOPPERS AND BRANDS

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In episode 110, Kestrel welcomes Rafik Riad, the founder of the Buy Good Feel Good Expo, to the show. Canada's only show bringing together socially- and environmentally-driven businesses, Buy Good Feel Good aspires to make ethical consumption the norm, inspiring all businesses to operate for the common good.

"Social enterprises so far are not playing the role they can play towards eradicating poverty, promoting social justice and advancing environmental stewardship. "  -Rafik Riad, founder of the Buy Good Feel Good Expo

In this episode, Rafik shares a powerful story about how he got the opportunity to spend time in the garbage collector's community in Cairo, Egypt as a child. The impact this experience had on Rafik opened his eyes to social justice from an early age, and still influences the work he does today.

With the slogan of "businesses that change the world", Rafik and his team are working to build the Buy Good Feel Good Expo into a space to truly help young socially conscious brands get access to brands and shoppers that are looking for them. Rafik gives us an understanding of what the Expo is really like, and some of the stories behind the brands and products that will be showcased there this year.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sponsor: This Conscious Chatter episode is brought to you by GlobeIn.**Use promo code CONSCIOUSCHATTER for 25% OFF your first Artisan Box with any Premium Artisan Box subscription.

Apr 18 2018

37mins

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