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Rank #87 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #87 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Society & Culture
Fashion & Beauty
Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
82
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
82
1
1
2
2

Interesting sustainable listen

By H12468 - Apr 17 2017
Read more
Interesting sustainable listen

Education That Goes Down Smooth

By NateBern - Sep 21 2016
Read more
Relatable, inspiring, unique.

Listen to:

Cover image of Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Conscious Chatter with Kestrel Jenkins

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

An inclusive audio space, Conscious Chatter opens the door to conversations about our clothing + the layers of stories, meaning and potential impact connected to what we wear. It's a venue that allows us to continue to learn more about the garment industry and how we can all be a bigger part of positive change in the industry.

S02 Episode 102 | MELANIN & SUSTAINABLE STYLE + ETHICAL FASHION AS A PRIVILEGED WHITE GIRL THING

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In episode 102, Kestrel welcomes Dominique Drakeford, the founder of Melanin & Sustainable Style, to the show. A platform that is bringing melanin to the forefront of sustainable fashion, beauty and living, MelaninASS is helping to give the ethical industry an authentic and culturally relevant voice. 

"This whole community is about 'let's talk about what's wrong' - we talk about what's wrong from an environmental point of view, we talk about fast fashion and we point fingers at H&M and we do all this ... but let's look at ourselves and let's talk about some real issues that are wrong because honestly, sustainability is founded on culture - the essence of sustainability is rooted in culture and we don't talk about it."  -Dominique Drakeford, Founder of Melanin & Sustainable Style

In this episode, Dominique shares a bit of her background and the eclectic experiences that have led her into the sustainable style conversation.

Kestrel and Dominique also discuss the layers behind two notable articles written by Dominique: "Who The Hell Wants To See Only White Women In Sustainable Fashion" and "Why I Think Ethical Fashion Is A Privileged White Girl Thing". Dominique highlights several of the disconnects in the sustainable fashion conversation - from representation to discrimination to tokenism to appropriation to privilege - and how historical relevance and institutional racism are being left out of the discourse.

They talk about the reality of how the ethical fashion space has been dominated by white women, and how privilege and race relations need to play a larger role in our approach to this conversation.

Also, Dominique shares her inspiration behind the Vanguard Series, a project she developed on her platform to highlight "true visionaries and cultural influencers who are creating a positive impact in the fashion, beauty and/or the sustainable lifestyle industry." 

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Recommended reading from the intro: "Why Fashion Is Key to Understanding the World of Black Panther" by Tanisha C. Ford in The Atlantic

Feb 21 2018

41mins

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S02 Episode 100 | NADINE FARAG, ONE WHO DRESSES + PERSONAL STYLE AS SUSTAINABILITY

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In episode 100, Kestrel welcomes Nadine Farag, the writer behind One Who Dresses, to the show. A website where she slowly explores the question of 'what is style,' One Who Dresses is a digital space dedicated to understanding the intricacies of personal style. Nadine is also known for her sustainable fashion writing for Man Repeller.

"Personal style is an extension of our being. It's another way to understand and articulate who we are in the world."  -Nadine Farag of One Who Dresses

Throughout this episode, Nadine explores her transition from thinking about sustainability to the art of dressing when it comes to understanding our fashion sense. She also walks us through some of the discoveries she has made about personal style along the way. For Nadine, she believes we're all on this journey of trying to understand who we are and to articulate that to the world around us, and personal style is an extension of who we are, which allows us to enhance that.

Kestrel and Nadine also talk about the way they both used to be "pink haters" and have now become "pink lovers". Kestrel asks Nadine for her thoughts on what draws us to different colors at different points in our lives - is it marketing, exposure, something else? The two discuss different ideas on what inspires those evolving attractions.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • "I have this spontaneous emotional reaction to clothes."
  • "Maybe sustainable fashion is really about fashion as an art form."
  • "Personal style is an extension of our being. It's another way to understand and articulate who we are in the world."
  • Issa Samb, artist Nadine wrote about on the "Meaning Of Objects"
  • Story Magazine
  • Anja Aronowsky Cronberg of Vestoj
  • StyleLikeU
  • Advanced Style
  • Ike Ude, artist

Feb 07 2018

44mins

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S01 Episode 49 | FABSCRAP + REUSING TEXTILE WASTE

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Episode 49 | FABSCRAP + REUSING TEXTILE WASTE

Feb 15 2017

34mins

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S04 Episode 171 | THE PSYCHOLOGY OF FASHION + WHY WE WEAR WHAT WE WEAR

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In episode 171, Kestrel welcomes Anabel Maldonado, the founder of The Psychology of Fashion™, to the show. A platform that explores why we wear what we wear, and the relationships between emotions, personality and aesthetic, The Psychology of Fashion™ also examines current issues in the fashion industry through the lens of psychology.

“You know, if we get away from this sort of like trends just because, buy it because all these people have it — if we think about who we are, why we like what we like, the way that fashion actually can be powerful for us, I think we’re going to buy less but buy better, and invest in things because we’re sure.” -Anabel Maldonado, Founder of The Psychology of Fashion™

On this show, Anabel shares more on her background, and how she has fused her interests to build The Psychology Of Fashion™. When she realized she wanted to build this platform and write about these topics together, she started a research project, to develop a framework to better talk about fashion through the lens of psychology.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • “We believe that personal style is not random. The clothes that feel best tap into our truest qualities, are a consequence of our different inner needs, and reflect our most deep-seated narratives about ourselves.”

  • “6 Reasons Why Fashion Is Losing Its Appeal” on The Psychology Of Fashion

  • Alain de Botton, writer and philosopher who has inspired Anabel

  • “It’s funny because it’s not just about the optical effect or making an impression on others — it’s about triggering a certain mindset in yourself.”

  • Enclothed Cognition: how clothes affect your cognitive process, anything cerebral (thinking, feeling, anything that happens in the brain)

  • “Self knowledge is the antidote to mindless consumption.”

  • Big 5 Personality Test

  • PSYKHE, a new e-commerce platform Anabel is launching, that is powered by personality science, machine learning and the psychology of fashion.

  • Article in the Washington Post Kestrel referred to, “Kamala Harris embraced black. That was both unremarkable and theatrically powerful.”

Aug 01 2019

36mins

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S02 Episode 78 | PATAGONIA'S WORN WEAR + MAKING MENDING MAINSTREAM

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In episode 78, Kestrel welcomes Nellie Cohen, the Worn Wear Program Manager at Patagonia, to the show. Patagonia's Worn Wear program aims to reduce environmental impacts by encouraging people to change their relationship to stuff, through repair and reuse of what they already have, and by celebrating quality and durability.

Patagonia's largest repair center is in Reno, Nevada, and they did 50,000 repairs there in 2016.

Nellie shares some of the history on Worn Wear, and how it evolved from Patagonia's earlier roots with Common Threads. It's a pretty cool story how Worn Wear originated from a blog that Patagonia surf ambassador Chris Malloy and his wife Lauren had started separately. 

Nellie also elaborates on the scale of Patagonia's Worn Wear, and the number of employees that are dedicated to mending and building out the company's program.

For Nellie, celebrating the stories behind the pieces we wear is huge - she's especially a fan of the family heirloom stories that can be attached to Patagonia's past styles. 

Throughout this chat, Nellie brings up the below companies, ideas and projects:

  • Worn Wear
  • Teijin, Patagonia partnered with Teijin in the early stages of Common Threads to recycle their capilene line, in a closed loop chemical recycling process
  • Don't Buy This Jacket campaign in the New York Times, Black Friday, 2011
  • Jay Nelson, artist behind the Worn Wear wagon
  • I Fix It, a company Patagonia partnered with to create their repair manuals
  • Patagonia's Repair Manuals
  • Yerdle, a company Patagonia invested in through their venture capital arm; they make it easy for brands to buy back and resell used items
  • Nellie gave a shoutout to the work Renewal Workshop is doing when it comes to closing the loop You can listen to our episode with their cofounder Nicole here >
  • The Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Reports on The Circular Economy

________

Amazon just launched a 500 piece fast fashion collection. What does this mean? How do you think this will impact the future of fashion? Will sustainability play a role in their upcoming endeavors? Check out The Fashion Law's article to learn more.

Also, chime in on Instagram @consciouschatter and let me know how you think this move will make an impact on what comes next for fashion.

Sep 06 2017

37mins

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S02 Episode 59 | PATAGONIA, FAIR TRADE + THE FASHION REVOLUTION

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In episode 59, Kestrel had the opportunity to visit the Patagonia Headquarters in Ventura, CA to record an in-person interview with 2 key players in the Patagonia game. Helena Barbour is the Senior Director of Global Sportswear at Patagonia, and Thuy Nguyen is the Manager of Social Responsibility and Special Programs. The two have played a large role in building out Patagonia's Fair Trade initiative - in conjunction with Fair Trade USA - in recent years. 

In light of Fashion Revolution Day this year, and a continued hope to instigate more respect for the people who make our clothes, this chat is focused heavily on the concept and implementation of Fair Trade initiatives in the garment supply chain. Kestrel asks Thuy and Helena to share more about the evolution of the program at Patagonia, including their thoughts on where they started and where they have come. In addition, they discuss the logistics of how the Fair Trade program works, and how it has the potential to help support local communities around the world.

Kestrel brings "scalability" to the table again, and Thuy and Helena provide their insight on the scalability of fair trade manufacturing, and how collaboration is key to the future success of this program. When it comes to storytelling, the three discuss how complicated it still is to bring up the sustainable fashion conversation with an inclusive, nonjudgemental approach. To close, Thuy and Helena each share their ideas on how we can continue to work on small ways of bringing a more conscious approach to what we wear.

Apr 23 2017

33mins

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S04 Episode 168 | THREDUP + THE MASSIVE RISE OF RESALE

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In episode 168, Kestrel welcomes Erin Wallace, the brand director at thredUp, to the show. The world’s largest tech-powered resale marketplace, ThredUp’s platform gives you the chance to buy and sell high-quality secondhand clothes.

“I mean if everyone in the U.S. bought just 1 item used instead of new this year, it would save around 6 billion pounds of carbon emissions, which is the equivalent of taking half a million cars off the road for an entire year.” -Erin Wallace, Brand Director at thredUp

On this week’s show, Erin shares more on how the secondhand world brought her into the sustainability conversation — she got her start working at Crossroads years ago. We also chat about the thrill of the hunt when it comes to secondhand, and how we both got into thrift shopping, in search of those extra special pieces that nobody else would have.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • thredUp processes up to 100,000 items per day

  • At this time, thredUp lists over 2 million unique items on their website

  • “We have definitely felt the Marie Kondo effect. We had an 80% spike in our clean-out kits, when ‘Tidying Up’ aired on Netflix.”

  • Choose Used, thredUp’s partnership with Olivia Wilde + Conscious Commerce

  • The Circular Fashion Fund, 501(c)(3) under thredUp, that invests in the next generation of non-profits and businesses pushing to transform the fashion industry

  • thredUp’s 2019 Resale Report

Jul 09 2019

29mins

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S02 Episode 58 | EILEEN FISHER, FISHER FOUND + CLOSING THE LOOP

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In episode 58, Kestrel welcomes on Cynthia Powers, the Facilitating Manager of Eileen Fisher’s clothing take back program, Fisher Found, as well as Teslin Doud, who was part of Eileen Fisher’s Social Innovators Project, helping develop some of the company’s circular design components.

Kestrel asks Cynthia and Teslin about Fisher Found’s origins, intention and goals. In addition, Cynthia and Teslin share more insight on the meaning behind the program’s three Rs: Reworn, Renewed, and Remade.

The three also discuss the future of take back programs and what we might expect down the line.

This week’s episode was sponsored by The Fourth Gentlemen, who make accessories from bamboo and cork. Why are their bamboo sunnies so amazing?

  1. Bamboo is a renewable resource and apparently one of the fastest growing plants on the planet.
  2. It’s super flexible and lightweight - often I’ve forgotten I have these shares on because they’re like a feather.
  3. They float! If you like sailing or being on the water like me, these are a great option - I’ve lost many a pair of sunglasses to the depths below over the years.

Apr 19 2017

37mins

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S01 Episode 50 | THINK DIRTY + THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN BEAUTY

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Episode 50 | THINK DIRTY + THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN BEAUTY

Feb 22 2017

28mins

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S02 Episode 99 | PROCLAIM + THE NUDE REVOLUTION

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In episode 99, Kestrel welcomes Shobha Philips, the CEO and founder of Proclaim, to the show. An ethically-made and inclusively-designed bra collection, Proclaim is expanding the definition of nude by celebrating real women.

"I think that lingerie should be marketed to the women that wear it - celebrating women's bodies of all types, all skin colors, letting women see themselves represented in these images, and feel like they are included and that they are beautiful."  -Shobha Philips, CEO + Founder of Proclaim

Throughout this episode, Shobha shares insight on the narrow definition of the color nude, and how she's redefining it with Proclaim.

In a past blog post, Shobha wrote: “What started as an annoyance about the color nude turned into something much bigger. It turned into the opportunity to revolutionize an industry. Proclaim is a love letter to women who demand change rather than settling for the status quo.”

Kestrel asks if there are other layers of the lingerie industry that are expired or need to be evolved. Shobha talks about how she believes in taking lingerie out of the bedroom in its marketing, and using visuals that are representative of real women. 

Shobha also explains how manufacturing locally, as well as accessible price points, are important to her and the future of Proclaim.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Jan 30 2018

23mins

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S03 Episode 141 | SUSTAINABLE STYLING + CURATING THE MINIMALIST WARDROBE SHOP

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In episode 141, Kestrel welcomes Lauren Engelke, a professional sustainable stylist, blogger + the curator of The Minimalist Wardrobe Shop, to the show. A new project, TMW Shop offers a curated collection of quality garments, perfect to help build a minimalist wardrobe.

“I never expected this in a million years, but the major pain point was shopping — and a lot of the clients that I worked with had actually almost over minimalized their wardrobe. And they had come so far from big wardrobes to a paired down, lean wardrobe that they were afraid to shop again.” - Lauren Engelke, Sustainable Stylist + Curator of TMW Shop

In this episode, Lauren shares more on how she started questions some of the realities of the fashion industry, through her work as a stylist. Whether it was overproduction or the chemicals in the apparel she was steaming, she realized firsthand the disconnects between her values and what was happening behind-the-scenes in the industry.

After giving herself a crash course in sustainable fashion, Lauren redefined her work moving forward as a sustainable stylist.

Also, Lauren shares more about her work with The Minimalist Wardrobe, and helping curate their recently launched discovery platform. One of the coolest tools offered on The Minimalist Wardrobe’s Shop is a Before-You-Buy Checklist to help you determine whether or not you really need the item before you buy it.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

This Week's Sponsor is BUFFY. Buffy makes comforters that are better for you and the earth, using skin-friendly lyocell fabric and fluffy fill made from 100% recycled water bottles.

Interested in Buffy’s products? For $20 off your Buffy comforter, visit Buffy.co and enter the promo code CHATTER.

Nov 20 2018

27mins

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S01 Episode 03 | WATER

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Episode 03 | WATER

Mar 04 2016

33mins

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S03 Episode 122 | ANITA VANDYKE + A ZERO WASTE LIFE

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In episode 122, Kestrel welcomes Anita Vandyke, the author of Zero Waste Life: in thirty days, to the show. A rocket scientist, blogger, and current student of medicine, Anita is passionate about inspiring others to be every day activists by making small, individual steps to reduce their waste.

"Zero waste living to me means reducing your waste, but also at the same time, it means not wasting away your life - so, not wasting your time, your energy, and finding purpose in your life."  -Anita Vandyke, Author of A Zero Waste Life

 In this episode, Anita shares more on her path toward a more zero waste life, how she wasn't always a minimalist, and how she gradually evolved from her past maximalist lifestyle.

Additionally, Anita shares some really digestible, accessible tips to help us think about reducing waste while traveling and beyond. For her, there isn't one specific way to work toward a more zero waste lifestyle, which is why she built a tiered system that offers options for you, depending on what's going on in your life at different time periods.

For Anita, it's about having grace for yourself throughout the process, and always understanding that life happens.

 The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Dr. Sylvia Earle, founder of Mission Blue / The Sylvia Earle Alliance
  • Anita's 3 Steps To Zero Waste Method: 1) Reduced Waste Option 2) Low Waste Option 3) Zero Waste Option
  • "It's also a big reminder when you go into a thrift store that fashion has become almost worthless. So, when you see the sale of a jacket or a dress for $3.99, which is less than a coffee in San Francisco, you have to question yourself: how far have we come that fashion is so worthless?"
  • "I like to use the terminology that we have enough."
  • "You can be passionate about a way of living such as zero waste living, but you don't have to be militant about it."
  • Anita suggests to bring your own Zero Waste Kit with you when you travel, including the below: + napkin, stainless steel straw, reusable coffee cup, reusable drink bottle + cutlery
  • "It's like any muscle, though - if you make a conscious decision, it's a muscle that you work at - mindfulness is a muscle, so if you keep practicing at it, it will get easier."

Book Recommendation From Intro:Give A Shit | Do Good. Live Better. Save The Planet by Ashlee Piper

Jul 11 2018

37mins

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S02 Episode 85 | THE GOOD TRADE + SOCIAL GOOD

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In episode 85, Kestrel welcomes AmyAnn Cadwell, the Cofounder & Editor-in-Chief of The Good Trade, to the show. A digital media company featuring brands, products & ideas dedicated to social good, The Good Trade is known for its elevated aesthetics and accessible writing style. 

"We're all on different places on the spectrum, and our goal is to really come meet people where ever they are with maybe that next step or that helpful story or that helpful point of action that kind of meets them right where they are." -AmyAnn, cofounder of The Good Trade

Throughout this chat, AmyAnn shares her interesting path into the conscious fashion and lifestyle world. She also shares her thoughts on what social good means to her, and how she's building it into the framework of The Good Trade. 

Also, AmyAnn shares insight into creating a platform with aesthetics in mind, and the importance she and her team place on visuals within their storytelling.

Here are a few of the things brought up throughout this chat:

________________

This week's episode is brought to you by GlobeIn, who deliver joy by empowering and connecting remarkable, remote artisans to mindful customers. They are known for their ARTISAN BOX, a monthly subscription featuring exclusive, handcrafted products from global artisans. 

Interested in trying it out? Get $10 off any GlobeIn Premium Box Subscription with promo code: CONSCIOUSCHATTER.

Oct 25 2017

31mins

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S01 Episode 13 | TINY WARDROBE

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Episode 13 | TINY WARDROBE

May 26 2016

30mins

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S01 Episode 04 | MADE IN USA

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Episode 04 | MADE IN USA

Mar 12 2016

26mins

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S02 Episode 66 | NOT JUST A LABEL

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In episode 66 of Conscious Chatter, Kestrel welcomes Stefan Siegel, the founder of Not Just A Label to the show. The world’s leading designer platform for showcasing and nurturing today’s pioneers in contemporary fashion, Not Just A Label has been described by Vogue Paris as: “One of the ten most essential websites of today: it inspires, to be ahead of the trends".

Stefan shares his insight on how data and fashion should be collaborating more often, and the potential that exists in that space. He also elaborates on his recent decision to move Not Just A Label physically to Los Angeles. For Stefan, LA is a place that has all the ingredients to redefine what fashion and manufacturing look like by creating a new system.

At the moment, Stefan sees huge power in being able to connect consumers to independent designers, and he sees the way the food industry has rebuilt itself, as inspiration for this change.

Jun 14 2017

33mins

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S01 Episode 42 | SUSTAINABILITY IN THE FASHION CURRICULUM

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Episode 42 | SUSTAINABILITY IN THE FASHION CURRICULUM

Dec 27 2016

35mins

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S02 Episode 60 | THE SUSTAINABLE APPAREL COALITION + QUESTIONING FASHION'S IMPACT

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In this week's episode, Kestrel welcomes two guests to the show: Jason Kibbey, the CEO of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition and Alden Wicker, writer and founder of EcoCult. The idea for this show exploded for Kestrel after she read an article Alden wrote for Racked“We Have No Idea How Bad Fashion Actually Is For The Environment”. It struck a chord with her -- and many other people who have been using the same unverified fact over and over again in our conversations: the global fashion industry is the 2nd most polluting industry in the world

In this chat, Jason shares his thoughts on where we are currently when it comes to determining the "impact" of the fashion industry. He highlights the reality that creating standards can be especially difficult in the fashion industry because value judgements will inevitably come into play. He also shares what The Sustainable Apparel Coalition is working on with the Higg Index.

Kestrel, Jason and Alden also dive deep into the question of whether conscious consumerism can make an impact, and if so - how much. The search for analytics in the fashion industry is a constant thread throughout this conversation.

May 03 2017

43mins

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S02 Episode 73 | SLOW FACTORY, FASHION + POLITICS

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In episode 73, Kestrel welcomes Céline Semaan Vernon, the CEO of Slow Factory to the show. Slow Factory is a mission-driven independent fashion label & lab that creates beautiful accessories, clothes and jewelry while directly supporting environmental and humanitarian causes. All work is fair-trade and manufactured with eco-friendly ink and fabrics.

"Fashion activism is the practice of using fashion as a means of social change. It merges popular styles of dress, from clothing and shoes, to headwear and accessories, with efforts to implement social and political change. Fashion activism can be used as a form of protest, whether expressing dissent or support." -"Fashion Activism" by Céline, Wikipedia

Throughout this chat, Céline shares insight into what fashion activism means to her, and why buzz words aren't enough in pushing for change in the fashion industry. She also shares her thoughts on the open web - unfiltered/unorganized information - and how she is an open web actovate.

Kestrel asks Céline about her creative process and what inspires her collections. Céline explains that leaving her annual collections somewhat open-ended allows for more of an ability to react in a creative way to political or cultural situations that arise. 

"You can't be creative in a vacuum ... well, you can but then you're completely disconnected from what's happening."

Below are a list of other ideas, blog posts or organizations that were discussed throughout this chat:

  • Overview effect
  • Fashion Activism (Céline's Wikipedia entry)
  • Read "Fair Trade Is Not Enough" on Slow Factory
  • Read "Open Web" on Slow Factory
  • ANERA
  • Are We There Yet? #WeAreHome Documentary -> You can watch here! 

Aug 02 2017

32mins

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S04 Episode 181 | ELIZABETH CLINE + THE CONSCIOUS CLOSET

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In episode 181, Kestrel welcomes New York-based author, journalist, and expert on consumer culture, fast fashion, sustainability and labor rights, Elizabeth Cline, back to the show. You may already know of Elizabeth from her widely read book, Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion; and she recently released a follow-up book called The Conscious Closet: A Revolutionary Guide to Looking Good While Doing Good.

“The book in a lot of ways is very informed by moving away from fast fashion — so, really remembering that clothing is not a disposable good, because it just requires too many resources and too much energy to create.” - Elizabeth Cline, Author of Overdressed + The Conscious Closet

On this week’s show, Elizabeth shares with us what she’s been working on, as well as her perspective on how much the fashion industry has shifted, since the last time she was on the show, almost 4 years ago.

Kestrel + Elizabeth dive into some of the inspiration and details about her new book, The Conscious Closet. For Elizabeth, a lot of what drove the direction for her new book was her education on the secondhand market globally, and how clothing cannot be considered a disposable product.

Also, in this chat, Elizabeth reveals some of her favorite ways to personally build a conscious closet.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • “I understand the power of personal style because of conscious fashion, not in spite of it.”

  • “And over time, it became more about, ‘wait — if we question the industrial food system, then the result of that, is that we also get to rebuild our food culture,’ and that is what’s happening with fashion — we are deciding as a community that clothing can be about more than mindless consumption and chasing the lowest price and buying whatever companies tell us to buy.”

  • The Buyerarchy Of Needs by Sarah Lazarovic

  • Some of Elizabeth’s favorite places to shop secondhand online: Poshmark, thredUp + The RealReal

  • LA FRIENDS | Get Tickets for The Conscious Closet event featuring Elizabeth Cline at The Helms Design Center on October 27th from 2-4pm

Oct 24 2019

42mins

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S04 Episode 180 | HUSTON TEXTILE COMPANY + BRINGING MANUFACTURING BACK TO AMERICA

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In episode 180, Kestrel welcomes Kat + Ryan Huston. the cofounders of Huston Textile Company, to the show. With a focus on making high quality, small-batch cloth, Huston Textile Company uses vintage American-made machines in their manufacturing process.

“The main concept for me, at least as a kid, that I took away was — you can’t expect to have a manufacturing job in the U.S. if you’re constantly buying things that are manufactured outside of the U.S.” - Ryan Huston, Cofounder of Huston Textile Company

On this week’s show, Kat and Ryan share more on their backstory, and how anticipating the birth of their first child was what instigated them to go down this path of manufacturing textiles in the United States. They also explain more on the sorts of challenges they face on a regular basis, going against the grain, and using vintage machines.

For Kat + Ryan, the goal is the build out an entirely local / region textile chain from the fiber to the finished textile, and while they are able to source some fibers in the U.S. currently, they are consistently working further toward this big dream.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Oct 17 2019

37mins

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S04 Episode 179 | FAIR TRADE USA + SHOPPER RECOGNITION OF THE LABEL TODAY

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In episode 179, Kestrel welcomes Maya Spaul Johnson, the Vice President of Apparel and Home Goods at Fair Trade USA, to the show. Certifying and promoting fair trade products, Fair Trade USA enables sustainable development and community empowerment by cultivating a more equitable global trade model that benefits farmers, workers, fishermen, consumers, industry, and the earth.

“I joined Fair Trade in 2004 — like 7% of people knew what Fair Trade was in the surveys we would do and the marketing testing, and now we’re over 60% of people in North America recognize that Fair Trade label.” - Maya Spaul, VP of Apparel and Home Goods at Fair Trade USA

On this week’s show, Maya shares more on her background and how ethnobotany eventually led her to Fair Trade. She also guides us through a bit of history on Fair Trade USA, and how much the organization has grown and evolved over the last 21 years.

Also, Maya shares more on where we are at today with shopper recognition of the Fair Trade label. Kestrel + Maya talk about how bigger, so-called mainstream brands are now offering Fair Trade certified products today. Kestrel asks Maya whether she believes these brands are testing the waters with Fair Trade for their shoppers, or if they are truly in it for the long haul.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Ethnobotany, what Maya originally studied / is trained in; it’s basically the study of people and their relationship to plants and agricultural systems

  • Over Fair Trade USA’s 21 years in operation, companies have contributed over $500 million back to families in 72 countries that grow or produce these products

  • About 40 million certified products made in Fair Trade factories have been sold

  • At the end of last year (2018), about $11 million dollars in additional income had actually gone back to the factories

  • “You know, the retail landscape is changing so fast, and what I am seeing is that the companies that are investing in sustainability, they’re investing in a better product, in an innovative product — they are winning.”

  • We Wear Fair Trade campaign lookbook, styled by Rachel Wang

  • Explore products that are Fair Trade certified >

Oct 10 2019

35mins

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S04 Episode 178 | LOLI + ZERO WASTE BEAUTY FROM FOOD WASTE

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In episode 178, Kestrel welcomes Tina Hedges, the founder of LOLI Beauty, to the show. Short for “Living Organic Loving Ingredients,” LOLI is the first ZERO Waste beauty brand that is completely waterless and uses food grade reusable containers and compostable plastic to package their products.

“I had a crisis of consciousness. I said to myself, wow — for 15 years, in the big corporate beauty world, my whole job was to come up with ideas of products, develop them, position them, and convince you that this was the holy grail, and then whatever ingredient I was talking about in that product was going to transform your skin and your life.” - Tina Hedges, Founder of LOLI Beauty

On this week’s show, Tina shares more on her background in the corporate beauty industry, as well as how growing up in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica influenced her beliefs around the ingredients we use in products.

She also shares more on what led her to build LOLI, and what she felt like was missing from the mainstream beauty market. For LOLI, less is more when it comes to products (they build products for multiple purposes), and their packaging is built on a foundation of sustainability and asking a ton of questions.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Most beauty brands out there are making their products of 80-95% water while creating tons of waste along the way.

  • In the beauty industry, the packaging usually costs more than what’s in the actual product.

  • “192 billion beauty packages end up in landfills a year.”

  • LOLI’s Plum Elixir — “the ultimate multitasker” — it replaces your moisturizer, your serum, you can use it on your face and your hair, your lips, your neck, your nails.

  • MadeSafe, certification body that LOLI uses to certify all of their ingredients and products

  • LOLI’s Date Nut Brûlée — “miracle melting balm” — can be a solid oil cleaner, works like an aquaphor or vaseline, can minimize scars or stretch marks, or be used for chapped lips and elbows

  • Tina’s top go-to products: Chamomile Lavender Water + Plum Elixir

  • From the intro — “25 Of The Funniest Signs From The Global Climate Strike” via Reconsidered Newsletter

CURIOUS TO TRY LOLI?

Tina has offered you 20% OFF your first purchase. Use the code CONSCIOUS20

Sep 29 2019

40mins

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S04 Episode 177 | NEW YORK TIMES STYLE + SUSTAINABILITY WITH ELIZABETH PATON

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In episode 177, Kestrel welcomes Elizabeth Paton, a reporter for The New York Times Styles section, to the show. Covering the fashion and luxury sectors in Europe, Lizzie’s writing focuses on business, tech and sustainability, along with Fashion Week coverage from London, Milan and Paris.

“For me, it’s about being fair in my reporting, but it’s also about not being afraid of blowback from a brand for writing the truth.” - Elizabeth Paton, Reporter For New York Times Style

On this week’s show, Lizzie shares more on her background, and how she originally planned to be a lawyer, but the recession among other events led her to become a fashion journalist.

Kestrel + Lizzie also dive deeper into some of her articles on The New York Times, including her writing about whether using prison labor in fashion supply chains can be ethical, and her questions around the new Fashion Pact.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 19 2019

34mins

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S04 Episode 176 | ANACT TOWELS + THE POWER OF HEMP

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In episode 176, Kestrel welcomes Brianna Kilcullen, a sustainability and supply chain expert + the founder of ANACT, to the show. A brand new sustainable towel company, ANACT is all about taking simple acts to make an impact.

“I chose hemp because it has these natural performance features that don’t need any manipulation with putting a chemical or a treatment or a finish on it. And so it made sense to me to use earth’s natural resources to solve these problems.” - Brianna Kilcullen, Founder of ANACT

On this week’s show, Brianna shares more on her journey into sustainability, and how she built her own role at Under Armour, to become the first full-time sustainability employee on their team.

She also walks us through the inspiration behind ANACT — basically, her search for a solution for smelly towels. :)

Brianna explains several of the superpowers of hemp, and where we are currently in the United States when it comes to the industrialization of hemp.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 12 2019

44mins

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S04 Episode 175 | ELIZA SLOANE JEWELRY, SCALING AS A MAKER + ULTIMATE CREATIVE FREEDOM

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In episode 175, Kestrel welcomes Sloane, the founder and makers behind Eliza Sloane Jewelry, to the show. Handcrafting jewelry for over 7 years, and collecting crystals and sea glass for over 20, Sloane is a master maker, and creates all of her cast pieces for Eliza Sloane Jewelry from recycled metals.

“I just think that not boxing ourselves in or pigeon-holing ourselves too much — that’s just what ultimate creative freedom is.” - Sloane, Founder + Maker Behind Eliza Sloane Jewelry

On this week’s show, Sloane shares more of her journey, and how an internship sourcing vintage gems in New York City motivated her to build an Etsy shop, and eventually inspired her to start making her own jewelry.

Sloane dives into more on how surfing inspires her creative work, and vice versa — and how they seem to feed each other consistently, helping her maintain a fluidity in both her lifestyle and creative work.

Kestrel and Sloane also chat about the idea of scaling, how complicated it can be, and the challenges that come with it when you are the actual maker behind the brand.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Sep 06 2019

40mins

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S04 Episode 174 | TONLÉ, ZERO WASTE + MAKING IN CAMBODIA

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In episode 174, Kestrel welcomes Rachel Faller, the founder of Tonlé, as well as Sreyoun, the General Manager of Tonlé’s production operations in Cambodia, to the show. A zero waste, ethical fashion brand, Tonlé is on a big mission, to reduce waste generated by larger factories and change the way business is done in the fashion industry.

“Lots of people define zero waste in different ways, and for us, it’s basically about reducing the waste that’s already being created in the fashion industry, and using every piece of our own waste.” - Rachel Faller, Founder of Tonlé

On this week’s show, Rachel shares more on her journey, and how a Fulbright fellowship to Cambodia helped plant the seeds for her to build Tonlé.

Also, we explore more in depth what zero waste means to the brand, and how for Tonlé, it naturally overlaps with their approach to manufacturing, and addressing social issues.

Sreyoun, the General Manager of Tonlé’s production operations in Cambodia, also shares how she started working with Tonlé, originally as an accountant. She had the opportunity to move into other positions, learn a lot about the business and sustainable fashion, and now has moved into the General Manager role.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Aug 31 2019

33mins

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S04 Episode 173 | FRANK AND OAK + LISTENING TO SHOPPERS TO DRIVE CREATION

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In episode 173, Kestrel welcomes Ethan Song, the cofounder of Frank and Oak, to the show. Inspired by ethical and sustainable thinking and with an eye to the future, Frank And Oak has set out to create clothing that is made for good living.

“So I think that for us, the idea is actually to create a deeper relationship with our customers, and make sure that we really understand them before we create something.”

On this week’s show, Ethan shares more on how his entrepreneurial dreams led him to the fashion industry, and how Frank and Oak was initially the response to he and his cofounder not being able to find brands that shared their values.

Also, Ethan dives into what sustainability really means to Frank and Oak, and how for them, it’s about: first —minimizing impact, second — restore.

Kestrel asks Ethan to comment on sustainability when it comes to subscription box services. For Ethan and Frank and Oak, they believe their subscription service can help them learn more about their shoppers, and in turn, produce more accurately, reducing waste.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Aug 21 2019

26mins

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S04 Episode 172 | NOBLE CARRIAGE + HOW SUSTAINABLE SHIFTS CAN START WITH MOMS

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In episode 172, Kestrel welcomes Jen Long, the CEO and Creative Director of Noble Carriage, to the show. A thoughtfully curated store, Noble Carriage offers a collection of organic & sustainably made baby goods.

“I think as a new mom, you’re told that you need to buy all of these things — that you need all of these things to make raising your child easier or just to survive, and I don’t believe that. I think you need fewer, better things.” -Jen Long, CEO of Noble Carriage

On this week’s show, Jen shares more on what led her to starting her own curated shop for little ones. She also talks about how she thinks sustainability as a lifestyle can really start with moms, as they are already tuned into starting fresh and doing whatever they can to provide a safe, healthy environment for their babies.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Watch more on Noble Carriage’s story >

  • “You need to lead with good design — good design I think can change the world. I felt like that was what was missing, and I felt like I could bring that to this world.”

  • Factory45, Jen worked with Shannon Lohr of Factory45 in the early development stages of her business

  • Noble Journal, where Jen features Noble Babe Rituals and more

Aug 05 2019

27mins

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S04 Episode 171 | THE PSYCHOLOGY OF FASHION + WHY WE WEAR WHAT WE WEAR

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In episode 171, Kestrel welcomes Anabel Maldonado, the founder of The Psychology of Fashion™, to the show. A platform that explores why we wear what we wear, and the relationships between emotions, personality and aesthetic, The Psychology of Fashion™ also examines current issues in the fashion industry through the lens of psychology.

“You know, if we get away from this sort of like trends just because, buy it because all these people have it — if we think about who we are, why we like what we like, the way that fashion actually can be powerful for us, I think we’re going to buy less but buy better, and invest in things because we’re sure.” -Anabel Maldonado, Founder of The Psychology of Fashion™

On this show, Anabel shares more on her background, and how she has fused her interests to build The Psychology Of Fashion™. When she realized she wanted to build this platform and write about these topics together, she started a research project, to develop a framework to better talk about fashion through the lens of psychology.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • “We believe that personal style is not random. The clothes that feel best tap into our truest qualities, are a consequence of our different inner needs, and reflect our most deep-seated narratives about ourselves.”

  • “6 Reasons Why Fashion Is Losing Its Appeal” on The Psychology Of Fashion

  • Alain de Botton, writer and philosopher who has inspired Anabel

  • “It’s funny because it’s not just about the optical effect or making an impression on others — it’s about triggering a certain mindset in yourself.”

  • Enclothed Cognition: how clothes affect your cognitive process, anything cerebral (thinking, feeling, anything that happens in the brain)

  • “Self knowledge is the antidote to mindless consumption.”

  • Big 5 Personality Test

  • PSYKHE, a new e-commerce platform Anabel is launching, that is powered by personality science, machine learning and the psychology of fashion.

  • Article in the Washington Post Kestrel referred to, “Kamala Harris embraced black. That was both unremarkable and theatrically powerful.”

Aug 01 2019

36mins

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S04 Episode 170 | SOURCERY THE LABEL AND SILK YOU CAN MACHINE WASH + DRY

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In episode 170, Kestrel welcomes Nicole Rattner, the founder of Sourcery The Label, to the show. A brand focused on cleaning up fashion with beautifully designed, naturally sourced garments, Sourcery is known for their Innovative Machine Washable silk.

“I think it’s important that we start to offer the customer, the consumer, something that works for her too, and invite her into this world of sustainability through better functionality. So, for me, a washable silk kind of did both of those things.” -Nicole Rattner, Founder of Sourcery The Label

On this week’s show, Nicole shares more on her past experiences working in design and textile development with larger brands like Victoria’s Secret, Polo Ralph Lauren, Urban Outfitters, Nordstrom and others. Through working on more of a global scale with these bigger brands, Nicole started to realize that, as the designer, she had a larger responsibility to start working to clean up fashion.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Jul 24 2019

30mins

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S04 Episode 169 | TRIARCHY ON SUSTAINABLE DENIM, MINDFULNESS + BALANCE

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In episode 169, Kestrel welcomes Adam Taubenfligel, the designer + creative director at Triarchy, to the show. An LA-based sustainable denim brand, Triarchy has a focus on conserving water, and reducing the massive consumption that is typically used to make jeans.

“We’re trying to be as sustainable as possible, but then, if we bring something to market that’s not giving you those things you love about the jeans that hold you in and do all this stuff, then they won’t sell, and then you’re not running a business. And so, you have to also remember this is a business and not a not-for-profit sustainable thing.” -Adam Taubenfligel, Creative Director + Cofounder of Triarchy

On this week’s show, Adam shares more on what led him from film to fashion, and how he discovered the destructive nature of the apparel industry. He also elaborates on how he believes mindfulness could be the key to transforming the fashion industry. After being on a month-long Instagram cleanse, Adam describes the power in disconnecting, when it comes to enhancing our creativity and productivity.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Ozone Denim Systems

  • e-flow Technology

  • “When you go into every major department store in the world, it’s basically the same 5 brands that are on that wall. And so, I really do think there’s room on those walls for brands that really are dedicated to making the denim industry as good as possibly can be, and that maybe have the ability to do that because they aren’t juggernauts, yet.”

Jul 16 2019

42mins

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S04 Episode 168 | THREDUP + THE MASSIVE RISE OF RESALE

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In episode 168, Kestrel welcomes Erin Wallace, the brand director at thredUp, to the show. The world’s largest tech-powered resale marketplace, ThredUp’s platform gives you the chance to buy and sell high-quality secondhand clothes.

“I mean if everyone in the U.S. bought just 1 item used instead of new this year, it would save around 6 billion pounds of carbon emissions, which is the equivalent of taking half a million cars off the road for an entire year.” -Erin Wallace, Brand Director at thredUp

On this week’s show, Erin shares more on how the secondhand world brought her into the sustainability conversation — she got her start working at Crossroads years ago. We also chat about the thrill of the hunt when it comes to secondhand, and how we both got into thrift shopping, in search of those extra special pieces that nobody else would have.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • thredUp processes up to 100,000 items per day

  • At this time, thredUp lists over 2 million unique items on their website

  • “We have definitely felt the Marie Kondo effect. We had an 80% spike in our clean-out kits, when ‘Tidying Up’ aired on Netflix.”

  • Choose Used, thredUp’s partnership with Olivia Wilde + Conscious Commerce

  • The Circular Fashion Fund, 501(c)(3) under thredUp, that invests in the next generation of non-profits and businesses pushing to transform the fashion industry

  • thredUp’s 2019 Resale Report

Jul 09 2019

29mins

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S04 Episode 167 | THE LOVE IS PROJECT + PAYING IT FORWARD

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In episode 167, Kestrel welcomes Chrissie Lam, the founder of the Love Is Project, to the show. Connecting people around the world through a universal message of LOVE, the Love Is Project empowers artisan communities through an ethical supply chain.

“There’s sometimes a lot of negative media and portrayals of people, and I wanted to show the positivity and humanize people. And I think the word love is very universal and it connects people.” -Chrissie Lam, Founder of Love Is Project

On this week’s show, Chrissie shares more on her past adventures, and how she came up with this random idea to ask people what love means to them while on a flight to Russia. This led her to continue asking this question to strangers all over the world throughout her travels.

Chrissie also shares more on how quickly the Love Is Project has evolved since the beginning. After starting in Kenya almost 5 years ago, the brand has now grown through their “pay it forward” social enterprise model, to be working with artisans in 10 different countries.

Additionally, Chrissie shares more background on her new book, The Greatest Love Story Ever Told.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Jul 02 2019

23mins

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S04 Episode 166 | MARIELLE ELIZABETH + SLOW FASHION FOR ALL

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In episode 166, Kestrel welcomes Marielle Elizabeth, a body positive blogger, writer, photographer + self-proclaimed social media monster, to the show. A standout Instagrammer, Marielle is also known for her #slowfashionforall hashtag and blog Something Copper.

“The conversation of ethical fashion already comes from a place of immense privilege, and if we are not making space for everyone, we are failing.” -Marielle Elizabeth, Founder of Something Copper

On this week’s show, Marielle shares more on her slow fashion journey, and how it was inspired at a young age by a cool, local shop in the town she grew up in.

She also dives into more on the idea that revolutions must be inclusive. As Marielle said in an interview with Clothed In Abundance, “Revolutions are for everyone and the biggest disservice we can do is to make it exclusive.”

Marielle reveals some of the results from the Size Inclusive Survey that she hosted through her Instagram in March 2019, and how she intends to utilize these numbers to help challenge the industry.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • Something Copper, Marielle’s blog

  • “We can’t have 300 people perfectly nailing ethical fashion, and the rest of the world completely closed off from it because they won’t hit that ‘perfect standard’.”

  • “I think so much work needs to be done in activating change and helping encourage other people to change behavior from a positive standpoint vs a shaming standpoint — from a place of the most ethical wardrobe you have is the one you already own, and it’s just caring for it and mending it and reusing those pieces.”

  • “I’m so passionate about calling someone in vs calling someone out.”

  • “I also think ethical fashion / sustainable fashion has a long way to go in terms of calling people into the revolution vs shaming them for already not doing better.”

  • “For me, one of my biggest fears is that if brands keep misappropriating this term, and saying size inclusive when it’s maybe only going up to a size 16, people that are larger than that will get frustrated and assume that they have no place in ethical fashion, and then will stop trying.”

  • Findings from Marielle’s Size Inclusive Survey — (responses from over 3,000 people) + 53% of responses said that to be '“size inclusive” you need to be above a size 22 + 41% of responses said that to be “size inclusive” you need to be at least up to a size 22 + So 94% of the survey results say you need to carry at least up to a size 22 to be considered “size inclusive”

  • Some of Marielle’s favorite brands — Elizabeth Suzann Sotela Block Shop Textiles State The Label Beaton Linen The Perennial ClosetHackwith Design House Basics Alice Alexander — listen to our show with founder Mary Alice >

  • “I think that a big part of clothing waste right now is coming from people hoping one day something will fit properly or settling.”

  • Marielle's Instagram >

This week's show is brought to you by ANA LUISA JEWELRY. Explore more about the brand + get your exclusive discount code here >

Jun 25 2019

49mins

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S04 Episode 165 | PACT + GROWING COTTON BETTER, WITHOUT THE GROSS STUFF

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In episode 165, Kestrel welcomes Brendan Synnott, the CEO of Pact Apparel, to the show. Offering head-to-toe basics, Pact believes in crafting clothing differently: sustainable materials, kindness toward humans and the softest clothing you’ll want on every layer.

“If I wanted to change everything in my wardrobe — if I just changed everything to organic cotton, how much more is that really going to cost me? And it turns out it’s not that much, and what impact does that make.” -Brendan Synnott, CEO of Pact

On this week’s show, Brendan shares more on what originally got him interested in the health movement, and how impactful it was for him to see his grandfather shift his diet after being diagnosed with heart disease.

Also, Brendan shares more on Pact’s supply chain, and how they grow, spin, knit and sew their organic cotton garments in Fair Trade factories in India.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Jun 20 2019

29mins

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S04 Episode 164 | MADE TRADE + ETHICALLY ELEVATED GOODS FOR DESIGN LOVERS

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In episode 164, Kestrel welcomes Cayley Pater, the founder of Made Trade, to the show. An online marketplace, Made Trade curates artfully-designed, ethically-sourced goods that put people and our planet first, and they are on a mission to become the ultimate destination for conscious consumers who love design.

“We love to shoot on bright, fun colors and to celebrate diversity in that way. Color is a big part of cultural representation.” -Cayley Pater, Founder of Made Trade

On this week’s show, Cayley shares more on her background and what got her interested in the sustainability, and heritage conversations. Turns out, for her — language was her entry point. Having studied linguistics, and speaking multiple languages, Cayley was exposed to the power of sustainable business through some of her experiences abroad, that her interest in language originally connected her to.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

Jun 12 2019

42mins

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S04 Episode 163 | ALICE ALEXANDER + INCLUSIVITY FOR ALL BODIES

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In episode 163, Kestrel welcomes Mary Alice Duff, the founder of Alice Alexander, to the show. A size-inclusive, ethically and sustainably made womenswear brand, Alice Alexander is on a mission to radically change the fashion industry to one that is inclusive of ALL BODIES and is respectful of people and the planet.

“It’s still the vision and our mission — when someone is shopping on our website, that they feel seen. And to not get the feeling that I got when I went shopping before I had my own brand, and all I saw were thin white women whose bodies looked nothing like mine, and it was very clear that this isn’t the place for me.” -Mary Alice Duff, Founder Alice Alexander

On this week’s show, Mary Alice shares more on what led her to quit her reliable job as a social worker, and instead start a fashion brand. She also takes us back and shares more on the early stages of Alice Alexander, which until last year, involved working out of her home — cutting and sewing with her tiny team on her family’s kitchen table.

Mary Alice explains more about why Made To Order was always the only option for her and her brand. Also, Kestrel + Mary Alice dive into more on how sizing and fit issues are interconnected to the sustainability conversation.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

  • The average American woman today is a size 16-18.

  • The plus size market is valued at $40 billion dollars, and has only reached half of its potential.

  • “If we can make leather out of pineapples, we can certainly dress someone who’s a size 18.”

  • 11 Honoré, a size-inclusive shopping site that does the patterning and product development for luxury designers.

  • “Inclusivity is trending hard. And on one hand, that’s great. On the other, some of the big issues I’m seeing is that brands are jumping into extended sizing and inclusivity without actually understanding the perspective of living in a bigger body.”
  • “I don’t know if there is a finite number, but I definitely think you can’t call yourself inclusive if you’re not going up to at least a 4X — you know a size 26 / 28.”

  • Mary Alice’s story on Instagram, that outlines more on the history of “sizing”

  • “How To Talk To Your Friends and Family About Sustainability” by Leah Thomas on The Good Trade (mentioned in introduction of show)

Jun 05 2019

43mins

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S04 Episode 162 | SARAH SPELLINGS OF THE CUT ON GOING FAST FASHION FREE

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In episode 162, Kestrel welcomes Sarah Spellings, a fashion writer for New York Magazine’s The Cut. Having been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and CBS New York, among others, Sarah’s recent writing about sustainable fashion and going fast fashion free in 2018 has generated an array of interest.

“A lot of my friends were like, ‘you’re no fun to shop with anymore.’ And she was like, ok, it’s the end of the year — basically, are you going to be fun again? And I was like ‘no, it’s a lifestyle change.’ And that’s what I realized is that it is more of a lifestyle change.” -Sarah Spellings, writer for New York Magazine’s The Cut

On this week’s show, Sarah shares more on what she learned throughout her fast fashion free year. She talks about how she started the pledge writing about “what she was wearing instead”, but quickly realized that it wasn’t actually about buying — it was more about not buying, buying less, reusing and recycling.

The below thoughts, ideas + organizations were brought up in this chat:

May 29 2019

36mins

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