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This Beautiful Shot is Not an Accident

Updated 7 days ago

Arts
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Society & Culture
Performing Arts
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A podcast about design thinking, storytelling and social change.

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A podcast about design thinking, storytelling and social change.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Great beautiful content for storytellers

By Nomad Cook - Nov 03 2019
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As a person that works on visual storytelling, it's always appreciated to have content that can sum up to our references. Especially if it's audible content that will help to expand our knowledge in this fascinating field. Thanks for sharing and looking forward to the next season.

Amazing topics!

By Heather Parady - Oct 28 2019
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I am soooo excited that I found this podcast! The topic of storytelling is something that we ALL can be if it to learn from and Laura has done an incredible job bringing together brilliant minds to shine light on creativity and impact. This is a must listen!

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0

Great beautiful content for storytellers

By Nomad Cook - Nov 03 2019
Read more
As a person that works on visual storytelling, it's always appreciated to have content that can sum up to our references. Especially if it's audible content that will help to expand our knowledge in this fascinating field. Thanks for sharing and looking forward to the next season.

Amazing topics!

By Heather Parady - Oct 28 2019
Read more
I am soooo excited that I found this podcast! The topic of storytelling is something that we ALL can be if it to learn from and Laura has done an incredible job bringing together brilliant minds to shine light on creativity and impact. This is a must listen!
Cover image of This Beautiful Shot is Not an Accident

This Beautiful Shot is Not an Accident

Latest release on Apr 16, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

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This means that the episode rankings aren't working properly. Please revisit us at a later time to get the best episodes of this podcast!

Rank #1: Sound Artist Jens-Uwe Dyffort

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Season 3: Episode 3

Sound Artist Jens-Uwe Dyffort talks about architecting acoustic space.

Sound artist Jens-Uwe Dyffort listens to the architecture of space and along with artist Roswitha von den Driesch, creates spatial audio installations and environmental audio work for galleries and public spaces. The work, through a web of sound that bounces, moves, swells, and circles, brings a new awareness to the places we occupy. In February we met up and spoke about the process of creating spacial audio work.

This season I am talking to artists about their first solo. Our conversation started discussing the show I saw in Spandau Citadel and then we went back in time to earlier works and looked at some of the practices of deep listening and experimentation that inform their work today.

If you start to hear, or try really to hear and follow what is going on then you start also to hear all the other sounds. And then, ah ha, there is this and then there’s the S-Bahn and then there’s a bird singing in the window, or something like that. That is something that started back then and we tried to follow in our following installations.

– Jens-Uwe Dyffort

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Jens-Uwe Dyffort and Roswitha von den Driesch live and work in Berlin. Jens-Uwe Dyffort studied composition at the University of Art Berlin with Franz Martin Olbrisch and Prof. Walter Zimmermann, Diploma and Master of composition. Their sound installations could be heard in London, Plymouth, North Adams, Marseille, Maastricht, Metz, Rom und Berlin, for example 2009 Donaueschinger Musiktage – Festival zeitgenössischer Tonkunst, 2008 Germanisches Nationalmuseum Nürnberg and Hessischer Rundfunk, Frankfurt am Main, 2006 Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl and 2001/02 singuhr-hoergalerie in parochial an

Visit: dyffort-driesch.de

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Apr 16 2020

39mins

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Rank #2: Cultural Worker Mikala Hyldig Dal

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Season 3: Episode 2

Artist Mikala Hydig Dal housing politics and radical optimism.

Cultural worker, artist, curator and author Mikala Hyldig Dal’s work embodies a deep examination of current global political struggles and echo a call for social justice.

Mikala’s first solo, Who’s Afraid, looked at ISIS propaganda videos of 2014 and their relation to iconoclasm, bodies and political role plays.

Today she employs radical optimism combined with realism to engage with complex issues like housing politics and gentrification, where increasingly one person’s home is another person’s windfall.

I met Mikala on her Utopian Bus Tour, set in the year 2099. It was a bus tour around the Berlin neighborhood of Kreuzberg to places impacted by gentrification to see monuments for the future.

Where do I put my IKEA couch and where will it look better? That’s kind of what augmented reality is being used for. And for me, it has a potential that’s much greater. It’s a kind of utopian, futurist technology that we need to assign value to. A value that is actually quite political. 

– Mikala Hydig Dal

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Mikala Hyldig Dal is an artist, curator and author based in Berlin, Cairo and The Hague. She examines visual cultures through video- and text-based interventions. Many of her works are installations, but also performance, drawing and painting are among her artistic practices. The artist is represented in international exhibitions, e.g. in Martin Gropius Bau Berlin, Cairo Townhouse Gallery, Nikolaj Kunsthal Copenhagen, Fluxfactory New York and Azad Gallery Tehran. Mikala Hyldig Dal is interested in the connections between image production and the destruction of images (iconoclasm), processes of visualization and invisibility, structures of power in the field of the visual. In the words of philosopher Jacques Rancière: Mikala deconstructs “aesthetic regimes” with her artistic works, her curatorial projects and theoretical reflections.
– Introduction by Prof. Dr. Linda Hentschel, Institute for Art and Visual History (IKB), Humboldt University Berlin (translated from German)

Visit: Mikala Hyldig Dal Website

Photo credits: Ali El-Darsa

Places and organizations referenced in this episode – in order of appearance:

LAUSE: Household collective in Kreuzberg threatend by sale from Taekker
TAEKKER: Danish real estate investor who purchased Lause to sell for profit
GECEKONDO: Turkish Community Center at Kottbusser Tor, built overnight
MOSIREEN VIDEO COLLECTIVE: Egyptian media activist collective formed in 2011
THE AUGMENTED ARCHIVE: A mobile site-specific video archive for public space
KUNSTBLOK: Artists and cultural workers, working for a livable and just Berlin city
LIEBIG: House-project without cis-men, but all other (a-) gender-identities welcome

Book: OPEN/OCCUPY, Open House Flutgraben
available online at: Motto Distribution OPEN/OCCUPY

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Apr 03 2020

56mins

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Rank #3: Performance Artist Tone Haldrup Lorenzen

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Season 3: Episode 1

Performance Artist Tone Haldrup Lorenzen talks about her first solo and overcoming the voice in her head.

Many of us have a voice in our head that keeps us from doing our work. Tone Haldrup Lorenzen, a performance artist, director and co-founder of the feminist theater, had such a voice.

This season I am talking to artists about their first solo show. Tone shares about overcoming this destructive voice and pushing forward, performing her first solo and shortly after that directing her first theater productions. She shares about learning from the bumps along the way and finding that letting go can allow for the work to come through in unexpected ways.

I had a professor once who said you have to say hello to your demons. They keep you on track. “Are you being brave enough? Are you taking enough risk?” But it should push you forward, not stop you.

– Tone Haldrup Lorenzen

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Tone Haldrup Lorenzen is a Danish artist working in the expanded field of theatre and performance art presently based in Berlin. Tone is working as freelance director, actor and produces her own work through the international performance-company CuntsCollective, which she co-founded in 2018. Her latest work My Country premiered at The Royal Theatre in Copenhagen has toured in China and will be touring in Europe summer 2020. Tone is currently in production with CuntsCollective next performance AKLL, which will premiere in October 2020. Tone has projects coming up in Zimbabwe, Brazil and New Orleans. She keeps moving towards unknown territories to deconstruct and reshape her perception of the world and society she lives in. She has studied at the interdisciplinary school Performer house and received her Master in Fine Arts at Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre USA (2016)

Visit: Cunts Collective
Instagram: c_ntscollective
Instagram: Tone_Haldr

Photo credit: Søren Meisner

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Mar 18 2020

45mins

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Rank #4: Bitter Things Exhibition bi’bak

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Season 2: Episode 10

Migration Stories, by Berlin-based bi’bak

This season I am talking to artists and thinkers about the art of listening.

In this episode, we talk about research-based artistic practice with two members of the bi’bak creative team who produced the exhibition, Bitter Things, Narratives and Memories of Transnational Families.

Malve Lippman is the co-founder and co-artistic director of bi’back, Malve was responsible for the exhibition design and along with bi’bak’s co-founder and husband Can Sungu conceived of the project and together, they were responsible for the art direction.

Maike Suhr who is also with us today is an Editor and is responsible for Project Development at bi’bak as well as research and editing for Bitter Things.

In today’s episode, we speak about the process of finding a story – how a series of conversations led to two years crossing Europe and many layers of legal and personal research to learn about a part of the migration story that has had little academic or media attention. While for a past generation their stories of family separation may have been buried, newer generations share their stories in songs and on YouTube with unpacking videos.

The exhibition is currently being shown at the Stadtlabor-Forum Historisches Museum Frankfurt, until April 2020. If you are unable to make the journey, you can check out the book that came out of the research, Bitter Things, at Archive Books.

We came to this subject because from time to time we talked to people and they said, ‘In the past in my childhood, I grew up alone in Turkey and my parents went to Germany, first alone, without me to work. And then, later on, I was called back.’ And we didn’t know this. People don’t talk [about this subject] so much about this issue because it’s connected to shame or sometimes it comes with the accusation of the parents.

– Malve Lippman

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bi’bak (Turkish: have a look) is a project space based in Berlin, with a focus on transnational narratives, migration, global mobility and their aesthetic dimensions. bi’bak’s programme examines diverse disciplines in art, academics, and community development, including film screenings, exhibitions, workshops as well as music events and culinary excursions.

In this interview:

Malve Lippmann studied at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart and at the Institute for Art in Context at the Berlin University of the Arts (MA). She works as a freelance stage and costume designer in the field of opera, performance and drama. In other European countries, Russia and the USA, she was responsible for the design of various performance, art and theater projects. She leads workshops and courses, deals with participation strategies and looks for innovative forms of art education.
Since 2014 she leads the intercultural project space bi’bak in Berlin Wedding.

Maike Sehr, Project Development / Editor, bi’bak

Visit: bi-bak.de

Music Videos from the exhibition

In the exhibition, Bitter Things, Narratives and Memories of Transnational Families, a television screens a compilation of YouTube videos, songs referencing the experience of parents being separated from their children because of transnational labor practices. Below is a sampling including songs from the Philippines, Romania, and Ukraine.

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Dec 12 2019

33mins

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Rank #5: Artist Giò Di Sera

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Season 2: Episode 9

Artista Totale Giò Di Sera talks about listening to youth.

This season I am talking to artists and thinkers about the art of listening.

Today I’m talking to Italian artist, musician, radio host and founder of StreetUniverCity, Giò De Sera, also known as, Don Rispetto.

Giò’s radio program, Radio Kanaka International and StreetUniverCity work focuses on bringing context and history of hip hop to the youth of Kreuzberg.The themes he chooses to highlight reflect the needs of that community and their way of experiencing the world. In today’s episode Giò shares some difficult subjects including the impact of bullying or mobbing on the community as well as gentrification and the growth of consumer culture. He also talks about teaching the youth about empowerment and the importance of trusting themselves and the rewards that come from helping the youth to move forward in life.

I met Giò at the ARENA, an interactive public sculpture by Benoît Maubrey made up of hundreds of speakers. The event, produced by the Schöneberg gallery, Zwitschermachine, included a screening of the rap video by Rap G, who was present, produced by StreetUniverCity. Watching from the sculpture, I sat next to several of the young local boys who had been running around all day, unable to sit still, who were suddenly silent. Check out the video by Rap G featuring Drob Dyname, Sag Mir.

So I don’t say this is our reality, this is our truth. This is the only truth. I just say look, you know this information. This is our version. And for me, it’s this version. But in the end, the listener or young people who are learning from us some things, you have to make the difference. You have to choose from all these truths.

– Giò Di Sera

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Born in Neapolitan in 1964, Giò Di Sera has lived in Berlin since 1986 and has been working as a multimedia artist since 1984, with numerous international solo and group exhibitions (Berlin Academy of the Arts, Wewerka Gallery, Raab Gallery, Biennale Venezia, Museo della Scienza, etc.).

In 2006, Di Sera initiated and co-founded StreetUniverCity Berlin eV in the heart of Kreuzberg, whose artistic direction he takes over in 2007 and still holds today.

In addition to artistic activity and mediation, he has been making projects of political and cultural education with children and adolescents since the 1990s. Di Sera has been active in radio since 1993, initially with Radio Kanaka International on Kiss FM, 1998-2008 with RadioMultikulti RBB and since 2009 on multicult.fm. In 1997, his project “X FM Eventure Radio” ran parallel to Documenta X.

Visit: Facebook/don.rispetto

Listen to the KRS One interview at Mixcloud.com

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Nov 28 2019

37mins

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Rank #6: Author Mathilde Ramadier

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Season 2: Episode 8

Author, Artist Mathilde Ramadier on the power of observation and the importance of listening to the natural world

Today I’m talking to French author and artist Mathilde Ramadier about the power of observation and the importance of listening to nature. Mathilde has written about work, sexism and most recently deep ecology. The foundation of much of her writing is taking time to listen to being aware of what is happening around us. In France, a defining moment for Mathilde as well as hundreds of French people has been the resignation of the Environmental Minister, Nicolas Hulot, in September 2018, over the lack of power of the government to fight lobbyist interests. Our conversation traversed the creative process, Freud’s assessment of the humiliation of man, to the philosophy of permaculture.

What I love in psychoanalysis is that it’s a cure where someone talks. But this cure cannot happen without someone who is listening. And psychoanalysis is always a story that you have to build with someone else. Even if this, if this person is not talking a lot, it’s just a question of being present. And it takes us back to this question of being in the world, being present in the world.

– Mathilde Ramadier

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After a first degree as a graphic designer with professional experiences in several agencies and studios, Mathilde Ramadier went on to study philosophy and psychoanalysis at the University Paris VIII, then obtaining a Masters Degree in Contemporary Philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. For four years, she hosted the weekly radio show on Radio Campus Paris called PoneyClub54, focussing on the electronic music and digital culture. She is currently working as a writer, a scriptwriter and a translator, mostly writing graphic novels and essays while working together with various illustrators, publishers and magazines on ecology and social issues like feminism and labour rights.

Visit: mathilderamadier.com 

Photo credits: Header Image – Daniil Silantev on Unsplash,
Headshot –  Chloé  Guilhem

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Nov 14 2019

32mins

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Rank #7: Musician Marion Ruault

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Season 2: Episode 7

Musician Marion Ruault talks about improvisation and listening to the self and others.

This season I am talking to artists and thinkers about the art of listening.

In this episode I’m talking to French musician, improviser and composer, Marion Ruault. While she has studied jazz, classical and many forms of world music and performed in various collaborations with around Europe, during her two years living in Berlin, Marion focused on expanding her improvisational practices.

We spoke about the freedom and responsibility that comes with playing improvised music about the need to find a balance between one’s impulses on what’s happening in the group. Listening is an important part of this practice.

We also spoke about her first solo performance and the challenge of making mistakes in public,  and how making mistakes can be the best way forward for one’s development as an artist.  

I think it’s no different in life and in music, for example. But in improvisation, it’s a big question, actually. To listen to yourself, to listen to the other, and to find a balance.

– Marion Ruault

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Marion Ruault is a French double bass player, a musician, improviser and composer. She studied jazz, classical music and world music at the National Conservatory of Lyon in France and is currently enrolled at Le Centre des Musiques Didier Lockwood in Paris. Navigating between several styles of music, she collaborates with prestigious artists and improvisers such as Scott Hamilton, William Galison (Baghdad Coffee / Sting), Sandy Patton (Lionel Hampton ensemble), Daniel Huck (Eddy Louis), Marc Thomas (Claude Bowling Big Band) and performs in many venues and festivals in different countries. Since 2018, she maintains a strong link with the Berlin scene where she regularly performs, mostly jazz and improvised music. She recently launched a project to interact with artists from different backgrounds, mixing performance, theater, dance, music, immersion and improvisation.

“As a musician, I play various forms of music but I am drawn to interdisciplinary collaborations and improvised music. For me, improvisation is a form of meditation. In working with others, I am confronted with the question of how to listen to others yet be myself. Improvisation is a process of putting my ego aside to be in the service of the present moment, dedicated to something bigger than myself. “

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marionruault/
Website: https://mariondoublebass.wixsite.com/music
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Marion-Ruault-106976427406938/
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/marionruault

Photo credits: Luz Scherwinski

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Oct 31 2019

23mins

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Rank #8: Noise Artist Mathieu Sylvestre

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Season 2: Episode 6

Noise Artist Mathieu Sylvestre talks about listening in art and life.

In this episode I talk to French noise artist, Mathieu Sylvestre about listening.  As an artist he plays live experimental works and sometimes composes for film and theater. When composing for others, he speaks about the challenge of translating what is heard and felt by one person to another. He suggests that the act of hearing reveals the personality behind the ear. This episode was recorded outside in Volkspark Friedrichshain in Berlin. 

When you close your eyes and try to define the space, listening to it, then something happens. And you can realize that your brain is making the logic of the things together. So it means, even if you’re listening to a noise, after a few seconds or minutes, than your brain is getting the logic out of it.

– Mathieu Sylvestre

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Mathieu Sylvestre, noise artist, performer, experimental musician. Mathieu has been performing since 2007 and has performed in Europe in France, Germany, Norway, Estonia, Finland, Denmark, Switzerland, Spain, Greece and the US. His work includes live performance, recordings and music for film and video.

Visit: mathieu-sylvestre.com/

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Oct 10 2019

33mins

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Rank #9: Artist Karine Bonneval

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Season 2: Episode 5

Artist Karine Bonneval talks about listening to plants.

This season I am talking to artists and thinkers about the art of listening.

In the spring of 2019 I attended a Tree Sound Walk organized by French artist Karine Bonneval, who works on the topic of human-plant relations. She was as artist in residence at the Berlin gallery, Gru_nd with her project, Dé jardiner, or De-Gardening.

We spoke about her work in finding ways to help humans share empathy with plants. As Karine states, plants don’t have eyes or ears but they can feel and see and listen. They just use other tools.

Many of her works involve creating ways to bring out the sounds of plants so we as humans can listen to plant lives.

Because we don’t have any sense in common, it’s pretty hard to share a kind of empathy with plants, because they don’t have eyes, they don’t have ears. But they can feel, they can see, they can listen. But with other tools, so that’s what my work is all about.

– Karine Bonneval

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How to regain empathy towards the non-human?

Karine Bonneval’s work focuses on the otherness of plants, and the complex and specific interactions that link humans and plants. In her projects, she is also interested in the way in which plant or human forms constitute a repertoire of references of all times used by artists. She was born in 1970 in La Rochelle, and lives in Jalognes, France. Since 2014, she has worked in collaboration with teams of scientists in the field of plant ecology.

Visit: www.karinebonneval.com

Influence: Philippe Descola

Photo credits: Eva Abvril 

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Oct 01 2019

30mins

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Rank #10: Musician Pamela Z

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Season 2: Episode 4

Season 2: Episode 4

Musician Pamela Z talks about listening

In this episode I spoke with composer, performer, and media artist Pamela Z, about her process of collecting sounds to create compositions, using samples from the environment, interviews and her own voice. Her practice has shown her that observing is an active role. We spoke about how a work is not truly finished until an audience has heard it.

Usually, you think of an observation in a sense of a person who sits quietly in the corner and they are not participating. They’re just observing. But I think that observing itself can be an extremely active thing. And I think people can get a lot by being observant.

– Pamela Z

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Pamela Z is a composer/performer and media artist who makes solo works combining a wide range of vocal techniques with electronic processing, samples, gesture activated MIDI controllers, and video. She has toured extensively throughout the US, Europe, and Japan. Her work has been presented at venues and exhibitions including Bang on a Can (NY), the Japan Interlink Festival, Other Minds (SF), the Venice Biennale, and the Dakar Biennale. She’s created installations and has composed scores for dance, film, and chamber ensembles (including Kronos Quartet). Her awards include the Rome Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Doris Duke Artist Impact Award, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation residency, the Herb Alpert Award, and an Ars Electronica honorable mention, and the NEA/Japan-US Fellowship. www.pamelaz.com

Recorded at 

Photo credits: main image courtesy of Ars Electronica; headshot Lori Eanes

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Sep 19 2019

18mins

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