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The Interchange

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The energy system is changing fast. Come explore the future with journalist Stephen Lacey and venture capitalist Shayle Kann. Each week, they'll take you on a tour of the global energy transformation, providing provide insight into technology trends, markets, and companies -- making for wonky and entertaining listening.

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The energy system is changing fast. Come explore the future with journalist Stephen Lacey and venture capitalist Shayle Kann. Each week, they'll take you on a tour of the global energy transformation, providing provide insight into technology trends, markets, and companies -- making for wonky and entertaining listening.

iTunes Ratings

329 Ratings
Average Ratings
317
7
4
1
0

One of the best out there.

By DanielWGreen - Jan 10 2020
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Highly recommend you give this a listen.

Favorite energy podcast

By Energy analyst - Jan 01 2020
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I listen to several energy podcasts. This is my favorite one by far.

iTunes Ratings

329 Ratings
Average Ratings
317
7
4
1
0

One of the best out there.

By DanielWGreen - Jan 10 2020
Read more
Highly recommend you give this a listen.

Favorite energy podcast

By Energy analyst - Jan 01 2020
Read more
I listen to several energy podcasts. This is my favorite one by far.
Cover image of The Interchange

The Interchange

Latest release on Jan 16, 2020

Read more

The energy system is changing fast. Come explore the future with journalist Stephen Lacey and venture capitalist Shayle Kann. Each week, they'll take you on a tour of the global energy transformation, providing provide insight into technology trends, markets, and companies -- making for wonky and entertaining listening.

Rank #1: Shell Thinks Solar Could Beat Oil & Gas

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Shell, the world’s sixth biggest oil and gas company, just published a future "sky" scenario that's getting a lot of attention. 

That potential future: By 2050, renewables could overtake oil, gas and coal as the primary energy source; by that date, it could be “impossible” to purchase a new internal combustion car; and by 2070, there could be 10,000 carbon capture plants operating globally.

Shell's energy transition report is receiving mixed reaction. Many energy experts are hailing Shell for putting together such an ambitious document. A lot of environmentalists are cynical, since oil and gas still play a prominent role in the company's future vision.

In this week's episode, we're going to walk through the different scenarios outlined by Shell. We'll also discuss what Shell's business might look like beyond 2050, as the company acquires more electricity retailers, EV charging assets and renewable energy developers.

This podcast is supported by Wunder Capital, the easiest way to invest in large-scale solar energy projects across the U.S. With Wunder, you can help finance renewable energy projects while earning up to 7.5 percent annually. Get started here to diversify your portfolio and support American solar projects.

This podcast is brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Recommended reading:

  • Shell: The Energy Transition report
  • Shell: The New Energies business
  • Washington Post: Shell Just Outlined a Radical Scenario for What It Would Take to Halt Climate Change

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Apr 17 2018

31mins

Play

Rank #2: How Flexible, Dispatchable Solar Works

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Forget everything you think you know about solar.

A growing body of research and real-world experience shows that solar can be a flexible, dispatchable resource. And it can potentially rival gas plants in providing grid regulation services — without the use of batteries.

We’ve had the technology to allow solar and wind to provide grid services for years. So how do we open up markets to unleash their full potential?

In this episode, we’ll look at some new modeling from First Solar, E3 and Tampa Electric Company that outlines how to use utility-scale solar power plants for spinning reserves, load following, voltage support, and frequency response. (Read Colin Meehan's tweet storm about the report, mentioned on the show.)

Jan 07 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #3: Climate Risk, Part 1: How Do We Measure It?

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This week, we present the first episode in our 3-part interview series on climate risk. How do we measure and quantify both the physical and economic risk of a warming planet?

This question has very real consequences for the way companies are run, the way cities are planned, and the way markets are valued.

In this episode, Shayle Kann speaks with Trevor Houser, a partner with Rhodium Group. 

Rhodium Group and Blackrock recently wrote a report on the underpriced risks of climate change throughout the economy.

Topics covered in this episode:

  • What counts as "climate risk,” and how is it distinguished from all the risks we face independent of climate change?
  • The state of climate risk reporting: How has our ability to measure climate risk improved? How much certainty can we provide today? What gaps remain?
  • Examples of climate risk in municipal bonds, commercial real estate, and energy & utilities.
  • How big a challenge is it to get different players (investors, insurers, corporations, etc) to account for climate risk? How should they be thinking about it?

Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Oct 30 2019

49mins

Play

Rank #4: What's Behind Rising US Emissions?

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After a period of moderation, heat trapping gases are going up in the U.S. and around the world. In 2018, global emissions rose by 2.7 percent. And U.S. emissions rose by 3.4 percent, according to an early tally from the Rhodium Group.

This week, we're going to put some meaning to those emissions numbers. We are joined by Brad Plumer, an energy and environment reporter at the New York Times, who will help us dig into each sector.

We will answer the following questions:

  • Why aren't wind and solar making up for coal closures?
  • Which sectors are becoming the worst emitters?
  • Will the "Trump bump" accelerate the emissions trend in the medium term?
  • If we were king/dictator/wizard for a day, what sector would we address first?


Don't forget to give The Interchange a rating and creative review on Apple podcasts for your chance to win a yearly subscription to GTM Squared!

Read along with us:

  • Rhodium Group: Preliminary US Emissions Estimates for 2018
  • NYT: U.S. Carbon Emissions Surged in 2018 Even as Coal Plants Closed
  • NYT: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Accelerate Like a ‘Speeding Freight Train’ in 2018


Follow us on Twitter: @InterchangeShow

Support for this podcast comes from Wunder Capital. Wunder Capital is the leading commercial solar financing company in the United States. Click here to find out how Wunder Capital can help you finance your next commercial solar project.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherSpotify or wherever you find your audio content. Or integrate our RSS feed into the app of your choice.

Jan 21 2019

42mins

Play

Rank #5: A Guide to Blockchain and Energy

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Over the last 18 months, blockchain has evolved from an obscure concept in cryptocurrency circles into a mainstream corporate tool for "disrupting” entire industries.
If you don’t have a blockchain strategy, you are not innovating hard enough.
People love throwing around the term. But wait, what is it again? And why is it relevant to energy?
In this week's episode, we'll get some context from GTM CEO Scott Clavenna. We explore how it’s already being applied to utility operations and energy markets, and where the long-term potential lies. The conversation was recorded at GTM's Grid Edge World Forum.
The Interchange is brought to you by AES Energy Storage. AES is helping utilities harness the power of battery-based energy storage to make the electric power system cleaner, more flexible and more reliable. Find out more: aesenergystorage.com/interchange

Jun 30 2017

29mins

Play

Rank #6: Can Solar Become the World's Dominant Source of Energy?

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Nothing can stop solar's growth trajectory -- except maybe solar itself.

This week, we have a deep discussion on the future of solar photovoltaics. Solar is exploding around the world, but have we grappled with the technology and market limitations that could stop the next order of magnitude in growth for PV?

On this week's episode of The Interchange, Shayle Kann sits down with Varun Sivaram, author of the new book, Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet.

Shayle and Varun examine every angle of the solar transition. They consider numerous possible futures, good and bad, for the technology. 

"If we do not take the right actions and urgently in innovation today, I warn that in the medium term we might run into a penetration ceiling for solar. And by the time that happens, it might have been too late to start investing in these long-term innovations that only pay off after you've invested for a little while," explains Varun.

Varun Sivaram is the Philip D. Reed Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations, and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University.

This podcast is brought to you by Fiveworx, a turnkey customer engagement platform for utilities. Find out more about how Fiveworx can help your customer engagement program succeed -- and get you beyond the meter.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Feb 19 2018

52mins

Play

Rank #7: European Solar Rises Again, With Fewer Subsidies

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Europe was once the world's biggest solar spender, until the region's PV market fell into a structural decline after subsidies were pulled back. Now Europe is on the upswing once again — this time, with far less government spending. 

As European countries embrace competitive auctions, the Old World of solar is getting new attention. The region is expected to install 10-17 gigawatts a year through 2022, bringing cumulative installs from 111 gigawatts to 182 gigawatts, according to GTM Research. A good portion of that capacity won't see any direct government support.

Competitive auctions will make solar growth much more sustainable. But will it be enough to make up for the tens of gigawatts of coal and nuke plants closing around the region?

Tom Heggarty, a senior global solar analyst with GTM Research, joins us on The Interchange to grapple with that question. We'll put the new trends into a historical and macro-economic context.

This podcast is supported by Wunder Capital, the easiest way to invest in large-scale solar energy projects across the U.S. With Wunder, you can help finance renewable energy projects while earning up to 7.5 percent annually. Get started here to diversify your portfolio and support American solar projects.

This podcast is brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Recommended reading:

  • GTM Research: Europe Solar PV Market Outlook 2018
  • GTM: Here Are Solar’s Next Gigawatt-Scale Markets
  • GTM: Germany's Course Correction on Solar Growth

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Apr 24 2018

32mins

Play

Rank #8: The Conservative and Progressive View on the Future of Electricity Markets

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Something feels different. In the last two years, there’s been a material shift in the way renewable energy and other distributed resources are discussed.

For so long, believers of wind, solar, batteries and microgrids have focused on targeted government support. But direct subsidies and mandates are diminishing in importance.

One example: utility-scale solar in the U.S., which was once almost exclusively driven by state mandates and tax credits, is now mostly being driven by economics. And tax credits are on a path to being phased out.

We now have a proven class of resources that can perform the same function as traditional power plants -- often at a lower economic and environmental cost. And these resources are hitting the grid at an accelerating pace.

Now that people are waking up to this reality, the conversation is shifting toward markets.

How do you put rules in place that fairly value the responsiveness, resiliency and environmental performance of distributed resources like aggregated batteries, real-time energy efficiency and commercial microgrids? And how do you manage the surge of wind and solar so they don’t crush wholesale markets by flooding them with cheap power at the wrong time?

That’s the framework we’re operating in today. It's uniting groups across the political spectrum that favor of open markets and oppose the Trump Administration's agenda to prop up coal.

This week, we'll talk with two experts who are focused intensely on the evolution of markets: Lenae Shirley, the senior director of technology innovation and market adoption at the Environmental Defense Fund; and Devin Hartman, a senior fellow with the R Street Institute.

How much should we read into this alignment?

This podcast is sponsored by Schneider Electric. Now, you can reap the benefits of a microgrid with no upfront capital through the new microgrid-as-a-service business model from Schneider Electric. Find out how it works.

Recommended reading and listening:

  • R Street Institute: Refreshing Price Formation in Electricity Wholesale Markets
  • EDF: More Subsidies than You Think Influence the Cost of Electricity
  • The Interchange: Renewables Are on a Collision Course With Power Markets

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Dec 05 2017

1hr 14mins

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Rank #9: Google and Microsoft Are Shaping Energy Markets

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Since 2015, large corporations have signed deals for more than 7 gigawatts of renewable energy. 

As activity picks up, these companies are grappling with increasingly complex deals. They're no longer just thinking about renewable energy credits or average consumption over the year; they're now looking at matching wind, solar and hydro supply directly with their on-site demand in a more granular way. Consequently, energy storage is becoming more attractive.

This week, we're talking with two leading buyers of renewable energy, Google and Microsoft.

We'll talk with Neha Palmer, Google's head of energy strategy, about hitting 100 percent renewable energy. Then, we'll talk with Brian Janous, Microsoft's general manager of energy, about how deals around the world are structured.

We'll also grapple with a bigger question that corporate buyers are facing: what happens to their procurement when the gigawatts and gigawatts of renewables they’re buying literally reshape how markets function?

This podcast is also brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

This podcast is brought to you by Fiveworx, a turnkey customer engagement platform for utilities. Find out more about how Fiveworx can help your customer engagement program succeed -- and get you beyond the meter.

Recommended reading:

  • GTM: The Latest Trends in Corporate Renewable Energy Procurement
  • Google: We’re Set to Reach 100% Renewable Energy -- and It’s Just the Beginning
  • Microsoft: Transitioning to Zero-Carbon Energy

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Mar 13 2018

1hr 4mins

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Rank #10: A Blueprint for the Transactive Grid

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Ryan Hanley is convinced that the distributed electric grid will create vastly more economic, security and societal value than today's centralized system.

Over the course of his career as a civil engineer -- working at Pacific Gas & Electric, SolarCity, Tesla and now Advanced Microgrid Solutions -- Hanley has worked to understand and extract that value. 

"A macro theme that I've been tracking in my career is that exchange of value over the grid [that] I'm convinced will only become more transactive over time. More value will be exchanged in markets as the system relentlessly tries to take out economic fat from the system."

In this week's conversation, Shayle Kann talks with Hanley about the tools at hand to re-engineer the distributed, transactive grid system. 

Topics addressed in this interview include:

  • What distributed energy resources actually look like to utility distribution engineers and planners.
  • The ultimate outcome of net metering battles and the market's natural "equilibrium."
  • How markets can extract maximum value from solar, storage and load control.
  • What it takes to build a 100-megawatt battery in South Australia in 100 days based on a tweet from Elon Musk.
  • The role of blockchain in future electricity markets
  • Plus, we'll play a bonus round of "who said it" and quiz Hanley on quotes from executives from PG&E, SolarCity, Tesla and Advanced Microgrid Solutions.


This podcast is also brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

This podcast is brought to you by Fiveworx, a turnkey customer engagement platform for utilities. Find out more about how Fiveworx can help your customer engagement program succeed -- and get you beyond the meter.

Mar 06 2018

1hr 10mins

Play

Rank #11: Best and Worst Cleantech Ad Campaigns of All Time

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The clean energy industry may not have a lot of money to spend collectively on advertisements. But over the years, we've seen numerous TV ads, infographics, slogans, and all kinds of marketing campaigns from individual companies.

So this week, we are going to rank some of our favorite – and least favorite – marketing efforts. We'll also debate the perennial question: do we need a "Got Milk" campaign for clean energy?

We're joined by Tor Valenza, a marketing expert better known as Solar Fred. Tor founded the marketing firm UnThink Solar and is currently the director of marketing at SepiSolar. 

Firstly, what is unique about clean energy that makes branding so important – yet so hard? Then, what are the best marketing campaigns in history outside of energy? Why are they so good? Finally, we’ll pick our favorite and least favorite ads or marketing campaigns in cleantech.

Below are links to our picks for best and worst campaigns.

Best non-cleantech campaigns:

Our favorite cleantech ads or pop-culture placements:

Our least favorite cleantech ads or campaigns:


This podcast is supported by Wunder Capital, the easiest way to invest in large-scale solar energy projects across the U.S. With Wunder, you can help finance renewable energy projects while earning up to 7.5 percent annually. Get started here to diversify your portfolio and support American solar projects.

This podcast is brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Aug 21 2018

41mins

Play

Rank #12: The Expert Who's Ranking Every Climate Solution

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This week, we have a special addendum to our deep decarbonization draft. 

We’re talking with Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the vice president of communication and engagement at Project Drawdown.

Katharine is one of the minds behind the Project Drawdown solutions list that we used as the basis for our draft. We chose the list because it spans so many different areas of the global economy.

Katharine is a renowned expert and self-proclaimed “climate solutionary.” She has a very popular TED Talk on gender equality and climate change, and she speaks regularly to the press about climate issues.

She was the lead author on the Project Drawdown book, which goes deep on the top 100 decarbonization solutions.

If you haven’t listened to our draft, go back and check it out. This conversation will make a lot more sense.

We talk with Katharine about the biggest wins for decarbonization, the most surprising opportunities, and how do they break down along the lines of high-tech and low-tech. 

We’ll also get her opinion on who won the Deep Decarbonization Draft — Stephen or Shayle?

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Dec 05 2019

37mins

Play

Rank #13: Collision Course: How Wind and Solar Are Disrupting Power Markets

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We've spent a lot more time lately looking at the structure of U.S. power markets. Why? Because they're about to get shaken up.

It's already begun. In this episode, we'll look at how renewables are upending wholesale power markets today -- and what we can do about it.

We'll examine the issue from a few different angles.

How the growth of renewables is depressing power prices: Wood Mackenzie's Prajit Gosh describes why low-price events are becoming more common in wholesale markets than high-price events. He'll also look at the impact on other generation sources.

How prices are decreasing: MAKE Consulting's Dan Shreve talks about what's driving cost reductions in wind. 

And GTM's Shayle Kann will look at the "vicious cycle" of low prices, and how to manage the wholesale market transition in the U.S.

This podcast is sponsored by Schneider Electric. Now, you can reap the benefits of a microgrid with no upfront capital through the new microgrid-as-a-service business model from Schneider Electric. Find out how it works.

Recommended reading:

GTM: The Rise of Renewables Creates Uncertainty in US Power Markets

GTM: Next-Generation Energy Technologies Are Constrained by Outdated Markets. Here’s How to Fix Them

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Nov 16 2017

33mins

Play

Rank #14: Where Did All Those Electric Scooters Come From?

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This spring, electric bikes and electric scooters started showing up on the streets of a handful of major U.S. cities in droves. Where did they come from? They were put there by a new breed of Silicon Valley companies focused on creating a new "last mile" ride sharing service.

The startups have spread so quickly, Uber and Lyft are now trying to get in on the action.

This week, we talk with Emily Warren, the senior director of public policy at Lime. Lime one of the leading "micromobility" companies hitting the streets. We'll talk with Emily about what this new form of mobility borrows (and hopes to avoid) from the last six years of ride sharing.

"That first wave of on-demand transportation has now prepared the public and the market to accept a much broader variety of transportation modes. They've now opened the door for a whole bunch of additional kinds of options that are coming on the scene. Frankly, I don't think any of us expected that scooters were going to be the thing," says Warren.

Recommended reading: 

  • Vox: Electric Scooters' Sudden Invasion of American Cities, Explained
  • Washington Post: The Electric Scooters Swarming Our City Won’t Solve Our Commuting Calamity

Support for The Interchange comes from Wunder Capital. According to ​GTM Research​, Wunder Capital is the leading commercial solar financing company in the United States. Click here to find out how Wunder Capital can help you finance your next commercial solar project.

The Interchange is also brought to you by Shoals Technologies Group, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherSpotify or wherever you find your audio content. Or integrate our RSS feed into the app of your choice.

Aug 28 2018

31mins

Play

Rank #15: Travis Fisher on DOE's Epic Grid Reliability Report

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We are getting a clearer picture of the Energy Department's direction under Secretary Perry.
In the four months after Perry requested special report on threats to baseload power plants, we saw an unprecedented number of prebuttals from groups worried that it would assist in President Trump's mission to revive the coal industry.
We finally got the end result last week. While some environmental groups didn't like the report, it was a straightforward account of the factors changing the grid -- not a booster for coal, or any other technology.
But there are still a lot of outstanding questions. Are emerging distributed resources discounted in the report? Where does climate change fit in? How does the report inform policy going forward?
This week, we’ve got a wide-ranging interview with Travis Fisher, a senior advisor at the Department of Energy, who took the lead on the study. He talks to us about the process, critical reactions, key findings, and recommendations for market designs.
Recommended reading:
DOE staff report on electricity markets and reliability: http://bit.ly/2wlKV1v
DOE's Grid Study Is a Rorschach Test for the Future of Electricity: http://bit.ly/2xubKA5
GTM Squared -- Getting Into the Weeds of DOE’s Grid Report: http://bit.ly/2wfTEUq

Aug 29 2017

1hr 12mins

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Rank #16: Rick Perry's Value-of-Coal Tariff

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Thought that controversial grid resiliency report ordered by Energy Secretary Rick Perry was only an intellectual exercise?
It didn't take long for the Department of Energy to put it into action -- in exactly the way that critics feared when the report was first announced.
Last week, Perry asked federal energy regulators to consider new rules that would value coal and nuclear plants with 90 days of fuel on hand. In other words: find a way to help keep struggling baseload plants open by offering them a new financial incentive.
Or, as a supposed free-market proponent like Perry might put it for any other technology, "pick winners and losers."
After months of prebuttals from renewable-energy interest groups, the final DOE study was widely considered a straightforward account of power plant retirements on the U.S. grid. Travis Fisher, the project coordinator at the DOE, joined us on the podcast to talk through the process and his team's findings.
While many cleantech enthusiasts disagreed with the lack of attention on distributed resources in the report, there was wide agreement that it was not a political document. That is, until Perry issued his letter to FERC last week. Now the politics are center stage. And it's going to get messy.
In this week's Interchange podcast, Shayle Kann interviews Ari Peskoe, a senior fellow in electricity law at Harvard Law School. They'll talk about the specifics of Perry's "flimsy" request, and, more importantly, what it could mean for regulatory priorities under FERC. Has the government found a new way to keep coal alive? Or is this a half-baked attempt to prop up struggling plants?
"This seems to be a total retreat from market-based principles," explains Peskoe in the podcast.

Oct 02 2017

40mins

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Rank #17: Policymakers Can't Keep Up With Battery and Solar Costs

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It's difficult to keep up with cost and performance trends for technologies like batteries and solar PV. It's particularly hard for regulators and policymakers, who often rely on outdated analysis.
The latest example comes from California, where the California Independent System Operator is using three-year-old data on battery and solar costs as it evaluates alternatives to a natural gas peaker plant. The cost of lithium-ion batteries and solar PV have come down precipitously since then. So why are regulators using such ancient data to make this crucial decision?
This is not an isolated incident.
In this episode, we talk about the questionable analysis behind the Puente natural gas plant in Southern California. We'll also discuss some other examples of faulty data being used for energy planning decisions. Finally, we'll speculate on some possible solutions to the chronic problem.
Read Julian Spector's story on the faulty analysis: https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/energy-storage-nrg-puente-gas-peaker-plant-cost

Sep 06 2017

33mins

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Rank #18: Solar Is Getting Super Cheap. What Next?

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Coal has taken center stage publicly within the Trump Administration. But solar is the real innovation star behind the scenes. 

This week, we're talking with Charlie Gay, the director of DOE's solar technologies office, about all the activity happening in the agency.

We'll discuss the solar power plants of the future: advances in power electronics; the normalization of energy storage; new ways to value and distribute solar electrons; and integration with the internet of things. We'll also discuss the winning politics of PV in Washington.

This podcast is supported by Wunder Capital, the easiest way to invest in large-scale solar energy projects across the U.S. With Wunder, you can help finance renewable energy projects while earning up to 7.5 percent annually. Get started here to diversify your portfolio and support American solar projects.

This podcast is brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Have a question for us? Record some audio on your phone or computer and send it to podcasts@greentechmedia.com.

Recommended reading and watching:

  • GTM: DOE Announces $105 Million in New Funding for Solar R&D
  • GTM: To Become Truly Mainstream, Solar Will Need to Cost 25 Cents per Watt by 2050
  • YouTube: A Brief History of Photovoltaics With Charlie Gay

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

Jun 11 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #19: The Deep Decarbonization Draft, Part II

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This week, we offer our second installment of the Deep Decarbonization Draft — our fantasy sports event for energy and climate nerds. 

Last year’s draft inspired similar versions at conferences and in the classroom. We’re bringing the game back by popular demand. 

The premise is simple: Shayle and Stephen choose their teams of decarbonization technologies and methods, and then pit them against each other to determine who’s best at saving the planet.

This year’s list climate solutions comes from Project Drawdown. You can find their list and scores here.

Producer Daniel Woldorff has anonymized the list. We need to choose seven draft picks from the 80+ solutions across seven sectors. After all the picks, one steal is allowed. 

Once the scores are locked in, we’ll tally up the total CO2 reductions and the total savings and determine a winner. Bonus points for the person who made the highest-scoring pick.

Listen to last year’s decarbonization draft. 

Thanks to Matt Farley for the theme song. 

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Nov 20 2019

47mins

Play

Rank #20: Batteries Are Changing Residential Solar

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The solar industry is talking about battery storage almost as much as solar these days.

On this week's Interchange, we're addressing the shift toward storage in residential solar. Sunrun, a top installer, is at the forefront of the trend. In California, the company is adding storage to 20 percent of rooftop PV systems — and it believes other states will soon catch up. 

Sunrun now thinks of itself as a grid services provider. We'll talk with Sunrun Chief Policy Officer Anne Hoskins about how this broadened focus influences the way it interacts with utilities, regulators and customers. 

Shayle and Stephen will also talk about how batteries are changing the way consumers shop around for solar.

This podcast is supported by Wunder Capital, the easiest way to invest in large-scale solar energy projects across the U.S. With Wunder, you can help finance renewable energy projects while earning up to 7.5 percent annually. Get started here to diversify your portfolio and support American solar projects.

This podcast is brought to you by Shoals, the gold standard for solar and storage balance-of-systems solutions. Learn more about how Shoals can make your project operate at the highest level.

Recommended reading:

  • Sunrun white paper: A B​etter System Created by the People, for the People
  • GTM: Sunrun Keeps Growing, While Prepping for a Whole New Grid Services Business

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcher or wherever you find your audio content.

May 04 2018

38mins

Play

Would You Take These Bets About Cars, Cities and Voice Control? (Rebroadcast)

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We’re undergoing some great changes here on The Interchange! We’re bringing on a new producer and we’re going to be featuring new voices that will help us tackle the energy transition in new and compelling ways. 

So while we reorient ourselves, we are bringing you an episode from 2018 called “8 bets about the future.” We debated and bet on a bunch of different scenarios for the coming decades.

This is one of our favorite shows. It’s a good one to bring up from the archives as we prepare ourselves for the decade ahead.

The bets we discuss:

Bet #1: Bug will control machines with her voice more than with her keyboard.

Bet #2: Bug will never personally drive a car.

Bet #3: By the time Bug buys her first home, especially if she’s in an urban environment, her surroundings will transformed. 

Bet #4: By the time Bug shops for her own groceries, >20% of her produce will be grown indoors

Bet #5: In Bug’s first home of her own, more than half of her electricity load will dynamically respond to grid or price signals

Bet #6: By the time Bug reaches 30 (in the year 2050), electricity’s market share of final energy consumption will more than double.

Bet #7: More than 50% of Bug’s electricity, as represented by the national breakdown, will come from renewables by the time she’s a sophomore in high school.

Bet #8 : Bug will live over 200 years, and for most of her life, electricity will be her only food.

Want to share your opinion about these predictions? Let us know on Twitter. Follow @InterchangeShow, @shaylekann & @stphn_lacey and send comments about the show.

This podcast is brought to you by Fronius. Now, Fronius gives you more control over your solar energy than ever before with its versatile hybrid inverter, the Primo GEN24 PLUS. Whether you’re storing solar power, integrating energy storage, or looking for back-up power, the Primo GEN24 PLUS has you covered. Find out more.

Jan 16 2020

42mins

Play

Proof the Energy Future Is Here

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We’re now in the 2020s. Many of the tropes about this era from films and literature may not have come true, but there’s a lot happening around us that does feel futuristic.

And this week, we are offering up proof that we are living in the energy future — right now. 

Shayle and Stephen are each going to pick a use of technology that once seemed futuristic, but is now a reality.

We’re also going to choose a technology that we thought would arrive but now, but is still seemingly off into the future.

What’s your pick? Let us know on Twitter. Follow @InterchangeShow, @shaylekann & @stphn_lacey and send comments about the show.

This podcast is brought to you by Fronius. Now, Fronius gives you more control over your solar energy than ever before with its versatile hybrid inverter, the Primo GEN24 PLUS. Whether you’re storing solar power, integrating energy storage, or looking for back-up power, the Primo GEN24 PLUS has you covered. Find out more.

Jan 10 2020

33mins

Play

Our Most Popular Interviews of 2019

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This show has a very simple mission: break down the complexity of the global energy transition in a clear way.

Whether that’s digging through reports, concepts, acronyms, business deals, or trends, we are constantly trying to make these topics accessible, yet wonky. 

Some of our most popular episodes of 2019 featured guests who were particularly good at delivering on that mission. So we’re going to serve up some snippets of those conversations.

In this episode, we'll hear from:

  • Dr. Leah Stokes from our July episode on the politics of the Green New Deal.
  • Futurist Ramez Naam on the exponential trends disrupting energy.
  • Analyst Adam James on the promise of aggregated distributed energy resources.

Happy new year! Please rate and review us as a gesture of support to close out the year. It’s very helpful for other people who are just finding the show.

Dec 28 2019

35mins

Play

Making 100% Clean Energy Goals a Reality [Content From Wartsila]

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Countries, states, cities, utilities and corporations are all setting increasingly ambitious targets for clean energy. 

There are lots of variations on the theme: 100% renewable energy, 100% clean energy, 100% carbon-free energy. They all require ambition -- and lots of planning.

In this episode, the first in a three-part series from Wartsila, we are exploring the causes and consequences of this 100% trend. 

How did we get to this point where utilities and states are all committing to 100% zero-carbon or 100% renewable energy goals? What are the limitations? What is the potential? And what’s the pathway to achieving them?

Producer Lisa Barfai speaks with Emma Foehringer Merchant, a staff writer at Greentech Media, who describes the origin of the trend.

Then we’ll talk with Jussi Heikkinen, director of growth and development for the Americas at Wartsila, who outlines the practical consequences for the electricity system.

Wartsila creates smart, flexible power technologies to enable a cleaner grid and put the world on a path to 100% renewable energy. They’re helping clients worldwide meet their clean energy goals in an efficient and cost-effective way. Find out more.

Dec 27 2019

17mins

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Decade in Review: Most Influential Deals, Stats, Twists and Buzz Phrases

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It’s our last episode of the decade! We’re looking back over the last 10 years and making our choices for:

  • The most important statistic
  • The most impactful piece of research
  • The top buzz phrase
  • The most unexpected twist
  • The most pivotal deal
  • And the dark horse trend of the 2020s

Thanks to everyone who’s been listening to this show since 2014. We appreciate your feedback and support. Please continue to suggest topics via Twitter so that we can evolve over the next decade.

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Dec 21 2019

37mins

Play

Emerging Tech That Will Help Revive Our Infrastructure

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America’s physical infrastructure is in the dumps. The American Society of Civil Engineers regularly gives the country’s infrastructure a near-failing grade.

We need to rebuild a lot of stuff. Hardening our roads, grids, buildings, transit systems has a climate context to it: we need to do it better and we need to do it cleaner.

This week, we are exploring the cleantech opportunities in physical infrastructure. What are the most compelling trends shaping the way we optimize our electrical equipment, pipelines, streets, homes and buildings? 

This conversation is based on Shayle Kann’s piece, titled “The World Around Us.”

We’re breaking the conversation into four parts:

  • The geospatial revolution: how the combination of new sources of geospatial data (satellites, drones, sensors), combined with the data revolution, will allow us to gain a real-time operational picture of our infrastructure and ultimately optimize it.
  • The culture of resilience: how increasing natural disasters will start to make investing in resilience (via anything from batteries to building retrofits) mainstream.
  • The re-platforming of our streets: how the arrival of new modes of transport (autonomous, micromobility, package delivery) will force us to rethink the orientation of our streets, which are currently designed for a single master – the passenger vehicle.
  • The impacts of 100% clean: how all the commitments to 100% will force us to confront the biggest challenge we’ll face in electricity for the next few decades: how to unlock grid flexibility, particularly behind the meter.

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Dec 13 2019

43mins

Play

The Expert Who's Ranking Every Climate Solution

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This week, we have a special addendum to our deep decarbonization draft. 

We’re talking with Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the vice president of communication and engagement at Project Drawdown.

Katharine is one of the minds behind the Project Drawdown solutions list that we used as the basis for our draft. We chose the list because it spans so many different areas of the global economy.

Katharine is a renowned expert and self-proclaimed “climate solutionary.” She has a very popular TED Talk on gender equality and climate change, and she speaks regularly to the press about climate issues.

She was the lead author on the Project Drawdown book, which goes deep on the top 100 decarbonization solutions.

If you haven’t listened to our draft, go back and check it out. This conversation will make a lot more sense.

We talk with Katharine about the biggest wins for decarbonization, the most surprising opportunities, and how do they break down along the lines of high-tech and low-tech. 

We’ll also get her opinion on who won the Deep Decarbonization Draft — Stephen or Shayle?

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Dec 05 2019

37mins

Play

The Deep Decarbonization Draft, Part II

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This week, we offer our second installment of the Deep Decarbonization Draft — our fantasy sports event for energy and climate nerds. 

Last year’s draft inspired similar versions at conferences and in the classroom. We’re bringing the game back by popular demand. 

The premise is simple: Shayle and Stephen choose their teams of decarbonization technologies and methods, and then pit them against each other to determine who’s best at saving the planet.

This year’s list climate solutions comes from Project Drawdown. You can find their list and scores here.

Producer Daniel Woldorff has anonymized the list. We need to choose seven draft picks from the 80+ solutions across seven sectors. After all the picks, one steal is allowed. 

Once the scores are locked in, we’ll tally up the total CO2 reductions and the total savings and determine a winner. Bonus points for the person who made the highest-scoring pick.

Listen to last year’s decarbonization draft. 

Thanks to Matt Farley for the theme song. 

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Nov 20 2019

47mins

Play

Climate Risk, Part 3: The Underwater Mortgage Market

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This week, we present the final episode in our 3-part interview series on climate risk. We’re going deep on the housing market. 

Our guest co-authored an important study quantifying extreme weather risk in the U.S. housing market — and identifying how banks are shifting that risk to us, the taxpayers.

Shayle Kann talks with Amine Ouazad, a professor of applied economics at the graduate business school HEC Montreal. He recently co-authored a study called Mortgage Financing in the Face of Rising Climate Risk.

The New York Times summarized the research, asking we're facing problems similar to the previous housing crisis.

Topics covered on this episode:

  • The role of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the mortgage market: what happens when mortgage loans get securitized to them?
  • Why does the decline in poor FEMA mapping and flood insurance create additional risk for lenders?
  • How are risky mortgage loans in vulnerable areas getting sold to Fannie and Freddie — putting taxpayers on the hook for tens of billions of dollars in risk?
  • What happens after a large disaster in terms of new loans? What is the significance?
  • What might this mean for the health of the housing market as natural disasters continue to increase in frequency and magnitude? Will there be a cascading effect?
  • What parallels can we draw from the 2008 financial crisis that resulted from the housing market collapse?

Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Nov 14 2019

40mins

Play

Climate Risk, Part 2: California's Crisis

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This week, we present the second episode in our 3-part interview series on climate risk. 

As the latest wildfires in California finally get under control, residents and public officials are in a state of panic. The scope and frequency of these disasters is expanding quickly. And it’s not solved by sprinkling more wind and solar on the grid — it’s a planning issue of the highest magnitude. 

Our guest is someone who is thinking through the complexities of dealing with the growing impact of climate change on the geography, economy and the infrastructure of the world’s fifth-biggest economy.

In part 2 of our climate risk series, Shayle Kann talks with Kate Gordon, director of the office of planning and research for California. She is also senior advisor to Governor Gavin Newsom on climate. 

It sounds like a dry job title. But it is an incredibly complicated role.

Topics covered in this episode:

  • What are the risks the state of California faces due to climate change, today and in the future? How are the expanding?
  • How should we think about housing policy and urban planning in light of wildfire risk? Should we be rebuilding homes that were burned down? How do we deal with rising insurance premiums?
  • How might climate change contribute to water scarcity in the state, and what can be done today to mitigate that risk?
  • What other climate risks should be at the forefront of Californians' minds — flooding, temperature, rise, impact on agriculture, etc?
  • Are events like wildfires and power shutoffs galvanizing the public into taking action around climate resilience? If so, in what form?
  • Does California look to any other countries as exemplary in building climate resilience? Who is doing it right?

Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Nov 07 2019

41mins

Play

Climate Risk, Part 1: How Do We Measure It?

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This week, we present the first episode in our 3-part interview series on climate risk. How do we measure and quantify both the physical and economic risk of a warming planet?

This question has very real consequences for the way companies are run, the way cities are planned, and the way markets are valued.

In this episode, Shayle Kann speaks with Trevor Houser, a partner with Rhodium Group. 

Rhodium Group and Blackrock recently wrote a report on the underpriced risks of climate change throughout the economy.

Topics covered in this episode:

  • What counts as "climate risk,” and how is it distinguished from all the risks we face independent of climate change?
  • The state of climate risk reporting: How has our ability to measure climate risk improved? How much certainty can we provide today? What gaps remain?
  • Examples of climate risk in municipal bonds, commercial real estate, and energy & utilities.
  • How big a challenge is it to get different players (investors, insurers, corporations, etc) to account for climate risk? How should they be thinking about it?

Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. 

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Oct 30 2019

49mins

Play

The Internet-of-Things Promise in Buildings [Special Content From Centrica]

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This week, we present a special episode in collaboration with Centrica Business Solutions and GTM Creative Strategies.

For the last decade and a half, we’ve been hearing about how the internet-of-things would completely reshape how our buildings operate -- and how people operate within them.

But while the layer of digital tech in buildings is advancing all the time, the IOT revolution is taking longer to play out than some expected.

“In short, a lot of the promise has not been fulfilled,” says Paul Kuehn, a senior sales director for distributed energy at Centrica Business Solutions.

“I don't think it's necessarily a measure of the technology at this point. We've gotten past the hype of having the devices. It's the use of the devices and the competency of the operators to be able to figure out how to solve problems with those devices,” explains Kuehn.

By next year, there will be 10 billion IOT devices connected to the cloud globally. In another three years, the number will more than double to 22 billion.

Billions of those devices -- sensors, intelligent lighting and HVAC systems, control systems -- are being deployed in commercial buildings and industrial facilities. They’re making buildings smarter. But are they making the people who run buildings any smarter?

We brought Paul Kuehn together with Darren Cooper, the president of Renteknik Group, to answer that question and discuss the state of play for IOT in C&I buildings.

This podcast was produced on behalf of Centrica Business Solutions. Centrica is using analytics, market know-how, and distributed technologies to help C&I customers take control of their energy use and improve their environmental performance.

Oct 30 2019

28mins

Play

3 Barometers of the Energy Transition

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This week: three barometers of the energy transition.

There are a lot of numbers flying at us every day — and it is our job to figure what they indicate about change. 

In this episode, we’ll choose three different numbers from the transportation, heating and electricity sectors, and explain what they mean.

At the end, we’ll choose which stat is most important.

Follow along with us:

Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. Schneider Electric is pioneering solutions like microgrids, for everything from community resiliency to higher adoption of electric vehicles.

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Oct 24 2019

24mins

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Can Venture Capital Make America Do Tough Things Again?

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Could you do us a favor? Take our listener survey so we can give you more relevant content: bit.ly/gtmpodcast

Venture capital is an effective source of money for scaling companies quickly. But what if your company needs 15 years to prove itself?

That’s the time horizon for many “tough tech” companies in energy that are developing new semiconductors, industrial processes, chemical production methods, and long-duration storage systems.

The first cleantech bubble showed the limits of VC in backing tough, capital-intensive tech. So we are asking: can venture capital ever step up to the big industrial-scale challenges of our day?

Our guest, Katie Rae, believes it can. Katie is the CEO and managing partner at The Engine, a venture firm based in Cambridge, Mass that invests in a wide-ranging sector she calls tough tech.

Katie joins us to explain why she’s hopeful that startups doing difficult things are finding more opportunities to connect with investors.

You can also learn more about The Engine’s upcoming Tough Tech summit next week.

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. Schneider Electric is pioneering solutions like microgrids, for everything from community resiliency to higher adoption of electric vehicles.

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

Oct 18 2019

39mins

Play

What’s Driving the Residential Battery Surge?

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The market for home batteries is picking up.

Residential storage capacity installations outpaced utility-scale installations in the second quarter of this year. There were more residential batteries installed in Q2 than in all of 2017.

So what’s driving the mini-boom?

Residential storage doesn’t mirror other technologies like solar. It’s more of an emotional sell — and there are a lot different value propositions that contribute to battery sales. 

In this episode, Shayle Kann talks with GTM Staff Writer Julian Spector about the latest trends in residential storage.

Read GTM's recent coverage of the battery market:

Support for the Interchange comes from Schneider Electric, the leader of the digital transformation in energy management and automation. Schneider Electric is pioneering solutions like microgrids, for everything from community resiliency to higher adoption of electric vehicles. 

Oct 07 2019

48mins

Play

The Stranded Asset Threat to Natural Gas

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There are $70 billion worth of natural gas-fired power plants planned in the U.S. through the mid 2020s. But a combination of wind, solar, batteries and demand-side management could threaten 90 percent of those investments.

New modeling from the Rocky Mountain Institute shows that more than 60 gigawatts of new gas plants are already economically challenged. And by the mid 2030s, existing gas plants will be under threat.

How severe is the threat? Could we eventually see tens of gigawatts of stranded gas plants?

RMI set out to answer that question in two reports on the economics of gas generation and gas pipelines. The tipping point is now.

Our guest, Mark Dyson, is a principal at RMI and one of the co-authors of the analysis. He joins us to talk about the modeling, the threat, and the consequences to power providers and investors.

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

We're also brought to you by Uplight, the company you once knew as Tendril and Simple Energy. The goal is still the same: to offer utility leaders a suite of engagement solutions that deliver customer experiences like Amazon and Netflix. Learn more about how Uplight is building an end-to-end product for utility customer engagement.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherSpotify or wherever you find your audio content. Or integrate our RSS feed into the app of your choice.

Sep 27 2019

41mins

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The Age of 100%

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We are now in a new age for clean energy: the age of 100%.

Every week, we get some new declaration from a corporation, a city, a state or a utility that they are going 100%.

But not all targets are created equal. 100% what? 100% clean? 100% renewable? 100% carbon free? Net zero emissions?

To someone who doesn’t follow energy closely, they may all seem like the same thing. But these targets often vary wildly in terms of timing, ambition, and complexity.

So this week: we are surveying the range of targets: which ones matter, what do they add up to, and have they changed what’s possible?

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

We're also brought to you by Uplight, the company you once knew as Tendril and Simple Energy.

The goal is still the same: to offer utility leaders a suite of engagement solutions that deliver customer experiences like Amazon and Netflix. Learn more about how Uplight is building an end-to-end product for utility customer engagement.

Subscribe to The Interchange podcast via Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherSpotify or wherever you find your audio content. Or integrate our RSS feed into the app of your choice.

Sep 20 2019

46mins

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Tesla’s Solar Gigafactory Struggles

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New York State offered Tesla $750 million to turn Buffalo into a solar manufacturing hub — why hasn’t Tesla delivered on the vision it promised?

It’s been five years since SolarCity first declared plans to become a solar manufacturer, and nearly three years since Musk unveiled the solar roof. Tesla had plans to pump out thousands of solar roofs per week by now. But the company has quietly struggled to build out any meaningful production in its Buffalo location.

Customers are angry. Buffalo locals and New York politicians feel burned. And employees are jaded. What do we make of the Gigafactory 2 debacle? 

We’re joined by Austin Carr, a reporter at Bloomberg, who’s been covering the Tesla solar story better than anyone else. 

We’ll look at the history of SolarCity/Tesla’s manufacturing plans, the derailed plans for the solar roof, and how current manufacturing activity compares with Tesla’s promises to New York.

Read Austin’s reporting on Tesla’s solar business:

  • Bloomberg: Did Elon Musk Forget About Buffalo?
  • Fast Company: The Real Story Behind Tesla’s Acquisition of SolarCity

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

The Interchange is brought to you by Uplight, the company you once knew as Tendril and Simple Energy.

The goal is still the same: to offer utility leaders a suite of engagement solutions that deliver customer experiences like Amazon and Netflix. Learn more about how Uplight is building an end-to-end product for utility customer engagement.

Sep 10 2019

53mins

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How Bad Are Oil & Gas Methane Leaks?

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This week: how much methane are U.S. oil & natural gas drillers emitting? The data is accumulating — and it’s not looking good. 

A recent Wall Street Journal analysis found yearly methane emissions were equivalent to 69 million cars on the road. Some estimates are higher. The United Nations says yearly methane leaks may amount to adding nearly 100 million cars. 

As activist investors put more pressure on oil & gas drillers to deal with methane leaks, producers are now admitting there’s a problem. Meanwhile, they’re also touting “sustainably fracked” gas that comes from sources with fewer methane emissions.

But what will happen to industry efforts to clean up methane leaks now that the Trump Administration is rolling back regulations?

We are talking with Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca Elliott, who’s been covering this leakage issue very closely. She’ll detail investor pressure, the impact of regulations, and why so many big drillers support slashing methane.

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

The Interchange is brought to you by Uplight, the company you once knew as Tendril and Simple Energy.

The goal is still the same: to offer utility leaders a suite of engagement solutions that deliver customer experiences like Amazon and Netflix. Learn more about how Uplight is building an end-to-end product for utility customer engagement.

You can listen to Uplight’s five-part podcast series, called Illuminators, about what utilities can learn from case studies of business disruption. Subscribe on AppleSpotifyGoogle PodcastsStitcher or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Sep 05 2019

36mins

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How the Kochs Built an Industrial Empire and Reshaped Politics

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This week, we have an interview with Christopher Leonard, author of a new book, “Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America.”

Earlier this month, David Koch passed away. And it suddenly got everyone talking about the Koch Brothers again. 

It got us thinking about them too — not just their role in politics, but about the company they built. Koch Industries is one of the most influential energy and industrial firms in the world. And the way the Kochs have run their company tells us a lot about their approach to conservative politics. 

With David and Charles Koch back in the public spotlight, we’re talking with Christopher about their business practices, libertarian philosophies, and influence on politics.

Support for this podcast comes from PG&E. Did you know that 20 percent of EV drivers in the U.S. are in PG&E’s service area in Northern California? PG&E is helping to electrify corporate fleet vehicles. Get in touch with PG&E’s EV specialists to find out how you can take your transportation fleet electric.

The Interchange is also brought to you by Uplight, the company you once knew as Tendril and Simple Energy.

The goal is still the same: to offer utility leaders a suite of engagement solutions that deliver customer experiences like Amazon and Netflix. Learn more about how Uplight is building an end-to-end product for utility customer engagement.

You can listen to Uplight’s five-part podcast series, called Illuminators, about what utilities can learn from case studies of business disruption. Subscribe on AppleSpotifyGoogle PodcastsStitcher or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 31 2019

45mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

329 Ratings
Average Ratings
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4
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One of the best out there.

By DanielWGreen - Jan 10 2020
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Highly recommend you give this a listen.

Favorite energy podcast

By Energy analyst - Jan 01 2020
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I listen to several energy podcasts. This is my favorite one by far.