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Rank #18 in How To category

Education
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Teaching in Higher Ed

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Rank #18 in How To category

Education
How To
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Thank you for checking out the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. This is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to increase our personal productivity, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

Read more

Thank you for checking out the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. This is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to increase our personal productivity, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

iTunes Ratings

271 Ratings
Average Ratings
246
19
1
1
4

Most Valuable

By buskilla - Mar 29 2019
Read more
An incredibly useful and fun resource for faculty! Most treasured.

Professor

By JSomething2013 - Mar 26 2018
Read more
I just discovered this podcast and it has already changed my teaching!

iTunes Ratings

271 Ratings
Average Ratings
246
19
1
1
4

Most Valuable

By buskilla - Mar 29 2019
Read more
An incredibly useful and fun resource for faculty! Most treasured.

Professor

By JSomething2013 - Mar 26 2018
Read more
I just discovered this podcast and it has already changed my teaching!
Cover image of Teaching in Higher Ed

Teaching in Higher Ed

Latest release on Oct 27, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 4 days ago

Rank #1: Rethinking Higher Education

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Wendy Purcell shares about rethinking higher education on episode 207 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I think you’re seeing that universities now are needing to be much more connected to the society we serve.
—Wendy Purcell

You really will be learning throughout your life.
—Wendy Purcell

The very best education should transform you.
—Wendy Purcell

You are supporting transformation of people, and through people, transformation of society at large.
—Wendy Purcell

Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
—Socrates

To an unprecedented extent, universities must partner with government, business, and civil society to take on the grand challenges of sustainable development that lie ahead.
—Jeff Sachs

If you want to build a ship, don’t herd people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.
—Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Resources Mentioned

RECOMMENDATIONS

Pod Save the People Podcast: Year Gone By
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Educated: A memoir by Tara Westover
RECOMMENDED BY:Wendy Purcell


World Time Buddy
RECOMMENDED BY:Wendy Purcell

May 31 2018

35mins

Play

Rank #2: Get More Meaningful Work Done

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Dr. Robert Talbert talks about how to get more meaningful work done on episode 120 of Teaching in Higher Ed.

Quotes from the episode

90% of the emails I get in my inbox are not actionable.
—Robert Talbert

The human brain is fantastic for processing information but it’s terrible for storing information.
—Robert Talbert

Sometimes the busyness we have is entirely self-inflicted; we work hard because we’re disorganized.
—Robert Talbert

Say yes to the things that matter and say no to everything else.
—Robert Talbert

Resources

The Five Steps

  1. Capture
  2. Clarify
    • Dave and Bonni talk about clarify and organize on episode #41
  3. Organize
  4. Review
  5. Engage

RECOMMENDATIONS

Sanebox*
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Todoist
RECOMMENDED BY:Robert Talbert


Todoist Pricing
RECOMMENDED BY:Robert Talbert

Sep 29 2016

43mins

Play

Rank #3: Practical instructional design

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Edward Oneill joins me to talk about practical instructional design.

Podcast notes

Practical instructional design

Guest

Edward Oneill, Senior instructional designer at Yale.

Teach Better Podcast

I know a little bit about a lot of things. – Edward Oneill (and also Diana Krall, etc.)

What Edward's clients often need

  • intuitively-appealing ways of conceptualizing the learning process
  • a survey of the relevant tools & which fit their needs & capacities

Edward's special skill

…finding the points in the learning process where assessment and evaluation can be woven in seamlessly

Design approach of Edward's early courses

Successes

  • Made sure students had to do something every week
  • Ensured consistent deadlines
  • Weekly messages, creatively introducing them to that week

Failures

  • Disconnected topics, no second chances

You don't learn anything by doing it once. – Edward Oneill

  • Not opportunities for practice

I wanted to see it as the students' fault. It's so hard to get out of that [mindset]. – Edward Oneill

Biggest challenges in our teaching

  • We know our content, but we don't realize how tightly packed our knowledge is…
  • Edward's blog post about the Five stages of teaching
  • Peter Newbury – prior Teaching in Higher Ed guest on episode #053 shared about recall / connections

Rehearsal and elaboration

It's about stepping away from the center and helping [students] communicate with each other. – Edward Oneill

Methods for incorporating assessment and evaluation into the design of courses

  • Have shorter/smaller forms of assessment that aren't necessarily graded 100% of the time
  • Use their performance as your own assessment

Bonni shares about teaching with Ellen's Heads Up iPad game

Jeopardy game as form of reinforcement

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Parker Palmer quote

I am a teacher at heart, and there are moments in the classroom when I can hardly hold the joy. When my students and I discover uncharted territory to explore, when the pathway out of a thicket opens up before us, when our experience is illumined by the lightning-life of the mind—then teaching is the finest work I know. – Parker Palmer

Edward comments:

There is a special privilege in people letting you help them grow and change. – Edward Oneill

Edward recommends:

On Becoming a Person, by Carl Rogers

As a teacher, I need to see you as a unique learner. If I really try to understand you and try to help you grow, it is not so much about information transfer; it is a more humane kind of relationship. – Edward Oneill

When you're passionate about teaching and you focus on it and you try to improve – you do. – Edward Oneill

Closing notes

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

Aug 06 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #4: Developing critical thinking skills

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Tine Reimers helps us define the term critical thinking and truly start developing our students' skills.

PODCAST NOTES

[GUEST ]

Tine Reimers

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Specialist
Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning
Vancouver Island University

Critical Thinking

Defining critical thinking (and the inherent challenges when we want to improve critical thinking in our students, without actually agreeing, collectively, on what we mean)

Different disciplines define critical thinking differently than each other

Difficulty in the concrete way in how to get students to think critically in the discipline-specific way that I'm trying to develop…

HANDOUT: Taxonomy of [some] critical thinking theories

* Developmental
– what gets emphasized?
– a few of the thinkers/researchers who posit this theory

* Learning styles / bio-neurological models of thought
Article from Wired: All you need to know about learning styles
– what gets emphasized?
– a few of the thinkers/researchers who posit this theory

* Categories of cognitive skills
– what gets emphasized?
– a few of the thinkers/researchers who posit this theory

* Processes of self (in culture and society)
– what gets emphasized?
– a few of the thinkers/researchers who posit this theory

Episode with stephenbrookfield/15

Suggestions to grow critical thinking

  • Invert the classroom intellectually
  • Give the students practice in situations of ambiguity and complexity

[Correction: I said I was listening to the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, but I meant that I was listening to the Inside Higher Ed podcast on competency-based programs]

  • Each team gets a significant problem to work on
  • Give the same problem to all the groups in the class
  • Limited set of choices as right answers
  • Which is the best answer to this problem
  • Simultaneous report in the classroom
  • Clickers or cards in class
  • Why did you say D?

Next steps

Flip the classroom – all of class period is around problem solving and sticking to your guns

Rabbit holes are a way of thinking… and we don't give our students enough chances to do that type of thinking in foundational classes.

ARTICLE: First day questions for learner-centered classrooms, by Gary Smith, University of New Mexico

Michelson and Fink’s team based learning approach

RECOMMENDATIONS

From Tine:

Feb 26 2015

37mins

Play

Rank #5: Becoming an Authentic Online Teacher

Jan 10 2019

40mins

Play

Rank #6: Teach Students How to Learn

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Saundra Y. McGuire discusses how to teach students how to learn on episode 132 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Learning is a process, not an activity.
–Saundra Y. McGuire

Physical activity is really important to having the brain operate at peak efficiency.
–Saundra Y. McGuire

Pretending that you’re teaching information is a great way to practice retrieval of that information.
–Saundra Y. McGuire

Students who may be failing our courses miserably are not failing because they are not capable; they are failing because they don’t have strategies to successfully manage the information.
–Saundra Y. McGuire

When we believe it’s possible, then we can help students believe it’s possible.
–Saundra Y. McGuire

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Saundra McGuire: Strategies to Teach Students How to Learn
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Dave’s holiday gifts for leaders post
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Handy Head Massager*
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Yoga for Wimps* by Miriam Austin
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Becoming a Master Student* by Dave Ellis
RECOMMENDED BY:Saundra McGuire


The New Science of Learning* by Terry Doyle and Todd Zakrajsek
RECOMMENDED BY:Saundra McGuire


How the Stress of Racism Effects Learning by Melinda D. Anderson, in The New Yorker
RECOMMENDED BY:Saundra McGuire

Dec 22 2016

37mins

Play

Rank #7: Motivating Students in Large Classes

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Brenda Gunderson shares approaches for motivating large classes on episode 160 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I’m always looking for one new thing, one new idea to try in an upcoming term.

I think it’s important that I keep learning. And not just learning inside my own discipline, but learning outside my discipline.

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Try Something New
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Rosie Revere, Engineer/ by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts *
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Be Mindful
RECOMMENDED BY:Brenda Gunderson


How to be Mindful While Eating Chocolate
RECOMMENDED BY:Brenda Gunderson


How to be Mindful While Taking a Shower
RECOMMENDED BY:Brenda Gunderson


Wellness Articles from NYTimes – How to be Mindful
RECOMMENDED BY:Brenda Gunderson

Jul 06 2017

42mins

Play

Rank #8: Universal design for learning

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Mark Hofer shares how he implements Universal Design for Learning in his teaching, so that all students have the opportunity to learn.

Podcast notes

Guest: Mark Hofer

Universal design for learning

Student, Tony, who helped Mark identify the need for Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

gives all individuals equal opportunities to learn. – National Center on Universal Design for Learning

If you think about [the UDL] components as you're designing your course, you're going to wind up with better learning experiences for all your students. – Mark Hofer

Addressing concerns about UDL

We inadvertently put up barriers for our students in their learning.

Mark's compare and contrast example, written about on his blog

Get started incorporating UDL into a course

Step 1:

  • What do I know that students struggle with related to this [topic or competency]?

Step 2:

  • What kind of options could I include to help them with [those common challenges]?

It does take students some time to get used to the idea that there may be more than one way to [accomplish] something. – Mark Hofer

Guidelines

  • Engagement – Mark is building his course around badges and experiences (through gamification and choice)

…goal is to try to make the learning as relevant and interesting to the learning, not just initially, but to sustain their interest in the learning… – Mark Hofer

  • Representation – pulling together readings, videos, interactives, where you can choose the way to learn
  • Action and expression – Mark is creating, for each project, 3 different options, all measured by the same rubric

While it is more [work] to select the various kinds of resources, it's paid back when in class the students are more prepared and we can go into further depth. -Mark Hofer

Getting started with UDL

Don't try to do [UDL] for every lesson, every day; it's a recipe for burnout. – Mark Hofer

  • Make sure all assignments aren't of the same type, over the course of a semester
  • “Pick a topic / concept that you know that students struggle with and try to find a range of different materials and see if it makes a difference.” – Mark Hofer

Common misconception about UDL

  • While technology can help you implement UDL, it isn't dependent on using it…
  • UDL is an instructional approach and does not require technology

In relation to universal design

If you apply good accessibility practices to [course content], it will really benefit multiple learners in the process. – Mark Hofer

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Mark recommends:

Closing notes

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

Jul 23 2015

38mins

Play

Rank #9: What to do before you act on all you've captured

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Bonni and Dave Stachowiak discuss what to do before you act on all you’ve captured.

PODCAST NOTES:

Episode #32 talked about capture. All the places where we capture what it is we need to do (either because of others’ demands, or freeing up our mind of the “clutter” of stuff that needs doing).

Clarify and organize

Before we do any of it… we need to:

  1. Clarify – process what it means
  2. Organize – put it where it belongs

For each item we have captured, we ask:

What action needs to take place?

Follow this GTD guide

If it isn’t actionable, are you going to need it in the future for reference?

Avoid becoming a digital hoarder

How I store files related to class content and specific classes

Don’t get carried away with folders, especially email, because as we read more on our mobile devices, pretty long to scroll through.

Dropbox debuts file commenting; rolls out “badge” for collaborating on Microsoft documents

Evernote/OneNote: another place not to get carried away with folders. Work, personal, reference + any shared notebooks (i.e. bondbox)

Actionable tasks

Put it into a trusted system, so you can consider it in relation to all your other priorities.

goodreads

IMDB

Dave's Coaching for Leaders episode #180: Do this for a productive week

Only set due dates for things that actually have due dates

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Bonni recommends:

Read/re-read the revised Getting Things Done, by David Allen
Buy a set of their guides
Check out Scannable app

Dave recommends:

Ulysses app

Mar 26 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #10: Approaches to calendar management

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Bonni and Dave Stachowiak talk calendar management.

Podcast notes

Guest: Dave Stachowiak

Dave shared about his “Wayne's World” moment, coming back as a guest on the show.

Chart on Twitter about service hours invested by gender/race:

hrs/wk assoc. profs spend on service by race/gender pic.twitter.com/vf4EA7xL6L

— Tressie Mc (@tressiemcphd) June 28, 2015

Keep the calendar’s purpose central

Exceptions to only having items calendared that have to happen at a particular time

  • Grading, as a means of budgeting time

See the big picture

My/our set up

  • Mac Calendar (BusyCal)
  • Exchange / Outlook
  • Planbook
  • RSS Calendar Subscriptions
  1. Preschool
  2. TIHE from Asana
  3. US holidays

Make it easy for your students and other stakeholders

  • TimeTrade for office hours and podcasting appointments
  • Time blocks

Support collaboration through scheduling tools

Review and reflect

  • Weekly review – each of us goes through a review each week to help us reflect on priorities and commitments
    • Look back to last week
    • Look forward next two weeks
  • Monthly review – the monthly review allows for a bigger picture view of how we are tracking toward goals
    • Look at next month

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Dave recommends:

Jul 02 2015

28mins

Play

Rank #11: Courses as Stories

Aug 16 2018

39mins

Play

Rank #12: Making online courses work

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In today’s episode, Doug McKee joins me to share about online courses. His Introduction to Econometrics class is taught about as close to an in-person as you can get, but without being bound by geographic barriers.

Guest: Doug McKee

Associate Chair and Senior Lecturer of Economics at Yale
http://economics.yale.edu/people/douglas-mckee

Website: http://dougmckee.net/
Teach Better blog and podcast: http://teachbetter.co/
Personal Blog: www.highvariance.net
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TeachBetterCo

Quotes regarding online courses:

We weren’t lowering the price, but we were lowering the geographic barriers.
–Doug McKee
You don’t need a big film crew, and snazzy digital effects; you just need to be clear, and communicate it well.
–Doug McKee
Students show up, and they don’t have any questions. What I do is come with questions.
–Doug McKee

Links:

Udacity: https://www.udacity.com/
Zoom: http://zoom.us/
Examity: http://examity.com/
Explain Everything iPad app: App Store Link*

Recommendations:

Bonni recommends:
Sherlock: IMDB
Doug recommends:
Poster sessions with students: Read blog post here
CS50 course: Syllabus
TeachBetter podcast: episode with David Malan

Nov 25 2015

38mins

Play

Rank #13: How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories behind Effective College Teaching

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Josh Eyler shares about his book How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories behind Effective College Teaching on episode 231 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Part of the purpose of college is to help students develop the skills to ask really great questions.
—Josh Eyler

People are conditioned to fear failure.
—Josh Eyler

How do we build in opportunities for mistakes and errors?
—Josh Eyler

Part of the work of college is to help our students figure out what they find meaningful in their lives and pursue that.
—Josh Eyler

Resources Mentioned

EPISODE SPONSOR

TextExpander

RECOMMENDATIONS

How to Take Great Photos on Your Smart Phone
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


The Hungry Mind, by Susan Engel *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


The Scientist in the Crib, by Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, and Patricia K. Kuhl, 
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


The Gift of Failure, Jessica Lahey *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


 Being Wrong, Kathryn Schulz *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler

Nov 15 2018

37mins

Play

Rank #14: How to Effectively Use Presentation Tools in Our Teaching

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Teddy Svoronos talks about how to effectively use presentation tools in our teaching on episode 168 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

A real tech win to me is a device that both enhances the student experience and also reduces friction.

—Teddy Svoronos

Think very carefully about what will enhance the learning of the people watching the presentation.

—Teddy Svoronos

When we adopt technology, there are are two considerations: how valuable it is and how much friction is it going to introduce.
—Teddy Svoronos

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

10.5” iPad Pro
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Write something down every day: Day One Journal
RECOMMENDED BY:Teddy Svoronos

Aug 31 2017

38mins

Play

Rank #15: Engage the Heart and Mind Through the Connected Classroom

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Ken Bauer shares how to engage the heart and mind through the connected classroom.

Quotes from the episode

I’m not going to be there and lecture; I want to really connect with my students.
—Ken Bauer

The number one difficulty for faculty in innovating in their practice is … fear.
—Ken Bauer

You’ve just got to take baby steps and change those things that you can change.
—Ken Bauer

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

TextExpander
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Feed WordPress 101 (Alan Levine): Building Connected Courses
RECOMMENDED BY:Ken Bauer


Alan Levine on Twitter
RECOMMENDED BY:Ken Bauer


YouCanBook.Me
RECOMMENDED BY:Ken Bauer

Aug 18 2016

36mins

Play

Rank #16: Flipped out

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Derek Bruff gives his unique take on the flipped classroom… what to have the students do before they enter the classroom and what to do once they get there.

PODCAST NOTES

Guest:

Dr. Derek Bruff

On Twitter

His blog

The flipped classroom

Shin, H. (2015) ‘Flipping the Flipped Classroom: The Beauty of Spontaneous and Instantaneous Close Reading’, The National Teaching & Learning Forum, 24(4), pp. 1–4. doi: 10.1002/ntlf.30027.

What are the experiences and activities we want to have our students engage in that will help them make sense of this material and have them do something interesting with it?” – Derek Bruff

Eric Mazur – learning as a 2 stage process

  1. Transfer of information (during class)
  2. Assimilation of that information by the students (outside the classroom)

A definition

  • A shift in time to that process
  • Class time spent on the assimilation process

The classic flipped classroom

  • Students encounter the info before class
  • Come to class already having exposure
  • Practice and feedback

Flipped Classroom resources

Vanderbilt flipping the classroom

FlippedClassroom.org

The Learning process

If students aren’t doing the pre-work before they come to class, the time together isn’t going to be well-served.” – Derek Bruff

Concerns that the flipped classroom is doubling the work for the students.

First exposure

Effective Grading, by Barbara Walvoord

Schwartz, Daniel L. and Bransford, John D.(1998)'A Time For Telling',Cognition and Instruction,16:4,475 — 522

Diet coke and Mentos experiment

This video is just an example of the Mentos/Diet Coke experiment; it isn't Derek's daughter

Creating times for telling

Students first need to encounter a problem, or a challenge, or something mysterious… and then that provides motivation to hear the 15 minute [explanation].” – Derek Bruff

  • Linear algebra course
  • Look at the board game Monopoly. What are the best places to buy on the board?
  • Markov chain modeling

Classes should do hands-on exercises before reading and video, Stanford researchers say. (2013, July 16). Retrieved 21 October 2015, from http://news.stanford.edu/news/2013/july/flipped-learning-model-071613.html

Even when you have defaults [in your teaching], you want to have good defaults…” – Derek Bruff

Peter Newbury on Teaching in Higher Ed talks about Peer Instruction

RECOMMENDATIONS

Bonni recommends:

  • Pictures as a means for reminders

Derek recommends:

Oct 22 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #17: Collaboration

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Maha Bali shares about collaboration.

Quotes

The reason virtual collaboration works really well is that there’s usually no hierarchy with the person you’re working with. —Maha Bali

If you want your students to collaborate, the main role of the educator is to provide them with something where collaboration is valuable. —Maha Bali

Virtually collaborating brings the conversations to people who can’t be there in person. —Maha Bali

If you want to keep learning, I think collaboration is necessary because you need to learn from somebody and with somebody. —Maha Bali

Resources

Are You Enjoying the Show?

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunesStitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Maggie Rogers, NYU student, sharing her story and her music with Pharrell Williams (artist-in-residence at NYU)
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Try out virtually connecting (check out www.virtuallyconnecting.org)
RECOMMENDED BY:Maha Bali


Digital Pedagogy Lab
RECOMMENDED BY:Maha Bali

Jul 07 2016

40mins

Play

Rank #18: How to Ungrade

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Jesse Stommel shares about how to ungrade on episode 217 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

The worst rubrics don’t create space for surprise or discovery.
—Jesse Stommel

Asking [students] to evaluate themselves ends up being a really important learning experience.
—Jesse Stommel

Something as complicated as learning can’t be reduced to … rows in a spreadsheet.
—Jesse Stommel

Just taking the grade off the table doesn’t do the harder work of demystifying that culture we’ve created in education.
—Jesse Stommel

Resources Mentioned

RECOMMENDATIONS

Ask: (Since we last got together) - What brought you life? What took life away?
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


The Final Year
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Deep Play, by Diane Ackerman
RECOMMENDED BY:Jesse Stommel


Icarus
RECOMMENDED BY:Jesse Stommel

Aug 09 2018

36mins

Play

Rank #19: The Joy of Teaching – Sustained

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Todd Zakrajsek and Bonni Stachowiak discuss how to sustain our joy of teaching on episode 280 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Don’t look for people who are like you, look for the people who are like the people you would like to be.
-Todd Zakrajsek

Schedule time and figure out ways to take care of yourself.
-Todd Zakrajsek

If you understand the importance and value of what you’re doing, it has more value for you.
-Todd Zakrajsek

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-Todd Zakrajsek

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Oct 24 2019

36mins

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Rank #20: How to use cognitive psychology to enhance learning

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Robert Bjork on using cognitive psychology to enhance learning.

PODCAST NOTES

Guest:

Dr. Robert Bjork

Common misperceptions

Belief that we work something like a man made recording device.

In almost every critical way, we differ from any such device.” – Robert Bjork

How can it be that we have all these years of learning things and formal education and then end up really not understanding the process? You might just think by sheer trial and error during all of our educational experiences we would come to understand ourselves better than we apparently do.” – Robert Bjork

We found all these different situations where the very same thing that produces forgetting then enhances learning if the material is re-studied again. Forgetting is a friend of learning.” – Robert Bjork

The spacing effect

  • Delay in re-studying information

The environmental context

  • If you study it again, then you're better off to study it in a different place.
  • This is counter to the advice to study in a single place.

Retrieval practice

When you recall something, it does far more to reveal that you did indeed have it in your memory.

“Using our memories shapes our memory.”- Robert Bjork

As we use our memories, the things we recall become more recallable. Things in competition with the memories become less recallable.”- Robert Bjork

We should input less and output more.”- Robert Bjork

Test yourself; retrieval practice

Low-stakes or no-stakes testing is key to optimizing learning.”- Robert Bjork

“When I say they become inaccessible, they are absolutely not gone.”- Robert Bjork

Interleaving

“In all those real-world situation where there's several related tasks or components to be learned, the tendency is to provide instruction in a block test. It seems to make sense to work on one thing at a time.”- Robert Bjork

“We are finding that interleaving leads to much better long-term retention. It slows the gain in performance during the training process but, then leads to much better long-term performance.”- Robert Bjork

“Forgetting is not entirely a negative process. There are a number of senses in which forgetting can be a good thing.”- Robert Bjork

“The very same people who just performed better, substantially, with interleaving, almost uniformly said that blocking helped them learn better.”- Robert Bjork

Desirable difficulties

They're difficulties in the sense that they pose challenges (increased frequency of errors) but they're desirable in that they foster the very goals of instruction (long-term retention and transfer of knowledge into new situations).

  1. Interleaving vs blocking
  2. Varying the conditions of learning and the examples you provide rather than keeping them constant
  3. Spacing vs massing (cramming)

“The word desirable is key. There's a lot of ways to make things difficult that are bad.”- Robert Bjork

The generation effect

Any time you can take advantage of what your students already know and give them certain cues so that they produce an answer, rather than you giving them an answer, you greatly enhance their long-term retention.”- Robert Bjork

Incorporating generation is a desirable difficulty but people have to succeed at the generation. If they fail, it is no longer a desirable difficulty.”- Robert Bjork

Errors are a key component of effective learning.”- Robert Bjork

Successful forgetting

  • Memory relies on being in the same situation
  • Present it in a different context, produces longer-term learning
  • Encode the information differently; encoding variability
  • Retrieval is powerful, but depends on success to make it so

Many things are involved in remembering people's names.” – Robert Bjork

Self regulated learning

The key is for us all to learn how to learn more effectively.”- Robert Bjork

As a consequence of our complex and rapidly changing world and also changes in technology and educational environments, more and more learning is happening outside any formal classroom setting. It's in our own hands.”

  • Across a lifetime

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

GoCognitive’s Robert Bjork videos on YouTube

Bob recommends:

Making things hard on yourself, but in a good way: Creating desirable difficulties to enhance learning

Several books on research on learning




Closing notes

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Oct 29 2015

33mins

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