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Rank #19 in How To category

Education
How To

Teaching in Higher Ed

Updated 2 days ago

Rank #19 in How To category

Education
How To
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Thank you for checking out the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. This is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to increase our personal productivity, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

Read more

Thank you for checking out the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. This is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to increase our personal productivity, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

iTunes Ratings

250 Ratings
Average Ratings
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4

Most Valuable

By buskilla - Mar 29 2019
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An incredibly useful and fun resource for faculty! Most treasured.

Professor

By JSomething2013 - Mar 26 2018
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I just discovered this podcast and it has already changed my teaching!

iTunes Ratings

250 Ratings
Average Ratings
227
18
0
1
4

Most Valuable

By buskilla - Mar 29 2019
Read more
An incredibly useful and fun resource for faculty! Most treasured.

Professor

By JSomething2013 - Mar 26 2018
Read more
I just discovered this podcast and it has already changed my teaching!

Listen to:

Cover image of Teaching in Higher Ed

Teaching in Higher Ed

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Thank you for checking out the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. This is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to increase our personal productivity, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

Rank #1: Team-based learning

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Jim Sibley shares about Team-based Learning.

Podcast Notes

Team-based learning has come up a few times on the show previously (Dr. Chrissy Spencer in Episode 25). Today, however, we dive deep into this teaching approach and discover powerful ways to engage students with Dr. Jim Sibley.

Guest: Jim Sibley

Jim Sibley is Director of the Centre for Instructional Support at the Faculty of Applied Science at University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. As a faculty developer, he has led a 12-year implementation of Team-Based Learning in Engineering and Nursing at UBC with a focus on large classroom facilitation. Jim has over 33 years of experience in faculty support, training, and facilitation, as well as managing software development at UBC. Jim serves on the editorial board of the Journal on Excellence in College Teaching.

Jim is an active member of the Team-Based Learning Collaborative and has served on its board and many of its sub-committees. He has mentored colleagues in the Team-Based Learning Collaborative’s Train the Trainer mentorship program. He is a co-author of the new book Getting Started with Team-Based Learning that was published by Stylus in July 2014. He is an international team-based learning consultant, having worked at schools in Australia, Korea, Pakistan, Lebanon, United States, and Canada to develop team-based learning programs.

Jim’s Book: Getting Started With Team-Based Learning

Jim's Website: www.learntbl.ca

More About Jim’s Personal Story:

Team-Based Learning Defined

  • A form of small-group learning that gets better with the bigger size of class you have. The idea is to discuss the question until you get to some sort of consensus.
    Team-based learning could easily be called decision-based learning, because as soon as you make a decision, you can get clear and focused feedback. That’s what team-based learning is all about.
  • Think about a jury, where you need brainpower. Then imagine you’re presenting the verdict, and you look around and see five other juries, on the same case as you. You can bet they’ve put a lot of thought into the verdict, and if they all have a different verdict than you, you can bet they’re going to give feedback.
  • Team-based learning is not a prohibition on lecturing…but it’s in smaller amounts, and it’s for a reason like answering a student need or question. An activity will often make students wish they knew about something, then you teach it.

About Teams

  • The Achilles heel of group work are students at different levels of preparedness.  Team discussion has a nice leveling effect.
  • Experience shows that smaller teams are the ones that have the most trouble
  • 5-7 students is the ideal size for a group.
  • Big teams work because you’re asking them to make a decision, and that’s something teams are naturally good at.
  • Because team-based learning is focused on teaching with decisions, there is less opportunity for people to ride on the coattails of others.
  • Instructors don’t have to teach about team dynamics or decision-making processes because teams are naturally motivated to engage in good discussion (if their conclusion is different than every other group, there will naturally be a lot of feedback).

The Team-Building Process:

  • The instructor builds teams, trying to add diversity to each team.
  • The instructor of a large class can do an online survey for diversity of assets.
  • Even freshman classes can have diversity (different people are better at different subjects).
  • CATME has an online team maker function, as does GRumbler.

Should students ever elect their own teams?

  • Student-selected teams are typically a disaster, mostly because they’re a social entity, and you tend to pick people that are the same as you.
  • It does work when students are passionate about the project.

Team-based learning requires commitment:

  • Team-based learning is something you have to commit to, not just something you try on for a day. it’s not a pedagogy that you can sprinkle on top of your lecture course; it’s a total change to the contract between you and your students.
  • It used to be that you were a “sage on the stage” or a “guide on the side.” Team-based learning means you’re a “sage on the side.”
  • Roles change. Everybody is uncomfortable at the beginning; students are in a new role, you’re in a new role.
  • You’ll get some student resistance, but if you commit, student evaluations at the end of the semester will show that students rate team-based learning courses better than conventional ones.
  • Teachers who do commit talk about “joy” and say things like “I’m falling in love with teaching again” and “class is so much fun.”

When should we use Team-based learning? Any cautions?

  • It works for all disciplines, but if you, as a teacher, are a last-minute person, be cautious with team-based learning. Because you’re making your students uncomfortable, and they’re looking for someone to pin it on, and if you’re disorganized, you'll become a target.
  • For teachers, it’s a similar amount of work as a traditional course, but because you have to do all the work upfront, it might seem like more.

Resources

Recommendations

  • Bonni uses Feedly to subscribe to student blogs. It serves up all new student posts in one place, saving her from having to go to each blog individually. Feedly Pro allows you to gather student blogs, and then students can subscribe to the class collection with one click.
  • Jim recommends an article in the Journal of Excellence in College Teaching by Bill Roberson and Billie Franchini. The article discusses why some teaching activities seem to crash while some seem to soar.

Nov 05 2015

37mins

Play

Rank #2: Teaching Naked Techniques

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C. Edward Watson joins me to talk about Teaching Naked Techniques on episode #137 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

How to Update Your LinkedIn Profile for 2017
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain* by John J. Ratey and Eric Hagerman
RECOMMENDED BY:C. Edward Watson

Jan 26 2017

46mins

Play

Rank #3: Practical instructional design

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Edward Oneill joins me to talk about practical instructional design.

Podcast notes

Practical instructional design

Guest

Edward Oneill, Senior instructional designer at Yale.

Teach Better Podcast

I know a little bit about a lot of things. – Edward Oneill (and also Diana Krall, etc.)

What Edward's clients often need

  • intuitively-appealing ways of conceptualizing the learning process
  • a survey of the relevant tools & which fit their needs & capacities

Edward's special skill

…finding the points in the learning process where assessment and evaluation can be woven in seamlessly

Design approach of Edward's early courses

Successes

  • Made sure students had to do something every week
  • Ensured consistent deadlines
  • Weekly messages, creatively introducing them to that week

Failures

  • Disconnected topics, no second chances

You don't learn anything by doing it once. – Edward Oneill

  • Not opportunities for practice

I wanted to see it as the students' fault. It's so hard to get out of that [mindset]. – Edward Oneill

Biggest challenges in our teaching

  • We know our content, but we don't realize how tightly packed our knowledge is…
  • Edward's blog post about the Five stages of teaching
  • Peter Newbury – prior Teaching in Higher Ed guest on episode #053 shared about recall / connections

Rehearsal and elaboration

It's about stepping away from the center and helping [students] communicate with each other. – Edward Oneill

Methods for incorporating assessment and evaluation into the design of courses

  • Have shorter/smaller forms of assessment that aren't necessarily graded 100% of the time
  • Use their performance as your own assessment

Bonni shares about teaching with Ellen's Heads Up iPad game

Jeopardy game as form of reinforcement

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Parker Palmer quote

I am a teacher at heart, and there are moments in the classroom when I can hardly hold the joy. When my students and I discover uncharted territory to explore, when the pathway out of a thicket opens up before us, when our experience is illumined by the lightning-life of the mind—then teaching is the finest work I know. – Parker Palmer

Edward comments:

There is a special privilege in people letting you help them grow and change. – Edward Oneill

Edward recommends:

On Becoming a Person, by Carl Rogers

As a teacher, I need to see you as a unique learner. If I really try to understand you and try to help you grow, it is not so much about information transfer; it is a more humane kind of relationship. – Edward Oneill

When you're passionate about teaching and you focus on it and you try to improve – you do. – Edward Oneill

Closing notes

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

Aug 06 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #4: Engaging Learners

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Gardner Campbell talks about engaging learners.

Quotes

Learning is an enormously powerful and eventful kind of experience.
—Gardner Campbell

Recognize that great ideas of all kinds come from all kinds of people at all stages of their knowledge.
—Gardner Campbell

There are some great ideas that are forever closed off to an expert because he or she is simply too conditioned by prior learning.
—Gardner Campbell

Resources

Are You Enjoying the Show?

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunesStitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The Great VCU Bike Race Book
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Jon Becker’s blog about the project
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Courses involved in the project
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Quadraphonic set of Chicago albums*
RECOMMENDED BY:Gardner Campbell


On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand* by Jerome Bruner
RECOMMENDED BY:Gardner Campbell


Toward a Theory of Instruction* by Jerome Bruner
RECOMMENDED BY:Gardner Campbell

Jun 30 2016

47mins

Play

Rank #5: How to Effectively Use Presentation Tools in Our Teaching

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Teddy Svoronos talks about how to effectively use presentation tools in our teaching on episode 168 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

A real tech win to me is a device that both enhances the student experience and also reduces friction.

—Teddy Svoronos

Think very carefully about what will enhance the learning of the people watching the presentation.

—Teddy Svoronos

When we adopt technology, there are are two considerations: how valuable it is and how much friction is it going to introduce.
—Teddy Svoronos

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

10.5” iPad Pro
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Write something down every day: Day One Journal
RECOMMENDED BY:Teddy Svoronos

Aug 31 2017

38mins

Play

Rank #6: Rethinking Higher Education

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Wendy Purcell shares about rethinking higher education on episode 207 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I think you’re seeing that universities now are needing to be much more connected to the society we serve.
—Wendy Purcell

You really will be learning throughout your life.
—Wendy Purcell

The very best education should transform you.
—Wendy Purcell

You are supporting transformation of people, and through people, transformation of society at large.
—Wendy Purcell

Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
—Socrates

To an unprecedented extent, universities must partner with government, business, and civil society to take on the grand challenges of sustainable development that lie ahead.
—Jeff Sachs

If you want to build a ship, don’t herd people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.
—Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Resources Mentioned

RECOMMENDATIONS

Pod Save the People Podcast: Year Gone By
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Educated: A memoir by Tara Westover
RECOMMENDED BY:Wendy Purcell


World Time Buddy
RECOMMENDED BY:Wendy Purcell

May 31 2018

35mins

Play

Rank #7: Research on Engaging Learners

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Peter Felten discusses the research on engaging learners on episode 216 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Notes from the episode


Shape what our students do and what they think in the most efficient ways possible.
—Peter Felten

Learning results from what the student does and thinks and only from what the student does and thinks. The teacher can advance learning only by influencing what the student does to learn. (from How Learning Works by Ambrose et al., 2010, p. 1)

Five Things Students Need to Do:

  1. Time
  2. Effort
  3. Feedback
  4. Practice
  5. Reflect

Three Things Students Need to Think/Feel:

  1. “I belong here.”
  2. “I can learn this.”
  3. “I find this meaningful.”

Resources Mentioned

EPISODE SPONSOR

TextExpander

RECOMMENDATIONS

Amicus podcast with Dahlia Lithwick
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Campbell TC. When Minutes Matter. JAMA. 2015
RECOMMENDED BY:Peter Felten

Aug 02 2018

39mins

Play

Rank #8: Using Evernote in Higher Ed

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Scott Self and Bonni Stachowiak share how they each integrate Evernote into their classes and workflows. Even if you aren't an Evernote user, you're bound to pick up a few tips.

Podcast notes

Guest:

Scott Self

Director, University Access Programs, Abilene Christian University

Productive Nerd Blog

The landscape of options for notebook-type applications

Guidance on maximizing the value of course assets

Creating collaborative learning environments with Evernote

  • Use it in a uni-directional way, not necessarily a conversational tool…
  • Classroom becomes a kind of conversation around learning
  • Scott gives students the unique, Evernote email address to send notes to the class-specific evernote notebook
  • He sets permissions up so that he’s the only one who can edit the notes in the notebook – read-only

Getting started with Evernote

Scott’s posts

We both recommend

Big advantages of Evernote

  • Easy capture
    • On iOS – text, audio, sticky notes, documents (auto-size), photo
    • Web clipper
    • Drafts – iOS app – start typing
    • Email – lots of tricks to organize when you send
  • Search capabilities
  • Integration with other apps and services
  • Keeps one’s course out of the LMS environment – the instructor should own the material, not the LMS

Our advice

  • Grow with it (start with the basics and go from there)
  • Keep folder structure simple
    • Bonni uses just reference, work, and personal, along with a shared notebook and a couple required ones that store my LiveScribe pencasts
    • Scott has only a few notebooks. I do have one for each section of a course that I teach so that I can share lecture notes, resources, and “FYIs” with my students.
  • As a “Premium” user, we have access to the “Presenter” view. Scott says:

Students see my lecture notes in a clear and uncluttered presentation, and have access to the information in the shared notes. I prefer that students take notes about the lecture – rather than copying down what’s on the screen.

  • Use tags when you would have normally used a folder. Scott says:

Yes! The search function is so powerful, it is often faster to search for a note than to navigate through a tree of folders

  • Capture whiteboard brainstorms in meetings (will recognize your handwritten text). Scott says:

My students with disabilities have become infamous on campus for snapping pictures of whiteboards. This saves time (and frustration for the students with learning disabilities), and the snaps can be annotated.

  • Use the inbox for quick capturing and have an action in your task management system to process it however regularly you need to… Scott says:

This can be done very quickly, since you can select a number of notes and bulk process them (tagging, merging, or sending to a notebook)

When you get really geeky with Evernote

Recommendations

Scott recommends

Bonni recommends

The Checklist Manifesto

Closing credits

Celebrate episode 50 with us!

Please call 949-38-LEARN and leave a message with a take-away you've had from listening to Teaching in Higher Ed, and a recommendation.

May 14 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #9: Creating Immersive Learning Experiences in Online Courses

Feb 08 2018

36mins

Play

Rank #10: Professional Online Portfolios

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Today’s guest, Dr. McClain Watson, at University of Texas at Dallas, advocates for the importance of our students being able to: “ convince people in the professional world that they 1) know what they’re doing, 2) can be trusted, and 3) are interesting to be around?” On today’s episode: Professional Online Portfolios.

Guest: McClain Watson
Clinical Associate Professor, Director of Business Communication Programs Organizations, Strategy and International Management

Bio: http://jindal.utdallas.edu/faculty/john-watson

Resources

Sample portfolios

Are You Enjoying the Show?

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunesStitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Blog: Meaningful, moral, and manageable? The grading holy grail, Betsy Barre
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Album: Disintegrator by Daniel Markham
RECOMMENDED BY:McClain Watson


Album: Delusions of Grand Fur* by Rogue Wave
RECOMMENDED BY:McClain Watson

Jun 20 2016

35mins

Play

Rank #11: How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories behind Effective College Teaching

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Josh Eyler shares about his book How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories behind Effective College Teaching on episode 231 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Part of the purpose of college is to help students develop the skills to ask really great questions.
—Josh Eyler

People are conditioned to fear failure.
—Josh Eyler

How do we build in opportunities for mistakes and errors?
—Josh Eyler

Part of the work of college is to help our students figure out what they find meaningful in their lives and pursue that.
—Josh Eyler

Resources Mentioned

EPISODE SPONSOR

TextExpander

RECOMMENDATIONS

How to Take Great Photos on Your Smart Phone
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


The Hungry Mind, by Susan Engel *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


The Scientist in the Crib, by Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, and Patricia K. Kuhl, 
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


The Gift of Failure, Jessica Lahey *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler


 Being Wrong, Kathryn Schulz *
RECOMMENDED BY:Josh Eyler

Nov 15 2018

37mins

Play

Rank #12: Gifts for Learning and Productivity

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Dave and Bonni Stachowiak share ideas for holiday gifts on this special 181st episode of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

Nov 30 2017

35mins

Play

Rank #13: Recipes for Effective Teaching

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Elizabeth Barkley shares recipes for effective teaching on episode 263 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

If you don’t know where you’re going, how will you know when you get there?
—Elizabeth Barkley

Teaching and learning is a complex process that involves the interaction of human beings.
—Elizabeth Barkley

We can never go into a classroom with a completely rigid script.
—Elizabeth Barkley

Resources Mentioned

Elizabeth Barkley is an expert consultant for ACUE on the following course modules:

RECOMMENDATIONS

How to Get Out of a Battle of Wills With Your Kid
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Ask “Why is this important to you?”
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Remember: You are not alone
RECOMMENDED BY:Elizabeth Barkley


K. Patricia Cross Academy
RECOMMENDED BY:Elizabeth Barkley

Jun 27 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #14: Teaching Lessons from Course Evaluations

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Dave Stachowiak and I talk about teaching lessons from my course evaluations on episode 165 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I hope students realize that I’m learning too, and I’m willing to grow and change and adapt.
— Dave Stachowiak

Is there anything worthwhile you can glean from this [evaluation] that can make you a better teacher?
— Bonni Stachowiak

Resources Mentioned

Are You Enjoying the Show?

Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.

Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.

Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Keep a digital and a physical encouragement folder and use them, liberally.
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Use the Stop-Start-Continue model to get feedback from students.
RECOMMENDED BY:Dave Stachowiak

Aug 10 2017

43mins

Play

Rank #15: How to take a break

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Five faculty members share how they are spending their breaks and what recommendations they have for how to take a break…

Podcast notes

Ten things to do instead of checking email, by Natalie Houston (guest on episode #034)

How to take a break

  1. David Pecoraro from the Student Caring podcast
    Heading to Fresno for son's swim meet
    Reading: Building social business, by Mohammed Yunus
  2. Christine – teaches part time. Fighting with insurance companies over the break. Dealing with snow days.
  3. Nicholas – teaches in Doha, Qatar  (pronunciation of Likert scale)
    “My spring break is already over, but I spent it learning how to use ScreenFlow so I can help my MA students learn to use Zotero better.”
  4. Doug McKee from the Teach Better podcast
    Two week break from teaching at Yale
    Microsoft Word in review mode
    PDF expert 5 on the iPad
    Screencasting with Quicktime on the Mac (record screen and do light editing)
  5. Sandie Morgan from the Ending Human Trafficking podcast
    Engaging with others in diverse communities to combat human trafficking
    Expand circles of influence
    Connect app

Recommendations

BusyContacts

David Allen on the Coaching in Higher Ed podcast

Closing credits

Please consider rating or reviewing the podcast via your preferred podcast directory. It is the best way to help others discover the show (gotta love algorithms).

https://teachinginhighered.com/itunes

https://teachinginhighered.com/stitcher

Mar 19 2015

19mins

Play

Rank #16: Interactivity and inclusivity can help close the achievement gap

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Viji Sathy and Kelly Hogan describe how inclusivity can help close the achievement gap on episode 197 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

How do I communicate that their work ethic was actually more important than innate ability?
—Viji Sathy

When I first started teaching, I thought the classroom had to look a certain way.
—Kelly Hogan

The attention span of a class goes down the larger the class size.
—Kelly Hogan

Making a mistake is a big part of learning.
—Kelly Hogan

The more you do it, the more you start to see opportunities for improvement.
—Viji Sathy

Resources Mentioned

RECOMMENDATIONS

EJI 2018 Calendar
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


EJI's National Memorial for Peace and Justice
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Make an audio recording of your name
RECOMMENDED BY:Bonni Stachowiak


Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
RECOMMENDED BY:Kelly Hogan

Mar 22 2018

46mins

Play

Rank #17: What the best college teachers do

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Ken Bain describes What the Best College Teachers Do…

PODCAST NOTES

Guest: Ken Bain

President, Best Teachers Institute, Ken Bain (Twitter: @kenbain1)

“Internationally recognized for his insights into teaching and learning and for a fifteen-year study of what the best educators do”

“His now classic book What the Best College Teachers Do. (Harvard University Press, 2004) won the 2004 Virginia and Warren Stone Prize for an outstanding book on education and society, and has been one of the top selling books on higher education. It has been translated into twelve languages and was the subject of an award-winning television documentary series in 2007.”

He was the founding director of four major teaching and learning centers.

WHAT THE BEST COLLEGE TEACHERS DO

Many will be familiar with What the Best College Teachers Do… If not, press stop, and get your hands on it.

What’s still the same, in the >10 years since the book was published?

“Ask engaging questions that spark people’s curiosity and fascination that people find intriguing…”

What’s changed, if anything?

  • More definition around the natural critical learning environment
  • Started with 4-5 basic elements
  • Since then, they have identified 15 different elements…
  • Deep approach to learning; deep achievement in learning

[Good teaching] is about having students answer questions or solving problems that they find intriguing, interesting, or beautiful. (Ken Bain)

Learner isn’t in charge of the questions. Teacher can raise questions that the learner will never invent on their own.

Need to give learners the same kind of learning condition and environment that we expect as advanced learners.

[As an advanced learner, asking for input from colleagues]… I would expect an environment in which I would try, fail, receive feedback… and do that in advance of and separate from anybody's judgment or anyone's grading of my work. (Ken Bain)

Bonni's introduction to business students are listening to the StartUp Podcast and making recommendations to the founders in the form of a business plan

The tone that you set in the classroom matters

We often teach as if we are God. (Craig Nelson)

Need to recognize the contingency in our own knowledge.

As advanced learners in our respective fields, we are interested in certain questions, because we were once interested in another question. (Ken Bain)

Another important study by Richard Light at Harvard asked: What are the qualities of those courses at Harvard that students find most intellectually rewarding?

When he published his initial results:

  1. High, but meaningful standards… important to the students beyond the scope of the class.
  2. Plenty of opportunity to try, fail, receive feedback… try again… all in advance of an separate from any grading of their work

As a historian, could begin with: “What do you think it means to think like a good historian.” Think, pair, square, share… Would then have an article on hand that someone else had written on the topic. Ask them to look at that article to compare their own thinking with that.

Collaborative Learning: Higher Education, Interdependence, and the Authority of Knowledge, by Kenneth Bruffee

What people are doing when they learn something is joining a community of knowledgeable peers. (Kenneth Bruffee)

Essential to this whole process is engagement

Harvard Professor: Eric Mazure, winner of the $500k Minerva Prize

Peer instruction

RECOMMENDATIONS

Think, pair, share (Bonni)

The girl who saved the king of Sweeden, by Jonas Jonason (Ken)

@kenbain1

bestteachersinstitute.org

kenbain [at] usa [dot] com

Feb 19 2015

38mins

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Rank #18: Make large classes interactive

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It seems that the larger classes get, the more distant our students can seem. On today’s episode, Dr. Chrissy Spencer helps us discover how to make large classes interactive.

Even if you teach classes of 20, the resources she uses in her classes as large as 200+ will be of benefit.

Podcast notes

Guest: Dr. Chrissy Spencer, teaches at Georgia Tech

Ph.D., Genetics, University of Georgia

Active learning video: Turning students into chili peppers

The interactive classroom

  • Learning Catalytics
  • Prepared in advance a few slides that help clarify commonly misunderstood concepts
  • Allowing students to fail or struggle with an answer

Interrupted case studies

  • Traditionally a set of materials where there are specific stopping points built in
  • Powerful, because students need to have their progress monitored and milestones achieved
  • Bonni's case studies rubric
  • Forming groups
  • Catme team maker

Team-based, low stakes assessments

Switching from clickers to Learning Catalytics

Flipped classroom

  • Khan Academy
  • Reinforce that reading ahead and reading in a particular way is important to making the class time in interesting ways
  • Process called team based learning
  • Lesson learned/ ignored: “start small and do things in a small and measured way”
  • Evernote
  • TopHat audience response system

Service learning

The way that students could apply learning from a content area in the real world and also give back to the community in some way (Chrissy)

  • Identified project partners that met certain criteria
  • Outside in the field
  • CATME tool helped to determine who had cars

Recommendations

  • The Dip (Bonni)
  • Find something that you love and bring it in to the classroom (Chrissy)

Closing Credits

Dec 04 2014

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Rank #19: Universal design for learning

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Mark Hofer shares how he implements Universal Design for Learning in his teaching, so that all students have the opportunity to learn.

Podcast notes

Guest: Mark Hofer

Universal design for learning

Student, Tony, who helped Mark identify the need for Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

gives all individuals equal opportunities to learn. – National Center on Universal Design for Learning

If you think about [the UDL] components as you're designing your course, you're going to wind up with better learning experiences for all your students. – Mark Hofer

Addressing concerns about UDL

We inadvertently put up barriers for our students in their learning.

Mark's compare and contrast example, written about on his blog

Get started incorporating UDL into a course

Step 1:

  • What do I know that students struggle with related to this [topic or competency]?

Step 2:

  • What kind of options could I include to help them with [those common challenges]?

It does take students some time to get used to the idea that there may be more than one way to [accomplish] something. – Mark Hofer

Guidelines

  • Engagement – Mark is building his course around badges and experiences (through gamification and choice)

…goal is to try to make the learning as relevant and interesting to the learning, not just initially, but to sustain their interest in the learning… – Mark Hofer

  • Representation – pulling together readings, videos, interactives, where you can choose the way to learn
  • Action and expression – Mark is creating, for each project, 3 different options, all measured by the same rubric

While it is more [work] to select the various kinds of resources, it's paid back when in class the students are more prepared and we can go into further depth. -Mark Hofer

Getting started with UDL

Don't try to do [UDL] for every lesson, every day; it's a recipe for burnout. – Mark Hofer

  • Make sure all assignments aren't of the same type, over the course of a semester
  • “Pick a topic / concept that you know that students struggle with and try to find a range of different materials and see if it makes a difference.” – Mark Hofer

Common misconception about UDL

  • While technology can help you implement UDL, it isn't dependent on using it…
  • UDL is an instructional approach and does not require technology

In relation to universal design

If you apply good accessibility practices to [course content], it will really benefit multiple learners in the process. – Mark Hofer

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Mark recommends:

Closing notes

  1. Rate/review the show. Please consider rating or leaving a review for the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast on whatever service you use to listen to it on (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.). It is the best way to help others discover the show.
  2. Give feedback. As always, I welcome suggestions for future topics or guests.
  3. Subscribe. If you have yet to subscribe to the weekly update, you can receive a single email each week with the show notes (including all the links we talk about on the episode), as well as an article on either teaching or productivity.

Jul 23 2015

38mins

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Rank #20: Your teaching philosophy: The what, why, and how

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How to formulate, refine, and articulate your teaching philosophy.

Podcast notes

The academic portfolio: A practical guide to documenting teaching, research, and service by J. Elizabeth Miller

Miller provides examples of the narrative from actual promotion and tenure portfolios.

What is a teaching philosophy?

  • Why we teach. Why teaching matters.
  • Not just a formula for teaching structure, but the rationale behind the structure.

Why is having a teaching philosophy important?

Helps guide our teaching methods. Needed in the job hunting process. Typically part of the promotion/tenure process at most universities.

How to identify, articulate, & refine it?

Questions from The Academic Portfolio (p. 13):

  • What do I believe about the role of a teacher, the role of a student?
  • Why do I teach the way I do?
  • What doesn't learning look like when it happens?
  • Why do I choose the teaching strategies and the methods that I use?
  • How do I assess my students learning?

Questions of my own that  I have found useful in articulating my teaching philosophy:

  • Who are my students? How I describe them says a lot about how I approach my teaching.
  • Who am I, as an educator? How I describe myself says a lot about my teaching, too.
  • What is teaching? Is the purpose to convey information, or to facilitate learning (or something else altogether)?

Planet Money episode about young woman becoming a business owner in North Korea.

  • What are the artifacts of my teaching? Observable things.
  • What would I see/hear/experience that would be evidence of those beliefs, if I was in your class?
  • Espoused beliefs vs theories in use. Chris Argyris / Edgar Schein

Podcast updates

Thanks to Suzie RN for giving us our first iTunes review. We appreciate iTunes or Stitcher reviews from listeners, as it helps us get the word out about the show. Also, if you haven't done the listener survey yet, please do. That will help us continue to make the show better meet your needs.

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