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Rank #83 in Technology category

Technology
Science

Radio Motherboard

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #83 in Technology category

Technology
Science
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iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
9
4
3
4

No it is NOT good for you to Waste hours online! Pay attention to this world around you....

By Janejane0 - Nov 19 2018
Read more
Too many people obsessed with screens is causing our society more harm than good. As grandma said, everything in MODERATION...

Grow up

By LanMind - Mar 04 2017
Read more
I listened to the first podcast on right to fix and it was great. I liked the flow of the show and thought hey I'll check this out. Well, the very next one sounded like a bunch of kids sitting around a dorm room on a liberal campus whining about Trump and dropping "F" bombs every other word. How about stepping out of your safe space and creating a non political show. Unsubscribing ....

iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
9
4
3
4

No it is NOT good for you to Waste hours online! Pay attention to this world around you....

By Janejane0 - Nov 19 2018
Read more
Too many people obsessed with screens is causing our society more harm than good. As grandma said, everything in MODERATION...

Grow up

By LanMind - Mar 04 2017
Read more
I listened to the first podcast on right to fix and it was great. I liked the flow of the show and thought hey I'll check this out. Well, the very next one sounded like a bunch of kids sitting around a dorm room on a liberal campus whining about Trump and dropping "F" bombs every other word. How about stepping out of your safe space and creating a non political show. Unsubscribing ....
Cover image of Radio Motherboard

Radio Motherboard

Latest release on Jan 23, 2019

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 9 days ago

Rank #1: The Future of Hacking

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As our lives become ever more digitized, the security of our data will become ever more important to protect.

So far, judging by the daily routine of data breaches and large scale hacks, it seems like we're failing to secure our most precious digital belongings. As some in the world of information security say, everything will get hacked. But is that really true?

As part of The Hacks We Can't See, Motherboard's theme week exploring the future of hacking, we asked real hackers what they think the future holds. We also spoke to Morgan Marquis-Boire, a well-known security researcher who's spent the last few years hunting malware and helping human rights activists and journalists protect themselves.

What's the craziest thing that'll get hacked in the future? And what can you do to protect yourself? Listen to this week's episode of Radio Motherboard to find out.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 02 2016

52mins

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Rank #2: The Tide Is Shifting in Silicon Valley

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The same tech companies once heralded as crusaders of a bright future are increasingly being seen as hoarders of vast, unchecked power. Franklin Foer, a national correspondent for The Atlantic, has been questioning the intentions of corporations like Facebook and Google for years. On this episode of Radio Motherboard, Assistant Editor Louise Matsakis talks with Foer about his new book, World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Sep 25 2017

42mins

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Rank #3: Net Neutrality

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The FCC will vote later this week to repeal net neutrality protections. Radio Motherboard talks to BoingBoing co-founder and Electronic Frontier Foundation activist Cory Doctorow about what the next steps are to protect the open internet.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2017

32mins

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Rank #4: The DeLonge Con

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Former Blink 182 guitarist Tom DeLonge has a new project: telling the world the truth about UFOs. DeLonge has always been interested in the supernatural, and he’s been researching and reporting the topic as part of a multimedia project called Sekret Machines that involves books, movies, music, and other moving parts. His first book, co-written by bestselling author AJ Hartley, is a pageturner novel called Chasing Shadows about a skeptical journalist who runs a UFO debunking website, a Holocaust survivor, an heiress whose father mysteriously dies, and a Marine pilot who gets recruited into a secret government technology project at Area 51. Somehow, their stories all intersect.


Motherboard talked to DeLonge about this project and whether he really believes all this stuff about aliens. We also dive into the weird and wonderful world of conspiracy theorists in the longest Radio Motherboard episode to date.

  For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Apr 29 2016

1hr 51mins

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Rank #5: The Moon Walking, Alien-Hunting, Psychic Astronaut Who Got Sued By NASA

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Edgar Mitchell, who passed away in February at the age of 85, was exceptional, even among astronauts. Like an archetypal moon man, he was a Boy Scout and a military test pilot with a protestant upbringing and an impressive command of engineering and aeronautics. In February 1971, on Apollo 14, he became the sixth man on the moon. But more so than other astronauts, Mitchell’s brief exploration of outer space led to a deep exploration of inner space and the entire universe of phenomena explained and not. After conducting an ESP experiment in space, he became a connoisseur of parapsychology; later, he sought to show that aliens had visited Earth and that governments around the world had tried to cover up the truth. But he remained grounded on Earth too, and worried that civilization's narrow perspectives were exceedingly dangerous for the future of the planet and humanity.

(Read more at http://motherboard.vice.com/read/astronaut-edgar-mitchell-outer-space-inner-space-and-aliens)

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 13 2016

38mins

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Rank #6: Everything You Wanted to Know About the New York City Subway

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The New York City subway is sprawling system, with more than 5 million people per day (and sometimes many more, on special occasions) passing through more than 460 stations. There is probably someone who knows more about the intricacies of the system than Max Diamond, but whoever it is, I don't know him or her.

Diamond is a transportation engineering student at the City College of New York and a "rail fan"—he studies budgets and plans, delves into contracts and historical minutia, and, of course, pays close attention whenever he's riding the subway. Every time he rides it, he brings a camera on the off chance he spots something that's not quite right.

Diamond runs the DJ Hammers YouTube channel, which features roughly 1,500 videos shot on the subway. These videos feature trains entering and leaving stations, new and rare subway announcements, subway rails catching fire, and lots of other sorts... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 17 2015

52mins

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Rank #7: Elon Musk, Then and Now

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Radio Motherboard pulls a 2015 interview with Elon Musk's biographer Ashlee Vance, and talks about how perceptions about Musk and his companies have changed.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 31 2018

38mins

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Rank #8: The Hyperloop

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The hyperloop, Elon Musk’s futuristic, tube-based “fifth mode of transportation” has stoked imaginations unlike any recent transportation technology except for maybe self driving cars.

Lots has been said about it—Musk called it a “cross between a Concord, a railgun, and an air hockey table,” while the media has latched on to the promised speeds of more than 700 mph and travel times between San Francisco and Los Angeles of 35 minutes.

But much of the promise of the hyperloop still remains theoretical. That changed in a small way last weekend, when SpaceX hosted the first part of its “Hyperloop Pod Design Challenge,” a contest that asks 180 university teams to design the capsules that will actually go inside the hyperloop. In June, 22 of the teams will test their pods in a track being built by SpaceX. I traveled to Texas A&M University to meet the teams, meet the companies actually building the hyperloop, and to separate out the hype from what’s actually happening.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 05 2016

32mins

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Rank #9: The Pokemon World Championships

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Who goes to the Pokemon World Championships in 2015? Well, we did, for one—mostly to find out who else was there. 
Well over a decade after its heyday, Pokemon is still going strong. There's now nearly 800 Pokemon, but there are still lots of kids, teens, and older nerds trying to catch 'em all. We caught up with some of the best players of both the card game and the video game at Boston's World Championships to see how the community has changed over the last few years.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 28 2015

59mins

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Rank #10: A Practical Guide to Sleep Hacking Your Room

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What does it take to get a good night’s sleep? In this episode of Radio Motherboard, managing editor Adrianne Jeffries talks to the greatest sleep hacker she knows: her little brother William. We cover blackout curtains, smart light bulbs, sleep headphones, the best white noise mixes, and sleeping in the office.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jan 22 2016

56mins

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Rank #11: Pirates and Robots: A Conversation With Annalee Newitz

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The science fiction author Annalee Newitz discusses her new novel Autonomous, set in a 22nd century world of patent pirates, soul-searching robots, indentured servants, and really great drugs. (BEWARE: BOOK SPOILERS) For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Sep 18 2017

31mins

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Rank #12: Wasting Time on the Internet

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Have you ever tried a digital detox? Or spending less time on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit? Kenneth Goldsmith definitely hasn't. He's a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches a class called "Wasting Time on the Internet." What started as an exploration of how we spend time online quickly became something of an art project—students shared their passwords, deleted files at random off their classmates' computers, and started impromptu dance parties. Goldsmith tells us why it's OK to spend all day looking at your phone or aimlessly browsing through Reddit. It's just human nature.

Radio Motherboard is up for a WEBBY AWARD - we would really appreciate a vote here: https://vote.webbyawards.com/PublicVoting#/2017/podcasts-digital-audio/general-podcasts/technology Tell your friends

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Apr 13 2017

51mins

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Rank #13: How to Think About the Biggest Earthquake Ever

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So scientists are saying an earthquake—a quake that is so big and so powerful you probably can’t even properly comprehend it—is probably going to hit your city, hard. It could be five years out, ten years, fifty years, or it could be tomorrow. But it’s going to come. How do we go about organizing that kind of information in we brains? How do we understand it on a rational, sensible level? Then, what do we do about it?

We can write science fiction stories about it, for one thing. That’s what the archivist, researcher, and writer Adam Rothstein has done. Rothstein spent many months poring over every available emergency document, seismic evaluation, and scientific study carried out on the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake that he could get his hands on. That quake, scientists say, will be of a magnitude up to 9.3 Mw—perhaps the biggest to hit the continental US in our nation’s history.

Last year, Kathryn Shulz published “The Really Big One” in the New Yorker. The story... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Mar 04 2016

35mins

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Rank #14: I Skipped Showering for Two Weeks and Bathed in Bacteria Instead

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For two weeks, Motherboard writer Kate Lunau skipped her soap and deodorant—spritzing herself with a “live bacteria spray” instead. Her goal was to colonize her skin with ammonia-eating bacteria, which are supposed to neutralize the smell of sweat. There are a growing number of believers out there: Chemist David Whitlock, who came up with this, hasn’t showered in 13 years. But are live bacteria products really the future of skincare? And, maybe more importantly, how bad did Kate smell by the end of it?

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 16 2016

29mins

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Rank #15: The Case for Giving Everyone Free Money

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Sometime in the last few weeks, or months, or years, you may have heard about this idea called “universal basic income.” It’s the idea that maybe governments should give a monthly stipend—no questions asked—to everyone who lives there.

It’s an idea we’ve covered quite a bit over the years, and it’s one that’s increasingly gaining steam among people on both sides of the political spectrum. Conservatives and libertarians say that it can simplify the bureaucracy associated with things like welfare and food stamps, and liberals like it because it would strengthen the social safety net.

Why do we need a basic income now? Well maybe you’ve noticed, but automation is slowly but surely replacing a lot of jobs that humans used to do with ones that robots, drones, software, and artificial intelligence can do. We’re looking at a future where it’s possible that there simply won’t be enough jobs for everyone. Maybe that’s a good thing—in a post scarcity society, do humans really need to do menial jobs?

And so basic income has been floated as both a cure to automation and potentially a better way to redistribute wealth. The movement is gaining steam around the world: Switzerland voted this last weekend on whether the country should “guarantee the introduction of an unconditional basic income.” The measure failed, but the fact that it was even on the ballot speaks to its increasing relevancy. In the United States, the startup incubator Y Combinator is doing an experiment that will give 100 people in Oakland between $1,000 and $2,000 per month to see how the “mechanics” of a basic income would work and to see what people do with the money.

That project is controversial for reasons we get into the podcast. I called up Matt Krisiloff, who is head of the basic income project at Y Combinator, and Elizabeth Rhodes, the research lead of the project, to talk about how it’ll work and why a Silicon Valley startup accelerator is interested in this idea. Then, we talk to Natalie Foster, who is a cofounder of the Universal Income Project, about why she finds the idea so compelling. Finally, we look at the history of basic income around the world and deconstruct the policy itself. Could it ever work?

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 09 2016

59mins

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Rank #16: Twilight of the Bomb

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We travel to the crater of the first atomic bomb with one of the youngest and last surviving Manhattan Project scientists. This is his story.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 07 2015

1hr 8mins

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Rank #17: You Have the Right to Repair Your Electronics

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Radio Motherboard talks to Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit, and Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of Repair.org about legislation that is moving through eight states that would require electronics manufacturers to enable you to fix your things. The bills have been intensely opposed by companies like Apple, IBM, John Deere, and dozens of other gigantic corporations.

If you're here, you might want to check out "pluspluspodcast," a new podcast from Motherboard that takes you on the road with our reporters: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pluspluspodcast/id1210989400?mt=2

 

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Mar 03 2017

44mins

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Rank #18: What Have We Learned from the Ebola Outbreak?

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It’s now been just over a year and a half of the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. We’ve dabbled in vaccines, but the best prevention method is still abstaining from contact with symptomatic patients, and the best treatment is still basically hydration. We’ve figured out that Ebola survivors seem at least temporarily immune, making them ideal health workers, but we still haven’t perfected treatment protocols and caretakers are still dying from the disease.

This week on Radio Motherboard, we spoke to Kayla Ruble, who covered the outbreak in... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jul 17 2015

48mins

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Rank #19: How the Grateful Dead Anticipated the Future

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Radio Motherboard talks time travel, sound tech, and why we're all living in the Grateful Dead's future, with Amir Bar-Lev, director of the new Martin Scorsese-produced documentary about the band.     For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 05 2017

51mins

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Rank #20: iPhones, Free Money, and Hacking Team

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If you've been listening to Radio Motherboard the last few months, thank you very much: It's been a bit of a roller coaster as we try to figure out a format and recording setup that works best for us, and it's been a blast experimenting. 

This week, we're experimenting again, as we try out a shorter, more segmented format that's hopefully a bit snappier than some of our more recent episodes. This week, we tackle the iPhone 6S release, talk about whether basic income will ever become a reality, and touch a bit on why reporting on the Hacking Team has been so much fun. We love hearing from our readers and listeners, so tell us if you're digging the new style or if it's got you down—we're available at editor@motherboard.tv and on Twitter @motherboard. We're also available on iTunes here.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Sep 10 2015

32mins

Play