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Technology
Science

Radio Motherboard

Updated 7 days ago

Technology
Science
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Personal futures brought to you today by VICE's Motherboard.

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Personal futures brought to you today by VICE's Motherboard.

iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
9
4
3
4

No it is NOT good for you to Waste hours online! Pay attention to this world around you....

By Janejane0 - Nov 19 2018
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Too many people obsessed with screens is causing our society more harm than good. As grandma said, everything in MODERATION...

Grow up

By LanMind - Mar 04 2017
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I listened to the first podcast on right to fix and it was great. I liked the flow of the show and thought hey I'll check this out. Well, the very next one sounded like a bunch of kids sitting around a dorm room on a liberal campus whining about Trump and dropping "F" bombs every other word. How about stepping out of your safe space and creating a non political show. Unsubscribing ....

iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
9
4
3
4

No it is NOT good for you to Waste hours online! Pay attention to this world around you....

By Janejane0 - Nov 19 2018
Read more
Too many people obsessed with screens is causing our society more harm than good. As grandma said, everything in MODERATION...

Grow up

By LanMind - Mar 04 2017
Read more
I listened to the first podcast on right to fix and it was great. I liked the flow of the show and thought hey I'll check this out. Well, the very next one sounded like a bunch of kids sitting around a dorm room on a liberal campus whining about Trump and dropping "F" bombs every other word. How about stepping out of your safe space and creating a non political show. Unsubscribing ....

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Cover image of Radio Motherboard

Radio Motherboard

Updated 7 days ago

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Personal futures brought to you today by VICE's Motherboard.

Are We Living in a Simulation?

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The world seems real, but is it really? As humans get better at simulating artificial intelligence, it seems at least plausible that we could create life that is both conscious and has free will. And if we can create conscious life, who's to say that the universe, as we know it, wasn't created by superintelligent artificial intelligence who wanted to simulate their past?

We talk to Nick Bostrom, the Oxford University philosopher who originally came up with this theory. Then we switch gears ever so slightly to talk with Craig Hogan, a Department of Energy researcher who is actively trying to prove that we're living not in a simulation, but in a hologram, which is a completely different thing. Finally, the Motherboard staff talks about glitches in the Matrix or moments that seem totally unreal.

Radio Motherboard is sponsored by Casper Mattresses. You can enter code VICE for $50 off any mattress: acast.com/privacy

May 08 2015

1hr 4mins

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The Future of Hacking

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As our lives become ever more digitized, the security of our data will become ever more important to protect.

So far, judging by the daily routine of data breaches and large scale hacks, it seems like we're failing to secure our most precious digital belongings. As some in the world of information security say, everything will get hacked. But is that really true?

As part of The Hacks We Can't See, Motherboard's theme week exploring the future of hacking, we asked real hackers what they think the future holds. We also spoke to Morgan Marquis-Boire, a well-known security researcher who's spent the last few years hunting malware and helping human rights activists and journalists protect themselves.

What's the craziest thing that'll get hacked in the future? And what can you do to protect yourself? Listen to this week's episode of Radio Motherboard to find out.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 02 2016

52mins

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What Will World War III Look Like?

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We assume that the next world war will be a technological one, but the United States and its potential adversaries are increasingly developing tech designed to blast enemies into the past. In Ghost Fleet, real cybersecurity and war experts Peter W. Singer and August Cole explore what would actually happen in a war between the United States and China. There's drones and hacking, sure, but what happens when our space capabilities are taken offline? What happens if China hacks all the microchips we bought from them?

In this version of the future, war is as gritty and as human as it's ever been. Singer footnotes the entire book with references to actual technology, speeches, military plots and documents to add a layer of realism not seen in most sci fi. Radio Motherboard talks to... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 26 2015

1hr 18mins

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The Tide Is Shifting in Silicon Valley

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The same tech companies once heralded as crusaders of a bright future are increasingly being seen as hoarders of vast, unchecked power. Franklin Foer, a national correspondent for The Atlantic, has been questioning the intentions of corporations like Facebook and Google for years. On this episode of Radio Motherboard, Assistant Editor Louise Matsakis talks with Foer about his new book, World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Sep 25 2017

42mins

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Net Neutrality

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The FCC will vote later this week to repeal net neutrality protections. Radio Motherboard talks to BoingBoing co-founder and Electronic Frontier Foundation activist Cory Doctorow about what the next steps are to protect the open internet.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2017

32mins

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Elon Musk, Then and Now

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Radio Motherboard pulls a 2015 interview with Elon Musk's biographer Ashlee Vance, and talks about how perceptions about Musk and his companies have changed.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 31 2018

38mins

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The DeLonge Con

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Former Blink 182 guitarist Tom DeLonge has a new project: telling the world the truth about UFOs. DeLonge has always been interested in the supernatural, and he’s been researching and reporting the topic as part of a multimedia project called Sekret Machines that involves books, movies, music, and other moving parts. His first book, co-written by bestselling author AJ Hartley, is a pageturner novel called Chasing Shadows about a skeptical journalist who runs a UFO debunking website, a Holocaust survivor, an heiress whose father mysteriously dies, and a Marine pilot who gets recruited into a secret government technology project at Area 51. Somehow, their stories all intersect.


Motherboard talked to DeLonge about this project and whether he really believes all this stuff about aliens. We also dive into the weird and wonderful world of conspiracy theorists in the longest Radio Motherboard episode to date.

  For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Apr 29 2016

1hr 51mins

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A Practical Guide to Sleep Hacking Your Room

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What does it take to get a good night’s sleep? In this episode of Radio Motherboard, managing editor Adrianne Jeffries talks to the greatest sleep hacker she knows: her little brother William. We cover blackout curtains, smart light bulbs, sleep headphones, the best white noise mixes, and sleeping in the office.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jan 22 2016

56mins

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The Moon Walking, Alien-Hunting, Psychic Astronaut Who Got Sued By NASA

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Edgar Mitchell, who passed away in February at the age of 85, was exceptional, even among astronauts. Like an archetypal moon man, he was a Boy Scout and a military test pilot with a protestant upbringing and an impressive command of engineering and aeronautics. In February 1971, on Apollo 14, he became the sixth man on the moon. But more so than other astronauts, Mitchell’s brief exploration of outer space led to a deep exploration of inner space and the entire universe of phenomena explained and not. After conducting an ESP experiment in space, he became a connoisseur of parapsychology; later, he sought to show that aliens had visited Earth and that governments around the world had tried to cover up the truth. But he remained grounded on Earth too, and worried that civilization's narrow perspectives were exceedingly dangerous for the future of the planet and humanity.

(Read more at http://motherboard.vice.com/read/astronaut-edgar-mitchell-outer-space-inner-space-and-aliens)

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May 13 2016

38mins

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The Hyperloop

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The hyperloop, Elon Musk’s futuristic, tube-based “fifth mode of transportation” has stoked imaginations unlike any recent transportation technology except for maybe self driving cars.

Lots has been said about it—Musk called it a “cross between a Concord, a railgun, and an air hockey table,” while the media has latched on to the promised speeds of more than 700 mph and travel times between San Francisco and Los Angeles of 35 minutes.

But much of the promise of the hyperloop still remains theoretical. That changed in a small way last weekend, when SpaceX hosted the first part of its “Hyperloop Pod Design Challenge,” a contest that asks 180 university teams to design the capsules that will actually go inside the hyperloop. In June, 22 of the teams will test their pods in a track being built by SpaceX. I traveled to Texas A&M University to meet the teams, meet the companies actually building the hyperloop, and to separate out the hype from what’s actually happening.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 05 2016

32mins

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The Pokemon World Championships

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Who goes to the Pokemon World Championships in 2015? Well, we did, for one—mostly to find out who else was there. 
Well over a decade after its heyday, Pokemon is still going strong. There's now nearly 800 Pokemon, but there are still lots of kids, teens, and older nerds trying to catch 'em all. We caught up with some of the best players of both the card game and the video game at Boston's World Championships to see how the community has changed over the last few years.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 28 2015

59mins

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You Have the Right to Repair Your Electronics

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Radio Motherboard talks to Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit, and Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of Repair.org about legislation that is moving through eight states that would require electronics manufacturers to enable you to fix your things. The bills have been intensely opposed by companies like Apple, IBM, John Deere, and dozens of other gigantic corporations.

If you're here, you might want to check out "pluspluspodcast," a new podcast from Motherboard that takes you on the road with our reporters: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pluspluspodcast/id1210989400?mt=2

 

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Mar 03 2017

44mins

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Transhumanists in Their Own Words

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Transhumanism, the idea that humans should use science and technology to extend our natural abilities, is the religion of the 21st century. It's a concept that has been around since the 70s, but seems to be resonating with a growing number of people. Whether it's because of the rise of smartphones, the idea of the quantified self, disillusionment with the world, or something else, transhumanist ideas have been gaining traction in the last 10 years with no signs of stopping.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 25 2015

17mins

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Pirates and Robots: A Conversation With Annalee Newitz

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The science fiction author Annalee Newitz discusses her new novel Autonomous, set in a 22nd century world of patent pirates, soul-searching robots, indentured servants, and really great drugs. (BEWARE: BOOK SPOILERS) For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Sep 18 2017

31mins

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Leslie Jones and the Ethics of Amplifying Online Harassment

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Soon after news broke that Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones’s website had been hacked and replaced with stolen nude photos and racist memes, I got an urgent email from Whitney Phillips, one of the world’s foremost experts on online trolling and harassment (Phillips quite literally has a doctorate in 4chan). Phillips wanted to know if Motherboard was going to cover the hack, and how we were going to do it.

“I have some thoughts on the ethics of amplification—how, we can't not comment on stories like this, but commenting perpetuates the disgusting narrative and associated imagery. The question being, what's the ethical way not just for journalists and academics to respond, but for individuals, as well?” she said.

“Is more harm than good done when the association of Jones with Harambe is given longer life? I'm honestly not sure,” she added. “BUT I WANT TO HAVE THAT CONVERSATION.”

In her book This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things, Phillips explores how early trolls from 4chan’s /b/ board manipulated the media into spreading their message. Though “trolling” is now an outdated, imprecise term, the Twitter harassment and illegal hacking of Jones’s website are amplified the more journalists write about it, the more people retweet it, the more we allow it to stay in our collective consciousness.

Phillips emailed me as I was also considering whether there’s an ethical way to cover abhorrent behavior on the internet—decisions about how and whether to write about racially, sexually, or xenophobically motivated hacks and harassment is a question the Motherboard staff considers all the time, but it’s rarely a conversation that ever makes it to the public.

And so I decided to have that conversation with Phillips and the roles we all play in amplifying questionable or grotesque online behavior.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Aug 26 2016

39mins

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How the Grateful Dead Anticipated the Future

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Radio Motherboard talks time travel, sound tech, and why we're all living in the Grateful Dead's future, with Amir Bar-Lev, director of the new Martin Scorsese-produced documentary about the band.     For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 05 2017

51mins

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How to Think About the Biggest Earthquake Ever

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So scientists are saying an earthquake—a quake that is so big and so powerful you probably can’t even properly comprehend it—is probably going to hit your city, hard. It could be five years out, ten years, fifty years, or it could be tomorrow. But it’s going to come. How do we go about organizing that kind of information in we brains? How do we understand it on a rational, sensible level? Then, what do we do about it?

We can write science fiction stories about it, for one thing. That’s what the archivist, researcher, and writer Adam Rothstein has done. Rothstein spent many months poring over every available emergency document, seismic evaluation, and scientific study carried out on the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake that he could get his hands on. That quake, scientists say, will be of a magnitude up to 9.3 Mw—perhaps the biggest to hit the continental US in our nation’s history.

Last year, Kathryn Shulz published “The Really Big One” in the New Yorker. The story... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Mar 04 2016

35mins

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Twilight of the Bomb

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We travel to the crater of the first atomic bomb with one of the youngest and last surviving Manhattan Project scientists. This is his story.

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Aug 07 2015

1hr 8mins

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I Skipped Showering for Two Weeks and Bathed in Bacteria Instead

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For two weeks, Motherboard writer Kate Lunau skipped her soap and deodorant—spritzing herself with a “live bacteria spray” instead. Her goal was to colonize her skin with ammonia-eating bacteria, which are supposed to neutralize the smell of sweat. There are a growing number of believers out there: Chemist David Whitlock, who came up with this, hasn’t showered in 13 years. But are live bacteria products really the future of skincare? And, maybe more importantly, how bad did Kate smell by the end of it?

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 16 2016

29mins

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The Case for Giving Everyone Free Money

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Sometime in the last few weeks, or months, or years, you may have heard about this idea called “universal basic income.” It’s the idea that maybe governments should give a monthly stipend—no questions asked—to everyone who lives there.

It’s an idea we’ve covered quite a bit over the years, and it’s one that’s increasingly gaining steam among people on both sides of the political spectrum. Conservatives and libertarians say that it can simplify the bureaucracy associated with things like welfare and food stamps, and liberals like it because it would strengthen the social safety net.

Why do we need a basic income now? Well maybe you’ve noticed, but automation is slowly but surely replacing a lot of jobs that humans used to do with ones that robots, drones, software, and artificial intelligence can do. We’re looking at a future where it’s possible that there simply won’t be enough jobs for everyone. Maybe that’s a good thing—in a post scarcity society, do humans really need to do menial jobs?

And so basic income has been floated as both a cure to automation and potentially a better way to redistribute wealth. The movement is gaining steam around the world: Switzerland voted this last weekend on whether the country should “guarantee the introduction of an unconditional basic income.” The measure failed, but the fact that it was even on the ballot speaks to its increasing relevancy. In the United States, the startup incubator Y Combinator is doing an experiment that will give 100 people in Oakland between $1,000 and $2,000 per month to see how the “mechanics” of a basic income would work and to see what people do with the money.

That project is controversial for reasons we get into the podcast. I called up Matt Krisiloff, who is head of the basic income project at Y Combinator, and Elizabeth Rhodes, the research lead of the project, to talk about how it’ll work and why a Silicon Valley startup accelerator is interested in this idea. Then, we talk to Natalie Foster, who is a cofounder of the Universal Income Project, about why she finds the idea so compelling. Finally, we look at the history of basic income around the world and deconstruct the policy itself. Could it ever work?

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 09 2016

59mins

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[Bonus] Introducing CYBER, a Hacking Podcast by Motherboard

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Motherboard has launched a new podcast, called CYBER. It's available on Apple Podcasts and on whatever app you listen to.


Hacking. Hackers. Disinformation campaigns. Encryption. The Cyber. This stuff gets complicated really fast, but Motherboard spends its time embedded in the infosec world so you don't have to. Host Ben Makuch talks every week to Motherboard reporters Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai and Joseph Cox about the stories they're breaking and to the industry's most famous hackers and researchers about the biggest news in cybersecurity. 

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jan 23 2019

1min

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NASA Turns 60

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NASA turns 60 this week. We're joined by Former NASA chief technologist Mason Peck joins us to discuss the agency’s history of spaceflight milestones, which include landing humans on the Moon (six times!), putting rovers on Mars, sending probes to interstellar space, and partnering on the International Space Station. Beyond these physical exploration achievements, NASA has also revolutionized the human view of Earth, the solar system, the Milky Way, and the deep swaths of space and time beyond our local group of galaxies. 


We also discuss NASA’s future, including its partnerships with the commercial space sector, megaprojects like the Space Launch System and the James Webb Space Telescope, and human exploration of the Moon and Mars.

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Oct 01 2018

56mins

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[BONUS] Introducing Queerly Beloved

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If you've been enjoying Radio Motherboard, we think you'll also love our newest VICE podcast, Queerly Beloved.


Queerly Beloved ​is a new podcast series from Broadly. Co-hosted by Broadly editor Sarah Burke and Fran Tirado of the popular queer podcast Food 4 Thot, it’s a multifaceted portrait of LGBTQ chosen family—the people who help us figure out who we are and inspire us to live as our most authentic selves. In a world obsessed with significant others, Queerly Beloved focuses on the unconventional, seemingly insignificant relationships that actually end up shaping us most.


Here's the first episode, "The Past Lovers." For the full season, sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen.

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Sep 12 2018

20mins

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Motherboard's New Crossword Puzzle: Solve the Internet

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Radio Motherboard talks to Caleb Madison and Marley Randazzo about Solve the Internet, Motherboard's new internet-themed weekly crossword puzzle.

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Jun 12 2018

18mins

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Sex Workers Lobby Congress Against a Terrible Internet Law

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Radio Motherboard talks to Liara Roux, a sex worker who was part of the first ever organized effort by her industry to lobby Congress. We talk about SESTA/FOSTA, a law that puts sex workers in danger and has fundamentally changed the internet.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 07 2018

38mins

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PewDiePie, Alinity, and the Burden of Being a Female Streamer

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Radio Motherboard breaks down the harassment that has been leveled against Twitch streamer Alinity and other women online, as well as the phenomenon of YouTube's "Twitch Fails" videos.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 05 2018

45mins

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Elon Musk, Then and Now

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Radio Motherboard pulls a 2015 interview with Elon Musk's biographer Ashlee Vance, and talks about how perceptions about Musk and his companies have changed.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 31 2018

38mins

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Facebook’s Reckoning with American Nazis

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After a white supremacist killed a protester in Charlottesville in 2017, Facebook pushed to re-educate its moderators about hate speech groups in the US, and spell out the distinction from nationalism and separatism, documents obtained by Motherboard show.


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May 29 2018

1hr 1min

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Amplifying the Alt-Right

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Whitney Phillips, the author of a new report called "The Oxygen of Amplification," talks about what she learned by talking to more than 50 journalists who covered the alt-right and white supremacists during the 2016 election cycle.

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May 24 2018

1hr 16mins

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Who's Afraid of Kaspersky?

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We went to Kaspersky Lab's SAS conference, where the controversial Russian anti-virus firm showcases its best research, wines and dines competitors and journalists, and burns American espionage operations. 

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 22 2018

43mins

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The Senate Voted to Save Net Neutrality--Here's How it Happened

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Evan Greer has spent the last few months pushing the Senate to preserve net neutrality. She explains how Fight for the Future and millions of internet users convinced the Senate, and what's next in the uphill battle to save the internet.

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May 17 2018

34mins

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Pod Void if Removed

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The FTC just announced that Warranty Void if Removed stickers on video game consoles are illegal. This is a big win for consumers--and an indication that the walled gardens of electronic manufacturers are being breached.

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May 15 2018

49mins

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How to Make a Photo Go Viral

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A woman in cyberpunk body paint stands in the center of a ring of old laptops. It's a staged photo about e-waste, sure, but photographer Ben Von Wong hasn't just set up the photo to look cool. He wants it to go viral: "I create viral campaigns around boring topics," he said. Radio Motherboard spoke to Von Wong about the campaign, and about everything that goes into making sure people actually consume his content: "I gathered almost 1,000 people on an email newsletter who said within the first 24 hours of launch, 'I promise to like, comment, and share it in order to fuck with Facebook's algorithm.' Literally manufacturing popularity in content by making sure these people would see the content within the first certain amount of time that it launches to artificially make it more popular."

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Mar 14 2018

27mins

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BROAD BAND (Live)

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We talk to Claire Evans (who last joined us on the first ever episode of Radio Motherboard!) about her new book BROAD BAND: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. Claire joined Motherboard staff writer Kaleigh Rogers to talk about the internet past and present with Marisa Bowe, editor-in-chief of one of the first internet publications, and Stacy Horn, founder of EchoNYC, an early internet community that launched in the early 1990s and still exists today.

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Mar 08 2018

58mins

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Net Neutrality

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The FCC will vote later this week to repeal net neutrality protections. Radio Motherboard talks to BoingBoing co-founder and Electronic Frontier Foundation activist Cory Doctorow about what the next steps are to protect the open internet.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2017

32mins

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Stress Week: Drone Therapy

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Kristel Jax, a performance artist, leads us through a drone therapy session, which uses drone music and cognitive behavioral therapy to try and treat anxiety and stress.

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Dec 08 2017

17mins

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Stress Week: How to Hack New York Stress

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Ankita gets her stress test results and sits down with Dr. Chiti Parikh at Weill Cornell's Integrative Health and Wellbeing program to talk about how to deal with the intense stress of 2017.

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Dec 07 2017

24mins

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Bonus: Rebuilding the Swamp

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Motherboard's Ankita Rao went to an Army Corps of Engineers project in south Florida to see an Everglades restoration project firsthand. Read the story at motherboard.vice.com.

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Nov 03 2017

5mins

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Jane Goodall on chimps, feminism and Donald Trump

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Staff writer Kaleigh Rogers sits down with renowned anthropologist and conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall and director Brett Morgen ahead of the release of "Jane," a new documentary about her life and work. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Oct 27 2017

14mins

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Cyberwar

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Motherboard speaks to Ben Makuch, the host of VICELAND's Cyberwar, about how he may have come face-to-face with a Russian DNC hacker. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Oct 06 2017

36mins

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