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Rank #11 in Medicine category

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Emergency Medicine Cases

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #11 in Medicine category

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
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Emergency Medicine Cases – Where the Experts Keep You in the Know. For complete episodes please visit emergencymedicinecases.com

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Emergency Medicine Cases – Where the Experts Keep You in the Know. For complete episodes please visit emergencymedicinecases.com

iTunes Ratings

294 Ratings
Average Ratings
253
16
13
9
3

Chest Pain

By Bobbi-in-the-hole - Aug 01 2019
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The best sound system of all medical podcasts - I can hear it in the shower!

Great EM pod

By Preventive Pal - Jan 16 2019
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Really liked the Quick Hits episode!

iTunes Ratings

294 Ratings
Average Ratings
253
16
13
9
3

Chest Pain

By Bobbi-in-the-hole - Aug 01 2019
Read more
The best sound system of all medical podcasts - I can hear it in the shower!

Great EM pod

By Preventive Pal - Jan 16 2019
Read more
Really liked the Quick Hits episode!
Cover image of Emergency Medicine Cases

Emergency Medicine Cases

Latest release on Feb 11, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 8 days ago

Rank #1: Episode 71 ACLS Guidelines 2015 – Cardiac Arrest Controversies Part 1

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A lot has changed over the years when it comes to managing the adult in cardiac arrest. As a result, survival rates after cardiac arrest have risen steadily over the last decade. With the release of the 2015 American Heart Association ACLS Guidelines 2015 online on Oct 16th, while there aren’t a lot a big changes, there are many small but important changes we need to be aware of, and there still remains a lot of controversy. In light of knowing how to provide optimal cardio-cerebral resuscitation and improving patient outcomes, in this episode we’ll ask two Canadian co-authors of The Guidelines, Dr. Laurie Morrison and Dr. Steve Lin some of the most practice-changing and controversial questions.

The post Episode 71 ACLS Guidelines 2015 – Cardiac Arrest Controversies Part 1 appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Oct 21 2015

1hr 7mins

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Rank #2: Episode 4: Acute Congestive Heart Failure

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Dr. Eric Letovsky and Dr. Brian Steinhart describe a practical way to approach patients with undifferentiated SOB and acute congestive heart failure, the utility of various symptoms and signs in the diagnosis of CHF, as well as the controversies surrounding the best use of BNP and Troponin in the ED. A discussion of the use of ultrasound for patients with SOB as well as the indications for formal Echo are reviewed. In the second part of the episode they discuss the management of acute congestive heart failure based on a practical EM model, as well as the difficulties surrounding disposition of patients with CHF.

The post Episode 4: Acute Congestive Heart Failure appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

May 01 2010

1hr 40mins

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Rank #3: Episode 101 GI Bleed Emergencies Part 1

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In this Part 1 of our two part podcast on GI bleed emergencies we answer questions such as: How do you distinguish between an upper vs lower GI bleed when it's not so obvious clinically? What alterations to airway management are necessary for the GI bleed patient? What do we need to know about the value of fecal occult blood in determining whether or not a patient has a GI bleed? Which patients require red cell transfusions? Massive transfusion? Why is it important to get a fibrinogen level in the sick GI bleed patient? What are the goals of resuscitation in a massive GI bleed? What's the evidence for using an NG tube for diagnosis and management of upper GI bleeds?  In which patients should we give tranexamic acid and which patients should we avoid it in? How are the indications for massive transfusion in GI bleed different to the trauma patient? What are your options if the bleeding can't be stopped on endoscopy? and many more...

The post Episode 101 GI Bleed Emergencies Part 1 appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Oct 10 2017

1hr 35mins

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Rank #4: Ep 109 Skin and Soft Tissue Infections – Cellulitis, Skin Abscesses and Necrotizing Fasciitis

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How do you distinguish cellulitis from the myriad of cellulitis mimics? At what point do we consider treatment failure for cellulitis? What is the best antibiotic choice for patients who are allergic to cephalosporins? Which patients with cellulitis or skin abscess require IV antibiotics? Coverage for MRSA? What is the best and most resource wise method for analgesia before I&D of a skin abscess? What is the best method for drainage of a skin abscess? Which patients with skin abscess require a swab? Irrigation? Packing? Antibiotics? With the goal of sharpening your diagnostic skills when it comes to skin and soft tissue infections – there are lots of cellulitis mimics - and choosing wisely when it comes to treatment, we’ll be discussing best practices for management of cellulitis and skin abscesses, when to cover for MRSA, how to pick up nec fasc before it’s too late and a lot more…

The post Ep 109 Skin and Soft Tissue Infections – Cellulitis, Skin Abscesses and Necrotizing Fasciitis appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Apr 24 2018

1hr 21mins

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Rank #5: Episode 60: Emergency Management of Hyponatremia

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In this EM Cases episode Dr. Melanie Baimel and Dr. Ed Etchells discuss a simple and practical step-wise approach to the emergency management of hyponatremia:

1. Assess and treat neurologic emergencies related to hyponatremia with hypertonic saline

2. Defend the intravascular volume

3. Prevent further exacerbation of hyponatremia

4. Prevent rapid overcorrection

5. Ascertain a cause

Dr. Etchells and Dr. Baimel answer questions such as: What are the indications for giving DDAVP in the emergency management of hyponatremia? What is a simple and practical approach to determining the cause of hyponatremia in the ED? How fast should we aim to correct hyponatremia? What is the best fluid for resuscitating the patient in shock who has a low serum sodium? Why is the management of the marathon runner with hyponatremia counter-intuitive? What strategies can we employ to minimize the risk of Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome (OSD) and cerebral edema in the emergency management of hyponatremia? and many more...

The post Episode 60: Emergency Management of Hyponatremia appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Mar 03 2015

1hr 5mins

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Rank #6: Episode 41: Hypertensive Emergencies

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In this episode on Hypertensive Emergencies, Dr. Joel Yaphe, EM residency program director at the University of Toronto & Dr. Clare Atzema, one of Canada's leading cardiovascular EM researchers will discuss the controversies of how to manage patients who present to the ED with high blood pressure and evidence of end organ damage related to the high blood pressure. Hypertensive emergencies are a grab bag of diagnoses that all need to be treated differently. Hypertensive Encephalopathy, Aortic Dissection, Acute Pulmonary Edema, Pre-eclampsia & Eclampsia, Acute Renal Failure, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Intracranial Hemorrhage all need individualized blood pressure management.

The post Episode 41: Hypertensive Emergencies appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Mar 24 2014

1hr 8mins

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Rank #7: Episode 20: Atrial Fibrillation

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In this episode Dr. Clare Atzema, Dr. Nazanin Meshkat and Dr. Bryan Au discuss the presentation, etiology, precipitants, management and disposition of Atrial Fibrillation in the Emergency Department. The pros and cons of rate and rhythm control are debated, what you need to know about rate and rhythm control medications reviewed, and the strength of the Ottawa Aggressive Protocol discussed. The importance of appropriate anticoagulation is detailed, with a review of the CHADS-VASc score and whether to use Warfarin, Dabigatran or ASA for stroke prevention for patient with Atrial Fibrillation. We end off with a discussion on how to recognize and treat Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in the setting of Atrial Fibrillation.

The post Episode 20: Atrial Fibrillation appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Feb 10 2012

1hr 29mins

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Rank #8: Episode 35: Pediatric Orthopedics Pearls and Pitfalls

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Dr. Sanjay Mehta & Dr. Jonathan Pirie, two experienced Pediatric EM docs from The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto discuss their approach to a variety of common, occult, challenging and easy to miss pediatric orthopedics diagnoses including: differentiating Septic Arthritis from Transient Synovitis of the hip, Toddler's Fracture, Tillaux Fracture, Suprachondylar Fracture, ACL tear, tibial spine & Segond fractures. They also debate the value of the Ottawa Knee Rules in kids, non-accidental trauma, pediatric orthopedic pain management, the evidence for the best management of Buckle, Greenstick, Salter 1 and 2 distal radius fractures and lateral malleolus fractures.

The post Episode 35: Pediatric Orthopedics Pearls and Pitfalls appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Aug 09 2013

2hr 19mins

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Rank #9: Ep 122 Sepsis and Septic Shock – What Matters from EM Cases Course

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In this podcast Dr. Sara Gray, intensivist and emergency physician, co-author of The CAEP Sepsis Guidelines, answers questions such as: How does one best recognize occult septic shock? How does SIRS, qSOFA and NEWS compare in predicting poor outcomes in septic patients? Which fluid and how much fluid is best for resuscitation of the septic shock patients? What are the indications for norepinephrine, and when in the resuscitation should it be given, in light of the CENSER trial? What are the goals of resuscitation in the patient with sepsis or septic shock? When should antibiotics administered, given that the latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines recommend that antibiotics be administered within one hour of arrival for all patients suspected of sepsis or septic shock? What are the indications for a second vasopressor after norepinephrine? Given the conflicting evidence for steroids in sepsis, what are the indications for steroids? Should we be considering steroids with Vitamin C and thiamine for patients in septic shock? What are the pitfalls of lactate interpretation, and how do serial lactates compare to capillary refill in predicting poor outcomes in light of the ANDROMEDA trial? Is procalcitonin a valuable prognostic indicator in septic patients? and many more...

The post Ep 122 Sepsis and Septic Shock – What Matters from EM Cases Course appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Mar 26 2019

1hr 6mins

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Rank #10: Ep 112 Tachydysrhythmias with Amal Mattu and Paul Dorion

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In this EM Cases main Episode 112 Tachydysrhythmias with Amal Mattu and Paul Dorion we discuss a potpurri of clinical goodies for the recognition and management of both wide and narrow complex tachydysrhythmias and answer questions such as: Which patients with stable Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) require immediate electrical cardioversion, chemical cardioversion or no cardioversion at all? Are there any algorithms that can reliably distinguish VT from SVT with aberrancy? What is the "verapamil death test"?  While procainamide may be the first line medication for stable VT based on the PROCAMIO study, what are the indications for IV amiodarone for VT? How should we best manage patients with VT who have an ICD? How can the Bix Rule help distinguish Atrial Flutter from SVT? What is the preferred medication for conversion of SVT to sinus rhythm, Adenosine or Calcium Channel Blockers (CCBs)? Why is amiodarone contraindicated in patients with WPW associated with atrial fibrillation? What are the important differences in the approach and treatment of atrial fibrillation vs. atrial flutter? How can we safely curb the high bounce-back rate of patients with atrial fibrillation who present to the ED? and many more...

The post Ep 112 Tachydysrhythmias with Amal Mattu and Paul Dorion appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Jul 17 2018

1hr 29mins

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Rank #11: Ep 104 Emergency Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage – The Golden Hour

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There exists a kind of self-fulfilling prognostic pessimism when it comes to ICH. And this pessimism sometimes leads to less than optimal care in patients who otherwise might have had a reasonably good outcome if they were managed aggressively. Despite the poor prognosis of these patients overall, there is some evidence to suggest that early aggressive medical management may improve outcomes. As such, the skill with which you manage your patient with ICH in those first few hours could be the most important determinant of their outcome. In this Golden Hour you have a chance to prevent hematoma expansion, stabilize intracerebral perfusion and give your patient the best chance of survival with neurologic recovery.

The post Ep 104 Emergency Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage – The Golden Hour appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Dec 19 2017

1hr 38mins

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Rank #12: Episode 48 – Pediatric Fever Without A Source

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Have you ever seen a child in your emergency department with a fever - he asks sarcastically? At the ginormous community hospital where I work, we see about 25,000 kids each year in our ED and about half of them present with fever. Yes, there still exists fever phobia in our society, which brings hoards of worried parents into the ED with their febrile kids. For most of these kids it's relatively straight forward: Most kids with fever have clinical evidence of an identifiable source of infection – a viral respiratory infection, acute otitis media, gastro, or a viral exanthem. However, about 20% have Fever Without a Source despite your thorough history and physical exam.

A small but significant number of this 20% without an identifiable source of fever will have an occult bacterial infection - UTI, bacteremia, pneumonia, or even the dreaded early bacterial meningitis. These are all defined as Serious Bacterial Infections (SBI), with occult UTI being the most common SBI especially in children under the age of 2 years.

In the old days we used to do a full septic work-up including LP for all infants under the age of 3 months, but thankfully, times have changed in the post-Hib and pneumoccocal vaccine age, and we aren’t quite so aggressive any more with our work-ups. Nonetheless, it's still controversial as to which kids need a full septic workup, which kids need a partial septic workup, which kids need just a urine dip and which kids need little except to reassure the parents.

In this episode, with the help of Dr. Sarah Reid and Dr. Gina Neto from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, we will elucidate how to deal with fever phobia, when a rectal temp is necessary, how to pick out the kids with fever that we need to worry about, how to work up kids with fever depending on their age, risk factors and clinical picture, who needs a urinalysis, who needs a CXR, who needs blood cultures and who needs an LP, and much more....

The post Episode 48 – Pediatric Fever Without A Source appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Jul 23 2014

1hr 14mins

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Rank #13: Episode 94 UTI Myths and Misconceptions

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In 2014, the CDC reported that UTI antibiotic treatment was avoidable at least 39% of the time. Why? Over-diagnosis and treatment results from the fact that asymptomatic bacteriuria is very common in all age groups, urine cultures are frequently ordered without an appropriate indication, and urinalysis results are often misinterpreted. Think of the last time you prescribed antibiotics to a patient for suspected UTI – what convinced you that they had a UTI? Was it their story? Their exam? Or was it the urine dip results the nurse handed to you before you saw them? Does a patient’s indwelling catheter distort the urinalysis? How many WBCs/hpf is enough WBCs to call it a UTI? Can culture results be trusted if there are epithelial cells in the specimen? Can a “dirty” urine in an obtunded elderly patient help guide management?...

The post Episode 94 UTI Myths and Misconceptions appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Apr 12 2017

1hr 33mins

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Rank #14: Episode 87 – Alcohol Withdrawal and Delirium Tremens: Diagnosis and Management

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Alcohol withdrawal is everywhere. We see over half a million patients in U.S. EDs for alcohol withdrawal every year. Despite these huge volumes of patients and the diagnosis of alcohol withdrawal seeming relatively straightforward, it’s actually missed more often than we’d like to admit, being confused with things like drug intoxication or sepsis. Or it’s not even on our radar when an older patient presents with delirium. What’s even more surprising is that even if we do nail the diagnosis, observational studies show that in general, alcohol withdrawal is poorly treated. So, to help you become masters of alcohol withdrawal management, our guest experts on this podcast are Dr. Bjug Borgundvaag, an ED doc and researcher with a special interest in emergency alcohol related illness and the director of Schwartz-Reismann Emergency Medicine Institute, Dr. Mel Kahan, an addictions specialist for more than 20 years who’s written hundreds of papers and books on alcohol related illness, and the medical director of the substance use service at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, and Dr. Sara Gray, ED-intensivist at St. Michael's Hospital...

The post Episode 87 – Alcohol Withdrawal and Delirium Tremens: Diagnosis and Management appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Oct 25 2016

1hr 26mins

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Rank #15: Ep 126 EM Drugs That Work and Drugs That Don’t – Part 1: Analgesics

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In this podcast we discuss the key concepts in assessing drug efficacy trials, and provide you with a bottom line recommendation for the use of gabapentinoids, NSAIDs and acetaminophen for low back pain and radicular symptoms, topical NSAIDs and cyclobenzaprine for sprains and strains, caffeine as an adjunct analgesic, why we should never prescribe tramadol, dexamethasone for pharyngitis, calcium channel blockers for hemorrhoids and anal fissures, buscopan for abdominal pain and renal colic and why morphine might be a better analgesic choice than hydromorphone...

The post Ep 126 EM Drugs That Work and Drugs That Don’t – Part 1: Analgesics appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Jun 18 2019

1hr 19mins

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Rank #16: Episode 86 – Emergency Management of Hyperkalemia

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This is 'A Nuanced Approach to Emergency Management of Hyperkalemia' on EM Cases.
Of all the electrolyte emergencies, hyperkalemia is the one that has the greatest potential to lead to cardiac arrest. And so, early in my EM training I learned to get the patient on a monitor, ensure IV access, order up an ECG, bombard the patient with a cocktail of kayexalate, calcium, insulin, B-agonists, bicarb, fluids and furosemide, and get the patient admitted, maybe with some dialysis to boot. Little did I know that some of these therapies were based on theory alone while others were based on a few small poorly done studies. It turns out that some of these therapies may cause more harm than good, and that precisely when and how to give these therapies to optimize patient outcomes is still not really known...

The post Episode 86 – Emergency Management of Hyperkalemia appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Sep 27 2016

1hr 9mins

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Rank #17: Ep 118 Trauma – The First and Last 15 Minutes Part 1

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In this part 1 of Trauma - The First and Last 15 Minutes, we answer questions such as: how should we best prepare our team, our gear and ourselves for the trauma patient? How does resequencing the initial trauma resuscitation save lives? How can we most readily identify occult shock, the silent killer in trauma? What are 7 actions to consider in the first 15 minutes of resuscitation? How can the concepts of "controlled resuscitation" and "resuscitation intensity" help us decide resuscitation targets and when to activate a massive transfusion protocol? and many more...

The post Ep 118 Trauma – The First and Last 15 Minutes Part 1 appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Dec 18 2018

1hr 32mins

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Rank #18: Episode 33: Oncologic Emergencies

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In this episode on Oncologic Emergencies Dr. John Foote (University of Toronto's CCFP(EM) residency program director) and Dr. Joel Yaphe (the director of the University of Toronto’s Annual Update in Emergency Medicine conference in Whistler), review 5 important presentations in the patient with cancer: fever, shortness of breath, altered mental status, back pain and acute renal failure; with specific attention to key cancer-related emergencies such as febrile neutropenia, hypercalcemia, superior vena cava syndrome, hyperviscosity syndrome and tumor lysis syndrome.

The post Episode 33: Oncologic Emergencies appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

May 22 2013

1hr 31mins

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Rank #19: Best Case Ever 31: Emergency Pericardiocentesis

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On this EM Cases Best Case Ever, Andrew Sloas, the brains behinds the fabulous PEM-ED podcast tells the tale of a pericardiocentesis gone bad and what he learned from it. Emergency pericardicentesis can be life saving, but it also carries risks. Dr. Sloas reviews the steps to take to ensure that the pericardiocentesis needle is the the correct place to minimize the risk of intubating the right ventricle of the heart. A discussion of errors of omission and ones of commission follows....

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The post Best Case Ever 31: Emergency Pericardiocentesis appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

Jan 14 2015

9mins

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Rank #20: Episode 14 Part 1: Migraine Headache and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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In Part 1 of this episode on Headache Pearls & Pitfalls - Migraine Headache & Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Dr. Anil Chopra and Dr. Stella Yiu discuss the best evidenced-based management of migraine headache in the ED including the use of dexamethasone, dopamine antagonists, the problems with narcotics and the efficacy of 'triptans'. An easy way to remember the worrisome symptoms of headache indicating a serious cause is reviewed followed by a detailed discussion of the pearls, pitfalls and controversies around the work-up of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) in light of some exciting recent literature, including the basis for a new Canadian decision rule for SAH.

The post Episode 14 Part 1: Migraine Headache and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

May 09 2011

1hr 4mins

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