Cover image of WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press
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Rank #20 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Design
Fashion & Beauty

WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #20 in Fashion & Beauty category

Arts
Design
Fashion & Beauty
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WARDROBE CRISIS is a sustainable fashion podcast from VOGUE's sustainability editor Clare Press. Join Clare and her guests as they decode the fashion system, and dig deep into its effects on people and planet. This show unzips the real issues that face the fashion industry today, with a focus on ethics, sustainability, consumerism, activism, identity and creativity.

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WARDROBE CRISIS is a sustainable fashion podcast from VOGUE's sustainability editor Clare Press. Join Clare and her guests as they decode the fashion system, and dig deep into its effects on people and planet. This show unzips the real issues that face the fashion industry today, with a focus on ethics, sustainability, consumerism, activism, identity and creativity.

iTunes Ratings

92 Ratings
Average Ratings
86
3
1
1
1

Great host & outstanding content

By cmm246888 - Feb 01 2020
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I was first drawn to this podcast because of my interest in secondhand, sustainable fashion. However, I have loved every single episode and have learned a great deal along the way. Clare is a wonderful host - she asks insightful industry questions and also engages guests on a more personal level. Highly recommended!

No need for the song

By largebeef - Oct 02 2019
Read more
Great, important podcast. The song is jarring and incongruous.

iTunes Ratings

92 Ratings
Average Ratings
86
3
1
1
1

Great host & outstanding content

By cmm246888 - Feb 01 2020
Read more
I was first drawn to this podcast because of my interest in secondhand, sustainable fashion. However, I have loved every single episode and have learned a great deal along the way. Clare is a wonderful host - she asks insightful industry questions and also engages guests on a more personal level. Highly recommended!

No need for the song

By largebeef - Oct 02 2019
Read more
Great, important podcast. The song is jarring and incongruous.
Cover image of WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

Latest release on Feb 19, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 1 day ago

Rank #1: Beyond Marie Kondo! Adam Minter Unpacks Secondhand, Recycling & Resuse

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Are you into vintage shopping or second-hand style? Join the club. Whether you're glued to Depop, buying high end designer vintage or a committed charity shop trawler, secondhand has lost its stigma in fashion circles. 

Recommerce is growing. According to Thredup preloved fashion is on track to eclipse fast fashion within a decade, while 64% of women have either bought or are open to buying used clothes. But... that doesn't mean the world isn't drowning in unwanted stuff. 

This podcast goes live on Black Friday. On this holiday and sales frenzy last year, Americans spent $6.2 billion on Black Friday, up 23.6% on the previous year.

Much of this haul will end up on the bin. We're still discarding clothing and other unwanted items at a record rate. So what happens to all our stuff when we’re done with it?

Meet the recycling obsessive who grew up on a junkyard and now works for Bloomberg. Adam Minter, author of Junkyard Planet, has a new book out. This one's called Secondhand - Travels in the New Global Garage Sale, and to write it he travelled all over the world talking to the people who deal in trash.

In this fascinating interview, we discuss everything from how metals get recycled to the politics of exporting our trash.

LOVE THE SHOW? Please share on social media and consider rating and reviewing in your favourite podcast app.

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter, and at clarepress.com

Nov 29 2019

53mins

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Rank #2: Claire Bergkamp - Stella McCartney's Secret Sustainability Weapon

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You know it: Stella McCartney does the eco things first. Whether it’s making all things green super-cool, proving non-leather accessories can compete with traditional animal leather in the luxury market, or bringing the circular fashion conversation mainstream, this fashion brand leads the way.

So who makes all this happen? There’s McCartney herself, of course - the designer is a visionary greenie. But no woman is an island. Claire Bergkamp has her back.

Meet Stella McCartney’s Worldwide Sustainability & Innovation Director. A self-confessed fibre nut, Claire started out as a costume designer in LA before switching lanes to study sustainability in London. There, she found her calling.

Six years ago Claire joined the Stella McCartney brand to head up sustainability; she was a team of one. Today she runs a team based in London and Italy. Her work is disruptive and tend-setting - from rethinking traditional supply chains to working with startups on new circular materials, Claire is changing the way fashion is produced. And she’s lovely too.

Notebooks at the ready, there’s so much to learn in this Episode.

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Mar 12 2019

52mins

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Rank #3: Dame Ellen MacArthur, Making Fashion Circular

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DON'T MISS OUR SHOWNOTES - the are packed with links & extra info!

To say that Ellen MacArthur is a phenomenal woman is an understatement. In 2005, aged 28, she became the fastest person to sail solo, non-stop around the world. It took her 71 days, 14 hours and 18 minutes.

You’re going to hear what that was like, how she stayed focused and what she learned from it. The importance of goal setting really comes through in this interview. Ellen is obviously an incredibly determined person but there’s a take-away for us all here: it’s about having a plan - by knowing which direction you want to go in, that’s how you make stuff happen.

What’s all this got to do with fashion? This is the story of how a world-record-breaking British sailor became an international advocate for the circular economy. How she created a platform, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, to encourage the global economy to transition to a system that designs out waste & pollution, keeps materials in use and regenerates natural systems. It's also the story of what that might look like, and how we can action it.

Ellen’s lightbulb moment happened at sea. In parts of the Southern Ocean she was 3000 kilometres from land. If she ran out of teabags, there was no nipping to the shop to buy more. She wrote in her logs: "What I have on this boat is all I have.’” That’s how it is with the Earth’s finite resources too.

Last year, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation launched its Make Fashion Circular initiative at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit with Stella McCartney and a bunch of other big brands on board. The aim is to tackling fashion’s polluting and wasteful ways and create a new system.

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. You can also find us on Spotify.

Sep 29 2018

38mins

Play

Rank #4: Stylist Laura Jones, Red Carpet Ready

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It’s Met Gala time, which means your social media feeds are going to be full of who wore what. This got us thinking about the huge influence of the red carpet on fashion and pop culture, and about how it works and who, apart from the designer, creates these looks - because make no mistake, celebrities do not dress themselves at these things...

What better time to share an Episode about styling? You’re going to meet New York-based fashion editor Laura Jones, who is fast carving a niche for herself as sustainable fashion’s go-to creative.

An ex-MTV stylist who used to work at W magazine, Laura has dressed the likes of Alicia keys, Rebecca Hall and Naomie Harris for red carpet events, and styled names like Katie Holmes and Uma Thurman for shoots. Now she's launched new sustainable fashion magazine The Frontlash .

This is a fascinating interview, about much more than frocking up for the red rug. We dig deep on fashion's #MeToo crisis and look at how we might apply ideas of health and wellbeing to the fashion industry. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of moving the needle on sustainability when it comes to high fashion and the business of dressing for events. We talk feminism, and the politics and power games of fashion, and of course, we decode what a stylist actually does

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us.

May 03 2018

50mins

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Rank #5: Patagonia's Director of Philosophy Vincent Stanley, Talking The Big Stuff

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Vincent Stanley is Patagonia’s Director of Philosophy. (Yes, that's a thing). He has been with the outdoor gear company since 1973, when his uncle, Yvon Chouinard, gave him a job as a kid out of college. 

Vincent is a deep thinker and passionate environmentalist, and a visiting fellow at the Yale School of Management. He's also a poet, whose work has appeared in Best American Poetry.

With Yvon, he co-wrote the book THE RESPONSIBLE COMPANY, which is like a handbook for building a more sustainable business. Oh and hello! This is the guy who wrote the first copy for The Footprint Chronicles Patagonia’s game-changing supply chain mapper -  and along with Rick Ridgeway, worked on the much-talked-about "Don’t Buy This Jacket" campaign that Patagonia ran in the New York Times in 2011. 

This Episode is about the big, important issues facing our planet, and business, today: We discuss what’s happening to our soils, loss of biodiversity, climate change, ocean acidification and water pollution, and the problems with over-consumption, population growth and the role of business in this challenging new world. But don't you worry, it's also fun. And awesome. And SUPER INSPIRING. Buckle up, this is a wild, challenging, and thought-provoking journey, and you're invited. Are you ready?

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Also, we're excited to announce our new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters - welcome to the Wardrobe Crisis family.

Nov 07 2017

57mins

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Rank #6: Everlane's Michael Preysman - Radical Transparency & Beyond

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Do you have any idea how much it actually costs to make your clothes? Most brands would rather you didn't.

Meet the fashion disruptor who is happy to tell you exactly what it costs his company to make its products, and exactly how much profit they make on each style.

Michael Preysman founded Everlane on the concept of "radical transparency" and says: “We believe our customers have a right to know how much their clothes cost to make. We reveal the true costs behind all of our products—from materials to labor to transportation—then offer them to you, minus the traditional retail markup.”

Why is transparency important in the fashion industry? How does that idea apply when it comes to garment workers and factory supply chains? How did this Californian start up become a major global player, and what drives Michael Preysman? In this interview we discuss what it takes to succeed, the power of disruption, and being okay with not being perfect. 

Check out the shownotes on clarepress.com for links and more info.

Enjoying Wardrobe Crisis? Get in touch with Clare on Instagram and Twitter (@mrspress) and let her know. Please consider rating and reviewing us in Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen.

Aug 14 2019

41mins

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Rank #7: Livia Firth, Eco-Age & the Green Carpet

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Livia Firth is the Creative Director of sustainability consultancy Eco-Age, and the founder of the Green Carpet Challenge and Green Carpet Fashion Awards. She is a UN Leader of Change, a founding member of Annie Lennox’s women’s advocacy group The Circle, and was a co-producer on Andrew Morgan’s ethical fashion documentary, The True Cost. Livia is also a warm and wonderful advocate for ethical and sustainable fashion, and an absolute treat to interview. We are so grateful to Livia for kicking off this, our brand sparkling new series 3 of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast!

In Episode, Clare and Livia discuss what it means to be a fashion activist, and why the world needs more of us (yes, including you!). We cover the big stuff - garment worker dignity, living wages, social justice - and the glitzy stuff - influencers, social media and the power of fashion to change stories.

Livia shares about her childhood growing up in Italy in a pre-fast fashion world, being “a ballbreaker” and starting a business with her brother. She reveals how her eco fashion quest began: when her husband Colin Firth was up for a Best Actor Oscar for his role in the Tom Ford movie A Single Man - dressing “eco” gave her a role to play. And she explains how that first challenge grew and flowered into something truly extraordinary that has seen Eco-Age become one of the biggest players in sustainable fashion. Want to change fashion for the better? This Episode is full of inspiration.

Don't miss our shownotes for links and further reading.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter, and join the conversation.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING!

Feb 05 2019

48mins

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Rank #8: Fashion Social Enterprise 101 with The Social Outfit's founder Jackie Ruddock & the Social Outfit

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Where would we be without creative collaboration? This week’s Episode is all about fashion community, its power to change the world, and the idea that together we are stronger.

You're going to meet the inspiring change-maker Jackie Ruddock, CEO of The Social Outfit, a Sydney-based social enterprise and fashion brand that works with refugees and new migrants to provide first Australian jobs in the fashion industry. 

What it’s like to come to a new country and to try to build a new life? How can fashion help? Community and giving back are central to this story. We discuss the challenges and joys of running a social enterprise, the magic powers of sewing, and our common humanity. And fabulous style!

This show is brought to you by Bianca Spender in celebration of Fashion Revolution week. #whomademyclothes

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Follow Bianca Spender

Follow The Social Outfit

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com (All the new Eps will be updated by end of April.)

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Apr 11 2018

46mins

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Rank #9: Anna Gedda on H&M's Sustainability Goals & Challenges

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Can fast fashion ever be sustainable? Will circularity funadamentally change things? Or is it, practically speaking, too far off? How about supply chain transparency, collaboration and pumping resources into textile innovation? Is all this eclipsed by the shadow of overproduction?

Swedish giant H&M is the second biggest clothing company in the world (the first is Zara.) The H&M Group comprises the H&M brand, but also COS, & Other Stories, jeans brand Cheap Monday, hyper-transparent newcomer Arket and a couple of others.

Clare caught up with Anna Gedda, Head of Sustainability at the H&M Group since 2015, at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit to ask about the company’s approach to sustainability across its brands. 

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jul 12 2018

31mins

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Rank #10: Fanny Moizant, Secondhand is Not Second Best

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There used to be a stigma about old clothes. Whereas vintage was always cool for those in the know, until fairly recently plain second hand wasn’t always so welcome. But this is changing: 30% of millennials have shopped second-hand in the last three months. Instagram is full of stylish people wearing second-hand gear. Fashion rental and resale sites are booming.

In this Episode, recorded in Paris, we meet Fanny Moizant, one of founders of Vestiaire Collective, the French ‘re-commerce’ site that’s seeing 30,000 designer items offered for sale each week by members of its 6 million-strong fashion community. Imagine a cross between Net-A-Porter and eBay with a bit of Instagram thrown in, so you can follow and like your favourite sellers. 

This interview is a must for anyone who buys or sells secondhand anywhere. It’s a ‘How to make it in fashion’ episode, a tech disruptor episode, an inspirational woman episode. Fanny is a working mamma and she has heaps of great advice on female entrepreneurship. Not surprisingly, she also has fantastic style. Fanny is super chic.

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

You can find all our podcasts and shownotes here.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Mar 06 2018

51mins

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Rank #11: Baroness Lola Young on Modern Slavery in Fashion

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CHECK OUT OUR SHOWNOTES for masses of extra goodness.

According to the Global Slavery Index 2018, fashion is one of 5 key industries implicated in modern slavery. How does that happen? What can we do about it?

In this Episode, you're going to meet Baroness Lola Young of Hornsey, a British crossbench peer in the House of Lords who is active in the ethical fashion space and is working to amend the UK's Modern Slavery Act.

Modern slavery is, of course, a depressing issue but this episode is not depressing. No, no. It's got the power! It’s all about unleashing your inner activist, understanding the issues and taking positive steps to do something about them - if you’re an individual, they can be really small steps. If you’re in business, they might be bigger ones. Don't forget to check the shownotes for further reading.

Lola Young started out as an actor, went onto become a professor of cultural studies then the Head of Culture at the Greater London Authority. She’s been a judge for the Orange Prize for Literature, and The Observer newspaper’s Ethical Awards. In 2004 she was appointed an independent Crossbench member of the House of Lords. In 2009 she set up the All Party Parliamentary Group on Ethics and Sustainability in Fashion, which she co-chairs.  Lola Young is fabulous.

What do you think about all this? Please get in touch with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress to let us know.

Don't forget to check the shownotes for further resources.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Aug 29 2018

58mins

Play

Rank #12: Sass Brown - Clothing Ethics

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Is sustainable fashion elitist? Does fashion contribute to poor body image and eating disorders by perpetuating a single, unattainable beauty ideal? What can we do about fashion's diversity problem? How do we, as consumers of fashion, navigate all this? "You can’t do it all at the moment,” says this week's guest. “You have to make choices based on your values and those are your personal ethics.

Sass Brown is an English designer, educator and the author of Eco Fashion. For many years, Sass taught at FIT in New York. She was the Founding Dean of the Dubai Institute of Design and Innovation (DIDI). She has purple hair, is a dedicated thrifter and has her shoes made by hand. But actually, this is not an interview about a life in fashion...

In this conversation, we focus on how fashion shapes our collective image, and how and why we allow it to dictate culture, and often get it so wrong.

Mar 27 2019

43mins

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Rank #13: Simon Doonan, Tales from the Fashion Asylum

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Designers know they’ve made it when their collections are stocked by Saks, Bergdorf’s or Barneys. The iconic New York department stores hold a special allure, even when you live elsewhere. But retail, globally, is in a state of flux.

Will there even be physical stores in 10 or 20 years’ time? As customers continue to head online, it seems like every week there's news of another “bricks and mortar” closure. In the US, analysts predict 25 % of malls could shutter within the next five years. Will we ditch consumerism on mass, as the anti-shopping / buy nothing movements expand? Will renting fashion and clothing libraries become major trends? Or is it still all about experiences?

The latter is where Simon Doonan comes in. He calls himself a carnival type, likens his celebrated window displays for Barneys New York to something out of Coney Island – and indeed he has put some very unusual objects in shop windows in his time.

Creative director, writer, fashion commentator and OTT window dresser extraordinaire, Simon Doonan is an actual proper fashion legend.

Wait till you hear how he got into it.

Growing up gay and dreaming of glamour in 1960s Reading, he moved to Manchester then London in search of “the beautiful people”, cadging window dressing jobs off the likes Tommy Nutter (tailor to the Beatles and the Rolling Stones) and cult filmmaker Ken Russell’s wife.

Simon was a Blitz Kid (part of the famed London party set) then moved to LA, where he did windows for luxury boutique Maxfield. In mid-80s Manhattan, he worked for Diana Vreeland at the Met, before joining Barneys, where, you know, he was JUST CASUALLY FRIENDS WITH JOAN RIVERS. And nearly starred in The Devil Wears Prada.

Simon’s story is both extraordinary, and, in a weird way ordinary – in that Fashion Land has long been a place where eccentric, creative kids from small, unremarkable towns can find a home and thrive.

In this Episode we talk about his professional path, and how today’s new generation of designers and dream weavers can navigate the changed fashion landscape. We discuss Simon’s unwavering belief in the value of originality - ("Conformity is the only real fashion crime," he says) and some of the fashion geniuses he’s encountered. And of course we talk shop.

The show notes will be live shortly at  www.clarepress.com/ - keep checking back, we’ll have some fantastic pics to show you.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

Aug 29 2017

47mins

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Rank #14: Fast Fashion Question Time

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This week’s Episode is little different from normal. It was recorded in September at a live Q&A event at the Wheeler Centre for Books & Ideas in Melbourne, and moderated by Madeleine Morris, a reporter for ABC television’s 7.30

We touch on a whole lot of issues front and centre in an industry currently in overdrive, from slow fashionoverconsumption and waste, to what brands are doing about supply chain transparency, as well as Australia’s move towards a Modern Slavery Act, the role of magazines in the fashion transparency conversation, and even how body mapping technology might reduce dead-stock.

For more on these issues, don't miss the shownotes here.

WHO’S TALKING?

Clare Press, yours truly, presenter of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast.

Clara Vuletich, a sustainable fashion consultant with a PhD in sustainable textiles, who has worked with clients such as H&M and Kering. 

Rebecca Hard, CEO of Sussan. The Sussan Group is the Australian women’s fashion retailer that owns retail brands Sportsgirl, Sussan and Suzanne Grae.

Jessica Perrin, one of the co-founders of Not My Style, a UK-based ethical shopping app that “tells you how much your favourite fashion brands share about how they treat the women and men who make our clothes.” The app launched after a successful Kickstarter campaign last year.

Music is by Montaigne

Enjoying the show? Clare would love to hear from you - get in touch here www.clarepress.com

Please consider leaving a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us! 

Sep 26 2017

51mins

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Rank #15: Rachel Rutt, Making Mending Great Again

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We live in a our throwaway society. "Landfill fashion" has become a phrase - we literally buy clothes to throw them away. With fast fashion brands dropping new stock into store sometimes as often as every week, we're consuming new clothes like never before. The average woman wears just 40 % of what's in her wardrobe, meanwhile it's cool to declutter. Or is it? Have you considered where all that "clutter" ends up when you remove it from your house?

In this Episode, fashion model and Heart People frontwoman Rachel Rutt makes the case for making mending great again! Rachel is a mad-keen mender, weaver, knitter and sewing person. She is especially excited about patching up old denim, and wants to make that a craze - why buy pre-ripped jeans? "If you wear them enough, they will get there." Authentically aged denim is much more satisfying. By mending your clothes, you deepen your connection to them, argues Rachel.

Listen to Rachel's story of being home-schooled, shaving her head as a kid, finding herself in modelling and learning to harness the creativity within. Can fashion be a beautiful, supportive place to be? It can!

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Clare would love to hear from you - get in touch www.clarepress.com

Please consider leaving a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us! 

Sep 19 2017

44mins

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Rank #16: Bandana Tewari - What We Can Learn from Gandhi about Mindful Fashion

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We don’t talk very much about mindfulness in fashion, but it’s not like the two are mutually exclusive. If the opposite of sustainable fashion is thoughtlessly buying more and more clothes and getting rid of them after just a few wears, then mindfulness surely has a place.

Fashion journalist Bandana Tewari is a former Vogue India editor who now writes for Business of Fashion, and speaks globally on India’s rich tradition of fashion craftsmanship. This episode covers that but from a unique perspective: Bandana’s been developing a theory around what we can learn from the great Indian activist Mohandas Gandhi (mahatma means high-souled in Sanskrit). It was Gandhi who lead the khadi movement, uniting Indians in opposition to British colonial rule around the issue of cotton production. How did he develop his sartorial integrity, and what can we learn from that in today's context of hyper-consumerism. As powerful argument as we ever heard in support of the idea that clothes do matter...

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

May 29 2019

49mins

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Rank #17: Easton Pearson - Slow Fashion in a Fast Fashion World

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What was it like to pioneer ethical fashion before that was even a phrase? For 27 years, Pamela Easton and Lydia Pearson ran the iconic Australian fashion label Easton Pearson, known for its exquisite artisanal fabrics and embellishments, colourful exuberance and sense of fun.

They are the subjects of a new exhibition at the Museum of Brisbane, The Designers’ Guide: Easton Pearson Archive - an invaluable resource for fashion students and fashion fans. It’s also an important contribution to Australia’s cultural history, which fashion absolutely should be considered a part of.

You could win free tickets - check Clare's Instagram for details.

In this interview, we discuss why this Aussie icon, that sold at Browns in London and Bergdorf’s in New York, was such a big deal. Pam and Lydia decode their design and making processes, and detail how they started out on the business of fashion, and kept at it for so long.

We talk about how they pioneered and centred slow fashion and ethical production in the Australian context, and also in India, where their main workshop was located. We also have a frank discussion about the challenges of running an independent, slow fashion business in a fast fashion world.

Our shownotes are packed with links and extra information. 

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

Nov 20 2018

39mins

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Rank #18: Craftivist Sarah Corbett - Stitching the Rebellion

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Fashion has a long association with craft, but what about fashion activism? Could we stitch out way to a better world?

Meet the author of How to be a Craftivist and founder of Craftivist Collective. Sarah Corbett believes, “If we want a world that is beautiful, kind and fair, shouldn’t our activism be beautiful, kind and fair?”

This Episode is a call to arms for fashion change-makers, a demonstration of the persuasive nature of gentle activism, and the wonderful idea that together we might stitch a rebellion, sweep out the status quo and usher in a fairer world in fashion and beyond.

Happy Fashion Revolution Week! 

For links and further reading, check out the show notes here.

Are you a craftivist? Would you like to be? We'd love to know what you think. Find Clare on Instagram & Twitter.

Apr 23 2019

44mins

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Rank #19: Economist Raj Patel - Can We Imagine the End of Capitalism?

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Why are the old white men still in charge? What's the system build from, and how might be change it? In A History of the World in 7 Cheap things, Raj Patel and his co-author Jason W. Moore argue that the modern world has been shaped by the exploitation of cheap nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives.

"Cheap is a strategy, a practice, a violence that mobilises all kinds of work - human, animal, botanical and geological - for as little compensation as possible.” And it goes back way further than the Industrial Revolution. Think about Columbus "conquering" new frontiers. Centuries later, we're still carrying on the same way - invade, exploit, move on.

Is it really easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism? Could we reform society along more equitable lines and create a brighter future for people and planet?

This week, Clare gets to hang out with Raj Patel, the US-based British writer, speaker, activist, academic and wearer of very nice ethically made jackets. He’s got degrees from Oxford, the London School of Economics and Cornell. And he has worked for the World Bank and World Trade Organisation - but he has also protested against them. Fascinating, provocative and full of ideas and information, this Episode will make you question everything.

Enjoying the show? DON'T FORGET TO HIT SUBSCRIBE. Please consider rating and reviewing Wardrobe Crisis in your favourite podcast app.

Nov 14 2019

41mins

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Rank #20: Tim Silverwood, Beating Plastic Pollution

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"Change isn’t going to be easy, but there’s no time to procrastinate or hope someone else is going to fix it…it’s time to do something. YOU are the person you’ve been waiting for." — Tim Silverwood.

Meet Tim Silverwood CEO of Take 3 for the Sea. Tim is an Australian environmentalist, surfer and plastic pollution campaigner. In Australia, you might have seen him on War on Waste, or if you have kids (or if you are one) you might have seen him at your school. He’s given hundreds of talks to schools, communities and businesses on the ocean plastics issue.

This episode is all about what we can do to turn it around. Be warned: it's highly motivating!

Our interview was recorded live at the Sustainable Living Festival in Melbourne. 

Thank you to the Australian documentary Blue for supporting this Episode.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jul 03 2018

50mins

Play