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Face 2 Face with David Peck

Updated 7 days ago

Arts
Society & Culture
Performing Arts
Philosophy
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The podcast, “Face 2 Face”, hosted by social change consultant David Peck, is featured on iTunes and Rabble.ca where he interviews guests and talks about change, social innovation and making a difference. His guests have included Paul Young, Atom Egoyan and Peter Singer. David’s paramount passion is social innovation and incremental change. He has spoken on on topics such as the Global South, mentorship, and entrepreneurship. He has presented in collaboration with organizations such as UNICEF and the Stephen Lewis Foundation, and has provided consulting services for health and literacy projects in Cambodia and Mongolia, respectively. For more information about David, especially about his work as a speaker, please visit his website, http://davidpecklive.com For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Read more

The podcast, “Face 2 Face”, hosted by social change consultant David Peck, is featured on iTunes and Rabble.ca where he interviews guests and talks about change, social innovation and making a difference. His guests have included Paul Young, Atom Egoyan and Peter Singer. David’s paramount passion is social innovation and incremental change. He has spoken on on topics such as the Global South, mentorship, and entrepreneurship. He has presented in collaboration with organizations such as UNICEF and the Stephen Lewis Foundation, and has provided consulting services for health and literacy projects in Cambodia and Mongolia, respectively. For more information about David, especially about his work as a speaker, please visit his website, http://davidpecklive.com For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
1
0
0
0

Giving value consistently

By Jonesy Money - Jan 28 2020
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It’s always great to pop in and listen to David’s style of interview. His research into his host and their current work goes deep. With 400 episodes he is now a master at his craft.

Great show!

By Gilgalad3434 - Jul 24 2017
Read more
David's got a great way of putting guests at ease and recognizing the difference that we can make in the world. His own passion for social change through the "ripple effect" is clearly obvious in the show! Highly recommended.

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
1
0
0
0

Giving value consistently

By Jonesy Money - Jan 28 2020
Read more
It’s always great to pop in and listen to David’s style of interview. His research into his host and their current work goes deep. With 400 episodes he is now a master at his craft.

Great show!

By Gilgalad3434 - Jul 24 2017
Read more
David's got a great way of putting guests at ease and recognizing the difference that we can make in the world. His own passion for social change through the "ripple effect" is clearly obvious in the show! Highly recommended.
Cover image of Face 2 Face with David Peck

Face 2 Face with David Peck

Latest release on Mar 31, 2020

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The podcast, “Face 2 Face”, hosted by social change consultant David Peck, is featured on iTunes and Rabble.ca where he interviews guests and talks about change, social innovation and making a difference. His guests have included Paul Young, Atom Egoyan and Peter Singer. David’s paramount passion is social innovation and incremental change. He has spoken on on topics such as the Global South, mentorship, and entrepreneurship. He has presented in collaboration with organizations such as UNICEF and the Stephen Lewis Foundation, and has provided consulting services for health and literacy projects in Cambodia and Mongolia, respectively. For more information about David, especially about his work as a speaker, please visit his website, http://davidpecklive.com For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Rank #1: Episode 490 - Brad Jersak

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Brad Jersak and Face2Face host David Peck talk about religiosity, alienation and separation, the truth of our beings, faith and doubt statements, following a ‘script’ versus leading a life of love, reality, truth and justice. 

For more info about Brad head here.

Check out his blog here.

About Brad:

By now, most of his social networks and some of his readership have heard of his move into the Eastern Orthodox Church. He was ‘chrismated’ at the end of June, 2013 and tonsured as a ‘reader’ for the All Saints Monastery in Dewdney in October. You might wonder why he - an evangelical/charismatic/Anabaptist - would don a cassock and take up incense and chanting. If you’re curious, here’s the short version.

Brad Jersak is an author and itinerant teacher based in Abbotsford, BC Canada. He is the Dean of Ministry Studies at St. Stephen's University where he teaches New Testament/Theology, Patristics and some philosophy. He also teaches on the core faculty with the Institute for Religion Peace and Justice. He also serves as an editor and graphic designer for CWR magazine.

Brad is a preacher and reader at All Saints of N.A. Orthodox Monastery in Dewdney, BC and is active in local 12-step addiction recovery.

Brad writes across genres, including Christian theology and practice, children's books and political philosophy. 

Image Copyright: Brad Jersak. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 19 2020

51mins

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Rank #2: Episode 475 August Diehl & Valerie Pachner, A Hidden Life

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August Diehl and Valerie Pachner and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Terence Malik’s new film A Hidden Life, true love, pacifism and evil, truth and justice, taking an ethical stance and standing up to power.

Trailer

Synopsis:

“..for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”

George Eliot

A Hidden Life is based on the true story of Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian peasant farmer who refused to take the oath of allegiance to Hitler during World War II, sacrificing everything, including his life, rather than to fight for the Nazis.

When Franz is called up to basic training, a requirement for all Austrian men, he is away from his beloved wife and children for months. Eventually, when France surrenders and it seems the war might end soon, he is sent back home. His mother and sister-in-law Resie come to live with them, and for a while things seem to go on as normal.

Instead of retreating, the war escalates, and Franz and the other men in the village are called up to fight. The first requirement of a new soldier is to swear an oath of allegiance to Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich. Despite pleas from his neighbors, fellow soldiers and commanding officers, Franz refuses the oath—objecting to Hitler and the Nazi regime. With a sense of personal responsibility and the inability to do what he believes is wrong, Franz refuses.

After months of incarceration, the case goes to trial. Franz is found guilty and sentenced to death. Franz continues to stand up for his beliefs and is executed by the Third Reich in August 1943. His wife and three daughters survive.  

The relationship, however, between Franz and his wife Fani endures. The film portrays their bond as deeply as Franz’s devotion to his cause. At every turn Fani is there for Franz - strong, unfaltering and supportive of his path while raising their daughters and running the farm alone, eventually with help from her mother-in-law and sister.

Terence Malik’s film draws on actual letters exchanged between Franz and Fani while Jägerstätter was in prison. The collection was edited by Erna Putz and published in English by Orbis Books. Some lines have been added to the letters, and sometimes the letters are paraphrased.

The story was little known outside of St. Radegund, and might never have been discovered, were it not for the research of Gordon Zahn, an American who visited the village in the 1970s.

About the Cast:

August Diehl made his debut in 23, which garnered him a Bavarian Film Award for Best Young Actor and a German Film Award for Best Actor. Best known for his role in the Academy Award-Winning The Counterfeiters and Inglorious Bastards Diehl’s additional credits include The Ninth Day, Slumming and If Not Us, Who.

Valerie Pachner was Born in Wels, Upper Austria, and trained at the famous Max Reinhardt Seminar in Vienna. She moved to Munich after completing her studies. In 2013 she became part of the permanent ensemble at the Residenztheater.

In addition to her stage work, Pachner also took on movie roles, among them Egon Schiele: Death and The Maiden, a part for which she was awarded the Austrian Film Prize. Pachner played the lead in The Ground Beneath My Feet which received its world premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in 2019.

Image Copyright: Elizabeth Bay Productions Productions. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 06 2019

25mins

Play

Rank #3: Thom Powers, TIFF and Documentary Film

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Thom Powers and Face2Face host David Peck talk about documentary film, some of the films to look out for at TIFF 2019, empathy and social change, the politics of story and why Toronto is a special place.

TIFF is a not-for-profit cultural organization with a mission to transform the way people see the world through film.

TIFF 2019

Buy tickets here: TIFF 2019 running from September 5th to the 15th.

And check out TIFF trailers here.

Be sure to listen to Thom Powers on: Pure Non Fiction

About our Guest:

Thom Powers has been an international documentary programmer for the Toronto International Film Fectival since 2006. His TIFF selections have gone on to win critical and commercial acclaim including the Oscar winners Free Solo, Undefeated and Inside Job. As a programmer of music documentaries, he has moderated conversations with U2, Grace Jones, Yo-Yo Ma, Keith Richards, and Neil Young.

He created and oversees TIFF Doc Conference, which has featured speakers such as Werner Herzog, Raoul Peck, and Sophie Fiennes. For nine years, he programmed the Festival’s Mavericks series, featuring conversations with the likes of Martin Scorsese, Chris Rock, and Julie Taymor.

Powers hosts the podcast Pure Nonfiction, for which he has interviewed over 100 filmmakers, among them Agnès Varda, Ava DuVernay, and Wim Wenders.

He and his wife, Raphaela Neihausen, are co-founders of DOC NYC, the USA’s largest documentary festival, and created its offshoot events DOC NYC Pro, Short List, Visionaries Tribute, and Boot Camps. They run the weekly documentary screening series Pure Nonfiction (formerly known as Stranger Than Fiction) at Manhattan’s IFC Center, and host WNYC’s Documentary of the Week that airs on New York’s public radio station and as a podcast.

He has taught documentary producing at the School of Visual Arts MFA Social Documentary program, New York University School of Continuing Professional Studies and held the Allesee Chair in Media at Wayne State University. He is a co-founder of the Cinema Eye Honors, an annual award for documentary excellence, and the Garrett Scott Development Grant for first-time. He has written on documentary filmmaking for Positif, The Boston Globe, Realscreen, Filmmaker Magazine, Criterion, and STFdocs.com.

Image Copyright: TIFF and Thom Powers. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Aug 20 2019

40mins

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Rank #4: Greg Paul talks about "Resurrecting Religion"

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Greg Paul and David Peck talk about his weapons of love, bad, crazy, vicious religion, belief, and the politics of fear, vulnerability, oppression, exclusion and the enormous problem of faith.

Greg Paul is a pastor and member, as well as the founder, of the Sanctuary community in Toronto. Sanctuary, a community in which people who are wealthy and people who are poor live, work and share their experiences and resources on a daily basis, makes a priority of welcoming and caring for some of the most hurting and excluded people in Canada’s largest city, including people struggling with addiction, mental illness, prostitution, and homelessness.

Greg is the author of the recently released Resurrecting Religion and several other award-winning books: Simply Open; Close Enough to Hear God Breathe; The Twenty-Piece Shuffle; and God In The Alley.  He is the father of four children, and married to Maggie, who has three children of her own.

For more information please head here: www.sanctuarytoronto

Image Copyright: Greg Paul. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jul 18 2018

46mins

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Rank #5: Episode 421 - David Taylor - Beauty, Art and Grace

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David Taylor and Face2Face host David Peck talk about the arts as a gift for everyone, Bono and U2, beauty and desire, a history of doubt, vehicles for Grace and why donuts are an uncomplicated food group.

And check out this short film as it documents the friendship between Bono and Eugene Peterson (author of contemporary-language Bible translation The Message) revolving around their common interest in the Psalms. Based on interviews conducted by David Taylor and produced in association with Fourth Line Films, the film highlights a conversation on the Psalms that took place between Bono, Peterson, and Taylor at Peterson’s Montana home.

Biography

W. David O. Taylor, assistant professor of theology and culture at Fuller, is the author of The Theater of God's Glory and of the forthcoming books, Glimpses of the New Creation: Worship and the Formative Power of the Arts (Eerdmans, 2019) and Honest to God: The Psalms and the Life of Faith (Thomas Nelson, 2019).

He is also editor of For the Beauty of the Church(Baker, 2010)and Contemporary Art and the Church: A Conversation between Two Worlds IVP Academic, 2017).He has published articles in The Washington Post, Image Journal, Books & Culture, and Christianity Today, among others. 

An Anglican priest, he has lectured widely on the arts, from Thailand to South Africa. In 2016 he produced a short film on the psalms with Bono and Eugene Peterson. He lives in Houston with his family.

He tweets @wdavidotaylor

You can find out more about David here.

Image Copyright: David Taylor. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 20 2019

45mins

Play

Rank #6: Episode 399 - Brock Cahill

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Brock Cahill Z and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Sharkwater Extinction, Rob Stewarts news film, enemies of sharks and activism, drift net fishing, policy changes and why sometime sit’s easier to like animals more than people.

Trailer

Synopsis

Sharkwater Extinction is a follow-up to the critically acclaimed Sharkwater, Stewart’s first film, which brought the devastating issue of shark finning to the world stage. Sharkwater Extinction is a thrilling and inspiring action-packed journey. Stewart continues his courageous crusade through the oceans and across four continents to investigate the corruption behind a multibillion-dollar pirate fishing trade and massive illegal shark fin industry.

From West Africa, Spain, Panama, Costa Rica, France, and even North America, Stewart exposes the shocking truth that is leading to the extinction of our oldest remaining predator and ultimately to the destruction of our planet. Both Sharkwater and Stewart’s second film Revolution (2012) had world premieres at TIFF before going on to international acclaim. Sharkwater and Revolution are still to this day the number 1 and 3 Canadian documentaries of the last 15 years. They have been awarded more than 70 international awards and viewed by over 125 million people. In January 2017, while shooting Sharkwater Extinction, Rob Stewart tragically passed away during a dive off the Florida Keys. The world was stunned by the loss of one of the most influential activists of our time. Rob risked everything in a tireless effort to educate, preserve and defend the oceans.

His impact and sacrifice are beyond measure and the producers along with a talented group of filmmakers, editors and loyal Sharkwater supporters felt compelled to continue his work and ensure the film was completed. Award-winning editor Nick Hector was given the daunting task of sifting through Rob’s copious hours of footage and reams of detailed notes to create a final cut of Sharkwater Extinction. His efforts were supported by award-winning documentary filmmaker Sturla Gunnarsson who acted as a consultant to the team. “Rob spent his life defending the oceans and sharks - determined to change the world. We believe his work will continue to do so,” said Brian and Sandy Stewart. “Rob had a magical way of connecting with audiences and this film is one more step in his mission to inspire action in the important fight to protect this planet for generations to come. We are pleased that Sharkwater Extinction, like Rob’s previous films, will launch at TIFF before rolling out to audiences around the world.”

Biography

Rob was a biologist, conservationist, activist, and filmmaker. Sharkwater Extinction follows his two internationally award-winning films, Sharkwater (2006) and Revolution (2012). Sharkwater brought the devastating issue of shark finning to the world stage. Revolution was the first feature film to expose the devastating effects that Ocean Acidification would bring: much worse than scientists had thought climate change would be.

Born in 1979 and raised in Toronto, Stewart graduated from the University of Western Ontario. He dedicated his life to conservation, saying: “Conservation is the preservation of human life on earth. And, that, above all else is worth fighting for.”

He taught the world to love the oceans and their creatures and not fear sharks, through his iconic images of hugging and free diving with sharks and mantas.

For more info head to the site here.

Image Copyright: D Films Corporation Company. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Oct 17 2018

38mins

Play

Rank #7: Episode 481 - Sophie Deraspe - Antigone

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Sophie Deraspe and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Antigone, Greek tragedies, empathy, dignity, resistance and trusting and following your heart

Trailer

Synopsis:

Antigone is a moving, compassionate and beautiful story and it won the best film at TIFF 2019. Gripping, powerful, and of-the-moment, Antigone loosely adapts Sophocles' Greek tragedy and situates it in contemporary Montreal. The latest from critically acclaimed Québécois writer-director Sophie Deraspe (The WolvesThe Amina Profile) is a compassionate family drama that doesn't hold back on its indictment of the current refugee and immigrant experience in North America.

Following the murder of their parents, Antigone, her sister Ismène, her brothers Étéocle and Polynice, and their grandmother Ménécée find refuge in Montreal. They live a quiet modest life in a tiny apartment in a working-class neighbourhood. A straight-A student seemingly destined for greatness, Antigone (masterfully played by Nahéma Ricci in her first leading role) is the glue that holds the family together.

Tragedy strikes when Étéocle is wrongfully gunned down by police during the arrest of Polynice, a small-time drug dealer. Motivated by her sense of duty towards her family and fuelled by the memory she cherishes of her dead parents, Antigone decides to jeopardize her own future to preserve that of her family.

Antigone acutely explores familial sacrifice, the burden of responsibility, and the nature of justice with exceptional depth and nuance. Although inspired by a story 2,500 years old, Deraspe's film is a timely meditation, one that prompts serious reflection on immigrant life in ostensibly welcoming contemporary Canada.

With thanks to TIFF.

About the Director:

One of the leading figures of new Quebec cinema, Sophie Deraspe fell in love with cinema through her Visual Arts studies in Austria and Literature studies at the University of Ottawa and Montreal.

As both a filmmaker and cinematographer, she worked primarily within the realms of documentary before making her first feature, Rechercher Victor Pellerin/Missing Victor Pellerin in 2016.

Her second feature, Les signes vitaux/Vital Signs in 2009, was in IFFR's Tiger Competition and she won the FIPRESCI award at Torino Film Festival for Les loups in 2015. The documentary Le profil Amina/A Gay Girl in Damascus: The Amina Profile was selected as a World Cinema Documentary at Sundance and won the Special Jury Prize at Hot Docs. 

Antigone was chosen as Best Canadian Feature at the Toronto International Film Festival and it will represent Canada at the Oscars in the category Best International Feature Film.

Image Copyright: Association Coopérative des Productions Audio-Visuelles and Sophie Deraspe. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.



For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 02 2020

43mins

Play

Rank #8: Episode 477 - Robert Fisk and Yung Chang

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Robert Fisk and Yung Chang and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film This Is Not A Movie, fake news and journalism, our addiction to social media, complicity, a “dead language”, and something called, “apparent clarity.”

Trailer

Synopsis:

For more than 40 years, journalist Robert Fisk has reported on some of the most violent and divisive conflicts in the world: Northern Ireland, the Balkans, and Syria. Yong Chang’s This Is Not a Movie captures Fisk in action—feet on the ground, notebook in hand, as he travels into landscapes devastated by war, interviewing both combatants and ordinary folk, ferreting out the facts and firing reports back home to reach an audience of millions.

As corporations devour independent media, and language becomes a weapon, another less obvious battle is taking place. In an ever-accelerating 24-hour news cycle, the process of translating raw experience into incisive and passionate dispatches requires the determination to see things first-hand and the tenacity to say what others won’t.  

In his relentless pursuit of the facts, Fisk has attracted his share of controversy. But in spite of the danger, he has continued to cover stories as they unfold, talking directly to the people involved, whether that’s Osama Bin Laden or a young Palestinians woman whose father was recently murdered. Unlike the glamorous films that fueled Fisk’s early ambitions, justice rarely prevails, villains aren’t punished, and there are no tidy endings. As Fisk says, “the truth is that this is not a movie.”

About the Director and Robert:

Yung Chang is the director of Up the Yangtze, China heavyweight and The Fruit Hunters. He is currently completing a screenplay for his first dramatic feature, Eggplant. In 2015, Chang was selected to participate in the prestigious Sundance Labs for Eggplant. His award-winning short Gatekeeper is a Vimeo Staff Pick and distributed by Field of Vision, Laura Poitras’ curated online film unit. 

Chang’s films have screened at international film festivals including Sundance, Berlin, Toronto, and IDFA and have played theatrically in cinemas around the world. Up the Yangtze was one of the top-grossing documentary releases in 2008. In 2013, China Heavyweight became the most widely screened social-issues documentary I Chinese history with an official release in 200 Chinese cinemas. 

His films have been critically acclaimed, receiving awards in Paris, Milan, Vancouver, San Francisco, the Canadian Screen Award, Taiwan Golden Horse, Cinema Eye Honors, among others and have been nominated at Sundance, the Independent Spirit Awards and the Emmys.

Chang's films have been shown on international broadcasters including PBS, National Geographic, ARTE, ZDF, Channel 4, HBO, TMN, NHK, CBC, Bell Media, TV2, SBS, RTS and EBS. He's received funding from major organizations like Sundance Institute, BRITDOC, Telefilm, SODEC, Hot Docs, National Film Board and Canada Council for the Arts.

Chang is the recipient of the Don Haig Award, the Yolande and Pierre Perrault Award, and the Guggenheim Emerging Artist Award. He is a member of the Directors Guild of Canada. In 2013, he was invited to become a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the organization behind the Academy Awards.

Up the Yangtze and The Fruit Hunters were co-produced by the National Film Board and Eyesteel film. 

Robert Fisk is the most famous foreign correspondent in Britain, according to The New York Times. He is the Middle East correspondent of the London Independent and has won more than 20 major British and international journalism awards for his reporting from the region. He is the author of several bestselling books, including Pity the Nation, an eyewitness account of the Lebanese Civil War, and the historical volume The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East. In 2006, he was awarded the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Prize for Cultural Freedom from the Lannan Foundation.

First for The Times of London and then for The Independent, Fisk has been reporting from the Middle East for nearly 40 years, covering everything from the Lebanese Civil War in the 1980s to the Israeli invasions of Lebanon. He was among the first Western journalists to report the massacre at the Palestinian refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila. He also witnessed and reported from the Iranian Revolution (1979), the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (1979), the Iran-Iraq War (1980–1988), the Algerian Civil War (1990–1998), the US-Iraqi Gulf War (1991), the Bosnian and Kosovo conflicts (1992–1995, 1998), the American attack on Afghanistan (2001), and the US invasion of Iraq (2003). He covered many of the 2011 Arab revolutions, especially Egypt, and is today reporting from the civil war in Syria.

He is the only journalist to have interviewed Osama bin Laden three times—first in Sudan and then in Al-Qaeda’s secret camps in Afghanistan. Born in England in 1946, Fisk holds a BA in English and Linguistics from Lancaster University in the UK, and a PhD in Politics from Trinity College, University of Dublin. He has received 17 honorary doctorates from British, Canadian, and other universities. He is a frequent broadcaster and lecturer around the world.

Fisk is the author of five books, including two works on Irish history, one of them an account of Irish neutrality in the Second World War; it remains a bestseller. Outside of the Middle East, Fisk has written and lectured extensively on the First and Second World Wars. He was the first Englishman to be invited to give a lecture to the families of Irish Catholics killed by British soldiers on Bloody Sunday.

He remains based in Beirut as The Independent’s Middle East correspondent and is currently working on a new history of the region called Night of Power.

Image Copyright: TINAM Inc. and the NFB. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2019

38mins

Play

Rank #9: Episode 458 - Hugo Weaving, Ben Lawrence, Andrew Luri, Bolude Watson - Hearts and Bones

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Hugo Weaving, Bolude Watson, Ben Lawrence, Andrew Luri and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film, Hearts and Bones, PTSD, relationships and hope, the power of community, the image and why finding our way home matters.

Trailer

Synopsis:

War photographer, Daniel Fisher has returned home to the news of his partner’s pregnancy. Determined not let fatherhood alter his way of life, he begins preparations for an upcoming exhibition and his next overseas assignment. However, as the birth of his child draws near he struggles to keep his rising anxiety hidden.

Meanwhile, South Sudanese refugee, Sebastian Aman has created a safe life in Australia with his wife and child. His peaceful life is disturbed when Dan’s exhibition threatens to display photographs of a massacre that occurred in Sebastian’s home village, 15 years earlier. When Sebastian approaches Dan with an appeal to not display any images of the massacre, an unlikely friendship develops between the men.

Bonded by their shared trauma, Sebastian introduces Dan to members of a community choir. These survivors of war offer Dan an escape from the anxieties of imminent fatherhood, much to the frustration of his wife. When Sebastian uncovers among Dan’s photographic archive an image of his daughter, thought to have died in war, the men set about finding her.

Amid the search for the young girl, Dan unearths disturbing details surrounding Sebastian’s past and the startling revelations threaten to destroy both families. Amid the pain, each man must face their painful past in order to regain their salvation.

Hearts and Bones - a story about hope and the mysterious bonds of family, friendship and fatherhood.

About our Guests:

Ben Lawrence is an internationally award-winning director and photographer. His short films have screened at Edinburgh, Clermont-Ferrand, Los Angeles, San Gio and Sao Paulo film festivals.

His photographs have been recognized at the International Photography Awards in New York, The Australian National Photographic Gallery Portrait Prize, the HeadOn Portrait Festival and The Spider Awards for photojournalism in London.

In 2018, his critically acclaimed debut feature documentary, Ghosthunter screened at multiple festivals around the world and was nominated for a prestigious Illuminate Award at the Sheffield Film Festival. It also earned an AACTA Award nomination for Best Feature Length Documentary and won the Best Australian Documentary Award at the Sydney Film Festival.

Hugo Weaving has enjoyed an enormously varied and successful career in film, theatre and television. He has won numerous awards, including three Australian Film Institute awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role - in Jocelyn Moorhouse's PROOF (1991), THE INTERVIEW (1998) - for which he also won Best Actor at The Montreal World Film Festival, and LITTLE FISH (2005). In 2011, he was an inaugural AACTA award winner for his performance in ORANGES AND SUNSHINE. In 2015 he won his second AACTA award for THE DRESSMAKER. In 2016 he won another for his work in HACKSAW RIDGE, and followed this up in 2017 with another for JASPER JONES.

Weaving is also well known for his roles in THE ADVENTURES OF PRISCILLA, QUEEN OF THE DESERT (1994), as Agent Smith in THE MATRIX trilogy, as Elrond in THE LORD OF THE RINGS and THE HOBBIT trilogies, and as 'V’ in V FOR VENDETTA (2006). Other films include LAST RIDE (2009), CAPTAIN AMERICA (2011), CLOUD ATLAS (2012), MYSTERY ROAD (2013), THE MULE (2014) and STRANGERLAND (2015). Hugo’s recent TV credits include PATRICK MELROSE released in 2018 and Australian series SEVEN TYPES OF AMBIGUITY (2016).

His many theatre appearances include Sydney Theatre Company’s ARTURO UI, as well as HEDDA GABLER and UNCLE VANYA (both enjoying successful U.S. tours in 2006 and 2011 respectively, the latter earning him a Helen Hayes Award), MACBETH (2014), ENDGAME (2015) and WAITING FOR GODOT (2013) with a London season in 2015. He has also voiced characters in several highly successful films, including BABE, HAPPY FEET and TRANSFORMERS.

Andrew Luri was born in Juba, which is now the capital of South Sudan. He came to Australia via Cairo Egypt, to Darwin then to Melbourne. He is married and has seven children. Music is his hobby and he is a Church and community leader.

Andrew loves comedy and studied at Charles Darwin University, he also studied Counter Terrorism at Swinburne University. He is multi skilled and has had many different jobs over the years.

Hearts and Bones is his first film and the culmination of a childhood dream.

Bolude Watson is a Nigerian born American raised actress. Moving to Sydney, Australia in 2014 from Los Angeles, has proven to flourish her career, staring in Ché Baker’s SciFi film ‘Blue World Order’ as female lead Marion Connors and most recently she just wrapped the film ‘Hearts and Bones’ directed by Australia’s brilliant director, Ben Lawrence where she played Anishka the wife of a South Sudanese immigrant with a dark secret.

Bolude’s television credits include roles in shows such as ‘Deadly Women’ and ‘Your Numbers Up’. Bolude is also co-creator with Michela Carattini of The web series ‘Americans in Oz’ which made its online debut last year.

As an African American and with a deep passion for story telling Bolude’s goal is to be part of the movement that creates a space for diverse voices in film and television

Image Copyright: Hearts and Bones Films Pty Ltd, Spectrum Films Pty Ltd, Lemac Films (Australia) Pty Ltd, Create NSW and Screen Australia. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Sep 11 2019

46mins

Play

Rank #10: Episode 409 - Ann Shin - The SuperFood Chain

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Ann Shin and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her important new film The Superfood Chain, ghetto gardens, sustainability, local versus fair trade, the butterfly effect and crossing into other cultures.

Trailer

Synopsis

Are so called superfoods really that great for you? And how does the burgeoning global demand impact the indigenous cultures who grow the food and depend on it as a staple? ‘The Superfood Chain’ is a beautiful cinematic documentary that investigates how the super food industry affects the lives of farming families from Bolivia, Ethiopia, Philippines, and Haida Gwaii.

Every year, the western world is introduced to a new ‘superfood’ that boasts extraordinary nutritional features, and year after year we buy them. The Superfood Chain is a feature documentary that explores the facts and myths behind superfoods, and reveals the ripple effect of the ‘Superfood’ industry on farming and fishing families around the world. Shot on location in four countries, the TVO produced film features the lush landscapes of Bolivia, Ethiopia, Philippines, and Haida Gwaii in Canada, following four farming and fishing families. The documentary examines the larger issues around globalization of superfoods, including unintended effects on food security and health, sustainable farming, and fair trade food practices and provides an opportunist to learn more about the good food revolution.

DIRECTOR'S STATEMENT

When I became a mom, I became hyper aware of the food I was feeding my family. I wanted the very best for them and so whenever a new superfood came to market, I’d buy it and serve it up, no questions asked. But when my six-year-old daughter asked me where her quinoa crusted salmon came from, I had no answers. When I started to look into it, what I discovered was eye-opening.

While superfoods have become a globalized trend, few people know if they’re really that great for you, and even fewer realize the profound impact that the superfood industry has on the farmers who produce them and the indigenous communities who rely on them as a staple food. The Superfood Chain takes a closer look at the superfoods we eat as well as the lives of superfood producing families around the world.

In this film, I travel to meet superfood farmers and fisherfolk, to witness firsthand the impact the world’s obsession with superfoods. How have their lives changed since the superfood boom? How have their diets changed? And what can we do as consumers to help sustainable practices in farming and fishing communities?

Biography

Ann Shin is an award-winning Director and Producer known for beautiful, compelling documentary films, series and innovative interactive projects. Her films and series have aired on CBC, TVO, HBO, ABC, CBC The Documentary Channel, Discovery Channel, HGTV, History Channel, SLICE.

Her latest film, ‘My Enemy, My Brother’ won Grand Jury Prize at SDAIFF , the short version was shortlisted for a 2016 Academy Award, and nominated for an Emmy. Her cross-platform project ‘The Defector’ film won Best Documentary and Best Documentary Director at the Canadian Screen Awards. The Defector Interactive won the FITC Award, the Canadian Digi Award, and at the SXSW Interactive Festival. The Four Seasons Mosaic was a Gemini nominee for Best Performance Doc. Other credits include Chris Award-winning ‘The Roswell Incident’, ‘Western Eyes’, and ‘Almost Real: Connecting in a Wired World’.

Image Copyright: Fathom Film Group and Ann Shin. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 14 2018

37mins

Play

Rank #11: Episode 488 - Sami Khan - St. Louis Superman

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Sami Khan and Face2Face host David Peck talk about the new film St. Louis Superman, reconciliation and battle rapping, solidarity and our shared history and being seduced by the outrage of the moment.

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Synopsis:

Bruce Franks Jr. is a 34-year-old battle rapper, Ferguson activist and state representative from St. Louis, Missouri. Known as Superman to his constituents, he is a political figure the likes of which you've never seen - full of contradictions and deep insights, who has overcome unspeakable loss to become one of the most exciting and unapologetic young leaders in the country.

This short verité documentary follows Bruce at a critical juncture in his life, when he is forced to deal with the mental trauma he's been carrying for the nearly 30 years since his 9-year-old brother was shot and killed in front of him, in order to find peace and truly fulfill his destiny as a leader for his community.

Canadian filmmaker Sami Khan is going to the Academy Awards along with his American co-director Smriti Mundhra, as their acclaimed short documentary St. Louis Superman has been nominated in the Short Documentary Category.

‘We share this honor with Bruce and our whole filmmaking team including our champions at MTV Documentary Films and AJE Witness,’ adds Mundhra. ‘At a critical moment for democracy worldwide, Bruce’s activism couldn’t be more urgent.’

About our Guest:

Sami Khan is a filmmaker based in New York City. His work has screened at leading festivals including the Toronto International Film Festival and the Mumbai Film Festival. He graduated from Columbia University with an MFA in film. 

Khoya, Sami's feature debut (as writer/director), was selected for the Tribeca Film Institute’s All Access fellowship and received financial backing from Spike Lee. The film tells the story of a man traveling to India to solve the decades-old mystery surrounding his adoption.

Sami is an adjunct filmmaking lecturer at Columbia University and Brooklyn College where his teaching focuses on empowering young filmmakers of color.

Image Copyright: Meralta Films and Sami Khan. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 04 2020

43mins

Play

Rank #12: Episode 448 - Karen Stokkendal Poulsen

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Karen Stokkendal Poulsen and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film On The Inside of A Military Dictatorship, democratic reform, compromise, trust and privilege, personal interest, corruption and power.

Trailer

Synopsis:

The film tells the story of how the military of Myanmar stepped into the shadow after 50 years of dictatorship, while the democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, who the military had kept in house arrest for 20 years, became the leader of the country. The story is unusual because the two parties keep having a strange grip on each other: the military with their control of the countries’ resources, Aung San Suu Kyi with her control of the people.

It’s the story of how power struggles unfold and how political enemies can end up being closer than the ones they claim to fight for: the people. They play in the same field and get to know each other on close hold and it changes them.

It is a two-egged sword, though: compromise can be the way forward to reconcile a painful past. It can unfortunately also be a way of trapping each other and leave the visions behind. In Myanmar it is a complex mix of both. 

About the Director:

Karen is a documentary filmmaker. She graduated with a Master of Arts in “Screen Documentary” from Goldsmiths College, London, in 2008.

In addition to her work as a director, Karen has an educational background in Political Science, in which she holds a bachelor’s and Masters degree from the University of Copenhagen. Parallel with her studies she has worked in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and has lectured a course in International Relations at the University of Copenhagen.

Her documentary the Agreement was selected for competition at CPH:DOX 2013 and for the Dragon award at Göteborg International Film Festival, the human rights festival and many more. 

Image Copyright: Karen Stokkendal Poulsen and First Hand Films. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jul 17 2019

41mins

Play

Rank #13: Episode 472 - Fisher Stevens and Malcolm Venville - And We Go Green

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Fisher Stevens and Malcolm Venville and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film And We Go Green, the environment, Climate Change, eco-capitalists, Electric Cars, Formula E and social innovation. 

Trailer

Synopsis:

Formula E, the groundbreaking electric car racing series, has grown from upstart championship to the world's fastest growing sport in 4 short years. Through its pulsating and unpredictable racing spectacle featuring the most skillful drivers and most advanced car manufacturers, Formula E is exciting millions about the potential of electric performance in order to combat climate change and air pollution in our cities.

With unprecedented access, And We Go Green is the human story of the live wires, underdogs and visionaries who have made this sport such a success and are reinventing racing for the next generation of motorsport fans.

Directed by Fisher Stevens and Malcolm Venville and produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, this highly cinematic documentary uses intimate character-driven storylines, behind-the-scenes vérité, and thrilling race footage to thrust you into the drama of a climatic 2018/19 championship and leave you in the driving seat in a race against the clock for a cleaner future.

About the Directors:

Fisher Stevens has been in the entertainment business for over 30 years. He directed The Confidence Man, ”for Netflix original series Dirty Money, and, with Leonardo DiCaprio, National Geographic’s Before the Flood, winner of the Hollywood Film Award. He co-directed two-time Emmy-nominated Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds for HBO, and directed three-time Emmy-nominated Netflix original film Mission Blue. He co-directed Independent Spirit Award-winning Crazy Love.

Stevens also produced Academy Award-winning documentary The Cove, and follow-up film, Racing Extinction for Discovery, nominated for an Academy Award for best song. He produced Emmy-nominated film Woody Allen: A Documentary for American Masters, SXSW Grand Jury Award-winner Beware of Mr. Baker, and 2016 Sundance opening-night documentary, Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang for Netflix. Stevens directed Paramount Classic’s feature film Just a Kiss, starring Marisa Tomei, Kyra Sedgwick and Taye Diggs. He produced films including five-time Academy Award-nominated drama In the Bedroom, A Prairie Home Companion, Piñero, Swimfan, and Uptown Girls. Stevens directed feature film Stand Up Guys for Lionsgate starring Al Pacino, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin. He also directed John Leguizamo’s Ghetto Klown, on Broadway, which he later adapted and directed for an HBO special.

As an actor, Stevens appears in numerous television shows and movies, including The Blacklist, The Good Fight, the Cohen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar! and Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs.

Malcolm Venville is a performance driven visual storyteller whose projects span the mediums of film, television, commercials and documentaries.

His advertising campaigns include Apple, Volkswagen, Nike, Porsche and Google. Notable commercials Apple iPad Air Pencil, Google's New Baby, and Squarespace's debut Super Bowl spot.

More recently, he gave an introduction to the workers at Jack Daniel's in the spot From the Maker's Of. Venville made his feature film debut with the dark comedy 44 Inch Chest starring Ray Winstone, Ian McShane, John Hurt, and Tom Wilkinson.

His next film, Henry's Crime, featured Keanu Reeves, Vera Farmiga, and James Caan. His work also includes the documentary shorts Portrait of a Dancer and Philophiles. He has published three works of photography: The Women of Casa X, Lucha Loco, a collection of more than 100 portraits of Mexican wrestlers; and Layers, a monograph of his work as an art and advertising photographer.

Venville has most recently been working on a feature length documentary about Formula E “And We Go Green”, the electric car racing formula and a limited series for A&E on the life of United States President, Civil War hero, and abolitionist, Ulysses S. Grant.

Image Copyright: Appian Way and Bloomfish Productions. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Nov 22 2019

32mins

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Rank #14: Episode 403 - The Silence of Others

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Almudena Carracedo, Robert Bahar, Chato and David Peck talk about their new film, empathy engines, recovering history, dictatorship, Spain, memory and the narrative of the people.

Synopsis

The Silence of Others reveals the epic struggle of victims of Spain’s 40-year dictatorship under General Franco, who continue to seek justice to this day. Filmed over six years, the film follows victims and survivors as they organize the groundbreaking Argentine Lawsuit and fight a state-imposed amnesia of crimes against humanity, in a country still divided four decades into democracy.

The Silence of Others is directed/produced by Emmy-winning filmmakers Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar. It is Executive Produced by Pedro Almodóvar, Agustín Almodóvar and Esther García.

The Silence of Others had its world premiere at the 2018 Berlinale in the Panorama section, where it won both the Panorama Audience Award for Best Documentary and the Berlinale Peace Prize.

Biography

The Silence of Others was written, produced and directed by Emmy-winning filmmakers Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar. Their previous film, Made in L.A. (MadeinLA.com), which tells the story of three Latina immigrants fighting for better working conditions in Los Angeles garment factories, was praised by The New York Times as “an excellent documentary... about basic human dignity.” Made in L.A. screened at 100+ film festivals, premiered on United States public television’s POV series and won numerous awards including an Emmy, the Henry Hampton Award and the Hillman Prize for Broadcast Journalism, among others.

Born in Madrid, Spain, Almudena Carracedo has developed her professional career in the US, where she directed and produced her debut feature film, the Emmy-winning documentary Made in L.A. She is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Creative Capital Fellow, a Sundance Time Warner Documentary Fellow, a United States Artists Fellow, and the recipient of an honorary doctorate from Illinois Wesleyan University. Prior to Made in L.A., she directed the short documentary Welcome, A Docu-Journey of Impressions, which won Silverdocs’ Sterling Prize. In 2012 Almudena returned to Spain to begin work on The Silence of Others.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Robert Bahar lives and works between Madrid, Spain and Brooklyn, New York. He won an Emmy as producer/writer of the documentary Made in L.A., and he spearheaded a three-year impact campaign that brought the film to audiences around the world. Prior to Made in L.A., he produced and directed the documentary Laid to Waste, and line produced several independent films. Robert is a Creative Capital Fellow, a Sundance Documentary Fellow, and holds an MFA from the University of Southern California’s School of Cinema-Television.

Image Copyright: Almudena Carracedo & Robert Bahar. Used with permission.

For more information about his podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Nov 07 2018

33mins

Play

Rank #15: Episode 489 - Pat Collins and Henry Glassie - Field Work

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Pat Collins and Henry Glassie and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Field Work, beauty, non-verbal cues, silence and listening, eliminating prejudice, and why art is always rooted in community.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Following the success of Song of Granite, Irish Director Pat Collins returns with his new documentary feature, Henry Glassie: Field Work, which will have its world premiere at the upcoming Toronto International Film Festival.

Over the last 50 years the celebrated American Folklorist Henry Glassie has been writing in-depth studies of communities and their art. Inspired by the writings and ideas of Glassie – Field Work is an immersive and meditative documentary set among the rituals and rhythms of working artists across Brazil, Turkey, North Carolina and Ireland. Glassie’s subject is folklore but his deep abiding love for the people who create it resonates throughout the film: 'I don’t study people. I stand with people and I study the things they create.'

Collins’ achievement with Henry Glassie: Field Work is to bring these makers of art, in wood, fabric, yarn, paint, clay, metal, in song and story to our attention through their work, through the raw materials they shape into art objects and through the undeniable passion they carry in to their work.

In this way the work is accorded profound meaning for the societies out of which it is generated an aesthetic value which is transcendent. And under Collins’ ever mindful direction, the process of making something out of raw materials is luminously manifested in sequences which reflect their measured and focused approach. The actual real time process of making works, such as hands, of the physicality of that work, and the close attention the artist is bringing to the work. 

For more info about the film head here.

About Pat and Henry:

Since 1999, Pat Collins has made over 30 films. His latest release Song of Granite, funded by the Irish Film Board, BAI, SODEC and Telefilm Canada, received its world premiere at SXSW 2017 and was the Irish nomination for best Foreign Language Oscar 2018.

His other credits include Silence, which had its international premiere at London International Film Festival and the 3-part series 1916 (co-director), which aired on networks including the BBC and PBS. In 2012, the Irish Film Institute curated a mid-career retrospective of his work.

Henry Glassie is one of the most celebrated folklorists across the world. He has spent the last 50 years making in-depth studies of communities and their art. Henry, College Professor Emeritus at Indiana University Bloomington, has done fieldwork on five continents and written books on the full range of folkloristic interest, from drama, song, and story to craft, art, and architecture. Glassie began teaching in the Folklore Institute at Indiana University in 1970. In 1976, he became the chairman of the Department of Folklore and Folklife at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1988, he returned as a College Professor to Indiana University, where he had appointments in Folklore and Ethnomusicology, American Studies, Central Eurasian Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, and India Studies. He retired in 2008.

Glassie has served as president of the American Folklore Society, the Vernacular Architecture Forum, and his local historic preservation organization, Bloomington Restorations Incorporated. He is married to fellow folklorist Pravina Shukla, a professor at Indiana University, who is an award-winning teacher and the author of two major books on dress and adornment: The Grace of Four Moons and Costume. Glassie and Shukla co-authored Sacred Art, an ethnographic account of creativity in northeastern Brazil. Glassie has four children and four grandchildren.

He published his first scholarly paper, an article on the Appalachian log cabin, in 1963. Since then, he has published over 100 articles and a steady stream of books.

Image Copyright: Harvest Films and Pat Collins. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 12 2020

44mins

Play

Rank #16: Episode 420 - Brian Goldman and The Power of Kindness

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Brian Goldman and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his book The Power of Kindness, healthcare and shame, threats and anxiety, the big reveal, bonding with others and why empathy is a choice.

Synopsis

In The Power of Kindness, Goldman leaves the comfortable, familiar surroundings of the hospital in search of his own lost compassion. A top neuroscientist performs an MRI scan of his brain to see if he is hard-wired for empathy. A researcher at Western University in Ontario tests his personality and makes a startling discovery. Goldman then circles the planet in search of the most empathic people alive, to hear their stories and learn their secrets.

He visits a boulevard in São Paulo, Brazil, where he meets a woman who calls a homeless poet her soul mate and reunited him with his family; a research lab in Kyoto, Japan, where he meets a lifelike, empathetic android; and a nursing home in rural Pennsylvania, where he meets a therapist at a nursing home who has an uncanny knack of knowing what’s inside the hearts and minds of people with dementia, as well as her protégé, a woman who talked a gun-wielding robber into walking away from his crime.

Powerful and engaging, The Power of Kindness takes us far from the theatre of medicine and into the world at large, and investigates why kindness is so vital to our existence.

Biography

Dr. Brian Goldman has been an ER doctor, radio host of White Coat, Black Art and healthcare pundit. As a veteran emergency room physician, Brian has a successful career setting broken bones, curing pneumonia, and otherwise pulling people back from the brink of medical emergency. He has been an award-winning medical reporter for CBC Television's The Health Show as well as The National. He's known across Canada as CBC Radio One's "House Doctor." Brian has a proven knack for making sense of medical baffelgab.

He always believed that caring came naturally to physicians, but time, stress, errors, and heavy expectations left him wondering if he might not be the same caring doctor he thought he was at the beginning of his career. He wondered what kindness truly looks like—in himself and in others.

You can purchase Brian’s book here: The Power of Kindness

Image Copyright: Brian Goldman. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 13 2019

40mins

Play

Rank #17: Episode 483 - Heather Young - Murmur

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Heather Young and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Murmur, loneliness, solitude and quiet desperation, relationships and our desire for love, inclusion and connection with others.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Murmur follows Donna, a sixty-something year-old who is scheduled to perform community service in an animal rescue shelter following a DUI charge. Over time Donna begins to relate to the abandoned animals that surround her and she forms a particular bond with a senior dog that she brings home to prevent from being euthanized. Donna begins collecting other animals from the shelter and buying them online, until her small apartment is over-run and her unchecked compulsion for connection ultimately causes her home and life to fall into further disarray. 

‘It is important to me to tell the stories of older women and allow them to be complex, flawed and fully realized characters, the likes of which are rarely depicted in cinema,” says award-winning filmmaker Heather Young of Murmur. “Donna is a difficult character, but hopefully one that will resonate. Her loneliness and addictive nature cause her to act in ways that are at times counterintuitive and destructive but ultimately she is looking for connection -- and that is something that we can all relate to.’

About the Director:

Heather Young is a filmmaker originally from New Brunswick now living in Halifax, Nova Scotia. After graduating from the University of New Brunswick and NSCAD University she made several short films. Fish played at festivals all over the world including Palm Springs Shortfest, the Vancouver International Film Festival, Vienna Independent Shorts and TIFF Canada’s Top Ten Festival. FISH was also a Vimeo Staff Pick and won Best Short Film in the NSI Online Short Film Festival.

Her latest short Milk had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (where she also participated in the TIFF Talent Lab), won Best Short Film (Canada) at Festival du nouveau cinema, and played TIFF Canada’s Top Ten, Aspen Shortsfest, the Maryland Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, the London Short Film Festival, and many others. Murmur is her first feature.

Image Copyright: Martha Cooley and Heather Young. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 15 2020

42mins

Play

Rank #18: Episode 408 - Tuva Novotny and Pia Tjelta - Episode

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Tuva Novotny and Pia Tjelta and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new beautiful and challenging new film Blind Spot, shock and grief, parenting, PTSD and dealing with guilt, blame and responsibility.

Trailer

Synopsis

Swedish actor Tuva Novotny’s feature directorial debut is an uncompromising confrontation with family tragedy and heartbreak, about a mother’s struggle to understand her teenage daughter’s crisis. Shot in a series of harrowing long takes, Tuva Novotny's uncompromising Blind Spot documents every parent's worst nightmare. Maria, Anders and their two children — teenaged daughter Tea and son Bjorn — enjoy a uneventful and connected family life. But when an unexpected catastrophe happens, everything about their life is called into question.

As the family assembles and tries to deal with events, shock and hysteria lead to recrimination and self-doubt. Shot in a style reminiscent of the Dogme 95 school, with a handheld camera that's constantly chasing after the characters as they struggle with their trauma, the film never releases its grip. Indeed, it grows more and more claustrophobic and heartrending with each passing scene.

Biography

One of Sweden's most durable and in-demand stars, Tuva Novotny has appeared in everything from Josef Fares's international hit ‘Jalla! Jalla!’ to TV series (Dag) to Hollywood titles like ‘Eat Pray Love’, ‘Annihilation’, ‘A War’ and ‘Borg vs McEnroe.’ Tuva Novotny was born in Stockholm. She has acted extensively in television and film. ‘Blind Spot” is her directorial debut.

Image Copyright: Tuva Novotny. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to TIFF’s Steve Gravestock and producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #19: Episode 422 - James Fell and the Holy Sh!t Moment

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James Fell and Face2Face host David Peck talk about peak experiences, core identities and values, losing weight, eureka movements, the tortoise/hare approach to decision making, the fear of boredom and why science and self help should be connected.

Synopsis

After years of helping people change, James Fell had a sudden insight about sudden insight: significant life change doesn’t often come from just putting one foot in front of the other, carefully observing and altering habits, slogging through baby steps toward new behavior. Rather, the research reveals that serious life turnaround usually happens in a moment, with a flash of inspiration. Epiphany arrives like a lightning strike, rapidly shifting the recipient of such enlightenment onto a new path that creates a better life.

Motivational psychology has traditionally focused on slow and steady―gradual improvement over time to reach a desired goal, whether it’s weight loss, career change, battling addiction, or success in relationships. We’ve all been told that the tortoise beats the hare. But, through compelling science and powerful stories, James Fell shows us that the hare has the edge; overwhelming desire can be awakened fast and furiously. When you learn to become attuned to that sensation of sudden awakening, a new path can be followed almost effortlessly.

Everyone has the ability to experience the lightning strike. The Holy Sh!t Moment will teach you how to create a life-changing epiphany and go directly from intention to action.

Biography

James Fell is a highly regarded science-based motivator for lasting life change. With millions of readers around the globe, he has the mission of helping people achieve sudden insight into what inspires them to live the life they know they’re meant to.

He has been a regular contributor for numerous major publications, including the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, AskMen.comMen’s Health, TIME, The Guardian, NPR, and a variety of others. Fell is the author of Lose it Right: A Brutally Honest 3-Stage Program to Help You Get Fit and Lose Weight Without Losing Your Mind.

You can find out more about him and his work here.

Image Copyright: James Fell. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Thom Powers form TIFF and producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 27 2019

37mins

Play

Rank #20: Episode 415 - Patricia Marcoccia - Shut Him Down

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Patricia Marcoccia and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Shut Him Down: The Rise of Jordan Peterson, human rights and pronouns, fearful associations, differing world-views and sacred ceremonies.

Trailer

Synopsis

Shut Him Down: The Rise of Jordan Peterson is the directorial debut of Patricia Marcoccia. It’s a timely one-hour point-of-view documentary film focusing on University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson’s controversial rise to fame from an unprecedented behind-the-scenes perspective. The film documents over 110 hours of vérité, fly-on-the-wall moments with Peterson, his family, activists, students and professors, ranging from staunch supporters of Peterson to those who vehemently oppose him.

In fall 2016, Peterson published a video entitled “Professor Against Political Correctness,” thrusting him into the national spotlight for his criticisms of Canadian human rights legislation Bill C-16. In the video, Peterson argued that the law crosses a dangerous line with regards to freedom of expression because it enforces the use of alternate gender pronouns for persons who identify as a gender outside of male or female. Peterson’s views were immediately described as transphobic and dangerous by people like A.W. Peet, a self-described non-binary University of Toronto physics professor. As Dr. Peet states in the film, “Bill C-16 is not about cisgender people, it’s about protections for transgendered people.”

Director Marcoccia, who was shooting another film about Peterson when the controversy ignited, stumbled into one of the biggest debates in Canada. As the debate ensued, media attention shifted from questions like “Is Peterson right or wrong about this debate,” to “who is this world-renowned professor and are his ideas dangerous?”

“As a documentary filmmaker, my goal wasn’t to push out a message,” continues Marcoccia, “But it was important that I deeply understood what was at stake for people coming at this from different vantage points: non-binary people; activists; professors; students, and to create a film that enabled each side to voice itself on its own terms.”

Biography

Patricia Marcoccia is a Toronto-based filmmaker with 8 years of multidisciplinary experience in digital media production, journalism, and documentary film. Her first documentary short, We Make Stories Out of Totem Poles, 2016, was screened at festivals internationally and her premiere feature-length documentary, Shut Him Down, aired on CBC in the fall 2018 and is available online.

Before her foray into documentary film, Patricia worked as a journalist and digital media producer with agencies that focus on social change mandates. She collaborated on innovative projects such as a Telefilm multi-city national workshop series on online marketing and multiplatform distribution for film, and Melting Silos, a trans media development workshop sponsored by NFB, Telefilm, CMPA and BC Film.

In 2011 Patricia participated in DOXA Documentary Film Festival’s Kris Anderson Program for emerging female filmmakers. She went on to work as associate producer for the interactive component of Canadian Screen Award nominated action documentary series, Battle Castle. Battlecastle.tv won the Blue Drop Award for best entertainment website in 2013.

Patricia earned an honours bachelor of science degree in psychology, neuroscience and behaviour at McMaster

Image Copyright: Patricia Marcoccia and Holding Space Films. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 29 2018

35mins

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Episode 496 - Jonathan Jakubowicz - Resistance

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Jonathan Jakubowicz and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Resistance that stars Ed Harris, Jesse Eisenberg and Clémence Poésy. They talk about inspiration and why artists create, responsibility and pushing back, connecting with an audience, Marcel Marceau, the art of silence and making the invisible visible.

Trailer

Watch it on iTunes and Amazon Prime

Synopsis:

All Marcel Marceau (Jesse Eisenberg) wants is a life for the arts. Working at his father’s butcher shop during the day, the talented mime tries to make his dream come true on the city’s small stages and to win the affections of politically active Emma (Clémence Poésy).

To please her, Marcel agrees to join a dangerous mission that will change the course of his life forever: they want to save 123 Jewish orphans from the grasp of the German Nazis and the ruthless Obersturmführer of the SS Klaus Barbie (Matthias Schweighöfer) and take them across the border to Switzerland.

Together with Emma, Marcel joins the French resistance to stand firmly against the atrocities of World War II.

His art will prove the greatest weapon against the horrors of war.

About the Director:

Venezuela's most celebrated filmmaker and writer, whose film Secuestro Express was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the British Independent Film Awards and was a New York Times Critics Pick in 2005.

In 2005 Secuestro Express became Venezuela’s highest-grossing film, eclipsing such movies as Titanic and The Passion of the Christ. It became the first Venezuelan movie to be acquired by a major US distributor - Miramax.

Jonathan’s first film passion was Distance is a poignant short film about a woman's mysterious past unfolding during an unexpected trip to Holland in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks. Distance screened at the World Film Festival of Montreal, New York Independent Film Festival and Palm Springs Short Film Festival, amongst others.

In addition, Jakubowicz wrote and directed, SHIPS OF HOPE, a documentary recounting the journey of refugee Jews on a ship fleeing the European Nazi Regime to Venezuela. It screened at the Director's Guild of America's Angelus Awards, and the Havana Film Festival. The documentary went on to win; Best Documentary at the Premios a la Calidad de Cenac (Venezulelan Oscars).

His second film, Hands of Stone about the relationship between Panamanian boxer Roberto Durán (played by Edgar Ramírez) and his trainer Ray Arcel (played by Robert De Niro) premiered in the Cannes Film Festival 2016 and was warmly received with a 15 minute standing ovation. It's the first Latin movie to have a simultaneous wide release in all of Latin America.

His latest film, Resistance, stars Academy Award nominated actors Jesse Eisenberg, Ed Harris, Clémence Poésy and Edgar Ramírez. The film was shot at the end of 2018 and it tells the story of how a group of Boys and Girls Scouts created a network that ended up saving ten thousand orphans during World War II. One of them went on to become the greatest mime of all time, Marcel Marceau.

Jakubowicz is Polish Jewish Descendant. Has a BA in Communications from the Universidad Central de Venezuela.

Image Copyright: Pantaleon films. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Mar 31 2020

37mins

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Episode 495 - Hockey Mom - Teyama Alkamli & Andrew Moir

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Teyama Alkamli and Andrew Moir and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film Hockey Mom, Syria, motherhood and refugees, new Canadians, survival jobs, and something called the newcomer kitchen .

Trailer

Watch it here.

Synopsis:

Hockey Mom is an intimate, character-driven film that follows a single Syrian mother and her young son rebuilding their life in Toronto with the support of Canada’s private refugee sponsorship program.

When the Syrian war tore her life apart, Fatma bravely seized the opportunity to build a new life for herself on her own terms. Twenty days after she arrived in Toronto from a refugee camp, Fatma fulfilled a years-long wish: she left her husband.

For the past two years, Fatma and her son, Majed, have been living with their sponsors on Vermont Avenue, a friendly street in Toronto. On the surface, their new life in Canada seems fine, but Majed hasn’t made friends and is routinely suspended from school for unruly behaviour. She decides that a change of address might be the solution to his problems. Determined to provide Majed with everything he needs, Fatma finds an apartment in a nearby suburb. But the move makes matters worse and Fatma encounters obstacles every step of the way.

Majed’s school suspensions continue, leaving Fatma with no time to look for a job. When the sponsors tell her that their financial support will soon run out, and with no job prospects in sight, she feels like a failure. Nowhere left to turn, Fatma digs deep to take ownership of her choices and finds the courage to face them.

HOCKEY MOM is more than just a story about a Syrian mother trying to make a new life with her son; it’s a story about a brave woman learning to trust herself.

About the Directors:

Teyama Alkamli was born in Aleppo and raised in Dubai, Teyama Alkamli is currently a proud Torontonian. Her visually tender and deeply human films deal predominantly with issues of identity, sexuality, displacement and migration. Alkamli’s short films have screened at festivals worldwide, including Doclisboa and FECIBogotá.

She is an alumna of DocNomads, the European Mobile Film School, Hot Docs Emerging Filmmaker Lab, and the Canadian Film Centre's Director Lab. Hockey Mom is her first mid-length documentary.

She is currently developing her narrative feature debut, My Name is Jala.

Andrew Moir’s documentaries leave you thinking long after watching them. The intricate maneuvers he manages while integrating himself into each subject's life, often spanning years, is remarkable.

Working with small crews or often alone, audiences have been truly touched by Andrew’s films. He has seen great success at film festivals where four of his short films premiered at Hot Docs Canadian Documentary Film Festival.

Other festivals who have featured his films include Sheffield Doc/Fest, AFI Fest, and DOC NYC. His production company, Hands Up Films, produces his docs and he is currently working on his first feature-length film, Bedside Bride, which will be released in 2020. 

Image Copyright: CBC. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Mar 26 2020

41mins

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Episode 494 - Karim Sayad - My English Cousin

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Karim Sayad and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new and intimate film My English Cousin, the myth of Sisyphus, international relations, feeling at home and finding beauty in simple stories.

Trailer

Synopsis:

This keenly observed documentary by Karim Sayad follows the director's cousin, Fahed, who left Algeria for England in 2001 and, now, contemplates returning to his place of birth. In 2001, Fahed left Algeria for England, settling in, of all places, Grimsby. Nearly two decades later, after marrying, working two jobs to pay the bills, and picking up a distinct Northern English accent, Fahed decides he wants to go back to his place of birth. But while his address in Algeria has remained fixed, the concept of home, he soon finds, is far more fluid. Trapped between two countries, Fahed is also between two cultures: one he's worked to assimilate into and one he nostalgically longs for but can't, in reality, face.

Shot with a keen eye that observes the smallest of details, director Karim Sayad's documentary unfolds in textures. From Fahed's Ramadan preparations for his flatmates (in whose hands cans of beer are basically a constant fixture), to family members in Algeria questioning Fahed about his marriage plans, Sayad captures the loneliness that trails his real-life cousin no matter where he goes.

(With thanks to TIFF and Kiva Reardon)

About the Director:

Karim Sayad was born in Lausanne, Switzerland, and holds a master's degree in international relations from Geneva's Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. He has directed the short film Babor Casanova. His debut feature documentary was Of Sheep and Men

My English Cousin is his latest film.

Image Copyright: Karim Sayad and Close Up Films. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Mar 18 2020

27mins

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Episode 493 - Alanis Obomsawin - The Messenger

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Alanis Obomsawin and Face2Face host David Peck talk about reconciliation, leaving a legacy, Jordan’s Principles, passion, commitment, advocacy, fighting back and why every child matters.

Trailer

More Info Here

Synopsis:

It took one little boy, Jordan River Anderson, to ensure that thousands of First Nations and Inuit children can today receive the same standard of social, health and education services as the rest of the Canadian population. In Jordan River Anderson, The MessengerAlanis Obomsawin’s latest film (her 52nd), the renowned documentary filmmaker chronicles the long legal fight against a health care system that operated on two disconnected levels, causing injustices and suffering—a situation that has since been significantly improved. The Abenaki filmmaker traces the parallels between the lives of two First Nations children, Jordan River Anderson and Noah Buffalo-Jackson.

A member of the Norway House Cree Nation of Manitoba, Jordan River Anderson had very serious health problems, for which he was being treated at a Winnipeg hospital. He could have ended his life in adapted housing close to his family, but because of his Indian status a dispute arose between the governments of Canada and Manitoba over who should pay the costs of his relocation to home-based care. Jordan died in hospital in 2005. Jordan’s Principle, which states that the first government agency to be contacted is the one responsible for this phase of a child’s care, was unanimously adopted by the House of Commons in 2007, and a ruling by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal resolved the issue of jurisdiction.

Many people and organizations worked hard for this outcome, but despite the judgment and the funding that was allocated for Jordan’s Principle, many First Nations and Inuit parents are still faced with a refusal of social, health and educational services. For example, when Carolyn Buffalo and Richard Jackson needed specialized transportation for their teenage son, Noah Buffalo-Jackson, who suffers from cerebral palsy, they had to pay for it themselves. Similarly, the First Nation of Wapakeka in Ontario appealed for assistance in combating a wave of suicides in their community, but received no help. “We hear a lot about universal health care in Canada,” says Aimée Craft, a law professor at the University of Ottawa who is interviewed in the film, “but why is it universal for everyone except First Nations children?”

Numerous binding government orders and the goodwill of several Canadian government officials, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, were required before First Nations and Inuit parents and children were finally able to enjoy appropriate support. “The law is a shield that protects this generation of children,” observes Cindy Blackstock, director general of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, and one of the protagonists of the documentary. “It restores their dignity, and allows them to grow up within their own families. Justice is possible.”

Filmed in centres of political power, in First Nations communities, and at public demonstrations, Jordan River Anderson, The Messenger provides a forum in which the voices of parents, caregivers, and their legal representatives can all be heard. Alanis Obomsawin’s latest documentary completes, on a note of optimism, the cycle of films devoted to the rights of children and Indigenous peoples that she began with The People of the Kattawapiskak River.

About the Director:

Alanis Obomsawin, a member of the Abenaki Nation, is one of Canada’s most distinguished documentary filmmakers. As a prolific director with the National Film Board, she has created an extensive body or work focusing on the lives and concerns of Canada’s First Nations.

She began her professional career in 1960 as a singer in New York City. In 1967, producers Joe Koenig and Bob Verrall invited her to join the NFB as an adviser on a film about Indigenous peoples. She has not put down her camera since.

An activist as well as a filmmaker, Obomsawin is driven to provide a forum for the country’s First Peoples. Her entire filmography is a testament to that desire. Her documentaries have always sought to show the importance of roots and strong intergenerational bonds for the preservation of Indigenous cultures—from Christmas at Moose Factory (1971), in which she used children’s drawings to tell the story of a Cree village on the shore of James Bay, Ontario, to Jordan River Anderson, The Messenger (2019), her most recent film (her 52nd), which documents the long struggle to establish the right of Indigenous children to receive, in their own communities, the same high standard of health care as the rest of the Canadian population.

Obomsawin is a director who knows how to film conflict, as demonstrated by her four films about the Oka Crisis of 1990: Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (1993), winner of 18 international awards; My Name Is Kahentiiosta (1995); Spudwrench: Kahnawake Man (1997); and Rocks at Whiskey Trench (2000).

Alanis Obomsawin has received numerous awards and honours throughout her career. She was inducted into the Canadian Film and Television Hall of Fame in 2010, and in 2014 she received the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television Humanitarian Award, an honour given in recognition of exceptional contributions to the community and the public sector. In 2015, the Valdivia International Film Festival (Chile) recognized her body of work with its Lifetime Achievement Award, and she received an Honorary Life Member Award from the Directors’ Guild of Canada in 2018.

Obomsawin has received honorary doctorates from many universities, including Dalhousie University in 2016 and McGill University in 2017. In 2016, she also received two of the highest civilian honours conferred by the Province of Quebec when she was named a Grand Officer of the National Order of Quebec and awarded the Prix Albert-Tessier. In 2019, she became a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Image Copyright: Alanis Obomsawin and NFB. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Mar 11 2020

34mins

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Episode 492 - Barbara Kopple and Desert One

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Barbara Kopple and Face2Face host David Peck talk about curiosity, politics and historical unknowns, rich and complex stories, the magic of people, being better informed and why she’s always been a good listener.

Synopsis:

It has been called “the most audacious, difficult, complicated, rescue mission ever attempted.” Desert One uniquely blends emotion and bravado to tell the incredible tale of America’s secret mission to free the hostages of the 1979 Iranian revolution. Two-time Academy Award-winning filmmaker Barbara Kopple discovers a wealth of unearthed archival sources and receives unprecedented access, engaging in intimate conversations with many of the soldiers closest to the story, some for the first time, as well as President Jimmy Carter, Vice President Walter Mondale and TV newsman Ted Koppel.

Evocative new animation brings audiences closer than anyone has ever gotten to being on the inside for this history-making operation. This is the thrilling story of a group of Americans working together to overcome the most difficult problem of their lives. Among those Americans is President Jimmy Carter, readying to face a re-election challenge when self-described student revolutionaries suddenly take power in Iran. Anti-American students take the U.S. embassy in Tehran by force and hold hostage fifty-two American diplomats and citizens.

Using new archival sources and unprecedented access to key players on both sides, master documentarian Barbara Kopple reveals the true story behind one of the most daring rescues in modern US history: a secret mission to free hostages captured during the 1979 Iranian revolution.

At a moment when tensions once again rise between the governments of Iran and the U.S., old wounds remain painfully current for many on each side who detail their recollections in Desert One -- but talk of hope also emerges, that the lessons of the past might finally guide us to a better future.

About the Director:

Barbara Kopple is a two-time Academy Award® winning filmmaker. A director of documentaries, as well as narrative TV and film, one of her more recent projects was the documentary Running From Crazy, which explores the life of actress Mariel Hemingway.

Barbara produced and directed Harlan County USA and American Dream, both winners of the Academy Award® for Best Documentary Feature. In 1991, Harlan County USA was named to the National Film Registry by the Librarian of Congress and designated an American Film Classic. Harlan County USA was restored and preserved by the Women's Preservation Fund and the Academy Film Archive, and was featured as part of the Sundance Collection at the Sundance Film Festival in 2005. The Criterion Collection released a DVD of Harlan County USA in 2006.

Barbara has been awarded the Human Rights Watch Film Festival Irene Diamond Award, Los Angeles Film Critics Award, National Society of Film Critics Award, the SilverDocs/Charles Guggenheim Award, New York Women in Film & Television Muse Award, the Maya Deren Independent Film and Video Award, the Woodstock Film Festival Maverick Award, Women in Film & Video of Washington, DC Women of Vision Award, the White House Project's EPIC Award, the International Documentary Association Career Achievement Award, the San Francisco Film Society's Persistence of Vision Award and the Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize, Filmmakers Trophy & Audience Award. The Paley Center for Media has named Barbara a 2007 She Made It Honoree.

She recently served her tenth year on the board of trustees for the American Film Institute and continues as an advisory board member for the American University Center for Social Media and Independent Feature Project's Filmmaker Labs. In 2010, Barbara received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from American University. She is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, the Director's Guild of America, New York Women in Film and Television’s Honorary Board, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and actively participates in organizations that address social issues and support independent filmmaking.

Image Copyright: Barbara Kopple and Cabin Creek Films. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 26 2020

35mins

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Episode 491 - Peter Tabuns & Mark Johnston - Political Blind Date

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Peter Tabuns, Mark Johnston and Face2Face host David Peck talk about politics, the art of conversation, logic and passion, hydro rates, climate change and the environment and finding common ground.

For more info about the series head here.

Synopsis:

Many politicians, from all levels of government, will admit that they never have time to sit down and meet one-on-one. Wouldn’t it be great if they had the opportunity to explore each other’s personal perspectives, motivations, histories and hopes for the future, while at the same time immersing themselves in an issue they disagree on?

Political Blind Date is not just playing matchmaker for fun. In an age of polarizing partisan politics, public distrust, “fake news” and questionable behavior, it’s worth the effort to get politicians to connect on a human level, to see if they can make unexpected alliances over issues they disagree on - and who knows, maybe even work together for common good!

A typical date starts out with an opportunity to get to know each other before heading out to explore the issue of the day. Sharing a coffee together for the first time, they get to know something about why each of them got into politics, their family history, some of their personal interests and their connection to the issue. Just like any date, finding out about another person humanizes them, not just for the each other, but for the audience as well. They then go out to explore each other’s point of view – each having a full day to bring their perspective and viewpoints to life.

This works on the fairest terms. Each participant chooses where they will take the other and keeps it a secret. By spending a day discovering the places and people associated with important issues, politicians who stand on opposing sides of an issue get to know someone they wouldn’t otherwise choose to spend time with.

The series has a healthy dose of light-hearted fun in between the heated exchanges, as our participants get to know each other. As in “real” life, it is much harder to stick to an entrenched position when you get to know the person on the other “side”!

About the Guests:

Peter Tabuns has been the Toronto-Danforth MPP for over decade, winning re-elections four times Peter has been at the forefront of change and new ideas. He is currently the Ontario New Democrat’s critic for Climate Crisis and Energy. Informed by his former roles as Greenpeace Canada’s Executive Director, and later Jack Layton's climate change advisor. Peter continues to push for Ontario to lead in meeting international climate goals. Peter also served seven years as a City Councillor in Toronto where among other positions he chaired the Board of Health.

Mark Johnston is the founder of Nomad Films. More than thirty years in the documentary business, Mark has worked in a producer or director capacity on over sixty films. Mark has more recently begun producing dramatic films, beginning with Act of Dishonour. Upcoming dramas include In the Shadow of a Saint (with Djimon Hounsou playing the late activist Ken Saro-Wiwa).

He began his television career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s nightly newscast, The National. He was one of the first team members on Millennium: Tribal Wisdom and the Modern World, a massive ten-hour PBS/BBC/Global Television documentary series filmed in fifteen countries around the world.

Most recently Mark Executive Produced TVO Original Much Too Young, a documentary for TVO and Knowledge Network about the teen and young adult children of parents with young onset Alzheimer’s. Mark has worked for partners as diverse as the BBC, ARTE France, Discovery, National Geographic, PBS, the CBC, as well as a plethora of other media outlets.

Image Copyright: Nomad Films and TVO. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 21 2020

43mins

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Episode 490 - Brad Jersak

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Brad Jersak and Face2Face host David Peck talk about religiosity, alienation and separation, the truth of our beings, faith and doubt statements, following a ‘script’ versus leading a life of love, reality, truth and justice. 

For more info about Brad head here.

Check out his blog here.

About Brad:

By now, most of his social networks and some of his readership have heard of his move into the Eastern Orthodox Church. He was ‘chrismated’ at the end of June, 2013 and tonsured as a ‘reader’ for the All Saints Monastery in Dewdney in October. You might wonder why he - an evangelical/charismatic/Anabaptist - would don a cassock and take up incense and chanting. If you’re curious, here’s the short version.

Brad Jersak is an author and itinerant teacher based in Abbotsford, BC Canada. He is the Dean of Ministry Studies at St. Stephen's University where he teaches New Testament/Theology, Patristics and some philosophy. He also teaches on the core faculty with the Institute for Religion Peace and Justice. He also serves as an editor and graphic designer for CWR magazine.

Brad is a preacher and reader at All Saints of N.A. Orthodox Monastery in Dewdney, BC and is active in local 12-step addiction recovery.

Brad writes across genres, including Christian theology and practice, children's books and political philosophy. 

Image Copyright: Brad Jersak. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 19 2020

51mins

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Episode 489 - Pat Collins and Henry Glassie - Field Work

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Pat Collins and Henry Glassie and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Field Work, beauty, non-verbal cues, silence and listening, eliminating prejudice, and why art is always rooted in community.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Following the success of Song of Granite, Irish Director Pat Collins returns with his new documentary feature, Henry Glassie: Field Work, which will have its world premiere at the upcoming Toronto International Film Festival.

Over the last 50 years the celebrated American Folklorist Henry Glassie has been writing in-depth studies of communities and their art. Inspired by the writings and ideas of Glassie – Field Work is an immersive and meditative documentary set among the rituals and rhythms of working artists across Brazil, Turkey, North Carolina and Ireland. Glassie’s subject is folklore but his deep abiding love for the people who create it resonates throughout the film: 'I don’t study people. I stand with people and I study the things they create.'

Collins’ achievement with Henry Glassie: Field Work is to bring these makers of art, in wood, fabric, yarn, paint, clay, metal, in song and story to our attention through their work, through the raw materials they shape into art objects and through the undeniable passion they carry in to their work.

In this way the work is accorded profound meaning for the societies out of which it is generated an aesthetic value which is transcendent. And under Collins’ ever mindful direction, the process of making something out of raw materials is luminously manifested in sequences which reflect their measured and focused approach. The actual real time process of making works, such as hands, of the physicality of that work, and the close attention the artist is bringing to the work. 

For more info about the film head here.

About Pat and Henry:

Since 1999, Pat Collins has made over 30 films. His latest release Song of Granite, funded by the Irish Film Board, BAI, SODEC and Telefilm Canada, received its world premiere at SXSW 2017 and was the Irish nomination for best Foreign Language Oscar 2018.

His other credits include Silence, which had its international premiere at London International Film Festival and the 3-part series 1916 (co-director), which aired on networks including the BBC and PBS. In 2012, the Irish Film Institute curated a mid-career retrospective of his work.

Henry Glassie is one of the most celebrated folklorists across the world. He has spent the last 50 years making in-depth studies of communities and their art. Henry, College Professor Emeritus at Indiana University Bloomington, has done fieldwork on five continents and written books on the full range of folkloristic interest, from drama, song, and story to craft, art, and architecture. Glassie began teaching in the Folklore Institute at Indiana University in 1970. In 1976, he became the chairman of the Department of Folklore and Folklife at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1988, he returned as a College Professor to Indiana University, where he had appointments in Folklore and Ethnomusicology, American Studies, Central Eurasian Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, and India Studies. He retired in 2008.

Glassie has served as president of the American Folklore Society, the Vernacular Architecture Forum, and his local historic preservation organization, Bloomington Restorations Incorporated. He is married to fellow folklorist Pravina Shukla, a professor at Indiana University, who is an award-winning teacher and the author of two major books on dress and adornment: The Grace of Four Moons and Costume. Glassie and Shukla co-authored Sacred Art, an ethnographic account of creativity in northeastern Brazil. Glassie has four children and four grandchildren.

He published his first scholarly paper, an article on the Appalachian log cabin, in 1963. Since then, he has published over 100 articles and a steady stream of books.

Image Copyright: Harvest Films and Pat Collins. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 12 2020

44mins

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Episode 488 - Sami Khan - St. Louis Superman

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Sami Khan and Face2Face host David Peck talk about the new film St. Louis Superman, reconciliation and battle rapping, solidarity and our shared history and being seduced by the outrage of the moment.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Bruce Franks Jr. is a 34-year-old battle rapper, Ferguson activist and state representative from St. Louis, Missouri. Known as Superman to his constituents, he is a political figure the likes of which you've never seen - full of contradictions and deep insights, who has overcome unspeakable loss to become one of the most exciting and unapologetic young leaders in the country.

This short verité documentary follows Bruce at a critical juncture in his life, when he is forced to deal with the mental trauma he's been carrying for the nearly 30 years since his 9-year-old brother was shot and killed in front of him, in order to find peace and truly fulfill his destiny as a leader for his community.

Canadian filmmaker Sami Khan is going to the Academy Awards along with his American co-director Smriti Mundhra, as their acclaimed short documentary St. Louis Superman has been nominated in the Short Documentary Category.

‘We share this honor with Bruce and our whole filmmaking team including our champions at MTV Documentary Films and AJE Witness,’ adds Mundhra. ‘At a critical moment for democracy worldwide, Bruce’s activism couldn’t be more urgent.’

About our Guest:

Sami Khan is a filmmaker based in New York City. His work has screened at leading festivals including the Toronto International Film Festival and the Mumbai Film Festival. He graduated from Columbia University with an MFA in film. 

Khoya, Sami's feature debut (as writer/director), was selected for the Tribeca Film Institute’s All Access fellowship and received financial backing from Spike Lee. The film tells the story of a man traveling to India to solve the decades-old mystery surrounding his adoption.

Sami is an adjunct filmmaking lecturer at Columbia University and Brooklyn College where his teaching focuses on empowering young filmmakers of color.

Image Copyright: Meralta Films and Sami Khan. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Feb 04 2020

43mins

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Episode 487 - Liz Forkin Bohannon - Beginner's Pluck

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Liz Forkin Bohannon and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new book Beginner's Pluck, optimism, why you might just be average after all, story telling and how it can change a life, social consciousness, leaning in and listening to others and about the remarkable start up story of Sseko Designs and its beginning.

You can buy the book here.

Synopsis:

Social entrepreneur and motivational speaker, Liz Forkin Bohannon will release her first book, Beginner’s Pluck: Build Your Life of Purpose and Impact Now, on October 1, 2019.  Beginner’s Pluck is a collection of Forkin Bohannon’s personal anecdotes that illustrate her path to building her global socially conscious enterprise, Sseko Designs, and ultimately, a life of purpose.

Beginner’s Pluck shares Forkin Bohannon’s 14 accessible steps of how anyone can build their passion and reach personal fulfillment – while also challenging society to reconsider the meanings of passion and purpose altogether. Turning the exhausted message of hustle harder into a fresh message of passion and pluck, readers will be encouraged to live like they were made on purpose – for a purpose.

‘I used to subscribe to the belief that we were born with a fixed passion and our purpose was a ‘simple’ duty to use whatever that thing was,” said Liz Forkin Bohannon. “But I’ve learned through personal experience that passion isn’t a starting point, and purpose isn’t a one-stop destination to reach.’

While Forkin Bohannon studied journalism, she developed a passion for social justice – leading her to purchase a one-way ticket to Uganda where she met young women unable to finance their education to attend university. With no background in business, fashion, or manufacturing herself, Forkin Bohannon taught the young women to make sandals, promising that if they did, they would be able to attend university.

Returning to the United States, Forkin Bohannon began selling the sandals out of the back of her car, raising enough funds to send the women to university. Today, Sseko Designs is one of the largest manufacturing companies in Uganda and will send its 131st woman to university by the end of this year. 

About my guest:

Liz Forkin Bohannon is a speaker, entrepreneur, and the founder of Sseko Designs, a socially conscious fashion brand creating educational and economic opportunity for women across the globe.

Recognized by Forbes as a top public speaker and named by John Maxwell as one of the top three transformational leaders in the U.S., Forkin Bohannon has been featured on Shark TankGood Morning AmericaBloomberg BusinessweekVogue, and others. She lives with her husband and company cofounder, Ben, and their two young sons in Portland, Oregon.

Image Copyright: Liz Forkin Bohannon and . Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Synopsis:

Social entrepreneur and motivational speaker, Liz Forkin Bohannon will release her first book, Beginner’s Pluck: Build Your Life of Purpose and Impact Now, on October 1, 2019.  Beginner’s Pluck is a collection of Forkin Bohannon’s personal anecdotes that illustrate her path to building her global socially conscious enterprise, Sseko Designs, and ultimately, a life of purpose.

Beginner’s Pluck shares Forkin Bohannon’s 14 accessible steps of how anyone can build their passion and reach personal fulfillment – while also challenging society to reconsider the meanings of passion and purpose altogether. Turning the exhausted message of hustle harder into a fresh message of passion and pluck, readers will be encouraged to live like they were made on purpose – for a purpose.

‘I used to subscribe to the belief that we were born with a fixed passion and our purpose was a ‘simple’ duty to use whatever that thing was,” said Liz Forkin Bohannon. “But I’ve learned through personal experience that passion isn’t a starting point, and purpose isn’t a one-stop destination to reach.’

While Forkin Bohannon studied journalism, she developed a passion for social justice – leading her to purchase a one-way ticket to Uganda where she met young women unable to finance their education to attend university. With no background in business, fashion, or manufacturing herself, Forkin Bohannon taught the young women to make sandals, promising that if they did, they would be able to attend university.

Returning to the United States, Forkin Bohannon began selling the sandals out of the back of her car, raising enough funds to send the women to university. Today, Sseko Designs is one of the largest manufacturing companies in Uganda and will send its 131st woman to university by the end of this year.

About my guest:

Liz Forkin Bohannon is a speaker, entrepreneur, and the founder of Sseko Designs, a socially conscious fashion brand creating educational and economic opportunity for women across the globe.

Recognized by Forbes as a top public speaker and named by John Maxwell as one of the top three transformational leaders in the U.S., Forkin Bohannon has been featured on Shark TankGood Morning AmericaBloomberg BusinessweekVogue, and others. She lives with her husband and company cofounder, Ben, and their two young sons in Portland, Oregon.

Image Copyright: Liz Forkin Bohannon and . Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 30 2020

44mins

Play

Episode 486 - Cornelia Principe - Prey

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Cornelia Principe and Face2Face host David Peck talk her new film Prey, justice, survivors guilt, truth, oppression and the abuse of power and why external oversight will be required for meaningful reform within the structure of the church.

Trailer

The film is now streaming on TVO

Winner Roger’s Audience Award for Best Canadian Documentary – Hot Docs 2019

Winner Special Jury Prize for Best Canadian Feature Documentary – Hot Docs 2019

Synopsis:

Prey follows London, Ontario lawyer Rob Talach – a.k.a. “The Priest Hunter” – and focuses on two survivors, Patrick McMahon and Rod MacLeod. The latter is determined to be the one plaintiff who does not settle in the case of William “Hod” Hodgson Marshall — a Basilian priest and teacher in Sudbury, Toronto and Windsor, who sexually abused at least 17 minors over the course of 38 years.

While not allowed into the actual court proceedings, Prey recreates the mood of the trial, while profiling the various people connected to it. McMahon - who was molested by Father Marshall in his own bed when the priest, a family friend, was invited to sleep over – mounts a one-man protest outside the churches and courtroom.

On the surface, this seems like an unsolvable case. But Talach has fought this fight many times, and takes nothing for granted, as the settlement money waved at MacLeod rises higher.

“Emotionally, this was a very difficult film to work through,” says the director Matt Gallagher, “The sheer scope of the abuse uncovered in these stories is chilling enough on its own. But the power of the secret held by these survivors, and the doubt and even blame they encountered when they began to talk, that’s an extra ordeal that’s hard to imagine.”

About the Producer:

Cornelia Principe is an Emmy©-nominated, award-winning producer with over 20 years of experience. She recently produced 14 & Muslim for CBC and is currently in post-production on the feature documentary with director Nisha Pahuja called Send Us Your Brother.

Other credits include producing the feature How To Prepare For Prison producing, directing and writing The Motherload, for CBC’s Doc Zone which has just been awarded prizes at both the Chicago International Film/TV Festival and at the Worldfest Houston Festival; taught courses in documentary production at Centennial College and completed the feature documentary The World Before Her with Storyline Entertainment and director Nisha Pahuja for ZDF/Arte.

The World Before Her has won 20 awards and distinctions including: best documentary at Tribeca, Hot Docs and Michael Moore's festival in Traverse City. It was voted a Canada top ten by the Toronto International Film Festival 2012, was nominated for Best Theatrical Documentary at the Canadian Screen Awards, and was part of the Sundance Film Forward Program. Recently it was nominated for an Emmy. 

Other select projects include: the feature documentary Grinders directed by Matt Gallagher, which was broadcast across Canada after a Hot Docs 2011 festival premiere and was nominated for a Canadian Screen Award in Best Direction in a Documentary and the 2008 Gemini award-winning (Best Documentary Series) Diamond Road, which she co-produced for TVOntario, History Television, Discovery Times and Arte/ZDF; Directed the one hour Poverty, Chastity, Obedience; and worked with Emmy award-winning Producer/ Director Shelley Saywell on several of her acclaimed documentaries including, A Child’s Century of War which was short-listed

for an Oscar.

More about Cornelia here.

Image Copyright: TVO and Border City Pictures. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 26 2020

39mins

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Episode 485 - Richard Bell - Brotherhood

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Richard Bell and Face2Face host David Peck talk his new film Brotherhood, dignity and self sacrifice, putting others before ourselves, rites of passage, real boys and toxic masculinity.

Trailer

The film be will be available on the Super Channel in March 2020.

Synopsis:

Based on the harrowing true story that made newspaper headlines across North America in the 1920s, Brotherhood is a taut survival drama that feels timely and modern in this era of the very real Boy Crisis. A bristling piece of Canadian history, that is a clarion call for a return to Nature, as wonderful and lethal as it may be.

A band of teenaged boys arrive at Long Point Camp on sprawling Balsam Lake for the ultimate Canadian experience: two weeks of games, kite-making, lacrosse, sing-a-longs, marshmallow roasts, canoeing, swimming and adventure. Great War veterans, Arthur and Robert have their own approach to educating and nurturing these boys who are pugnacious with raw personalities.

Arthur and Robert set off across the lake in a thirty-foot Indian war canoe with the unofficial band of brother’s leader Waller and ten of his companions. When they encounter a freak summer storm and are capsized in the middle of the churning lake, the brotherhood's holiday descends into a soul-shuddering fight for survival. Only four will survive.

About the Director:

Richard wrote and directed Eighteen, shot in twenty days and made with only $800, 000, it co-starred acting titans Ian McKellen and Alan Cumming, and featured a score by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. It hopscotched the world at film festivals and was broadcast on City TV and Movie Central and the Movie Network.

Bell was nominated for a Genie Award for co-writing the song “In a Heartbeat”, with composer Bramwell Tovey. Bell adapted the teen novel Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet by Joanne Proulx and penned a television pilot for Brightlight Pictures, a ‘prairie noir’ based on the fleet of Russell Quant detective novels by Anthony Bidulka. Bell got his start in the industry by writing and directing the micro-budgeted indie Two Brothers. It was shot for $545.00 and went on to gross $150,000 on DVD. Richard is a graduate of Studio 58, the only conservatory-style theatre training program in Western Canada. He is an alumnus of the TIFF Talent Lab, the Praxis Centre for Screenwriters’ Screenwriting Lab, and the CFC’s Writers’ Workshop at the Whistler Film Festival.

Richard recently co-executive produced Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet for producer Kim Roberts. The film stars Cameron Monaghan, Peyton List, and Juliette Lewis.

Image Copyright: Richard Bell and Karma Film. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 21 2020

42mins

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Episode 484 - Peter Albrechtsen - The Cave

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Peter Albrechtsen and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Feras Fayyad's new film The Cave, sonic landscapes, fragility and fear, Syrian women in leadership, strength, resilience and sound as a storyteller.

Trailer

For more info about the film head here.

Synopsis:

Oscar nominee Feras Fayyad (Last Men in Aleppo) delivers an unflinching story of the Syrian war with his powerful new documentary, The Cave. For besieged civilians, hope and safety lie underground inside the subterranean hospital known as the Cave, where pediatrician and managing physician Dr. Amani Ballour and her colleagues Samaher and Dr. Alaa have claimed their right to work as equals alongside their male counterparts, doing their jobs in a way that would be unthinkable in the oppressively patriarchal culture that exists above.

Following the women as they contend with daily bombardments, chronic supply shortages and the ever-present threat of chemical attacks, The Cave paints a stirring portrait of courage, resilience and female solidarity.


About the Director:

Nominated for the MPSE Golden Reel Award for sound design, Peter Albrechtsen is known for his work on The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Dunkirk and Idealisten.

He’s a sound designer based in Copenhagen, Denmark and graduated from the Danish Film School in 2001, and since then has been working on features and documentaries, both Danish and international productions. He has worked in Israel, Bulgaria and on several US indie film productions, in addition to all of his Danish and Scandinavian work.

Peter lives in København, Denmark.

Image Copyright: National Geographic. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 19 2020

44mins

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Episode 483 - Heather Young - Murmur

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Heather Young and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Murmur, loneliness, solitude and quiet desperation, relationships and our desire for love, inclusion and connection with others.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Murmur follows Donna, a sixty-something year-old who is scheduled to perform community service in an animal rescue shelter following a DUI charge. Over time Donna begins to relate to the abandoned animals that surround her and she forms a particular bond with a senior dog that she brings home to prevent from being euthanized. Donna begins collecting other animals from the shelter and buying them online, until her small apartment is over-run and her unchecked compulsion for connection ultimately causes her home and life to fall into further disarray. 

‘It is important to me to tell the stories of older women and allow them to be complex, flawed and fully realized characters, the likes of which are rarely depicted in cinema,” says award-winning filmmaker Heather Young of Murmur. “Donna is a difficult character, but hopefully one that will resonate. Her loneliness and addictive nature cause her to act in ways that are at times counterintuitive and destructive but ultimately she is looking for connection -- and that is something that we can all relate to.’

About the Director:

Heather Young is a filmmaker originally from New Brunswick now living in Halifax, Nova Scotia. After graduating from the University of New Brunswick and NSCAD University she made several short films. Fish played at festivals all over the world including Palm Springs Shortfest, the Vancouver International Film Festival, Vienna Independent Shorts and TIFF Canada’s Top Ten Festival. FISH was also a Vimeo Staff Pick and won Best Short Film in the NSI Online Short Film Festival.

Her latest short Milk had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (where she also participated in the TIFF Talent Lab), won Best Short Film (Canada) at Festival du nouveau cinema, and played TIFF Canada’s Top Ten, Aspen Shortsfest, the Maryland Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, the London Short Film Festival, and many others. Murmur is her first feature.

Image Copyright: Martha Cooley and Heather Young. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 15 2020

42mins

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Episode 482 - Dekel Berenson - Anna

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Dekel Berenson and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his beautiful new short film Anna, hard work and luck, politics and activism, child labour, allegory and truth and why movies should never just be entertaining. 

Trailer

Synopsis:



Anna, a middle-aged single mother, lives in a small industrial town in war-torn Eastern Ukraine. She works in a meat processing plant, lives in a rundown apartment and dreams for a better life for herself and her 16-year-old daughter.

Desperate for a change, she is lured by a radio advertisement to attend a party organized for foreign men who are touring the country, searching for love. Despite not having been out for years she decides to take part in the event.

At the party, Anna is confronted with the realities of old age, with the American men's real intentions, and by her underaged daughter who is also attending the event. Both mother and daughter realize the absurdity and indignity of the situation and abandon their dream for a better life.

About the Director:

Originally from Israel, completed a mandatory three-year service in the Israeli Defense Forces. In 2001 he went abroad to pursue his education, eventually acquiring a Masters in International Relations from the Central European University in Budapest in 2006, receiving the Best Thesis Award and graduating first in his class. Moving forward, the next ten years of his work in writing, activism, and graphic design took him all over the world, where he explored more than sixty countries.

Over the past three years, he has combined his two passions, making artistic films of high quality that bring to light real-world social and humanitarian issues.

His 2nd film Ashmina won several prizes, including the Best Short Film award at the 59th Krakow Film Festival, and Best Short Film at the 36th Jerusalem Film Festival, allowing the film to compete for a short Oscar. His 3rd film, Anna, premiered in competition at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival and TIFF 2019.

He is currently working on his first feature.

For more info on Dekel check out his website here.

Image Copyright: Dekel Berenson. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 07 2020

40mins

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Episode 481 - Sophie Deraspe - Antigone

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Sophie Deraspe and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Antigone, Greek tragedies, empathy, dignity, resistance and trusting and following your heart

Trailer

Synopsis:

Antigone is a moving, compassionate and beautiful story and it won the best film at TIFF 2019. Gripping, powerful, and of-the-moment, Antigone loosely adapts Sophocles' Greek tragedy and situates it in contemporary Montreal. The latest from critically acclaimed Québécois writer-director Sophie Deraspe (The WolvesThe Amina Profile) is a compassionate family drama that doesn't hold back on its indictment of the current refugee and immigrant experience in North America.

Following the murder of their parents, Antigone, her sister Ismène, her brothers Étéocle and Polynice, and their grandmother Ménécée find refuge in Montreal. They live a quiet modest life in a tiny apartment in a working-class neighbourhood. A straight-A student seemingly destined for greatness, Antigone (masterfully played by Nahéma Ricci in her first leading role) is the glue that holds the family together.

Tragedy strikes when Étéocle is wrongfully gunned down by police during the arrest of Polynice, a small-time drug dealer. Motivated by her sense of duty towards her family and fuelled by the memory she cherishes of her dead parents, Antigone decides to jeopardize her own future to preserve that of her family.

Antigone acutely explores familial sacrifice, the burden of responsibility, and the nature of justice with exceptional depth and nuance. Although inspired by a story 2,500 years old, Deraspe's film is a timely meditation, one that prompts serious reflection on immigrant life in ostensibly welcoming contemporary Canada.

With thanks to TIFF.

About the Director:

One of the leading figures of new Quebec cinema, Sophie Deraspe fell in love with cinema through her Visual Arts studies in Austria and Literature studies at the University of Ottawa and Montreal.

As both a filmmaker and cinematographer, she worked primarily within the realms of documentary before making her first feature, Rechercher Victor Pellerin/Missing Victor Pellerin in 2016.

Her second feature, Les signes vitaux/Vital Signs in 2009, was in IFFR's Tiger Competition and she won the FIPRESCI award at Torino Film Festival for Les loups in 2015. The documentary Le profil Amina/A Gay Girl in Damascus: The Amina Profile was selected as a World Cinema Documentary at Sundance and won the Special Jury Prize at Hot Docs. 

Antigone was chosen as Best Canadian Feature at the Toronto International Film Festival and it will represent Canada at the Oscars in the category Best International Feature Film.

Image Copyright: Association Coopérative des Productions Audio-Visuelles and Sophie Deraspe. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.



For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Jan 02 2020

43mins

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Episode 480 - Karl Markovics & Nobadi

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Karl Markovics and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Nobadi, national socialism, guilt, fear and shame, fairytales for grown ups, Ulysses and why freedom scares us.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Heinrich Senft, a 93 year old, cranky pensioner, lives on a small allotment in Vienna. His dog died during the night and he wants to dig a hole behind his cabin to bury him. But failing to dig it himself he begrudgingly hires a young man from Afghanistan, Adib. While the two struggle to trust each other, Adib finds ways to pacify and appease the angry old man. Senft finds out that Adib has a wound on his foot, which seems rather badly covered up, but Adib pretends that all is well.

When the work is done, Senft seems relieved to have the foreigner out of his back yard. Yet a little while later, when Senft finds Adib unconscious at the bus stop, he knows he will need to help the young man. When Adib regains consciousness, he refuses to go to hospital out of fear to be deported.

Senft decides to take matters into his own hands to save this young man and the two spend a night together that is so full of chance, will-power, and inner revelation, that it sometimes appears hard to believe that these two found each other.

About the Director:

Karl Markovics was born in Austria in 1963. He started his career in Vienna's Serapionstheater and spent 12 years as a freelance actor before landing the role of Stockinger in the TV Series Kommissar Rex in 1993. This brought him to wider public attention and he eventually played the leading role in Stefan Ruzowitzky's Academy Award winning The Counterfeiters in 2008. Breathing, his directorial debut, premiered at Cannes Film Festival at the Directors' Fortnight in 2011, winning the Europa Cinema Label award.

It was screened and awarded at festivals worldwide, including Sarajevo FF (Best Film, Best Actor), and Sao Paolo IFF (Best Film). Superwelt followed in 2014 and screened at Berlinale, Karlovy Vary IFF and New Horizons FF Poland amongst others.

Nobadi is Karl Markovics' third film as a director.

Image Copyright: EPO-Film Vienna and Karl Markovics. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 30 2019

36mins

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Episode 479 - François Girard - The Song of Names

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François Girard and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film The Song of Names, history, remembrance, choices, mystery and discovery, film as music, the paradox of technology and musical, archeological digs.

Trailer

Synopsis:

Martin Simmonds (Tim Roth) has been haunted throughout his life by the mysterious disappearance of his “brother” and extraordinary best friend, a Polish Jewish virtuoso violinist, Dovidl Rapaport, who vanished shortly before the 1951 London debut concert that would have launched his brilliant career. Thirty-five years later, Martin discovers that Dovidl (Clive Owen) may still be alive, and sets out on an obsessive intercontinental search to find him and learn why he left.

Shortly before World War II, Martin’s music publisher father, Gilbert (Stanley Townsend), invites young Dovidl Rapoport (Luke Doyle), a ten-year-old Jewish violin prodigy from Poland, to live in their London home. Gilbert’s intent is to help the boy achieve his musical potential and protect him from the imminent German invasion of Poland. Martin (Misha Handley), also ten, initially sees Dovidl as an invader in his house, but Dovidl’s worries about the plight of his family in Warsaw elicits Martin’s compassion, and he is won over by the young genius’s charisma and rebelliousness.

Soon they are as close as brothers. Having the extraordinary Dovidl as his best friend and confidante opens up Martin’s narrow world, and enhances his selfconfidence. Over several years as the boys grow up, Gilbert lavishes all his attention and the money he has on developing Dovidl’s (now Jonah Hauer-King) talent, a process that elicits jealousy from Martin (now Gerran Howell), despite his love for Dovidl. Eventually, Gilbert stages an extravagant London debut for Dovidl at age 21. Unfortunately, as the audience and orchestra await Dovidl’s arrival on stage, Dovidl fails to appear.

The cancellation of the concert bankrupts and devastates Gilbert, who dies soon after. It also leaves Martin with the loss of the “brother” he loved, the lingering question of what happened, and a growing bitterness over Dovidl’s responsibility for Martin’s father’s death. Almost four decades later, Martin follows the clues that lead him ever closer to his friend, until he learns the meaning of ‘The Song of Names,’ a profoundly moving piece of music that holds the answer to why his brother vanished so suddenly from his life.

About the Director:

François Girard gained notoriety as much for his filmmaking as for his staging of operas and theater plays. In 1993, his feature film Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould would go on to garner international success including four top Genie Awards. Five years later he directed The Red Violin, featuring Samuel L. Jackson, which received an Academy Award for best original score and enshrined Girard as an important player on the international movie scene. The film also won eight Genie Awards and nine Jutra Awards. Silk, which he later directed, was adapted from Alessandro Baricco’s best-selling book, and was released worldwide in 2007. The cast includes Michael Pitt, Keira Knightley, Alfred Molina, Miki Nakatani and Koji Yakusho.

SILK received four Jutra Awards. His film Boychoir, released in 2015, features Dustin Hoffman, Kathy Bates and Eddie Izzard among others. Most recently, Hochelaga, Land of Souls, was presented at the Toronto Film Festival, and represented Canada in the race for Best Foreign Language Film Oscar at the 90th Academy Awards. It was released in September 2017 and was greatly acclaimed by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. Girard’s 1994 concert film Peter Gabriel’s Secret World, became a best-selling film and earned him a Grammy Award. A few years later he directed one of the six episodes of the internationally acclaimed series “Yo-Yo Ma Inspired By Bach.”

In 1997, François Girard made his opera directorial debut with Oedipus Rex/Symphony of Psalms by Stravinsky and Cocteau, which received numerous awards and was named by The Guardian as ‘the best theatrical show of the year.’ His other opera works include Lost Objects, for the Brooklyn Academy of Music; Wagner’s Siegfried; The Flight of Lindbergh/Seven Deadly Sins by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht; as well as Kaija Saariaho's Émilie. In recent years, Cirque du Soleil’s commissioned Girard to write and direct Zed, their first permanent show in Tokyo; and Zarkana, which opened at Radio City Music Hall, played at the Kremlin Theatre and has become a resident show in Las Vegas.

To date, François Girard’s accomplishments have earned him over one hundred international awards and public acclaim the world over.

Image Copyright: Serendipity Point Films and François Girard. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 24 2019

35mins

Play

Yaron Zilberman, Yehuda Nahari Halevi and Incitement

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Yaron Zilberman, Yehuda Nahari Halevi and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film Incitement, the complicated history of the Middle East, justice, peace and racism, inclusion, war and the real cost of radicalization. 

Trailer

Synopsis:

“This rigorous psychological thriller by American-Israeli director Yaron Zilberman (A Late Quartet) depicts the lead-up to the 1995 assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin through the worldview of his assassin, Yigal Amir.

In 1995, Yitzhak Rabin, the Prime Minister of Israel, was assassinated by an ultranationalist, right-wing Zionist who opposed the leader's signing of the Oslo Accords. Rabin's murder is held to be a definitive — and infamous — moment in the struggling peace process with Palestinians and also in Israel's charged history. So much so that it has never been depicted in a feature film, until now.

Israeli-American filmmaker Yaron Zilberman sets out, with a rigourous, exacting gaze, to expose — through the eyes of Rabin's assassin, Yigal Amir — the motivations that led to Rabin's death. Set in the year preceding the incident, Zilberman's meticulously crafted period piece is embedded in the world of Amir (portrayed with unsettling stoicism by Yehuda Nahari Halevi), moving from his family home to his failed relationships to his radicalization on illegal settlements.

At its core a psychological thriller, Zilberman's film also neatly weaves in archival footage, foregrounding the high political stakes of the era, and boldly showing the ways in which Israeli society incited one man to such deadly lengths. In this way, and with unflinching clarity, the film draws connective lines from the past to the present.

Co-written by Zilberman and Ron Leshem (who penned the novel and script for the Oscar-nominated Beaufort), and made without state money, Incitement is a gripping work of cinema that concretely writes into history a moment that many would rather not reflect on.”

With thanks to Kiva Reardon - TIFF

About the Guests:

Yaron Zilberman was born in Haifa, Israel. He studied physics at MIT before turning to filmmaking. He wrote, produced, and directed the documentary feature Watermarks. He also directed, co-wrote and produced A Late Quartet, which starred Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christopher Walken, and Catherine Keener. The film premiered in the Special Presentation program at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival. Inspired by and structured around Beethoven's Opus 131, the film follows the world-renowned Fugue String Quartet after its cellist Peter Mitchell is diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. It was a New York Times Critics Pick. Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers called it “a shining gem of a movie” and Roger Ebert said, “it does one of the most interesting things any film can do. It shows how skilled professionals work.”

Zilberman made his directorial debut with his theatrical feature documentary Watermarks, which follows the champion women swimmers of Hakoah Vienna as they reunite at their old swimming pool 65 years after they were forced by the Nazis to flee Austria. Watermarks won nine film festival awards and enjoyed a successful theatrical run internationally.

Yehuda Nahari was born in 1985 in Herzliya.

After graduating from school he joined the army between 2003-2006. In 2007 he met Eyal Cohen, manager of "The Way" where he was discovered and this inspired Yehuda to become an actor. In 2008 he played a series of youth television series "Our High School Song" as "Asi". As part of his school studies he also underwent an acting technique course with Ruth Dytches.

Image Copyright: Yaron Zilberman and Metro Communications. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 19 2019

21mins

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Episode 477 - Robert Fisk and Yung Chang

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Robert Fisk and Yung Chang and Face2Face host David Peck talk about their new film This Is Not A Movie, fake news and journalism, our addiction to social media, complicity, a “dead language”, and something called, “apparent clarity.”

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Synopsis:

For more than 40 years, journalist Robert Fisk has reported on some of the most violent and divisive conflicts in the world: Northern Ireland, the Balkans, and Syria. Yong Chang’s This Is Not a Movie captures Fisk in action—feet on the ground, notebook in hand, as he travels into landscapes devastated by war, interviewing both combatants and ordinary folk, ferreting out the facts and firing reports back home to reach an audience of millions.

As corporations devour independent media, and language becomes a weapon, another less obvious battle is taking place. In an ever-accelerating 24-hour news cycle, the process of translating raw experience into incisive and passionate dispatches requires the determination to see things first-hand and the tenacity to say what others won’t.  

In his relentless pursuit of the facts, Fisk has attracted his share of controversy. But in spite of the danger, he has continued to cover stories as they unfold, talking directly to the people involved, whether that’s Osama Bin Laden or a young Palestinians woman whose father was recently murdered. Unlike the glamorous films that fueled Fisk’s early ambitions, justice rarely prevails, villains aren’t punished, and there are no tidy endings. As Fisk says, “the truth is that this is not a movie.”

About the Director and Robert:

Yung Chang is the director of Up the Yangtze, China heavyweight and The Fruit Hunters. He is currently completing a screenplay for his first dramatic feature, Eggplant. In 2015, Chang was selected to participate in the prestigious Sundance Labs for Eggplant. His award-winning short Gatekeeper is a Vimeo Staff Pick and distributed by Field of Vision, Laura Poitras’ curated online film unit. 

Chang’s films have screened at international film festivals including Sundance, Berlin, Toronto, and IDFA and have played theatrically in cinemas around the world. Up the Yangtze was one of the top-grossing documentary releases in 2008. In 2013, China Heavyweight became the most widely screened social-issues documentary I Chinese history with an official release in 200 Chinese cinemas. 

His films have been critically acclaimed, receiving awards in Paris, Milan, Vancouver, San Francisco, the Canadian Screen Award, Taiwan Golden Horse, Cinema Eye Honors, among others and have been nominated at Sundance, the Independent Spirit Awards and the Emmys.

Chang's films have been shown on international broadcasters including PBS, National Geographic, ARTE, ZDF, Channel 4, HBO, TMN, NHK, CBC, Bell Media, TV2, SBS, RTS and EBS. He's received funding from major organizations like Sundance Institute, BRITDOC, Telefilm, SODEC, Hot Docs, National Film Board and Canada Council for the Arts.

Chang is the recipient of the Don Haig Award, the Yolande and Pierre Perrault Award, and the Guggenheim Emerging Artist Award. He is a member of the Directors Guild of Canada. In 2013, he was invited to become a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the organization behind the Academy Awards.

Up the Yangtze and The Fruit Hunters were co-produced by the National Film Board and Eyesteel film. 

Robert Fisk is the most famous foreign correspondent in Britain, according to The New York Times. He is the Middle East correspondent of the London Independent and has won more than 20 major British and international journalism awards for his reporting from the region. He is the author of several bestselling books, including Pity the Nation, an eyewitness account of the Lebanese Civil War, and the historical volume The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East. In 2006, he was awarded the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Prize for Cultural Freedom from the Lannan Foundation.

First for The Times of London and then for The Independent, Fisk has been reporting from the Middle East for nearly 40 years, covering everything from the Lebanese Civil War in the 1980s to the Israeli invasions of Lebanon. He was among the first Western journalists to report the massacre at the Palestinian refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila. He also witnessed and reported from the Iranian Revolution (1979), the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (1979), the Iran-Iraq War (1980–1988), the Algerian Civil War (1990–1998), the US-Iraqi Gulf War (1991), the Bosnian and Kosovo conflicts (1992–1995, 1998), the American attack on Afghanistan (2001), and the US invasion of Iraq (2003). He covered many of the 2011 Arab revolutions, especially Egypt, and is today reporting from the civil war in Syria.

He is the only journalist to have interviewed Osama bin Laden three times—first in Sudan and then in Al-Qaeda’s secret camps in Afghanistan. Born in England in 1946, Fisk holds a BA in English and Linguistics from Lancaster University in the UK, and a PhD in Politics from Trinity College, University of Dublin. He has received 17 honorary doctorates from British, Canadian, and other universities. He is a frequent broadcaster and lecturer around the world.

Fisk is the author of five books, including two works on Irish history, one of them an account of Irish neutrality in the Second World War; it remains a bestseller. Outside of the Middle East, Fisk has written and lectured extensively on the First and Second World Wars. He was the first Englishman to be invited to give a lecture to the families of Irish Catholics killed by British soldiers on Bloody Sunday.

He remains based in Beirut as The Independent’s Middle East correspondent and is currently working on a new history of the region called Night of Power.

Image Copyright: TINAM Inc. and the NFB. Used with permission.

F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.

For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Dec 12 2019

38mins

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iTunes Ratings

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Giving value consistently

By Jonesy Money - Jan 28 2020
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It’s always great to pop in and listen to David’s style of interview. His research into his host and their current work goes deep. With 400 episodes he is now a master at his craft.

Great show!

By Gilgalad3434 - Jul 24 2017
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David's got a great way of putting guests at ease and recognizing the difference that we can make in the world. His own passion for social change through the "ripple effect" is clearly obvious in the show! Highly recommended.