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Sounding Out!

When reading about sound is not enough, Sounding Out! presents an aural chronicle of sound and culture. From the crackle, pop and hiss of a record to Arizona noise ordinances, Sounding Out! remixes the everyday with theory, insight and practice. More details at www.soundstudiesblog.com

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Sounding Out! Podcast #63: The Sonic Landscapes of Unwelcome: Women of Color, Sonic Harassment, and Public Space

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/the-sonic-landscape-of-unwelcome.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: The Sonic Landscapes of Unwelcome: Women of Color, Sonic Harassment, and Public Space SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST This podcast focuses on the sonic landscapes of unwelcome which women and femmes of color step into when we walk down the street, take the bus, and navigate public and professional spaces. Women of color must navigate harassment, violent, and sexually abusive language and noise in public space. While walking to the market or bus, a man or many might yell at us, blow us an unwanted kiss, comment on our bodies, describe explicit sexual acts, or call us “bitch.” The way that women and femmes do or do not respond to such unwelcome language can result in retaliation and escalated violence. A type of harm reduction, women often wear headphones and listen to music while in public for the specific purpose of cancelling out the hostile sonic landscape into which we are walking. The way that women and femmes make use of technology and music as a tool of survival in hostile sonic landscapes is a form of femme tech as well as femme defense. What sort of psychological and emotional effect does constant and repeated exposure to abusive noise have on the minds and bodies of women of color? Locatora Radio is a Radiophonic Novela  hosted by Mala Muñoz and Diosa Femme, two self-identified locxs. Also known as “Las Mamis of Myth & Bullshit”, Las Locatoras make space for the exploration and celebration of the experiences, brilliance, creativity, and legacies of femmes and womxn of color. Each Capitulo of Locatora Radio is made with love and brujeria, a moment in time made by brown girls, for brown girls. Listen as Las Locatoras keep brown girl hour and discuss the layers and levels of femmeness and race, mental health, trauma, gender experience, sexuality, and oppression. – Mala Muñoz is a writer, advocate, and crisis counselor from Los Angeles. Her writing profiles Latinx artists and creators and has been featured online in VIBE Magazine’s VIBE Viva section. A self-defense instructor and one half of Locatora Radio, Mala’s work online and in real life focuses on the creativity, genius, and legacies of women and survivors of color.Diosa Femme is a Peruana-Mexicana from Los Angeles. She’s a model for Mi Vida Boutique, and co-founder of Locatora Radio. She intentionally creates and sustains virtual and material spaces that promote alternative self and collective healing work for queer femmes and womxn of color. Catch her on Instagram, making magic, conjuring self-love, and sharing selfies– Featured image of Mala and Diosa is used with permission by the authors. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Chicana Soundscapes: Introduction — Michelle Habell-Pallán If La Llorona Was a Punk Rocker: Detonguing The Off-Key Caos and Screams of Alice Bag– Marlen Ríos-Hernández Sounding Out! Podcast #60: Standing Rock, Protest, Sound, and Power (Part 1) – Marcella Ernest

55mins

5 Oct 2017

Rank #1

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Sounding Out! Podcast #43: Retail Soundscapes and the Ambience of Commerce

Click to view slideshow. https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/retail-soundscapes-and-the-ambience-of-commerce.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Retail Soundscapes and the Ambience of Commerce SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST What is the ambient sound of commerce? Equally reviled and revered, the programmed soundscapes of retail space combine wonderful serendipity with quotidian blandness. This podcast examines field recordings from luxury megastores, suburban fast food joints, and everything in between. As it turns out, the corporate ambience of chain-store retail isn’t so far away from the high-brow ambitions of ambient music. Ambience is whatever surrounds us, and it’s embroiled within the same kinds of aesthetic, political, and economic struggles that have been recognized in architecture for centuries. While a long line of thinkers have identified the links between retail and modernity, surprisingly few have addressed the phenomena in auditory terms. Following up on Jonathan Sterne’s 1997 inquiry regarding environmental music in the Mall of America, this podcast examines new developments in ambient sound that have accompanied the rise of e-commerce and the decline of brick-and-mortar stores. Segmentation of markets, nostalgia for the past, and the early history of recording are all addressed, as we take a listening trip through consumer culture. The podcast presents highlights from field recordings from retail stores, accompanied by voice-over narration. Field recordings were captured with a Zoom H4n handy recorder, at Menlo Park Mall in Edison, NJ, Dover Street Market New York, Parsonage Road Target in Edison, NJ, Wal-Mart Route 27 in Edison, NJ, and Dunkin Donuts Route 27 in Edison, NJ. Also includes excerpts from Brian Eno’s “Ambient 1: Music for Airports” (1978) and Disconscious’ “Hologram Plaza” (2013). – James Hodges is a PhD student in media studies at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the relationship between promotional culture and media preservation. James is the cofounder of a media archaeology working group at Rutgers, and he runs a small cassette label for fun. – Featured image by Nicholas Eckhart @Flickr CC BY. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #6: Spaces of Listening / The Record Shop – Aaron Trammell Sounding Out! Podcast #18: Listening to the Tuned City Brussels , Day 3: “Ephemeral Atmospheres”– Felicity Ford and Valeria Merlini Sounding Out! Podcast #28: Off the 60: A Mix-Tape Dedication to Los Angeles – Jennifer Stoever

17mins

25 Jun 2015

Rank #2

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SO! Podcast #73: NYC Highline Soundwalk

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/high-line-soundwalk.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  SO! Podcast #73: NYC Highline Soundwalk SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In a recent profile, New Yorkmagazine’s Justin Davidson called the NYC High Line, a “tunnel through glass towers,” an urban beautification project that had been designed with local real estate prices in mind, which has since become a “cattle chute for tourists,” wending its way through Manhattan’s Lower West Side from Gansevoort Street to 34th, and lined on each side by newly sprouted luxury apartment towers designed by some of the world’s preeminent architects. Conceived in the mid-2000s and completed in several phases through 2018, the High Line has been an epicenter of gentrification: From the 10,000 square foot glass-and-steel wedge of 40 10th Avenue, to twisty twins of 76 Eleventh Avenue, to the massive Western Yard project, the sounds of the High Line – as I experienced them this past August – are redolent with the city’s rising inequality, and the remaking of working class neighborhoods and small businesses into stretches of upscale high rises and posh boutiques. Having not visited the High Line for a year or so – and having never walked the route from end to end – I decided this past August to make this viaduct-turned-urban greenway the subject of a soundwalk. How, I wonder, might the soundof this space reveal its complex relationships and uses to the city surrounding it – its use as a public park, a tourist-trap, a space for small business, a featured attraction for builders and real estate agents marketing location? The whole walk is about a mile and a half, and I have about an hour to play with before heading up to midtown to make a research appointment, so I hoof down to the Meatpacking District to pick up the trail at its southwestern terminus. Climbing up a set of stairs directly next to the Whitney museum, the shrill sounds of the streets gradually melt away and I emerge into a peaceful grove of birches and thick shrubs. It’s relatively quiet at the moment, and one gets the sense of being in a rooftop garden – an urban meadow at once removed from the city, yet still immersed in its ambient hum. As I walk the length of the route, these city sounds become the leitmotif of my journey: the din of traffic along the avenues and cross-streets; the distant car horns; the sirens; the weekday morning sounds of unseen trucks loading and unloading their wares at nearby businesses; the constant drone of rooftop air conditioners; the sounds of tourists conversing in myriad languages; the inescapable jingling of mobile phones. And it’s from these latter sounds that I can begin to see – particularly as I’m here at an off-hour – why some local residents are a bit ticklish about the High Line’s popularity with out-of-towners. But overlaying all of this are the sounds of construction – the drills, circular saws, massive trucks, and heavy equipment of every description – that pierces the air on every block. Such sounds are not unusual in New York City, of course. But here, on each side of the High Line, the scale of such projects is enormous, and I can’t help but think of each pop of a nail gun, each hammer, each whirring crane, and creaking construction elevator making its sonic contribution to the glass and steel monstrosities piling up on the site of former slaughterhouses. Here, in this tumult, is the city-as-palimpsest: the writing-over of the industrial past with a plutocratic future. – Featured image by Moltkeplatz. It is in the public domain. – Andrew J. Salvati is a PhD candidate in Journalism and Media Studies at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University. His research examines the ways in which American history is packaged in popular media forms including film, television, computer games, mash-ups, and podcasts. Andrew currently live in New Jersey with his wife and two cats. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #57: The Reykjavik Sound Walk— Andrew Salvati DIY Histories: Podcasting the Past— Andrew Salvati Sounding Out! Podcast #2: Springtime in KC: Soundwalking Kansas City—Liana Silva

41mins

31 Jan 2019

Rank #3

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SO! Podcast #72: Not Your Muse (Episode 1 feat. Hailey Niswanger)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/11/not-your-muse-1.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  SO! Podcast #72: Not Your Muse (Episode 1 feat. Hailey Niswanger) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLISTNot Your Muse is a podcast series that dissects the unique experience of being a woman in the music industry. Each episode features an interview with a different artist; we talk about their entry into music, and the struggles and triumphs that followed. The goal of this series is to bring attention to the sexism, both blatant and subtle, that women have to process as professionals.You can find more here: https://soundcloud.com/notyourmusepodcastand https://allisonoyoung.wixsite.com/allisonoyoung/podcastOur debut episode features Hailey Niswanger, a 28-year-old experimental jazz artist based in Brooklyn, NY. From playing Saturday Night Live to touring with Esperanza Spalding, Hailey’s career has been nothing short of extraordinary. So what did she do when her former mentor, who helped shape her relationship with music, crossed a line? Listen in to learn more about her story.Links to Hailey’s work: haileyniswanger.com/ www.maesunmusic.com/ open.spotify.com/album/3Eo4i1UkqM1rDoLoF8x8aj saxsideproject.com/ – Featured image by Lexie Farabaugh used with permission by the author. – Allison Young graduated from Binghamton University this past May with a degree in English rhetoric, and devoted her education to fueling her passion for media and its place in social activism and culture. She currently works as a copywriter and content strategist at Idea Kraft, a creative agency in Binghamton, NY. She believes storytelling is all around us. It has the unique ability to connect and shape our society for the better; sometimes the best thing we can do is just listen. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #63: The Sonic Landscapes of Unwelcome: Women of Color, Sonic Harassment, and Public Space— Mala Muñoz and Diosa Femme SO! Amplifies: The Women in L.A. Punk Archive— Alice Bag Sounding Out! Podcast #59: Soundwalk of the Women’s March, Santa Ana— Aaron Trammell

34mins

29 Nov 2018

Rank #4

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Sounding Out! Podcast #69: Sound The Alarm

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/soundthealarmmix2.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Sound The Alarm SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Sound The Alarm Elvis Costello and the Attractions, “Night Rally”—Jeremy Braddock J. Ballin and Carla Morrison, “Mi Gente”—Liana Silva Snap!, “I’ve Got the Power!”—Robin James Diana Gordon, “Woman”—Allie Young The Raincoats, “No One’s Little Girl”—Gina Arnold Sam Cooke, “This Little Light of Mine (Live)”—Shakira Holt The Ergs, “Books About Miles Davis”—Aaron Trammell Descendents, “Parents”—Marlen Rios-Hernandez Guerrilla Toss, “Betty Dreams of Green Men”—James T Tlsty Shabazz Palaces, “Shine a Light w/ Thaddillac”—Nabeel Zuberi Amali Dhumali, “DHOOM3”—Monika Mehta Rhianna, “Man Down”—Justin Burton Dr. Dre, “Keep Their Heads Ringing”—Karen Cook Analog Tara, “Percolation”—Tara Rodgers Princess Nokia, “Kitana”—Jennifer Stoever Rina Sawayama, “Ordinary Superstar”—Shauna Bahssin Nina Diaz, “January 9th”—Wanda Alarcon — ***Click here to read our Blog-o-versary year-in-review by Ed. in Chief JS 

59mins

30 Jul 2018

Rank #5

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Sounding Out! Podcast #47: Finding the Lost Sounds of Kaibah

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/finding-the-lost-sounds-of-kaibah.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Finding the Lost Sounds of Kaibah SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In the early 1960s Native American women had few opportunities and rights as citizens. During this politically charged era, a young Navajo woman, Kay Bennett, or “Kaibah”, defied those restrictions by recording and releasing her own albums. Almost fifty years later, we present this conversation with Rachael Nez, a Navajo scholar and filmmaker, whose research explores “Songs from the Navajo Nation” through Kaibah’s records. Kaibah self-published her own albums until she was signed by Canyon records, wrote and published her own books, and traveled the world performing Navajo music everywhere from the Middle East to Europe. Rachael looks at how Kaibah’s music acts as a site for the circulation of Indigenous knowledge, oral history, and resistance. In this podcast Marcella Ernest speaks with Rachael about the scarcity of materials relating to Kaibah’s history. Although there is no archive of her work, and no coherent trace of her story in one site, she explains how we can piece together a story of Kaibah based on her albums and songs. This dialogue considers the ways in which Indigenous erasure can be recuperated through sound. The project of finding the lost sounds of Kaibah is a fascinating story of how sound can be used to reconstitute indigeneous identity. What social and cultural norms conspire to obfuscate a Navajo woman of such prestige and talent? Finding the lost sounds of Kaibah is a conversation about (re)searching to find a lost sound. – Marcella Ernest is a Native American (Ojibwe) interdisciplinary video artist and scholar. Her work combines electronic media with sound design with film and photography in a variety of formats; using multi-media installations incorporating large-scale projections and experimental film aesthetics. Currently living in California, Marcella is completing an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in American Studies at the University of New Mexico. Drawing upon a Critical Indigenous Studies framework to explore how “Indianness” and Indigenity are represented in studies of American and Indigenous visual and popular culture, her primary research is an engagement with contemporary Native art to understand how members of colonized groups use a re-mix of experimental video and sound design as a means for cultural and political expressions of resistance. www.marcellakwe.com – Featured image is used with permission by the author. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #24: The Raitt Street Chronicles: A Survivor’s History – Sharon Sekhon and Manuel “Manny” Escamilla Sounding Out! Podcast #20: The Sound of Rio’s Favelas: Echoes of Social Inequality in an Olympic City— Andrea Medrado The “Tribal Drum” of Radio: Gathering Together the Archive of American Indian Radio–Josh Garrett Davis

52mins

29 Oct 2015

Rank #6

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Sounding Out! Podcast #45: Immersion and Synesthesia in Role-Playing Games

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/synesthesia-and-immersion-podcast.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Immersion and Synesthesia in Role-Playing Games SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In tabletop role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons players collaboratively and improvisationally create and explore imagined worlds primarily constructed through speech. In this episode Nicholas Mizer explores what it means to bring those imagined worlds into the shared space of play. Through interviews and recordings of games sessions with a dungeonmaster names Liz Larsen, he explores the importance of what Liz calls “color, song, and choice diction,” for kidnapping this reality with the imagined one. This podcast investigates the often sonic and synesthetic methods needed for conjuring these fantastic realities. – Nicholas Mizer is an anthropology PhD candidate at Texas A&M University.Besides role-playing games his research interests include folklore, mythology, ritual, phenomenology, interpretive anthropology, performance studies, and geek culture.  His dissertation explores how players of tabletop role-playing games collaboratively experience imagined worlds. He is an editor for The Geek Anthropologist and produces Spot Check, a Youtube series about his research on gaming. – Featured image “Map of Nabonidus IV” by Liz Larken. Used with permission by the author. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Experiments in Aural Resistance: Nordic Role-Playing, Community, and Sound – Aaron Trammell Sounding Out! Podcast #5: Sound and Spirit on the Highway – David B. Greenberg SO! Amplifies: Mega Ran and Sammus, The Rappers With Arm Cannons Tour – Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo

56mins

27 Aug 2015

Rank #7

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SO! Podcast #66: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Marlen Rios)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/03/listening-in-to-so-2.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Marlen Rios) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Join host James Tlsty in the second installment of his podcast miniseries–“Listening In with Sounding Out!” In this miniseries Tlsty and co-host Shauna Bahssin dig deep into the archives of Sounding Out! and interview authors to get a sense of what they were thinking as they wrote their essays. In this episode Tlsty and Bahssin interview one of our favorite contributors, Marlen Rios. – James Tlsty is a Junior studying English and Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) at Binghamton University. James draws from literature and philosophy for pragmatic applications in social policy and activism. James is an active champion of the arts, as evidenced by his work with on-campus art initiative OPEN, a hybrid art gallery and open mic. He is also the resident Pop Music Department Director and an E-Board member at WHRW, where he is a registered radio engineer and programmer. Shauna Bahssin is a junior double-majoring in English and art history. She currently serves as the managing editor for Binghamton University’s student newspaper, Pipe Dream, after maintaining the position of copy desk chief for three semesters. Outside of the paper, she helps supervise student fundraising initiatives through the Binghamton Telefund, and she hopes to work within the field of arts advancement after she graduates. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #38: Radio Frequencies, Radio Forms LIVE — Monteith McCollum, Jennifer Stoever, and Daniel Santos Sounding Out! Podcast #65: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever) – James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #13: Sounding Shakespeare in S(e)out – Brooke A. Carlson

29mins

26 Mar 2018

Rank #8

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SO! Podcast #67: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Claire Cooley)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/listening-in-to-so-3.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Claire Cooley) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Join host James Tlsty in the second installment of his podcast miniseries–“Listening In with Sounding Out!” In this miniseries Tlsty and co-host Shauna Bahssin dig deep into the archives of Sounding Out! and interview authors to get a sense of what they were thinking as they wrote their essays. In this episode Tlsty and Bahssin interview the amazing Claire Cooley discussing her SO! piece from October 2017, “Gender and the First Sound Films in 1930s Bombay” – James Tlsty is a Junior studying English and Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) at Binghamton University. James draws from literature and philosophy for pragmatic applications in social policy and activism. James is an active champion of the arts, as evidenced by his work with on-campus art initiative OPEN, a hybrid art gallery and open mic. He is also the resident Pop Music Department Director and an E-Board member at WHRW, where he is a registered radio engineer and programmer. Shauna Bahssin is a junior double-majoring in English and art history. She currently serves as the managing editor for Binghamton University’s student newspaper, Pipe Dream, after maintaining the position of copy desk chief for three semesters. Outside of the paper, she helps supervise student fundraising initiatives through the Binghamton Telefund, and she hopes to work within the field of arts advancement after she graduates. Claire Cooley is a PhD student in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests center on overlapping Middle East and South Asia film histories. Claire’s dissertation project traces connections between Egyptian, Iranian, and Indian cinemas with a focus on the 1930s-1960s, and uses sound as a framework to capture the dynamics of cinematic circulations across this contiguous region. In 2010, she received her BA from Tufts University, and from 2010-2013 she lived in Cairo, Egypt where she pursued a project translating, mapping, and blogging about graffiti during the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Claire also teaches Persian and Arabic. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: SO! Podcast #66: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Marlen Rios) — James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #65: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever) – James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #13: Sounding Shakespeare in S(e)oul – Brooke A. Carlson

28mins

30 Apr 2018

Rank #9

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SO! Podcast #68: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Pavitra Sundar)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/listening-in-to-so-4.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Pavitra Sundar) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Join host James Tlsty in the second installment of his podcast miniseries–“Listening In with Sounding Out!” In this miniseries Tlsty and co-host Shauna Bahssin dig deep into the archives of Sounding Out! and interview authors to get a sense of what they were thinking as they wrote their essays. In this episode Tlsty and Bahssin interview the amazing Pavitra Sundar discussing her SO! piece from October 2017, “The Queer Sound of the Dandiya Queen, Falguni Pathak” – James Tlsty is a Junior studying English and Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) at Binghamton University. James draws from literature and philosophy for pragmatic applications in social policy and activism. James is an active champion of the arts, as evidenced by his work with on-campus art initiative OPEN, a hybrid art gallery and open mic. He is also the resident Pop Music Department Director and an E-Board member at WHRW, where he is a registered radio engineer and programmer. Shauna Bahssin is a junior double-majoring in English and art history. She currently serves as the managing editor for Binghamton University’s student newspaper, Pipe Dream, after maintaining the position of copy desk chief for three semesters. Outside of the paper, she helps supervise student fundraising initiatives through the Binghamton Telefund, and she hopes to work within the field of arts advancement after she graduates. Pavitra Sundar is Assistant Professor of Literature at Hamilton College, where she teaches courses on global film and literature. Her scholarly interests span the fields of cinema studies, sound studies, postcolonial literary and cultural studies, and gender-sexuality studies. She is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Bollywood film sound and music. Her work has been published in journals such as Meridians, Jump Cut, South Asian Popular Culture, and Communication, Culture, and Critique, as well as in anthologies on South Asian and other cinematic traditions. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: SO! Podcast #66: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Marlen Rios) — James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #65: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever) – James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #13: Sounding Shakespeare in S(e)oul – Brooke A. Carlson

26mins

31 May 2018

Rank #10

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SO! Podcast #76: F*** U Pay Us @ UC Riverside PunkCon

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: F*** U Pay Us @ UC Riverside PunkCon SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Sounding Out! was naturally curious about the amazing UC Riverside Punk Con–organized by Marlen Rios-Hernandez and Susana Sepulveda–and so we asked if we could listen in on some of the amazing conversations happening there. Fortunately the wonderful Mikaela Elson volunteered to be our ears on the ground and recorded this excellent keynote presentation by femme and them punk band FUPU (Fuck U Pay Us). Mikaela chose to feature this keynote because of how they discuss how the voice can be used as a tool to undermine the white male patriarchy. In this talk they discuss how their music is used to cure the sting of a society that is anti-black and which thrives off of using power to suppress black folk, people of color, lgbtq+, disabled, and otherwise marginalized folk. BOOM!!!! — Featured image of FUPU borrowed from the UCR PunkCon site. — Mikaela Elson is a media and culture scholar from the University of California, Riverside. She also has an associates degree in art. She creates and documents underground media that stands in opposition to the mass media. Her work focuses on helping to facilitate representation for folks from marginalized communities. She is the personal assistant for graphic novelist and artist John Jennings and host of “Hybrid Virtue” a college radio show on KUCR 88.3fm. To learn more about Mikaela follow her on Instagram @thisismik_ — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: SO! Amplifies: The Women in L.A. Punk Archive- Alice Bag Sounding Out! Podcast #63: The Sonic Landscapes of Unwelcome  “Oh how so East L.A.”: The Sound of 80s Flashbacks in Chicana Literature- Wanda Alarcon

49mins

3 Jun 2019

Rank #11

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SO! Podcast #75: Wring Out Fairlea

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Wring Out Fairlea SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST This podcast commemorates the thirty-year anniversary of the first Wring Out Fairlea demonstration, which was organised by the Coalition Against Women’s Imprisonment to take place at the former Fairlea women’s prison in Melbourne on 26 June 1988. The Wring Out action was repeated three more times over the next eight years, bringing thousands of people to encircle Fairlea prison in protest and in solidarity with the women inside. The podcast draws on original broadcasts of the Wring Outs and interviews with activists. It grows out of a collaborative research project conducted by Bree Carlton and Emma Russell on the history of an anti-carceral feminist movement in Melbourne, Australia. The podcast is produced and narrated by Emma Russell at the studios of 3CR Community Radio in Naarm / Melbourne, on the land of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nations. — Featured image used with permission by the author. — Emma Russell’s research centres on social movements, punishment and policing. It aims to interrogate punitive logics and the nature of carceral and securitised space. Emma is particularly interested in feminist and queer activist histories, theories of prison abolition, and sound as a tool for understanding carceral space and resistance. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #59: Soundtrack to the Women’s March, Santa Ana–Aaron Trammell Sounding Out! Podcast #50: Yoshiwara Soundwalk: Taking the Underground to the Floating World– Gretchen Jude Regulating the Carceral Soundscape: Media Policy in Prison–Bill Kirkpatrick

55mins

1 Apr 2019

Rank #12

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SO! Podcast #74: Bonus Track for Spanish Rap & Sound Studies Forum

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/finalist-mix.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Bonus Track for Spanish Rap & Sound Studies Forum SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In “Asesina,” Darell opens the track shouting “Everybody go to the discotek,” a call for listeners to respond to the catchy beat and come dance. In this series on rap in Spanish and Sound Studies, we’re calling you out to the dance floor…and we have plenty to say about it. Your playlist will not sound the same after we’re through. Throughout the forum, we explored what Spanish rap has to say on the dance floor, in our cars, and through our headsets. Michael Levine discussed trap in Cuba and el paquete semanal. Lucreccia Quintanilla mused about about Latinx identity in Australia. Ashley Luthers broke down femme sexuality in Cardi B’s music. A forum on Spanish rap couldn’t be complete without a mixtape, and Lucreccia Quintanilla obliged. She has provided SO! readers with a free playlist that acts as a soundtrack to our series. Also? It’s hot. We wrap up No Pare, Sigue Sigue: Spanish Rap & Sound Studies with this bonus track. Songs: We will dance to the light of the moon – Lucreccia and Ruben Heller-Quintanilla La Cumbia Modular – Galambo Festividad – Funeral 6 De la Mañana – Kelman Duran Daddy Yankee, DJ Playero Baby Yankee Rio Bamba Remix New Freezer- DJ Na Contra La Pared – Moro Como Mujer – Ivy Queen Lucreccia Quintanilla Edit Dimelo – Demphra Fuego – Lisa M. El-Apache-ness- x-jlo-mueve-el-cucta-x-jenny-from-the-block    Tayhana-Turra-Edit La Chilaperra – Mixeo Dj’s Try Again (Chaboi ‘Mas Duro’ Dembow Refix) Sueltate el dembow – Bigote Edit Y Que Lo Mueva (feat.MC Buseta) – Rosa Pistola and YNFYNYT SCROLL — Featured image: “La Flor de Reggaetón” by Flickr user La Tabacalera de Lavapiés, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 — Lucreccia Quintanilla  is an artist/DJ/writer and PhD candidate at Monash University in Naarm, Melbourne, Australia. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #44: Keep on Pushing!–Editorial Collective Sounding Out! Podcast #28: Off the 60: A Mix-Tape Dedication to Los Angeles–Jennifer Stoever Sounding Out! Podcast #26: Wobbling the Speakerspace–Justin Burton

24mins

7 Feb 2019

Rank #13

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Sounding Out! Podcast #46: Ruptures in the Soundscape of Disneyland

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/cynthia-disney-podcast.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Ruptures in the Soundscape of Disneyland SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In this podcast, Cynthia Wang shares examples taken from a soundwalk she performed at Disneyland. Disneyland has been an idealized space for the middle-class white American experience, and the aural signals and music used throughout the park encourage visitors to become cultural tourists and to share in this mindset. Here Cynthia considers the moments of rupture that disturb Disney’s controlled soundscape. Join us as we listen for a pathway out of the hyper-consumerist labyrinth of Disney. And, if you would like to learn more about this soundwalk, visit it’s website here. – Cynthia Wang is currently a PhD candidate at the Annenberg School of Communication at USC, a USC Endowed Fellow, and a USC Diploma in Innovation grant recipient (for an LGBTQ stories mapping project called GlobaltraQs). Her work is framed in critical cultural perspectives. In the past she has done research on how Asian American musicians use digital media to build community and collaborate, and how crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo provide new avenues of creative production and distribution for independent artists. Her current research seeks to bring health care into this conversation of power, examining how health professionals manage and organize their time throughout the day, using practitioner-facing methods to identify where institutional systems and processes break down through a lens of time and temporality. In particular, she is interested in how communication technologies impact the organization of time and social relations within the health care system while enacting and/or reinforcing hegemonic power dynamics. In addition to research and academic stuffs, Cynthia is also a singer-songwriter, and just released her EP album (Find it on iTunes, Amazon, or wherever else you get your music). – Featured image “Toontown Sound Makers” by Ryutaro Koma @Flickr CC BY-NC.  — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Park Sounds: A Kansas City Soundwalk for the Fall – Liana Silva Sounding Out! Podcast #43: Retail Sounds and the Ambience of Commerce – James Hodges Sound(Walking) Through Smithfield Square in Dublin – Linda O Keeffe

43mins

24 Sep 2015

Rank #14

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SO! Podcast #70: Listening In with Sounding Out! (Shauna Bahssin)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/listening-in-to-so-5.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  Listening In with Sounding Out! (Shauna Bahssin) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Join host James Tlsty in the second installment of his podcast miniseries–“Listening In with Sounding Out!” In this miniseries Tlsty and co-host Shauna Bahssin dig deep into the archives of Sounding Out! and interview authors to get a sense of what they were thinking as they wrote their essays. In their final episode Tlsty interviews Bahssin about her SO! piece from October 2017, “SO! Amplifies: Anne Le Troter’s ‘Bulleted List’.” – James Tlsty is a Junior studying English and Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) at Binghamton University. James draws from literature and philosophy for pragmatic applications in social policy and activism. James is an active champion of the arts, as evidenced by his work with on-campus art initiative OPEN, a hybrid art gallery and open mic. He is also the resident Pop Music Department Director and an E-Board member at WHRW, where he is a registered radio engineer and programmer. Shauna Bahssin is a junior double-majoring in English and art history. She currently serves as the managing editor for Binghamton University’s student newspaper, Pipe Dream, after maintaining the position of copy desk chief for three semesters. Outside of the paper, she helps supervise student fundraising initiatives through the Binghamton Telefund, and she hopes to work within the field of arts advancement after she graduates. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: SO! Amplifies: Anne Le Troter’s ‘Bulleted List’ — James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin SO! Amplifies: Basilica Hudson’s 24 HOUR DRONE — Shauna Bahssin Sounding Out! Podcast #65: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever) – James Tlsty and Shauna Bahssin

28mins

27 Sep 2018

Rank #15

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SO! Podcast #71: Everyday Sounds of Resilience and Being: Black Joy at School

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/gershon-podcast.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  SO! Podcast #71: Everyday Sounds of Resilience and Being: Black Joy at School SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Inspired by the recent Black Perspectives “W.E.B. Du Bois @ 150” Online Forum, SO!’s “W.E.B. Du Bois at 150” amplifies the commemoration of the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Du Bois’s birth in 2018 by examining his all-too-often and all-too-long unacknowledged role in developing, furthering, challenging, and shaping what we now know as “sound studies.” – This soundwork resides somewhere between a podcast and academic scholarship. Using W.E.B. DuBois’ (1926) arguments about the centrality of aesthetics and the Arts to liberatory practices and justice in Criteria for Negro Art, this piece argues for the significance of Black joy at school as a powerful pathway for interrupting layers of oppression in schooling. It is a work that seeks to convey these understandings as much affectively as epistemologically, where getting a feel for the argument matters at least as much as grasping the points raised throughout. Sounds for this work are drawn from a four-year longitudinal sonic ethnographic project that was first rendered as a piece of soundart, exhibited at the Akron Art Museum from March through July 2012. The purpose of this project was to examine how writing songs about science might help students of color and girls (of color) more deeply experience and otherwise engage academic content. Students and teachers serves as co-researchers, documenting students’ songwriting processes, gathering audio and video recordings of their work, interviewing one another and the like. Given the collaborative nature of this project, with proper layers of student assent and parental consent, participating first, fifth, seventh, and eighth graders and their teachers used their actual names to receive credit for their work. As the study was winding to a close, I also engaged in an extension activity with first graders to better get a sense of how they conceptualized the school. To these ends, I first took pairs of first graders then had them work with one-on-one with their fifth grade buddies to video and audio record their three favorite places in the school. Bookending the piece are two slices of the same half hour recording of fifth graders in Mrs. Grindall’s 5th grade classroom, Taris, Gayle, Tia, and Ki-Auna as they negotiate one of their songs about planetary motion and phases of the moon. The piece continues with Colton’s recording of the spaces and places he likes most at school including the art room, followed by part of Lanaria’s recording of the cafetorium (period!), then Delante’s recording of his first grade teacher Mr. Bennett’s room where he spent most of his days (lockers is amazing!). The sounds at the end of the piece start with Najah’s talk at the library as she looks out the window and the school’s “wall of fame” located there, with Gayle helping along. The middle sounds are exactly what one might think, bunches of first graders and their fifth grade buddies passing each other along the hall, ending with the friends doing a take of their song, messing up, and keeping rolling for the joy of it. Along with layering and assembling the above recordings, all other sounds, their composition and arrangement are played, edited, and recorded by the author (Instrumentation: shaker, chekere, guataca, vibratone, udu, and bass). A short reference list for scholarship supporting the arguments made can be found below. – Featured image by Jambox998 @Flickr CC BY-NC-ND. – Walter S. Gershon (Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor in the School of Teaching, Learning & Curriculum Studies, LGBTQ Affiliate Faculty, and served as Provost Associate Faculty for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (2014-2017) at Kent State University. His scholarly interests focus on questions of justice about the ways in which young people make sense, the sociocultural processes that inform their everyday sense-making, and the qualitative methods used to study those processes, especially in relation to sound and the sensory. Though his work most often attends to how continually marginalized youth negotiate schools and schooling, Walter is also interested in how people of all ages negotiate educational contexts and knowledges outside of institutions. Recent publications include serving as co-editor (with Peter Appelbaum, Arcadia University) for a special issue of Educational Studies: A Journal of the American Educational Studies Association, the first to focus on sound studies in education, and as editor of a forthcoming book titled, Sensuous Curriculum: Politics and the Senses in Education. He is the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Book Award from Division B (Curriculum Studies) of the American Educational Research Association for his work, Sound Curriculum: Sonic Studies in Educational Theory, Method, and Practice(2017, Routledge). — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Listening to and as Contemporaries: W.E.B. Du Bois & Sigmund Freud — Julie Beth Napolin “Music More Ancient than Words”: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Theories on Africana Aurality — Aaron Carter-Ényì “Most pleasant to the ear”: W. E. B. Du Bois’s Itinerant Intellectual Soundscapes – Phillip Luke Sinitiere

24mins

1 Nov 2018

Rank #16

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SO! Podcast #65: Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/listening-in-to-so-1.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  Listening In with Sounding Out! (feat. Jenny Stoever) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Join host James Tlsty as he kicks off a special podcast miniseries–“Listening In with Sounding Out!” In this miniseries Tlsty and co-host Shauna Bahssin dig deep into the archives of Sounding Out! and interview authors to get a sense of what they were thinking as they wrote their essays. In this first episode Tlsty and Bahssin interview the music maven herself, Sounding Out! Editor-In-Chief Jenny Stoever. Listen in for a rare glimpse of the special glue that holds Sounding Out! together! – James Tlsty is a Junior studying English and Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) at Binghamton University. James draws from literature and philosophy for pragmatic applications in social policy and activism. James is an active champion of the arts, as evidenced by his work with on-campus art initiative OPEN, a hybrid art gallery and open mic. He is also the resident Pop Music Department Director and an E-Board member at WHRW, where he is a registered radio engineer and programmer. Shauna Bahssin is a junior double-majoring in English and art history. She currently serves as the managing editor for Binghamton University’s student newspaper, Pipe Dream, after maintaining the position of copy desk chief for three semesters. Outside of the paper, she helps supervise student fundraising initiatives through the Binghamton Telefund, and she hopes to work within the field of arts advancement after she graduates. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #38: Radio Frequencies, Radio Forms LIVE — Monteith McCollum, Jennifer Stoever, and Daniel Santos Sounding Out! Podcast #27: Interview with Jonathan Sterne – Aaron Trammell Sounding Out! Podcast #13: Sounding Shakespeare in S(e)out – Brooke A. Carlson

28mins

29 Jan 2018

Rank #17

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Sounding Out! Podcast #48: Languages of Exile

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/languages-of-exile.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Languages of Exile SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Factual Dispersion, Poetic Compression With words stepping backwards from the wave of news coverage, attempting to retrace a moment or point in time, to go back where things began, to the innocuous genesis of a single deliberate decision, the resentment or, in some camps, the war crime, within the continuous ebb and flow.  The stepping back breaks up the habit of our clear factual articulation – a clear factual articulation that, in its fact, becomes ignorable as it satisfies the need for fact and its pincer click of tiny precision.  This articulation now carries other words, carries them forward from the reversal of the day’s date stamped so firmly and authoritatively on the facts, as if justification itself. Stepping backwards and moving forwards with the words of Syrian poets, women whose poems are oddly and noticeably not dated in the books recovered in translation from the British Library, despite the original words being imminently intelligible within the contemporary language of the particular place from where they were written – whether that be Syria, France, Lebanon or elsewhere. The necessary compression of meaning within each sentence of this poetry is in turn counterpointed against the fact of legal journalistic accuracy and its subsequent dispersal, its general thinning out, particularly in the face of reported death. Poets: Mona Fayad Hala Mohamed Maram al-Masri Saniyya Saleh Aisha Arnaout Ghada Al-Samman Salwa Al-Neimi Artists David Mollin Salomé Voegelin — All images supplied by the artists — David Mollin’s work is concerned with ideas of contingency within the professionalized contemporary art world, and in particular with the effect of power consolidation and commodification and those elements of the work that disappear as a result of such a process. This has led to an increasing interest in the use of writing as a process of materialization of an artwork that fails to materialize. Mollin has co-founded with Matthew Arnatt the project 100 Reviews (Alberta Press and Greengrassi Gallery) and, with John Reardon, he co-edited ch-ch-ch-changes: Artists talk about teaching (Ridinghouse, 2009). Mollin works collaboratively on text-based sound work with Salomé Voegelin.  Salomé Voegelin is an artist and writer engaged in listening and hearing as a socio-political practice. She is the author of Sonic Possible Worlds: Hearing the Continuum of Sound, Bloomsbury, NY, 2014 and Listening to Noise and Silence: Towards a Philosophy of Sound Art, Continuum, NY, 2010. While her solo work focuses on the small and slight, unseen performances and moments that almost fail to happen, her collaborative work, with David Mollin, has a more conceptual basis, establishing through words and sounds conversations and reconfigurations of relationships and realities. http://www.salomevoegelin.net Follow their collaboration at: https://twitter.com/mollinvoegelin — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: detritus 1 & 2 and V.F(i)n_1&2 : The Sounds and Images of Postnational Violence in Mexico – Luz Maria Sánchez Sounding Out! Podcast #41: Sound Art as Public Art–Salomé Voegelin World Listening Day 2015: Mendi + Keith Obadike’s “Blues Speaker [for James Baldwin]” (2015) #WLD2015

26mins

2 Nov 2015

Rank #18

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Sounding Out! Podcast #64: Standing Rock, Protest, Sound and Power (Part 2)

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/protest-sound-power-ii.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Standing Rock, Protest, Sound and Power (Part 2) SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST Part Two of a special series on Standing Rock, Protest, Sound and Power. The guest for today’s podcast is Tracy Rector. Tracy is a Choctaw/Seminole filmmaker, curator, community organizer, and Executive Director and Co-founder of Longhouse Media. In 2017 Indigenous grassroots leaders called upon allies across the United States and around the world to peacefully march in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. They asked allies to simply exist, resist, and rise in solidarity with Indigenous peoples and their rights–rights which protect mother earth for all future generations. In this podcast we talk about Tracy’s thoughts and observations as a filmmaker who was present at Standing Rock. We discuss the election of a new administration, increasing threats to native land, and police violence in today’s podcast. In Part One, our host Marcella Ernest spoke with Dr. Nancy Marie Mithlo, a Native American art historian and Associate Professor of Art History and American Indian studies. They discussed how Nancy experiences the sonic elements of Native activism as a trained anthropologist. In Part Two, Tracy’s experience playing with sound and visuals as a documentarian brings a different perspective to understanding Native activism. – Marcella Ernest is a Native American (Ojibwe) interdisciplinary video artist and scholar. Her work combines electronic media with sound design with film and photography in a variety of formats; using multi-media installations incorporating large-scale projections and experimental film aesthetics. Currently living in California, Marcella is completing an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in American Studies at the University of New Mexico. Drawing upon a Critical Indigenous Studies framework to explore how “Indianness” and Indigenity are represented in studies of American and Indigenous visual and popular culture, her primary research is an engagement with contemporary Native art to understand how members of colonized groups use a re-mix of experimental video and sound design as a means for cultural and political expressions of resistance. – Featured image used with permission by Tracy Rector. — REWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig: Sounding Out! Podcast #60: Standing Rock, Protest, Sound, and Power (Part 1) — Marcella Ernest Sounding Out! Podcast #51: Creating New Worlds From Old Sounds – Marcella Ernest Sounding Out! Podcast #58: The Meaning of Silence – Marcella Ernest

27mins

30 Nov 2017

Rank #19

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Sounding Out! Podcast #62: ¡¡¡¡RESIST!!!!

https://soundstudies.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/resistmix.mp3 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: ¡¡¡¡RESIST!!!! SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST ¡¡¡¡RESIST!!!! The Clash, “Guns of Brixton”—The Editorial Collective Alice Bag, “Programmed”—Jenny Stoever Speedy Ortiz, “Raising the Skate”—Liana Silva OutKast, “Humble Mumble”—Regina Bradley The Staple Singers, “Freedom Highway”—Shakira Holt El Jornaleros del Norte, “Serenata a un Indocumentado”—Dolores Inés Casillas A Tribe Called Red (feat. Yasiin Bey, Narcy & Black Bear), “R.E.D.”—reina alejandra prado Body Count, “No Lives Matter”—Holger Schulze Pega Monstro, “Partir a Loiça”—Carlo Patrão Björk, “Declare Independence”—Chris Chien Green Velvet and Prok & Fitch, “Sheeple”—Justin Burton Pet Shop Boys, “Go West”—Airek Beauchamp Kate Bush, “Waking the Witch”—Gretchen Jude Cabaret Voltaire, “Do the Mussolini (Headkick)”—Yetta Howard Lucid Nation (feat. Jody Bleyle), “Fubar”—Tamra Lucid Resorte, “Opina o Muere”—Aurelio Meza Leonard Cohen, “You Want it Darker”—Ariel B Taub Charlie Haden & Liberation Music Orchestra, “We Shall Overcome”—Elizabeth Newton Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros, “Johnny Appleseed”—Aaron Trammell — ***Click here to read our Blog-o-versary year-in-review by Ed. in Chief JS 

1hr 14mins

31 Jul 2017

Rank #20