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Arts
TV & Film
Visual Arts

No Filter Photography Podcast

Updated 8 days ago

Arts
TV & Film
Visual Arts
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National Geographic Creative photographer talks with fellow photographers and photojournalists about mastering, monetizing and bringing meaning to their chosen craft of visual storytelling.

Read more

National Geographic Creative photographer talks with fellow photographers and photojournalists about mastering, monetizing and bringing meaning to their chosen craft of visual storytelling.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
1
0
0
0

Quality Podcast

By ThisGuy1050 - Dec 15 2016
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Very well produced. Great interviews. Thanks for making a great podcast. Subscribed.

Awesome podcast!

By CA_Johns - Dec 02 2016
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Love this production. If you're interested in the behind the curtain inner-workings of top notch photojournalism, this podcast takes you there. Intimate, accessible, and inspiring. Keep 'em coming!

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
1
0
0
0

Quality Podcast

By ThisGuy1050 - Dec 15 2016
Read more
Very well produced. Great interviews. Thanks for making a great podcast. Subscribed.

Awesome podcast!

By CA_Johns - Dec 02 2016
Read more
Love this production. If you're interested in the behind the curtain inner-workings of top notch photojournalism, this podcast takes you there. Intimate, accessible, and inspiring. Keep 'em coming!

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Cover image of No Filter Photography Podcast

No Filter Photography Podcast

Updated 8 days ago

Read more

National Geographic Creative photographer talks with fellow photographers and photojournalists about mastering, monetizing and bringing meaning to their chosen craft of visual storytelling.

Rank #1: Annie Griffiths

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Annie Griffiths is a photographer with a mission - some might say many missions.

She is a true trail blazer, refusing to be bound by convention and unafraid to push for what she believes is possible and right. Annie was one of the first female staff photographers with National Geographic, and managed to balance the demands of assignments that would span two or three months with motherhood, bravely taking her two children, Lilly and Charlie, with her to the remote corners of the earth. Their presence opened doors for Annie in cultures in which other mothers welcomed her, and demonstrated that women did not need to relinquish their chance at a successful career to become mothers.

Annie has photographed in over 150 countries and has seen the good, the bad and the ugly in the human condition. But where others may see only problems and challenges Annie sees opportunity. Angry at the role the media was playing in portraying disenfranchised women and girls around the world as vulnerable and weak, Annie decided to tell a different story, and founded Ripple Effect Images to cover under-reported issues that impact women and girls. She assembled a team of some of the best photographers to help her, and Ripple Effect is going from strength to strength in helping to scale solutions for women and girls globally.

Annie's exuberant personality and positive outlook shine through in her vibrant images and stories that paint women and girls around the world as strong, resilient and bursting with hope.

Sep 20 2016

1hr

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Rank #2: Amy Toensing

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Amy Toensing, an American photojournalist committed to telling stories with sensitivity and depth, is known for her intimate essays about the lives of ordinary people.

Toensing has been a regular contributor to National Geographic magazine for over a decade and recently completed her fifteenth feature story for them. She has covered cultures around the world including the last cave dwelling tribe of Papua New Guinea, the Maori of New Zealand and the Kingdom of Tonga. She has also covered issues such as the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina and Muslim women living in Western culture. For 4 years she documented Aboriginal Australia which was published in the June, 2013 issue of National Geographic magazine.

Toensing’s work has been exhibited throughout the world and recognized with numerous awards, including an exhibit at the 2012 Visa Pour L’image, Festival of the Photograph in Perpignan France. Her work has also appeared in Smithsonian, The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Time Magazine, and National Geographic Traveler. A photograph she took in the Australian outback was chosen as one of National Geographic magazine’s all time 50 Best Photos. Toensing began her professional career in 1994 as a staff photographer at her hometown paper, The Valley News, in New Hampshire. She then worked for The New York Times, Washington D.C. bureau covering the White House and Capitol Hill during the Clinton administration. In 1998, Toensing left D.C. to receive her Master’s Degree from the School of Visual Communication at Ohio University.

In addition to her photojournalism work, Toensing is committed to teaching photography to kids and young adults in underserved communities. This includes working with the non-profit organization VisionWorkshops on numerous projects including teaching photography to Somali and Sudanese refugees in Maine, Burmese refugees in Baltimore, young Pakistanis in Islamabad and children and adults in South Sudan and Jordan.

Toensing lives in the Hudson Valley of New York with her husband Matt Moyer, who is also a photojournalist.

Nov 02 2016

1hr 4mins

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Rank #3: Lynn Johnson

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Lynn Johnson is a photographer who for 40 years has dedicated herself to exploring the far reaches of the human condition.    She develops deep and genuine relationships with the people's whose stories she tells, and feels that it is her job to get out of the way in order that they can tell their own story through her.    Lynn is a frequent contributor to National Geographic Magazine and was recently awarded a National Geographic Fellowship.    For this episode of the No Filter Podcast Robin Moore sat down with Lynn at the National Geographic headquarters in Washington, DC, to discuss her approach to photography, how she came back from being told that editing her was like being dropped into a pit with a cloud over it, and her advice for younger photographers.

Oct 05 2016

52mins

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Rank #4: John Burcham

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"Hanging on a rope and shooting a rock climber, there's a lot going on. You're usually in pretty spectacular places,. But to go meet and greet someone for the first time and bring home a good portrait, to me that's more nerve-racking."

John Burcham is most at home climbing new routes up the often fragile and absurd sandstone spires of Sedona, but has been adventuring and photographing since college. From his experiences working at a fish cannery to a decade spent living in Alaska, John has developed qualities that differentiate him from others in the field. His blue-collar work ethic and love for wild places allow him to capture still and moving images in exploration and adventure from otherwise inaccessible perspectives under grueling conditions. All the while, John smiles.

Whether he’s shooting high in the Himalayas, in a hospital operating room, or at a studio in town, John constantly engages with his collaborators, subjects, and environment. He has worked for healthcare and outdoor clients including National Geographic, The New York Times, the History Channel, Kahtoola Snowshoes, and Sherpa Adventure Gear.

Nov 09 2016

54mins

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Rank #5: Rena Effendi

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Rena Effendi was born in Baku, Azerbaijan, and grew up in the USSR, witnessing her country’s path to independence—one marred by war, political instability, and economic collapse. From the outset, Effendi focused her photography on issues of conflict, social justice, and the oil industry’s effect on people and the environment.

From 2002 to 2008, Effendi followed a 1,700-kilometer pipeline through Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Turkey documenting the impact this multibillion-dollar project had on impoverished farmers, fishermen, and other citizens. This six-year journey became her first book Pipe Dreams: A Chronicle of Lives Along the Pipeline, published in 2009. The project received numerous awards, including a Getty Images Editorial grant, a Fifty Crows International Fund Award, a Magnum Foundation Caucasus Photographer Award, and a Mario Giacomelli Memorial Fund Award. In 2012, Effendi published her second monograph “Liquid Land”, where her images of Baku are paired with photographs of perished butterflies hunted by her father, a Soviet entomologist, who collected more than 30,000 butterflies in Soviet Union. "Liquid Land" punctuates the theme of fragility and environmental decay of her native city. Over the past 10 years, Effendi has covered stories in the post-Soviet region, as well as in Turkey and Iran, including the 2008 Russia-Georgia conflict, women victims of heroin and sex trafficking in Kyrgyzstan, and the hidden lives of youth in Tehran. In 2011, she received the Prince Claus Fund Award for Cultural Development and moved to Cairo. In 2012, Effendi was short-listed for the Prix-Pictet Global Award for Photography and Sustainability, for her series documenting life of the survivors of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Effendi’s involvement with World Press Photo goes back to 2005, when she was a participant in the Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2012, she was a selector for, and later contributor to the organization’s Reporting Change project.

Oct 19 2016

1hr 2mins

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