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Rank #3 in Tech News category

News
Tech News

Software Engineering Daily

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #3 in Tech News category

News
Tech News
Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

iTunes Ratings

392 Ratings
Average Ratings
342
24
12
7
7

Must Listen

By JakeKay34 - Nov 04 2019
Read more
Great podcast. If you’re a developer, it’s a must listen. Enjoy!

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.

iTunes Ratings

392 Ratings
Average Ratings
342
24
12
7
7

Must Listen

By JakeKay34 - Nov 04 2019
Read more
Great podcast. If you’re a developer, it’s a must listen. Enjoy!

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.

Listen to:

Cover image of Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

HTTP with Julia Evans

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HTTP is a protocol that allows browsers and web applications to communicate across the Internet.

Everyone knows that HTTP is doing some important work, because “HTTP” is at the beginning of most URLs that you enter into your browser. You might be familiar with the request/response model, and HTTP request methods such as GET, PUT, and POST. But unless you have had a reason to learn more about the details of HTTP, you probably don’t know much more than that.

Julia Evans is a software engineer and writer who creates Wizard Zines, a series of easy-to-read online magazines that explain technical software topics. Julia’s zines include “Linux Debugging Tools”, “Help! I Have A Manager!”, and recently “HTTP: Learn your browser’s language”.

Her zines are a creative, innovative format for describing the world of software engineering while also exploring her own artistic pursuits in writing, design, and illustration. Julia was previously on the show to discuss Ruby profiling, and she returns to the show to discuss HTTP, as well as her creative process and goals with Wizard Zines.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post HTTP with Julia Evans appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 21 2019

1hr 7mins

Play

Redis with Alvin Richards

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Redis is an in-memory database that persists to disk. Redis is commonly used as an object cache for web applications.

Applications are composed of caches and databases. A cache typically stores the data in memory, and a database typically stores the data on disk. Memory has significantly faster access times, but is more expensive and is volatile, meaning that if the computer that is holding that piece of data in memory goes offline, the data will be lost.

When a user makes a request to load their personal information, the server will try to load that data from a cache. If the cache does not contain the user’s information, the server will go to the database to find that information. 

Alvin Richards is chief product officer with Redis Labs, and he joins the show to discuss how Redis works. We explore different design patterns for making Redis high availability, or using it as a volatile cache, and we talk through the read and write path for Redis data. Full disclosure: Redis Labs is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active projects:

  • We are hiring a head of growth. If you like Software Engineering Daily and consider yourself competent in sales, marketing, and strategy, send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com
  • FindCollabs is a place to build open source software.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Redis with Alvin Richards appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 24 2019

1hr

Play

Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck

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Kent Beck is a legendary figure in the world of software engineering. 

Kent was an early advocate of Test-Driven Development (TDD), and popularized the idea of writing unit tests before writing code that would satisfy those unit tests. A unit test isolates and tests a small piece of functionality within a large piece of software. Practitioners of Test-Driven Development write tens or hundreds of tests in order to cover a large variety of cases that could potentially occur within their software.

When Kent Beck joined Facebook in 2011, he was 50 years old and thought he had seen everything in the software industry. During Facebook Boot Camp, Kent started to realize that Facebook was very different than any other company he had seen. Facebook Boot Camp is the six-week onboarding process that every new hire learns about the software practices of the company.

After graduating Facebook Boot Camp, Kent began to explore Facebook’s codebase and culture. He found himself rethinking many of the tenets of software engineering that he had previously thought were immutable.

Kent joins the show to discuss his time at Facebook, and how the company’s approach to building and scaling products thoroughly reshaped his beliefs about software engineering.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 28 2019

56mins

Play

Cloud Dependencies with Mya Pitzeruse

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New software abstractions always take advantage of the abstractions that have been built before.

Software libraries allow us to import code that sits on the same host as a new program. Open source software let us copy and paste existing code, or clone entire repositories. Cloud providers offer hosted tools and APIs that we can leverage to develop scalable, easy-to-use infrastructure.

When existing pieces of software are built into new software, the existing software becomes a dependency. Managing those dependencies is an engineering problem. Mya Pitzeruse is the founder of deps.cloud, a project with the goal of improving dependency changes across a company’s ecosystem. In today’s show, we talk about the modern dependency issues of a large company, and her perspective on how to address them. Mya has developed the project in public on FindCollabs, and we also spend some time talking about building in the open.

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Cloud Dependencies with Mya Pitzeruse appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 23 2019

47mins

Play

Web Application Testing with Gabriel-James Safar

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Web applications are used on a wide variety of platforms. 

On each of these platforms the web app needs to load properly and allow the user to navigate the website and interact with all of the user flows, such as sign-up, login, and the various read and write operations that make up the functionality of any website.

It is difficult to ensure web application functionality across all platforms, because there are so many platforms. Different operating systems, different underlying hardware, different browsers, and different device form factors all create potential sources of suboptimal website functionality and performance.

Testing web applications often involves the work of a manual quality assurance (QA) employee. The QA can simulate the procedures that a normal user would go through. This QA process ensures that the website is operating as expected. But the manual workflow can slow down software development.

Gabriel-James Safar is a software engineer and the founder of Madumbo, which was acquired by Datadog. Madumbo was founded with the goal of making web application testing simpler by identifying errors in pages and enabling users to create test suites from recordings of user activity. This process simplifies and accelerates the testing process. 

Gabriel-James joins the show to talk about his experience building Madumbo, and his perspective on the modern application testing process. Full disclosure: Datadog is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Web Application Testing with Gabriel-James Safar appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 22 2019

50mins

Play

LinkedIn Kafka with Nacho Solis

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Apache Kafka was created at LinkedIn. Kafka was open sourced in 2011, when the company was eight years old. By that time, LinkedIn had developed a social network with millions of users. LinkedIn’s engineering team was building a range of externally facing products and internal tools, and many of these tools required a high-throughput system for publishing data and subscribing to topics.

Kafka was born out of this need. Over time, Kafka’s importance within LinkedIn has only grown. Kafka plays a central role for services, log management, data engineering, and compliance. LinkedIn might be the biggest user of Apache Kafka in the entire software industry. Kafka has many use cases, and it is likely that they are almost all on display within LinkedIn.

Nacho Solis is a senior software engineering manager at LinkedIn, where he helps teams build infrastructure for Kafka, as well as Kafka itself. Nacho joins the show to discuss the history of Kafka at LinkedIn, and the challenges of managing such a large deployment of Kafka. We also talk about streaming, data infrastructure, and more general problems in the world of engineering management.

Full disclosure: LinkedIn is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active projects:

  • We are hiring a head of growth. If you like Software Engineering Daily and consider yourself competent in sales, marketing, and strategy, send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com
  • FindCollabs is a place to build open source software.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post LinkedIn Kafka with Nacho Solis appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Oct 18 2019

56mins

Play

Talking Python with Michael Kennedy

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Python is one of the most popular programming languages in the software world.

After working with Python and developing a love for the language, Michael Kennedy started to wonder why there was not a high quality podcast dedicated to covering the community and new technologies of the Python ecosystem. Michael started Talk Python To Me as a podcast with the goal of telling stories from the world of Python. 

Today, Talk Python To Me is the most popular podcast dedicated to Python and related technologies. Subjects on the podcast include web frameworks, compilers, career development, and cloud services. One of the more recent developments in the world of Python is the prevalence of data science, which Michael also covers in great detail. Michael has also spun up a second podcast called Python Bytes, which offers timely updates to the Python community.

Michael joins the show to share his thoughts on several topics related to Python, including compilers, data science workflows, and web frameworks. Michael also gives his perspective on the world of software podcasting, which he has been doing for more than four years.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Talking Python with Michael Kennedy appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 12 2019

56mins

Play

Kafka Applications with Tim Berglund

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Ever since Apache Kafka was open sourced from LinkedIn, it has been used to solve a wide variety of problems in distributed systems and data engineering.

Kafka is a distributed messaging queue that is used by developers to publish messages and subscribe to topics with a certain message type. Kafka allows information to flow throughout a company such that multiple systems can consume the messages from a single sender. 

In previous shows, we have covered design patterns within Kafka, Kafka streams, event sourcing with Kafka, and many other subjects relating to the technology. Kafka is broadly useful, and new strategies for using Kafka continue to emerge as the open source project develops new functionality and becomes a platform for data applications.

In today’s episode, Tim Berglund returns to Software Engineering Daily for a discussion of how applications are built today using Kafka–including systems that are undergoing a refactoring, data engineering applications, and systems with a large number of communicating services.

If you are interested in learning more about how companies are using Kafka, the Kafka Summit in San Francisco is September 30th – October 1st. Companies like LinkedIn, Uber, and Netflix will be talking about how they use Kafka. Full disclosure: Confluent (the company where Tim works) is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Kafka Applications with Tim Berglund appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 17 2019

59mins

Play

Career Karma: Coding Bootcamp Platform with Ruben Harris and Artur Meyster

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Coding bootcamps allow anyone to become a programmer at a faster pace than the traditional computer science education system. In the last five years, coding bootcamps have grown rapidly in popularity, with thousands of people gaining the necessary skills to work as a software engineer.

Career Karma is a platform that allows individuals to find the best coding bootcamp. There are many coding bootcamps, and they are not all the same. Much like different schools have different cultures and focus on different disciplines, coding bootcamps vary widely in their teaching styles and acceptance path.

Reuben Harris and Artur Meyster are co-founders of Career Karma, and they join the show to discuss the changing nature of software engineering education and the frictions that new programmers encounter as they navigate the world of coding bootcamps. They also describe their journey to entrepreneurship and their own personal experience with coding bootcamps.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.    

The post Career Karma: Coding Bootcamp Platform with Ruben Harris and Artur Meyster appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 02 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Kafka Data Pipelines with Robin Moffatt

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A new software product usually starts with a single database. That database manages the tables for user accounts and basic transactions.

When a product becomes popular, the database grows in size. There are more transactions and more users. A company grows around that product, and the company starts to accumulate more data in different sources. Analytics systems, time series databases, and logging tools start to generate data.

Moving this data around between systems starts to become complicated. Apache Kafka is often used as a system for moving data between these different systems, performing transformations, and generating aggregations and summaries of these large quantities of data.

Robin Moffatt works at Confluent, and has written numerous articles about how to move data between systems and design effective workflows for data pipelines. Robin joins the show to talk about modern data platforms and databases, and the patterns for using Kafka to connect those systems to each other.

If you are interested in learning more about how companies are using Kafka, the Kafka Summit in San Francisco is September 30th – October 1st. Companies like LinkedIn, Uber, and Netflix will be talking about how they use Kafka. Full disclosure: Confluent (the company where Tim works) is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Kafka Data Pipelines with Robin Moffatt appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 23 2019

54mins

Play

Stripe Infrastructure Management with Uma Chingunde

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Software engineering is a new field. There are theories about how we should be building our systems, but these theories might change over time. The same is true for engineering management. 

There are many successful examples of companies scaling with the management hierarchies pioneered by Microsoft and Google, but since everyone knows that those techniques work, they get continually copied. Of course, there is tremendous risk in pioneering a brand new management structure. There have been examples of successful software companies that have suffered tremendously due to a trial of an exciting new management structure.

New software is much easier and safer to try than revolutionary new management structures. New software is easier to try in a company with a strong engineering team, because that team is equipped to assess the new software and figure out if it is actually solving a problem that the company has. 

Uma Chingunde is an engineering manager at Stripe on the compute team. Uma has worked in management for a decade, and has worked in virtualization in infrastructure for even longer than that. Uma joins the show to give her perspective on management of engineers as well as management of compute infrastructure. We discussed some timeless principles of engineering management, as well as contemporary ideas around virtualization and compute.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

The post Stripe Infrastructure Management with Uma Chingunde appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 27 2019

59mins

Play

PlayStation Engineering with Tony Godar

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The PlayStation is a line of game consoles created by Sony. PlayStation devices include the PS2, PS3, PS4, and the PSP mobile system. Tony Godar worked as an engineer in the PlayStation ecosystem for 15 years, and he joins the show to give a retrospective on his time in the console industry.

Developing hardware and software for game consoles differs significantly from the world of web development. Tony describes the culture of the game development world, and the challenges involved in the domains of software tooling, custom operating systems, and streaming media. In 2010, the PS3 was hacked by notorious tinkerer George Hotz, a previous guest on the show, an event which Tony also discusses.

We also discuss the world of modern gaming and VR technology. Tony currently works as an engineer at MelodyVR, a company that makes virtual reality live music experiences.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.   

The post PlayStation Engineering with Tony Godar appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 13 2019

58mins

Play

LinkedIn Data Engineering with Kapil Surlaker

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A large social network needs to develop systems for ingesting, storing, and processing large volumes of data.

Data engineering at scale requires multiple engineering teams that are responsible for different areas of the infrastructure.

Data needs to be structured coherently in order to minimize the data cleaning process. Machine learning models need to be developed, deployed, and iterated on at scale. Areas of the company which produce data need to be decoupled from the areas of the company which consume data, so that engineers throughout the company can reliably build tools on top of these large data sets.

In our previous episodes about LinkedIn, we covered two major components of LinkedIn’s data engineering systems: the Kafka infrastructure and the LinkedIn data platform used by engineers to productively build data applications.

Kapil Surlaker is a senior director of engineering at LinkedIn, and he joins the show to discuss the bigger picture of LinkedIn’s data infrastructure. Kapil works with teams across LinkedIn to understand the requirements for the products and internal tools, and translate those requirements into team structures and software platforms that let LinkedIn use data more productively.

We discuss a wide range of topics, including engineering management, the modern data platform, and LinkedIn’s adoption of public cloud.

Full disclosure: LinkedIn is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. 

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active projects:

  • We are hiring a head of growth. If you like Software Engineering Daily and consider yourself competent in sales, marketing, and strategy, send me an email: jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com
  • FindCollabs is a place to build open source software.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post LinkedIn Data Engineering with Kapil Surlaker appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 07 2019

52mins

Play

Facebook Release Engineering with Chuck Rossi

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When Chuck Rossi joined Facebook in 2008, he was one of the most experienced release engineers at the company. As he began to explore the engineering practices of the organization, he was surprised, confused, and impressed by the release engineering system that he encountered.

Release engineering is the process by which software is released to users. As software is being developed, it moves through a series of testing environments. In these test environments, the software can be studied using simulated inputs that can help developers discover software bugs.

Chuck had come to Facebook from Google. At Google, the crown jewel was Google web search which had a regimented release process. At Facebook, the crown jewel was facebook.com. Chuck found that the release process for facebook.com was much different than Google web search.

Chuck joins the show to talk about release engineering at Facebook, and how the company constantly evolved its code deployment process. Chuck also describes Facebook’s pivot to mobile, and how the bottlenecks in the mobile app release process threatened Facebook’s ability to iterate and release quickly.

This show provided some amazing perspective on continuous delivery, and will be useful to anyone who is working on figuring out their “DevOps” process. Chuck has a wealth of knowledge and context about the modern software industry.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Facebook Release Engineering with Chuck Rossi appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 27 2019

1hr 5mins

Play

Data-As-A-Service with Auren Hoffman

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Data-as-a-service businesses offer paid access to data sets. These data sets can be useful for building products or training machine learning models. 

There has been steady growth in the tools and practices around processing and storing data. But access to data sets remains a bottleneck for widespread development of machine learning applications in a large set of domains. 

SafeGraph is a company focused on the problem of data-as-a-service. Today, SafeGraph’s primary product is reliable, up-to-date location information on places. The data for these points-of-interest needs be acquired, verified, cleaned, made accessible through an API, and intelligently priced. 

In previous episodes with SafeGraph, we have explored the basic premise of data businesses and why they are important platforms for building futuristic data products that are impossible for entrepreneurs to build today. SafeGraph CEO Auren Hoffman returns to the show to discuss the data as a service business model.

Software-as-a-service has existed as a category for more than a decade. Infrastructure-as-a-service has existed for just as long. Data-as-a-service is much more undeveloped. Auren recently published the “Data-As-A-Service Bible: Everything You Wanted To Know About Running A DaaS Business”. This was a very useful article, as it breaks down a category of software that is almost entirely unexplored.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out. 

The post Data-As-A-Service with Auren Hoffman appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 08 2019

1hr 2mins

Play

Technical Onboarding with Kristen Gallagher

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When a new employee joins a software company, it is often unclear where that employee should begin. Do they have a mentor? What are they working on? What are the expectations for how fast that employee should be contributing?

The early period of employment is often referred to as “onboarding.” During the onboarding period, an employee will learn the basics of the company they have just joined. These basics include the work procedures, meeting schedules, expectations, and technical tools that an employee needs to become productive.

A poor onboarding process can slow an employee down, and even cause them to quit the company entirely. Conversely, a good onboarding process can accelerate an employee towards rapid contribution within the organization. A scalable onboarding process can be a difference in millions of dollars in productivity per year across the organization.

Kristen Gallagher is the founder of Edify, a company that helps organizations define and implement their onboarding process. Kristen joins the show to talk about the ingredients of a successful onboarding process and what she is doing with her company Edify.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.   

The post Technical Onboarding with Kristen Gallagher appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 22 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Leadership with Ben Horowitz

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Photo credit: Elisabeth Fall

Ben Horowitz started Loudcloud with Marc Andreessen in 1999. He ran the company for eight years and chronicled his experience in his first book The Hard Thing About Hard Things.

In his time running Loudcloud, the dotcom bubble burst, but Loudcloud needed cash so badly that he took the company public in 2001. Loudcloud went through layoffs, downsizing, and a difficult strategic maneuver in which Loudcloud sold its cloud provider business for cash, then used the core competency it had developed to create new software for building and running cloud services. This new software was the core product of the company Opsware, which was sold to HP in 2007 for $1.6bn.

The Loudcloud story looks like a rational, straightforward execution in retrospect, but at many points in the timeline, Ben was unsure he was making the correct decision. As the subtitle of his first book states “there are no easy answers.” 

The Hard Thing About Hard Things tells the story of Loudcloud and Opsware in harrowing detail. Most founders of software companies will end up reading the book at some point when they are building their company, because there are so few books which capture the granular details of what it feels like to run a company.

A CEO is completely alone in their understanding of the company. Nobody else has nearly as much information as the CEO–not the board, not the market, and not the employees. When you are a CEO, there is simply nobody to turn to who can give you the actionable advice that you wish you could have access to. And because there is nobody else, it means that the CEO’s own psychological state is extremely important.

The Hard Thing About Hard Things provides a CEO with solace: while the CEO is alone within their company, they are not alone in the world. Every CEO has a set of issues which they have never faced before, and the CEO can learn to face those issues confidently and competently. 

Like any influential book, The Hard Thing About Hard Things presents the reader with useful answers, but also raises many questions. How can a normal person foster the mentality of a leader? How can a leader convince smart people to follow their direction? How can a seemingly crazy direction be framed as completely rational?

The second book by Ben Horowitz is called What You Do Is Who You Are. This book surveys a set of case studies in leadership, including a Haitian slave revolt, the Mongol empire, and a dominant prison gang. By studying violent environments, Ben frames leadership in the context of the highest stakes. 

These stories are about life and death. When a leader’s performance is measured in blood, it frames the true nature of leadership in the starkest resolution. Ben uses each distilled example as a base case which inducts into broader applications: the cultures of Netflix, Facebook, Uber, and McDonalds are explored alongside editorials about Hillary Clinton and hip hop culture.

Throughout all of these stories, the most important thread is continually reinforced: the leader creates the culture. The culture is the leader. What you do is who you are.

Ben joins the show to discuss his writing, and how he has applied these beliefs to Andreessen Horowitz, the venture capital firm he co-founded and leads today.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

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The post Leadership with Ben Horowitz appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 04 2019

48mins

Play

MongoDB Data Platform with Andrew Davidson

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A new software application has simple requirements for a database. 

The database needs to be written to and read from. The database fulfills simple needs such as storing user information and providing the application frontend with the necessary data to render a simple webpage of financial transactions or blog posts.

As an application becomes successful, the database grows in size. The complexity of queries increases, requiring more sophisticated logic in order to maintain performance. New databases need to be added to the overall system, as users begin to have demands for advanced features such as search, or analytics.

Over time, the requirements for a database expand into a need for a data platform. A data platform might include multiple databases such as a NoSQL database, a relational database, a data warehouse, and a search index. The relationships between these different databases can vary in terms of consistency requirements, latency, and scalability.

Andrew Davidson is the Director of Cloud Products at MongoDB. In a previous episode, Andrew discussed the tradeoffs of scaling databases while maintaining high performance indexing. Andrew returns to the show to discuss the emerging subject of “data platform.” 

As a growing number of companies have data requirements beyond that of a simple transactional database, Andrew’s work has increasingly involved figuring out the best ways for developers to adapt those transactional systems to providing a wider set of functionality. Full disclosure: MongoDB is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

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The post MongoDB Data Platform with Andrew Davidson appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 11 2019

52mins

Play

Linkerd Market Strategy with William Morgan

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The container orchestration wars ended in 2016 with Kubernetes being the most popular open source tool for deploying and managing infrastructure. Since that time, most large enterprises have been implementing a “platform strategy” based around Kubernetes.

A platform strategy is a plan for creating a consistent experience for software engineers working throughout an enterprise. At most companies, a software engineer should be thinking about business logic–whether that logic is related to banking, insurance, oil and gas, or e-commerce. 

Today, engineers at many enterprises need to think about continuous delivery, application deployment, security policy management, and other deeply technical problems that have nothing to do with the business that they are actually working at. Kubernetes is a foundational open source building block that allows enterprises to base the rest of their infrastructure decisions around. Kubernetes has made it much more viable for enterprises to pursue a platform strategy.

With widespread adoption of Kubernetes, there is a business opportunity for companies that can offer other platform solutions that build on top of Kubernetes. A service mesh is one such tool. A service mesh provides networking and security features for all the services in an organization.

The service mesh category is a large business opportunity because it sits on the critical path of every network request that goes through an enterprise. It is a potential insertion point for lots of other products including logging agents, distributed tracing, network packet scanning, security policy management, and A/B testing.

The potential for business expansion is why so many businesses are entering the service mesh category today, from cloud providers to API gateways. Buoyant was one of the first companies to work on a service mesh tool, with the Linkerd open source project. William Morgan is the CEO of Buoyant, and he returns to the show to discuss the competitive dynamics of the service mesh market.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.

The post Linkerd Market Strategy with William Morgan appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Dec 06 2019

1hr 5mins

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Istio Market Strategy with Zack Butcher

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Kubernetes has created a widespread system for deploying and managing infrastructure. As Kubernetes has been increasingly adopted, companies are thinking about how to leverage that common layer of infrastructure. With the common infrastructure abstraction of Kubernetes, it becomes easier to adopt other abstractions that are uniform across the entire company. 

This has created a market opportunity for products such as a service mesh.

A service mesh consists of sidecar containers that get deployed alongside services in a distributed system. Each sidecar container is used as a proxy for all the communication that goes through the service it is deployed with. This consistent proxying layer provides each service with benefits such as security, routing, telemetry, and policy management.

Istio is a service mesh that was created and open sourced by Google. Istio is built around the Envoy service proxy sidecar and a control plane that manages the Envoy sidecars. Since the launch of Istio, some of the Google employees who were working on Istio have started Tetrate, a company with the goal of commercializing Istio into a product that enterprises will pay for.  

The market demand for service mesh has been proven, but there are many competitors to Tetrate. Istio is open source and can be commercialized by other companies, as well as cloud providers such as Google and AWS. Linkerd is a service mesh built by the company Buoyant, which was the first company to focus exclusively on this space. There are other companies that are expanding existing products into service mesh: Kong, NGINX, and Hashicorp.

Zack Butcher is a founding engineer with Tetrate, and he joins the show to discuss the market for service mesh and the plan for Tetrate to build a business around Istio.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.

The post Istio Market Strategy with Zack Butcher appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Dec 05 2019

1hr 23mins

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Heroku Infrastructure with Mark Turner

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A cloud provider gives a developer low-cost compute infrastructure on-demand. 

Cloud providers can be divided up into two categories: Layer 1 cloud providers and Layer 2 cloud providers. A Layer 1 cloud provider such as Amazon Web Services owns server hardware and sells compute infrastructure as a commodity. A Layer 2 cloud provider purchases compute infrastructure from a Layer 1 provider and builds a high quality developer experience on top of that compute infrastructure.

Heroku was the first Layer 2 cloud provider. Heroku’s first business was to provide a high quality developer experience and low cost containerization infrastructure on top of Amazon’s EC2 virtual machine infrastructure. Heroku has added features for continuous integration, relational databases, caches, and queueing.

Building a Layer 2 cloud provider is a very different challenge than building a Layer 1 cloud provider. A Layer 1 provider must focus on low level problems such as hardware infrastructure and virtualization. This does not leave much time for focusing on developer experience. A Layer 1 cloud provider must be able to serve every type of potential software customer. A Layer 2 provider can provide a streamlined experience.

Mark Turner is an engineer at Heroku. He joins the show to discuss the architecture and engineering of a Layer 2 cloud provider. Heroku is built on top of Amazon Web Services, and the core compute infrastructure is built on top of a pool of EC2 virtual machines that are continually scheduled with applications that users create on Heroku. Full disclosure: Heroku is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Heroku Infrastructure with Mark Turner appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Dec 04 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

Java 13 with Georges Saab

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Java has been popular since the 90s, when it started to be used as a programming language for enterprises. 

Today, Java is still widely deployed, but the infrastructure environment is dramatically different. Java is often deployed to containers in the cloud. If those containers can share resources, then those containers can share the same underlying Java infrastructure. 

Java 13 is the most recent public release of Java. The new features in Java 13 reflect the changing demands of modern application developers. Georges Saab is an engineer with Oracle who has been working on Java for more than a decade. He joins the show to discuss how Java development patterns are changing, and how the language is evolving to accommodate those changes, including discussion of garbage collection and dynamic application class data sharing.

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Java 13 with Georges Saab appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Dec 03 2019

50mins

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Distributed SQL with Karthik Ranganathan and Sid Choudhury

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Relational databases provide durable transactional systems for storing data. The relational model has existed for decades, but the requirements for a relational database have changed.

Modern applications have requirements for high volumes of data that do not fit onto a single machine. When a database gets too big to fit on a single machine, that database needs to be sharded into smaller subsets of the data. These database shards are spread across multiple machines, and as the database grows, the database can be resharded to scale to even more machines.

To ensure durability, a database needs to be replicated. The database needs to be able to survive any single machine losing power or getting destroyed.

Sharding and replication allow a relational database to be scalable, durable, and highly available. There are many ways to build sharding and replication into a database. Karthik Ranganathan and Sid Choudhury are engineers with YugabyteDB, a distributed SQL database.

In today’s episode, we discuss the modern requirements of a distributed SQL database, and compare the applications of distributed SQL to those of other systems such as Cassandra and Hadoop. We also talk through the competitive market of cloud-based distributed SQL providers such as Google Cloud Spanner and Amazon Aurora. YugabyteDB is an open source database that competes with these other relational databases. Full disclosure: YugabyteDB is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Distributed SQL with Karthik Ranganathan and Sid Choudhury appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Dec 02 2019

1hr 3mins

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Economics of Software with Russ Roberts Holiday Repeat

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Originally published July 14, 2016

EconTalk is a weekly economics podcast that has been going for a decade. On EconTalk, Russ Roberts brings on writers, intellectuals, and entrepreneurs for engaging conversations about the world as seen through the lens of economics.

Russ Roberts is today’s guest, and it is a treat because I have been listening to EconTalk since 2006 and it was a central point of inspiration for what Software Engineering Daily has become. On this episode, we talk about how software impacts the world economically, from bitcoin’s promise of zero cost transactions to the opportunities and regulatory challenges of the software-enabled gig economy.

The post Economics of Software with Russ Roberts Holiday Repeat appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 29 2019

1hr 3mins

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Uber’s Data Platform with Zhenxiao Luo Holiday Repeat

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Originally published May 24, 2018

When a user takes a ride on Uber, the app on the user’s phone is communicating with Uber’s backend infrastructure, which is writing to a database that maintains the state of that user’s activity. This database is known as a transactional database or “OLTP” (online transaction processing). Every active user and driver and UberEATS restaurant is writing data to the transactional data store.

Periodically, that data is copied from the transactional data system to a different data storage system, where that data can be queried for large-scale data analysis. For example, if a data scientist at Uber wants to get the average amount of miles that a given user rode in February, that data scientist would issue a query to the analytical data cluster.

Uber uses the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS) to store analytical data. On this file system, Uber has a version history of all of the company’s useful historical data. Trip history, rider activity, driver activity–every data point that is in the transactional database–but in a file format that is easier to query for large scale processing. This file format is known as Parquet.

Data scientists, machine learning engineers, and real-time application developers all depend on the massive quantities of data that are stored in these Parquet files on Uber’s HDFS cluster. To simplify the access of that data by many different clients, Uber uses Presto, an analytical query engine originally built at Facebook.

Presto translates SQL queries into whatever query language is necessary to access the underlying storage medium–whether that storage system is an ElasticSearch cluster, a set of Parquet files, or a relational database. Presto is useful because it simplifies the relationship between data engineers and the application developers who are building on top of the data engineering infrastructure.

In today’s show, Zhenxiao Luo joins to give an end-to-end description of Uber’s data infrastructure–from the ingest point of the OLTP database to the OLAP data storage system on HDFS, to the wide range of data systems and applications that run on top of that OLAP data.

The post Uber’s Data Platform with Zhenxiao Luo Holiday Repeat appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 28 2019

1hr 2mins

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Kong API Platform with Marco Palladino Holiday Repeat

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Originally published January 4, 2019

When a user makes a request to product like The New York Times, that request hits an API gateway. An API gateway is the entry point for an external request. An API gateway serves several purposes: authentication, security, routing, load balancing, and logging.

API gateways have grown in popularity as applications have become more distributed, and companies offer a wider variety of services. If an API is public, and anyone can access it, you might need to apply rate limiting so that users cannot spam the API. If the API is private, the user needs to be authenticated before the request is fulfilled.

Kong is a company that builds infrastructure for API management. The Kong API gateway is a widely used open source project, and Kong is a company built around supporting and building on top of the API gateway.

Marco Palladino is the co-founder and CTO of Kong. He joins the show to tell the story of starting Kong eight years ago, and how the API gateway product evolved out of an API marketplace. Marco also discusses the architecture of Kong and his vision for how the product will develop in the future–including the Kong service mesh.

The post Kong API Platform with Marco Palladino Holiday Repeat appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 27 2019

1hr 3mins

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Future of Computing with John Hennessy Holiday Repeat

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Originally published June 7, 2018

Moore’s Law states that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years. Moore’s Law is less like a “law” and more like an observation or a prediction.

Moore’s Law is ending. We can no longer fit an increasing amount of transistors in the same amount of space with a highly predictable rate. Dennard scaling is also coming to an end. Dennard scaling is the observation that as transistors get smaller, the power density stays constant.

These changes in hardware trends have downstream effects for software engineers. Most importantly–power consumption becomes much more important.

As a software engineer, how does power consumption affect you? It means that inefficient software will either run more slowly or cost more money relative to our expectations in the past. Whereas software engineers writing code 15 years ago could comfortably project that their code would get significantly cheaper to run over time due to hardware advances, the story is more complicated today.

Why is Moore’s Law ending? And what kinds of predictable advances in technology can we still expect?

John Hennessy is the chairman of Alphabet. In 2017, he won a Turing award (along with David Patterson) for his work on the RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Compiler) architecture. From 2000 to 2016, he was the president of Stanford University.

John joins the show to explore the future of computing. While we may not have the predictable benefits of Moore’s Law and Dennard scaling, we now have machine learning. It is hard to plot the advances of machine learning on any one chart (as we explored in a recent episode with OpenAI). But we can say empirically that machine learning is working quite well in production.

If machine learning offers us such strong advances in computing, how can we change our hardware design process to make machine learning more efficient?

As machine learning training workloads eat up more resources in a data center, engineers are developing domain specific chips which are optimized for those machine learning workloads. The Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) from Google is one such example. John mentioned that chips could become even more specialized within the domain of machine learning. You could imagine a chip that is specifically designed for a LSTM machine learning model.

There are other domains where we could see specialized chips–drones, self-driving cars, wearable computers. In this episode, John describes his perspective on the future of computing, and offers some framework for how engineers can adapt to that future.

Show Notes

The post Future of Computing with John Hennessy Holiday Repeat appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 26 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Indie Hackers with Courtland Allen Holiday Repeat

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Originally published November 4, 2016

Indie Hackers is a website that profiles independent developers who have made profitable software projects, usually without raising any money. These projects make anywhere from a few hundred dollars a month to more than $100,000 as in the case with park.io, one of the services profiled by Indie Hackers.

Courtland Allen is the creator, engineer, and interviewer behind Indie Hackers. For each business that is profiled by Indie Hackers, Courtland conducts a short interview with the founder.

Courtland joins the show to discuss the changing trends that are making it easier to bootstrap a software business if you are a capable developer–or even if you are a nontechnical person who understands how software works. Since Courtland and I are both in the business of interviewing engineers, we had a lot to talk about, and this is a fantastic episode.

The post Indie Hackers with Courtland Allen Holiday Repeat appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 25 2019

1hr 5mins

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Cloud Dependencies with Mya Pitzeruse

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New software abstractions always take advantage of the abstractions that have been built before.

Software libraries allow us to import code that sits on the same host as a new program. Open source software let us copy and paste existing code, or clone entire repositories. Cloud providers offer hosted tools and APIs that we can leverage to develop scalable, easy-to-use infrastructure.

When existing pieces of software are built into new software, the existing software becomes a dependency. Managing those dependencies is an engineering problem. Mya Pitzeruse is the founder of deps.cloud, a project with the goal of improving dependency changes across a company’s ecosystem. In today’s show, we talk about the modern dependency issues of a large company, and her perspective on how to address them. Mya has developed the project in public on FindCollabs, and we also spend some time talking about building in the open.

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Cloud Dependencies with Mya Pitzeruse appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 23 2019

47mins

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Web Application Testing with Gabriel-James Safar

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Web applications are used on a wide variety of platforms. 

On each of these platforms the web app needs to load properly and allow the user to navigate the website and interact with all of the user flows, such as sign-up, login, and the various read and write operations that make up the functionality of any website.

It is difficult to ensure web application functionality across all platforms, because there are so many platforms. Different operating systems, different underlying hardware, different browsers, and different device form factors all create potential sources of suboptimal website functionality and performance.

Testing web applications often involves the work of a manual quality assurance (QA) employee. The QA can simulate the procedures that a normal user would go through. This QA process ensures that the website is operating as expected. But the manual workflow can slow down software development.

Gabriel-James Safar is a software engineer and the founder of Madumbo, which was acquired by Datadog. Madumbo was founded with the goal of making web application testing simpler by identifying errors in pages and enabling users to create test suites from recordings of user activity. This process simplifies and accelerates the testing process. 

Gabriel-James joins the show to talk about his experience building Madumbo, and his perspective on the modern application testing process. Full disclosure: Datadog is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Web Application Testing with Gabriel-James Safar appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 22 2019

50mins

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HTTP with Julia Evans

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HTTP is a protocol that allows browsers and web applications to communicate across the Internet.

Everyone knows that HTTP is doing some important work, because “HTTP” is at the beginning of most URLs that you enter into your browser. You might be familiar with the request/response model, and HTTP request methods such as GET, PUT, and POST. But unless you have had a reason to learn more about the details of HTTP, you probably don’t know much more than that.

Julia Evans is a software engineer and writer who creates Wizard Zines, a series of easy-to-read online magazines that explain technical software topics. Julia’s zines include “Linux Debugging Tools”, “Help! I Have A Manager!”, and recently “HTTP: Learn your browser’s language”.

Her zines are a creative, innovative format for describing the world of software engineering while also exploring her own artistic pursuits in writing, design, and illustration. Julia was previously on the show to discuss Ruby profiling, and she returns to the show to discuss HTTP, as well as her creative process and goals with Wizard Zines.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post HTTP with Julia Evans appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 21 2019

1hr 7mins

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Indie Hack or Venture Back with Lynne Tye

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Key Values is a platform where companies are profiled with descriptions of their company values. These profiles describe features such as work-life balance, company culture, daily routines, and strategy.

Lynne Tye created Key Values with the goal of building a small business that would make money through connecting job seekers to companies with a culture that matched their own personal values system. Key Values has become highly successful, and Lynne is making enough money from the business to live comfortably.

In a previous episode, Lynne and I discussed her founding story and the engineering of Key Values. Today’s episode picks up a few years later, with Lynne having found significant success with her own company.

Lynne’s software business is an example of a growing trend: “Indie Hackers”. This trend was identified by Courtland Allen, founder of the Indie Hackers platform. Courtland is close friends with Lynne, and Lynne’s desire to start her own software company was influenced by her conversations with Courtland.

At a certain point, Lynne was considering raising money and growing Key Values. She was accepted into Y-Combinator. But she decided to stick with the Indie Hackers route, and grow the business independently. Lynne joins the show to talk about the process of starting a software business, and the pivotal decisions she has made around financing, growth, and her own psychology.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Indie Hack or Venture Back with Lynne Tye appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 20 2019

1hr 5mins

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Bubble: Code-Free Programming with Emmanuel Straschnov and Joshua Haas

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Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Tuesday December 3rd.

The vision of code-free programming has existed for decades. Software engineers have always dreamed of empowering non-technical users with the same creative tools that programmers have access to. 

For many years, the underlying technology of the web was not powerful enough to make this dream a reality. Platforms such as WordPress, Squarespace, and Wix have allowed for some of the functionality of programming without writing code, but the scope of what those tools could accomplish was limited.

Today, the web has caught up. Improvements in browser technology and client devices mean that the end user has access to more powerful technology. The API economy encapsulates large amounts of functionality into cheap, well-defined functionality. No-code platforms are finding success among developers and non-developers, after persisting for several years as their technology matured.

Bubble is a code-free platform for building websites, startups, and internal tools. Emmanuel Straschnov and Joshua Haas are the founders of Bubble, and they join the show to tell the story of Bubble, and give their perspective on engineering, business, and the low-code movement. 

The story of Bubble is strikingly similar to that of no-code tools Airtable and Webflow, which we have covered in previous episodes. All of these products have taken years to get to maturity, with no shortcuts–only gritty, difficult engineering problems and performance improvements. Each of these no-code platforms has an inspiring story behind them, and persistent founders who eventually got their product to success.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Bubble: Code-Free Programming with Emmanuel Straschnov and Joshua Haas appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 19 2019

1hr 10mins

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Cloudflare Serverless with Zack Bloom

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“Serverless” is an execution model where applications are scheduled and deployed to servers that are not directly managed by the application developer. 

In serverless execution, an application only loads and operates when a user actually needs to get a response from that application. This saves on resources, because many applications do not need to run at all times–they only need to be available for user requests.

The serverless model was popularized by Amazon Web Services Lambda. When Lambda first launched in 2015, it was an experimental product. Today, it is a widely used product and the market has validated the desire for serverless execution. Other cloud providers have introduced different models of serverless functionality including Google Cloud Functions, Azure Functions, and Fastly edge computing.

Zack Bloom is director of product for product strategy at Cloudflare, and he joins the show to discuss Cloudflare’s model for serverless execution. Zack also discusses Cloudflare’s growing product line, including the fast, privacy-protecting DNS resolver 1.1.1.1. Zack is a rare mix of engineering, business strategy, and product vision, which made for a great conversation.

For more content, you can check out our episodes about serverless technology and episodes about Cloudflare.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Announcements

  • We are hiring a content writer and also an operations lead. Both of these are part-time positions working closely with Jeff and Erika. If you are interested in working with us, send an email to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com.
  • We will be at KubeCon San Diego 2019, and AWS re:Invent Las Vegas. We are planning a meetup at re:Invent on Wednesday December 4.

The post Cloudflare Serverless with Zack Bloom appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 18 2019

59mins

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Dagster with Nick Schrock

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Data engineering is difficult. 

Companies want to be able to maximize the value they get from their large data sets, but there are so many steps required for deriving that value that most companies feel like they are always far behind the ideal state of where they could be. 

The cloud makes it cheap to save data. Tools like Spark and Snowflake give us usable APIs for simplifying the data processing. Workflow engines like Airflow help us visualize a complex execution path of a data pipeline. With all of this tooling, why is it so hard to make use of our data?

Nick Schrock is the creator of Dagster, an open source system for building modern data applications. Nick is also the CEO of Elementl, a company that he is building around Dagster. Before creating Dagster, Nick worked at Facebook, where he co-created GraphQL. 

Nick returns to the show to discuss modern data engineering, and why it continues to be so difficult for engineers to be productive with their data.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Dagster with Nick Schrock appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Nov 15 2019

1hr 17mins

Play

GraalVM Quarkus: Java Acceleration with Guillaume Smet and Emmanuel Bernard

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Java programs run in a different environment than they did ten years ago.

Modern infrastructure runs on containers sitting in a Kubernetes cluster. The optimal configuration for a Java program in that context is different than it was for an environment dominated by virtual machines and bare metal. When you are co-scheduling your services with each other, those services could be fighting for resources. You may want to optimize them with more ahead-of-time compilation.

Quarkus is a system for accelerating Java performance through the use of GraalVM. In a previous show, we explored the basics of GraalVM. In today’s show, Guillaume Smet and Emmanuel Bernard join the show to describe an application of GraalVM: the acceleration of Java. Guillaume and Emmaneul are engineers at Red Hat, and are working on changes to the Java ecosystem that are informed by the cloud and the rise of Kubernetes.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

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Nov 14 2019

1hr 1min

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Bugsnag Business with James Smith

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Crash monitoring emerged as a software category over the last decade.

Crash monitoring software allows developers to understand when their applications are crashing on client devices. For example, we have an app for Software Engineering Daily that people download on Android or iOS. Users download the app to their smartphone. When the user is playing an episode, and the app crashes, the details of the crash are sent to a server that collects all of these crash reports.

Crash reports allow a company to understand where their application is breaking on client devices. This is important, since there are so many client surfaces to test, from iOS to Android to browsers.

As a business, crash monitoring is a category that has some similarities to log management. There are lots of companies that offer crash monitoring. At first glance, it seems like a simple problem to solve. It seems like a market without winner-take-all or winner-take-most dynamics. But at scale, crash monitoring becomes a deeply complex engineering problem. From indexing to database choices to complex distributed systems tradeoffs, crash monitoring is not a simple business, and it promises to provide an extremely good business for the few companies who are able to out-execute the crowded market.

James Smith is the CEO of Bugsnag, a company that makes crash monitoring and application stability tools. James returns to the show to discuss the growth-stage engineering challenges of error monitoring, and the business opportunities that come with them.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

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Nov 13 2019

1hr 1min

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Incident Response Machine Learning with Chris Riley

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Software bugs cause unexpected problems at every company. 

Some problems are small. A website goes down in the middle of the night, and the outage triggers a phone call to an engineer who has to wake up and fix the problem. Other problems can be significantly larger. When a major problem occurs, it can cause millions of dollars in losses and requires hours of work to fix.

When software unexpectedly breaks, it is called an incident. To triage these incidents, an engineer uses a combination of tools, including Slack, GitHub, cloud providers, and continuous deployment systems. These different tools emit updates that can be received by an incident response platform, which allow the on-call engineer to have the information they need centralized to more easily work through the incident.

On-call rotation means that different people will be responsible for dealing with different incidents that occur. When an incident happens, the current engineer who is on-call may not be aware that a similar incident happened last week. It might be easier for the new engineer to triage the issue if they have insights about how the incident was managed during the first time.

Chris Riley is a DevOps advocate with Splunk. He joins the show to discuss the application of machine learning to incident response. We discuss the different data points that are created during an incident, and how that data can be used to build models for different types of incidents, which can generate information to help the engineer respond appropriately to an incident. Full disclosure: Splunk is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

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Nov 12 2019

55mins

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