Cover image of Software Engineering Daily
(448)

Rank #14 in Tech News category

News
Tech News

Software Engineering Daily

Updated 2 months ago

Rank #14 in Tech News category

News
Tech News
Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

iTunes Ratings

448 Ratings
Average Ratings
391
27
12
8
10

Must Listen

By JakeKay34 - Nov 04 2019
Read more
Great podcast. If you’re a developer, it’s a must listen. Enjoy!

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.

iTunes Ratings

448 Ratings
Average Ratings
391
27
12
8
10

Must Listen

By JakeKay34 - Nov 04 2019
Read more
Great podcast. If you’re a developer, it’s a must listen. Enjoy!

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.
Cover image of Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

Latest release on Jul 31, 2020

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

Rank #1: RedwoodJS with Tom Preston-Werner

Podcast cover
Read more

Over the last 5 years, web development has matured considerably. React has become a standard for frontend component development. GraphQL has seen massive growth in adoption as a data fetching middleware layer. The hosting platforms have expanded beyond AWS and Heroku, to newer environments like Netlify and Vercel.

These changes are collectively known as the JAMStack. With the changes brought by the JAMStack, it raises the question: how should an app be built today? Can a framework offer guidance for how the different layers of a JAMStack app should fit together?

RedwoodJS is a framework for building JAMStack applications. Tom Preston-Werner is one of the creators of RedwoodJS, as well as the founder of GitHub and Chatterbug, a language learning app. He joins the show to talk about the future of JAMStack development, and his goals for RedwoodJS.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post RedwoodJS with Tom Preston-Werner appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 22 2020

1hr 4mins

Play

Rank #2: Serverless Development with Jeremy Daly

Podcast cover
Read more

Serverless tools have come a long way since the release of AWS Lambda in 2014. Serverless apps were originally architected around Lambda, with the functions-as-a-service being used to glue together larger pieces of functionality and API services.

Today, many of the common AWS services such as API Gateway and DynamoDB have functionality built in to be able to respond to events. These services can use Amazon EventBridge to connect to each other. In many cases, a developer does not need AWS Lambda to glue services together in order to build an event-driven application.

Jeremy Daly is the host of the Serverless Chats podcast, a show about patterns and strategies in serverless architecture. Jeremy joins the show to talk about modern serverless development, and the new tools available in the AWS ecosystem.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Serverless Development with Jeremy Daly appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 02 2020

59mins

Play

Rank #3: AWS Virtualization with Anthony Liguori

Podcast cover
Read more

Amazon’s virtual server instances have come a long way since the early days of EC2. There are now a wide variety of available configuration options for spinning up an EC2 instance, which can be chosen from based on the workload that will be scheduled onto a virtual machine. There are also Fargate containers and AWS Lambda functions, creating even more options for someone who wants to deploy virtualized infrastructure.

The high demand for virtual machines has led to Amazon moving down the stack, designing custom hardware such as the Nitro security chip, and low level software such as the Firecracker virtual machine monitor. AWS also has built Outposts, which allow for on-prem usage of AWS infrastructure.

Anthony Liguori is an engineer at AWS who has worked on a range of virtualization infrastructure: software platforms, hypervisors, and hardware. Anthony joins the show to talk about virtualization at all levels of the stack.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post AWS Virtualization with Anthony Liguori appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 15 2020

59mins

Play

Rank #4: Dropbox Engineering with Andrew Fong

Podcast cover
Read more

Dropbox is a consumer storage product with petabytes of data. Dropbox was originally started on the cloud, backed by S3. Once there was a high enough volume of data, Dropbox created its own data centers, designing hardware for the express purpose of storing user files. 

Over the last 13 years, Dropbox’s infrastructure has developed hardware, software, networking, data center infrastructure, and operational procedures that make the cloud storage product best in class.

Andrew Fong has been an engineer at Dropbox for 8 years. He joins the show to talk about how the Dropbox engineering organization has changed over that period of time, and what he is doing at the company today.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Dropbox Engineering with Andrew Fong appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 08 2020

54mins

Play

Rank #5: Remote Team Management with Ryan Chartrand

Podcast cover
Read more

Remote engineering work makes some elements of software development harder, and some elements easier. With Slack and email, communication becomes more clear cut. Project management tools lay out the responsibilities and deliverables of each person. GitHub centralizes and defines the roles of developers.

On the other hand, remote work subtracts the role of nuanced conversation. There is no water cooler or break room. Work can become systematic, rigid, and completely transactional. Your co-workers are your allies, but they feel less like friends when you don’t see them every day. For some people, this can have a devastating long-term impact on their psyche.

Managers have the responsibility of ensuring the health and productivity of the people that work with them. Managing an all-remote team includes a different set of challenges than an in-person team. 

Ryan Chartrand is the CEO of X-Team, a team of developers who work across the world and collaborate with each other remotely. X-Team partners with large companies who need additional development work. Ryan joins the show to talk about the dynamics of leading a large remote workforce, as well as his own personal experiences working remotely.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Remote Team Management with Ryan Chartrand appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 26 2020

59mins

Play

Rank #6: Facebook Messenger Engineering with Mohsen Agsen

Podcast cover
Read more

Facebook Messenger is a chat application that millions of people use every day to talk to each other. Over time, Messenger has grown to include group chats, video chats, animations, facial filters, stories, and many more features. Messenger is a tool for utility as well as for entertainment.

Messenger is used both on mobile and on desktop, but the size of the mobile application is particularly important on mobile. There are many users who are on devices that do not have much storage space.

As Messenger has accumulated features, the iOS code base has grown larger and larger. Several generations of Facebook engineers have rotated through the company with the responsibility of working on Facebook Messenger, which has led to different ways of managing information within the same codebase. The iOS codebase had room for improvement.

Project Lightspeed was a project within Facebook that had the goal of making Messenger on iOS much smaller. Mohsen Agsen is an engineer with Facebook, and he joins the show to talk about the process of rewriting the Messenger app.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Facebook Messenger Engineering with Mohsen Agsen appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 31 2020

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #7: Google Cloud Networking with Lakshmi Sharma

Podcast cover
Read more

A large cloud provider has high volumes of network traffic moving through data centers throughout the world. These providers manage the infrastructure for thousands of companies, across racks and racks of multitenant servers, and cables that stretch underseas, connecting network packets with their destination.

Google Cloud Platform has grown steadily into a wide range of products, including database services, machine learning, and containerization. Scaling a cloud provider requires both technical expertise and skillful management.

Lakshmi Sharma is the director of product management for networking at Google Cloud Platform. She joins the show to discuss the engineering challenges of building a large scale cloud provider, including reliability, programmability, and how to direct a large hierarchical team.

We’re looking for new show ideas, so if you have any interesting topics, please feel free to reach out via twitter or email us at  jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Google Cloud Networking with Lakshmi Sharma appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Mar 23 2020

49mins

Play

Rank #8: Dask: Scalable Python with Matthew Rocklin

Podcast cover
Read more

Python is the most widely used language for data science, and there are several libraries that are commonly used by Python data scientists including Numpy, Pandas, and scikit-learn. These libraries improve the user experience of a Python data scientist by giving them access to high level APIs.

Data science is often performed over huge datasets, and the data structures that are instantiated with those datasets need to be spread across multiple machines. To manage large distributed datasets, a library such as scikit-learn can use a system called Dask. Dask allows the instantiation of data structures such as a Dask dataframe or a Dask array.

Matthew Rocklin is the creator of Dask. He joins the show to talk about distributed computing with Dask, its use cases, and the Python ecosystem. He also provides a detailed comparison between Dask and Spark, which is also used for distributed data science.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Dask: Scalable Python with Matthew Rocklin appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 27 2020

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #9: NGINX Service Mesh with Alan Murphy

Podcast cover
Read more

NGINX is a web server that is used as a load balancer, an API gateway, a reverse proxy, and other purposes. Core application servers such as Ruby on Rails are often supported by NGINX, which handles routing the user requests between the different application server instances. 

This model of routing and load balancing between different application instances has matured over the last ten years due to an increase in the number of servers, and an increase in the variety of services. 

A pattern called “service mesh” has grown in popularity and is used to embed routing infrastructure closer to individual services by giving them a sidecar proxy. The application sidecars are connected to each other, and requests between any two services are routed through a proxy. These different proxies are managed by a central control plane which manages policies of the different proxies.

Alan Murphy works at NGINX, and he joins the show to give a brief history of NGINX and how the product has evolved from a reverse proxy and edge routing tool to a service mesh. Alan has worked in the world of load balancing and routing for more than a decade, having been at F5 Networks for many years before F5 acquired NGINX. We also discussed the business motivations behind the merger of those two companies. Full disclosure: NGINX is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post NGINX Service Mesh with Alan Murphy appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 16 2020

59mins

Play

Rank #10: Zoom Vulnerabilities with Patrick Wardle

Podcast cover
Read more

Zoom video chat has become an indispensable part of our lives. In a crowded market of video conferencing apps, Zoom managed to build a product that performs better than the competition, scaling with high quality to hundreds of meeting participants, and millions of concurrent users.

Zoom’s rapid growth in user adoption came from its focus on user experience and video call quality. This focus on product quality came at some cost to security quality. As our entire digital world has moved onto Zoom, the engineering community has been scrutinizing Zoom more closely, and discovered several places where the security practices of Zoom are lacking.

Patrick Wardle is an engineer with a strong understanding of Apple products. He recently wrote about several vulnerabilities he discovered on Zoom, and joins the show to talk about the security of large client-side Mac applications as well as the specific vulnerabilities of Zoom.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Zoom Vulnerabilities with Patrick Wardle appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Apr 20 2020

1hr

Play

Security Monitoring with Marc Tremsal

Podcast cover
Read more

Logs are the source of truth. If a company is sufficiently instrumented, the logging data that streams off of the internal infrastructure can be refined to tell a comprehensive story for what is changing across that infrastructure in real time. This includes logins, permissions changes, other events that could signal a potential security compromise.

Datadog is a company that was built around log management, metrics storage, and distributed tracing. More recently, they have also built tools for monitoring the security of an organization. Detecting security threats can be achieved by alerting on known security risks, or pieces of information that could be indicative of a vulnerability.

Marc Tremsal works at Datadog, and joins the show to talk through security monitoring. Full disclosure: Datadog is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Security Monitoring with Marc Tremsal appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 31 2020

51mins

Play

DEV and Forem with Ben Halpern

Podcast cover
Read more

Dev.to has become one of the most popular places for developers to write about engineering, programming languages, and everyday life. For those who have not seen it, DEV is like a cross between Twitter and Medium, but targeted at developers. The content on DEV ranges from serious to humorous to technically useful.

DEV contains a set of features which appeal to a developer community, such as the ability to embed code snippets in a post, but for the most part the entire app is generalizable to other types of communities. Hence, the motivation for “Forem”. Forem is an open source project to make it possible to spin up instances of communities that are like DEV, but for other communities such as mixed martial arts, or doctors.

Ben Halpern is the creator of DEV and Forem, and he joins the show to talk about the DEV Community and his long-term goals for what the DEV team is building.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post DEV and Forem with Ben Halpern appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 30 2020

59mins

Play

Drug Simulations with Bryan Vicknair and Jason Walsh

Podcast cover
Read more

Drug trials can lead to new therapeutics and preventative medications being discovered and placed on the market. Unfortunately, these drug trials typically require animal testing. This means animals are killed or harmed as a result of needing to verify that a drug will not kill humans.

Animal testing is unavoidable, but the extent to which testing needs to occur can be reduced by inserting machine learning models which simulate the effects of a drug on the human body. If the simulated effect is negative enough, animal testing doesn’t need to be run, thus no animals need to be harmed.

Bryan Vicknair and Jason Walsh work at VeriSIM Life, a company which makes software simulations of animals. These simulations can be used to model drug testing, and change the workflow for drug trials. They join the show to talk through the mechanics of drug testing, and how VeriSIM Life fits into that workflow.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Drug Simulations with Bryan Vicknair and Jason Walsh appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 29 2020

58mins

Play

Access Control Management with Fouad Matin and Dan Gillespie

Podcast cover
Read more

Across a company, there is a wide range of resources that employees need access to. Documents, S3 buckets, git repositories, and many others. As access to resources changes across the organization, a history of the changes to permissions can be useful for compliance and monitoring.

Indent is a system for simplifying access management across infrastructure. Indent allows users within an organization to request access to resources, and keeps logs of the changes to who can access those resources.

Fouad Matin and Dan Gillespie are the founders of Indent, and they join the show to talk through the application of access control management, and the architecture of Indent itself, which has numerous interesting engineering decisions within it.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Show Notes:

Indent job opportunities

The post Access Control Management with Fouad Matin and Dan Gillespie appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 28 2020

54mins

Play

Acquired Podcasting with David Rosenthal and Ben Gilbert

Podcast cover
Read more

Acquisitions are part of the technology industry. A successful corporation will often have an “exit”, either going public or becoming acquired. And with each of these corporations, there is a set of stories that narrate the company from beginning to end. 

Acquired is a podcast that tells the stories of companies such as YouTube, Instagram, and PayPal. During each episode, the life of a company is explored from its beginning til the end. Media companies, chip companies, and software companies all take the center stage on various episodes.

David Rosenthal and Ben Gilbert are the hosts of Acquired, and they join today’s show to talk about the podcast they started, a few business stories, and the podcast industry itself.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Acquired Podcasting with David Rosenthal and Ben Gilbert appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 27 2020

57mins

Play

Ray Applications with Richard Liaw

Podcast cover
Read more

Ray is a general purpose distributed computing framework. At a low level, Ray provides fault-tolerant primitives that support applications running across multiple processors. At a higher level, Ray supports scalable reinforcement learning, including the common problem of hyperparameter tuning.

In a previous episode, we explored the primitives of Ray as well as Anyscale, the business built around Ray and reinforcement learning. In today’s episode, Richard Liaw explores some of the libraries and applications that sit on top of Ray. 

RLlib gives APIs for reinforcement learning such as policy serving and multi-agent environments. Tune gives developers an easy way to do scalable hyperparameter tuning, which is necessary for exploring different types of deep learning configurations. In a future show, we will explore Tune in more detail.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Ray Applications with Richard Liaw appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 24 2020

54mins

Play

Modin: Pandas Scalability with Devin Petersohn

Podcast cover
Read more

Pandas is a Python data analysis library, and an essential tool in data science. Pandas allows users to load large quantities of data into a data structure called a dataframe, over which the user can call mathematical operations. When the data fits entirely into memory this works well, but sometimes there is too much data for a single box.

The Modin project scales Pandas workflows to multiple machines by utilizing Dask or Ray, which are distributed computing primitives for Python programs. Modin builds an execution plan for large data frames to be operated on against each other, which makes data science considerably easier for these large data sets.

Devin Petersohn started the Modin project, and he joins the show to talk about data science with Python, and his work in the Berkeley RISELab.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Modin: Pandas Scalability with Devin Petersohn appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 23 2020

58mins

Play

Sourcegraph: Code Search and Intelligence with Beyang Liu

Podcast cover
Read more

A large codebase cannot be searched with naive indexing algorithms. In order to search through a codebase the size of Uber’s it is necessary to build a much more sophisticated indexing system than simple pure text search.

Sourcegraph is a system for universal code search. It allows developers to more easily onboard to a new codebase, make large refactors, and perform other tasks. SourceGraph can integrate with source control systems, IDEs, and other tools to fit comfortably into an engineer’s workflow.

Beyang Liu is a co-founder of Sourcegraph and he joins the show to talk about how codebases can become large and unwieldy, and the tooling that Sourcegraph offers to make these codebases easier to work with.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Sourcegraph: Code Search and Intelligence with Beyang Liu appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 22 2020

59mins

Play

Digital Experience Analytics with Michael Morrissey

Podcast cover
Read more

Users do not use web applications in the way that you might expect. And it is not easy to get the data that is necessary to get a full picture. But a newer API within browsers does make this more possible by capturing DOM mutations. 

The change capture of these DOM mutations can be stored for replay in the future. After being stored, this change capture can be retrieved and replayed. That allows for comprehensive frontend monitoring, which has been built into a product called FullStory.

Michael Morrissey is the CTO of FullStory, and he joins the show to talk about how session capture works, and the architecture of FullStory–how sessions get saved, stored and retrieved. In a previous show we talked about LogRocket, a product which does something similar.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Digital Experience Analytics with Michael Morrissey appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 21 2020

57mins

Play

Cortex: Microservices Management with Anish Dhar and Ganesh Datta

Podcast cover
Read more

Managing microservices becomes a challenge as the number of services within the organization grows. With that many services comes more interdependencies–downstream and upstream services that may be impacted by an update to your service. 

One solution to this problem: a dashboard and newsfeed system that lets you see into the health and changes across your services. With this kind of system, you can avoid accidentally shipping code that will impact other service owners. It can also help with testing, giving you an end-to-end picture for how a test can impact other services.

Anish Dhar and Ganesh Datta are co-founders of Cortex, a system for managing your services. Anish and Ganesh join the show to talk about their work building Cortex, and the value that it provides to the companies that use it.

In a previous show we covered a company called Effx, which does something similar.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Cortex: Microservices Management with Anish Dhar and Ganesh Datta appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 20 2020

1hr 1min

Play

ADP Engineering with Tim Halbur

Podcast cover
Read more

ADP has been around for more than 70 years, fulfilling payroll and other human resources services. Payroll processing is a complex business, involving the movement of money in accordance with regulatory and legal strictures. 

From an engineering point of view, ADP has decades of software behind it, and a bright future of a platform company used by thousands of companies. Balancing the maintenance of old code while charting a course with the new projects is not a simple task. 

Tim Halbur is the Chief Architect of ADP, and he joins the show to talk through how engineering works at ADP, and how the organization builds for the future of the company while maintaining the code of the past.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post ADP Engineering with Tim Halbur appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 17 2020

55mins

Play

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Podcast cover
Read more

Software companies can be funded in a variety of ways: venture capital, self-funding, and debt, among others. In order to receive financing, a company is evaluated on its ability to generate future cash flows. After all, a valuation is a number that summarizes the present value of future cash flows.

Determining that valuation number is a complicated, subjective process. If the valuation can be determined more intelligently and objectively, then smarter financing decisions can be made. This is the reasoning behind the company Capital, which aims to build a better modeling system for evaluating companies.

Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares are founders of Capital, and they join the show to explore the modeling process for valuations, and their strategy for doing this with their software models.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 16 2020

58mins

Play

GitHub Mobile with Brian Lovin and Ryan Nystrom

Podcast cover
Read more

GitHub has been a social network for developers for many years. Most social networks are centered around mobile applications, but GitHub sits squarely in a developer’s browser-based desktop workflow. As a result, the design of a mobile app for GitHub is less straightforward. GitHub did acquire a popular mobile client called GitHawk, which was developed by Ryan Nystrom.

Since joining GitHub, Ryan has worked on a new mobile app for GitHub, along with a team of engineers including Brian Lovin. Ryan and Brian both join the show to discuss GitHub mobile, and how they designed, architected, and built the app.

There is no company quite like GitHub–a social network combined with a version control system that provides a critical utility. All this made for an interesting episode about a one-of-a-kind mobile product.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post GitHub Mobile with Brian Lovin and Ryan Nystrom appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 15 2020

51mins

Play

Multimesh with Luke Kysow

Podcast cover
Read more

A service mesh provides routing, load balancing, policy management, and other features to a set of services that need to communicate with each other. The mesh can simplify operations across these different services by providing an interface to configure them. 

There are lots of different vendors who offer service mesh technology: AWS has AppMesh, Google has Istio (which is open source), Buoyant has Linkerd (which is also open source), and HashiCorp has Consul Connect. Unfortunately, these service meshes do not all play well together. And at a large enough company, different teams will be setting up different service meshes. So it would be useful for services in those different meshes to be able to communicate with each other.

Luke Kysow is an engineer at HashiCorp where he works on Consul Connect, and he joins the show to discuss service mesh usage, adoption, and possible strategies for maintaining multiple service meshes within a single organization.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Multimesh with Luke Kysow appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 14 2020

54mins

Play

Metaflow: Netflix Machine Learning Platform with Savin Goyal

Podcast cover
Read more

Netflix runs all of its infrastructure on Amazon Web Services. This includes business logic, data infrastructure, and machine learning. By tightly coupling itself to AWS, Netflix has been able to move faster and have strong defaults about engineering decisions. And today, AWS has such an expanse of services that it can be used as a platform to build custom tools.

Metaflow is an open source machine learning platform built on top of AWS that allows engineers at Netflix to build directed acyclic graphs for training models. These DAGs get deployed to AWS as Step Functions, a serverless orchestration platform.

Savin Goyal is a machine learning engineer with Netflix, and he joins the show to talk about the machine learning challenges within Netflix, and his experience working on Metaflow. We also talk about DAG systems such as AWS Step Functions and Airflow.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Metaflow: Netflix Machine Learning Platform with Savin Goyal appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 13 2020

56mins

Play

Strapi: Headless CMS with Pierre Burgy

Podcast cover
Read more

WordPress has been a dominant force in the world of online publishing for many years because of how battle-tested it is. WordPress is the definitive leader in CMS technology. But there have always been alternatives. 

Drupal, Ghost, and other open source CMSes. More recently, there has been an emergence of the headless CMS, such as Contentful, which decouples the CMS backend from the frontend presentation layer.

Strapi is a popular open source headless CMS. Pierre Burgy is the founder of Strapi, and he joins the show to talk about the CMS category, the role that Strapi fills, and the technology behind Strapi.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Strapi: Headless CMS with Pierre Burgy appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 10 2020

49mins

Play

Chronosphere: Scalable Metrics Database with Rob Skillington

Podcast cover
Read more

M3 is a scalable metrics database originally built to host Uber’s rapidly growing data storage from Prometheus. When Rob Skillington was at Uber, he helped design, implement, and deploy M3. Since leaving Uber, he has co-founded a company around a hosted version of M3 called Chronosphere.

If you have access to a scalable metrics database, you might as well start accumulating as much data as possible, right? Not exactly. If your company generates enough data, you probably want to turn down the dials on how frequently you save a metric. Downsampling will reduce the amount of money that you pay for these hosted metrics.

In today’s show, Rob discusses the engineering and deployment of M3, and how that work led him to founding Chronosphere, as well as the product offering of the company.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Chronosphere: Scalable Metrics Database with Rob Skillington appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 09 2020

41mins

Play

Determined AI: Machine Learning Ops with Neil Conway

Podcast cover
Read more

Developing machine learning models is not easy. From the perspective of the machine learning researcher, there is the iterative process of tuning hyperparameters and selecting relevant features. From the perspective of the operations engineer, there is a handoff from development to production, and the management of GPU clusters to parallelize model training.

In the last five years, machine learning has become easier to use thanks to point solutions. TensorFlow, cloud provider tools, Spark, Jupyter Notebooks. But every company works differently, and there are few hard and fast rules for the workflows around machine learning operations.

Determined AI is a platform that provides a means for collaborating around data prep, model development and training, and model deployment. Neil Conway is a co-founder of Determined, and he joins the show to discuss the challenges around machine learning operations, and what he has built with Determined.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Determined AI: Machine Learning Ops with Neil Conway appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 08 2020

48mins

Play

The Good Parts of AWS with Daniel Vassallo

Podcast cover
Read more

AWS has over 150 different services. Databases, log management, edge computing, and lots of others. Instead of being overwhelmed by all of these products, an engineering team can simplify their workflow by focusing on a small subset of AWS services–the defaults.

Daniel Vassalo is the author of The Good Parts of AWS. An excerpt from the book: “The cost of acquiring new information is high and the consequence of deviating from a default choice is low, so sticking with the default will likely be the optimal choice. A default choice is any option that gives you very high confidence that it will work.” Having confidence in your workflow–even if it is a simple workflow–has advantages.

S3, EC2, Elastic Load Balancers: for simple web applications, this is really all you need to build your business. Daniel Vassallo worked at AWS for more than 8 years before leaving to become an entrepreneur and author. He joins the show to talk about what the good parts of AWS are, and his strategy for building applications with that subset of services.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post The Good Parts of AWS with Daniel Vassallo appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 07 2020

1hr 4mins

Play

Pull Request Environments with Eric Silverman

Podcast cover
Read more

The modern release workflow involves multiple stakeholders: engineers, management, designers, and product managers. It is a collaborative process that is often held together with brittle workflows. A developer deploys a new build to an ad hoc staging environment and pastes a link to that environment in Slack. Other stakeholders click on that link, then send messages to each other in Slack, or make comments on the pull request in GitHub.

This workflow is far from ideal. Collaborating around pull requests can be made easier with a dedicated set of tools for sharing and discussing those pull requests. This is the goal of FeaturePeek, a system for spinning up dedicated pull request environments, creating screenshots and comments, and reimagining the lifecycle of the release workflow.

Eric Silverman is a co-founder of FeaturePeek and he joins the show to discuss release management, the interactions between different stakeholders, and the development of his company. Much like the previous show about Postman, in which we explored how API management has become a ripe space for collaboration, the same is true of pull requests.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

The post Pull Request Environments with Eric Silverman appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 06 2020

47mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

448 Ratings
Average Ratings
391
27
12
8
10

Must Listen

By JakeKay34 - Nov 04 2019
Read more
Great podcast. If you’re a developer, it’s a must listen. Enjoy!

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.