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Rank #1 in Daily News category

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The Daily

Updated 2 months ago

Rank #1 in Daily News category

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Read more

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
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I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
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Really good. Brought me back

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back
Cover image of The Daily

The Daily

Latest release on Aug 02, 2020

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Rank #1: Space Travel, Privatized

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After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

May 28 2020

26mins

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Rank #2: The (Misunderstood) Story of NATO

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On a combative opening day of the NATO summit in Brussels, President Trump called other member countries “delinquent” on military spending and attacked Germany as a “captive” of Russia. We examine where his frustration is coming from. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 12 2018

26mins

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Rank #3: Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

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The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.

May 27 2020

30mins

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Rank #4: Deployed in the U.S., Just Waiting for the Caravan

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At nearly every turn, President Trump’s own generals tried to persuade him not to deploy active-duty troops to the United States border with Mexico. So what are 5,000 troops doing there? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 21 2018

20mins

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Rank #5: Brett Kavanaugh’s Change of Heart

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who has been nominated to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court, once made the case for impeaching a president. He now says that was a mistake. Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times, who examines why Judge Kavanaugh’s views have shifted. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 11 2018

21mins

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Rank #6: The Jungle Prince, Chapter 3: A House in Yorkshire

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In a ruined palace in the woods, rummaging through discarded papers, our reporter finds a clue.

For more information, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 28 2019

34mins

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Rank #7: A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 2: The Future of Genetic Privacy

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The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Jun 07 2019

28mins

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Rank #8: Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

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Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.

“1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.”

Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 23 2019

45mins

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Rank #9: Boeing’s Broken Dreams

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer? 

Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Jan 03 2020

26mins

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Rank #10: Why U.S. Bombs Are Falling in Yemen

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The killing of Jamal Khashoggi has renewed criticism of Saudi Arabia more broadly, including the kingdom’s role in the war in Yemen. It’s a war that has created what has been called the worst humanitarian crisis in the world — and one that the United States has backed from the beginning. Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 20 2018

26mins

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Rank #11: The Candidates: Pete Buttigieg

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Today we launch Part One in our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 presidential front-runners. In studio with “The Daily,” Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., talks about how his lifelong political ambitions were complicated by the secret he kept for decades.

Guests: 

  • Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind., and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate.
  • Jeremy W. Peters, a politics reporter in the Washington bureau of The New York Times.


“The Candidates” is a new series from “The Daily” exploring pivotal moments in the lives of top presidential contenders in the 2020 election. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 22 2019

40mins

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Rank #12: What the Bidens Actually Did in Ukraine

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Yesterday, we looked at the origins of President Trump’s baseless theory that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 election. This theory inspired one of the two investigations he sought from Ukraine that triggered the impeachment inquiry. Today, we look at the origins of the president’s second theory. Guest: Kenneth P. Vogel, a reporter in The New York Times’s Washington bureau. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Nov 27 2019

25mins

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Rank #13: Our Fear Facer Makes a New Friend

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids’ episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella’s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for “The Daily”; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella’s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 31 2019

34mins

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Rank #14: The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

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Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.

May 26 2020

44mins

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Rank #15: The Candidates: Joe Biden

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He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise? 

In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 20 2019

40mins

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Rank #16: The Post-Acquittal Presidency

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Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

Feb 14 2020

26mins

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Rank #17: 'There's No Going Back'

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions — and why retroactive regulation won’t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 27 2019

28mins

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Rank #18: ’1619,’ Episode 2: The Economy That Slavery Built

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Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.

The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “As the large slave-labor camps grew increasingly efficient, enslaved black people became America’s first modern workers,” Matthew Desmond writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 31 2019

33mins

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Rank #19: By Challenging Evangelicals, She Changed Them

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death.

In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. “It tells me there’s a lot of pain in the world,” Mr. Evans said. “I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.” Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans’s husband. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

  • Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.

Dec 24 2019

27mins

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Rank #20: Confronting a Childhood Abuser

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Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The “Daily” producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains descriptions of abuse.

Background reading:

May 24 2019

42mins

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The Sunday Read: 'On Female Rage'

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In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Aug 02 2020

33mins

Play

A #MeToo Moment in the Military

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The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.

Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.

Jul 31 2020

28mins

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The Big Tech Hearing

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The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?

Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.

Jul 30 2020

33mins

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Confronting China

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A cooperative relationship with China has been a pillar of U.S. foreign policy for more than half a century. So why does the Trump administration think it’s time for a change? Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 29 2020

26mins

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Why $600 Checks Are Tearing Republicans Apart

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A fight has erupted among congressional Republicans over how long and how generously the government should help those unemployed during the pandemic. But what is that battle really about? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 28 2020

23mins

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The Mistakes New York Made

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A New York Times investigation found that surviving the coronavirus in New York had a lot to do with which hospital a person went to. Our investigative reporter Brian M. Rosenthal pulls back the curtain on inequality and the pandemic in the city.

Guest: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk of The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • At the peak of New York’s pandemic, patients at some community hospitals were three times more likely to die than were patients at medical centers in the wealthiest parts of the city.
  • The story of a $52 million temporary care facility in New York illustrates the missteps made at every level of government in the race to create more hospital capacity.

Jul 27 2020

31mins

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The Sunday Read: 'The Accusation'

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When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 26 2020

52mins

Play

The Battle for a Baseball Season

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This episode contains strong language.

Today, we go inside the fraught weeks that led up to the opening game of the 2020 professional baseball season — from the perspective of the commissioner of Major League Baseball. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times, spoke with Rob Manfred, the commissioner of Major League Baseball. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 24 2020

43mins

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The Showdown in Portland

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This episode contains strong language.

Federal agents dressed in camouflage and tactical gear have taken to the streets of Portland, Ore., unleashing tear gas, bloodying protesters and pulling some people into unmarked vans. Today, we go behind protest lines to ask why militarized federal authorities are being deployed to an American city. Guests: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, The New York Times’s homeland security correspondent, and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 23 2020

29mins

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The Science of School Reopenings

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Around the world, safely reopening schools remains one of the most daunting challenges to restarting national economies. While approaches have been different, no country has tried to reopen schools with coronavirus infection rates at the level of the United States. Today, we explore the risks and rewards of the plan to reopen American schools this fall. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 22 2020

25mins

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The Vaccine Trust Problem

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Public health officials and private researchers have vowed to develop a coronavirus vaccine in record time. But could that rush backfire? Guest: Jan Hoffman, a health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 21 2020

27mins

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The Life and Legacy of John Lewis

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This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

Representative John Lewis, a stalwart of the civil rights era, died on Friday. We take a look at his life, lessons and legacy. 

Guest: Brent Staples, a member of the Times editorial board.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

  • Mr. Lewis, a son of sharecroppers and an apostle of nonviolence who was bloodied at Selma, Ala., and across the Jim Crow South in the historic struggle for racial equality, and who then carried a mantle of moral authority into Congress, died on Friday. He was 80.
  • Bipartisan praise poured in for the civil rights leader, as friends, colleagues and admirers reached for the appropriate superlatives to sum up an extraordinary life.
  • Mr. Lewis risked his life for justice, The Times’s editorial board wrote.

Jul 20 2020

38mins

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The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Cracked the Lottery'

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When the Iowa Attorney General's office began investigating an unclaimed lottery ticket worth millions, an incredible string of unlikely winners came to light, and a trail that pointed to an inside job. Today, listen to a story about mortality — about our greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 19 2020

44mins

Play

Tilly Remembers Her Grandfather, Three Months On

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For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the pandemic to hear what’s happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

Climbing on the roof to look at stars in the middle of summer. Making French toast and popcorn. Kind eyes. These are some of the memories Tilly Breimhorst has of her grandfather, Craig. We spoke with Tilly in May about losing her grandfather to coronavirus. Today, we check back in with her.

Guest: Matilda Breimhorst, a 12-year-old who recently lost her grandfather to the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.

Jul 17 2020

24mins

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Reopening, Warily: Revisiting Jasmine Lombrage

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For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

As state stay-at-home orders expired, small business owners faced a daunting question: Should they risk the survival of their company, or their health? Today, we speak again with one restaurant owner about the decision she made.

Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.

Jul 16 2020

31mins

Play

One Meat Plant, One Thousand Infections: Revisiting Achut Deng

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For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were aired.

One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States was inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we revisit our conversation with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew — and ask her how she has been doing since. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, and Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who works for Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 15 2020

31mins

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'It's Like a War.' Revisiting Dr. Fabiano Di Marco.

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For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

Italy was an early epicenter of the pandemic in Europe. In March, we spoke to a doctor who was triaging patients north of Milan about the road that might lie ahead for the United States. Today, we call him again to hear what it was like to discharge his last coronavirus patient while the American caseload soars. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan and the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to institute a nationwide lockdown and, later, to choose a cautious approach to reopening public spaces. Here is a comparison of how successful other countries have been in their subsequent responses to the pandemic.

Jul 14 2020

24mins

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A Turning Point for Hong Kong

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After protests convulsed Hong Kong for much of the last year, the city’s pro-democracy movement has been chilled by a new law that some say may change the semiautomonous territory forever. Today, we examine why China chose this moment to assert control, and what the new law means for the city’s future. Guest: Austin Ramzy, a reporter in Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 13 2020

25mins

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The Sunday Read: 'The Decameron Project'

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As the coronavirus pandemic swept the world, The New York Times Magazine asked 29 authors to write new short stories inspired by the moment — and by Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” which was written as a plague ravaged Florence in the 14th century. We’ve selected two for you to hear today.

These stories were written by Tommy Orange and Edwidge Danticat. They were recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 12 2020

25mins

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The Fate of Trump's Financial Records

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The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard — and the meaning of their decisions.

Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 10 2020

25mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back