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Rank #1 in Daily News category

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The Daily

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #1 in Daily News category

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Read more

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
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I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
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Really good. Brought me back

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back
Cover image of The Daily

The Daily

Latest release on Jul 02, 2020

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Rank #1: Space Travel, Privatized

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After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

May 28 2020

26mins

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Rank #2: The (Misunderstood) Story of NATO

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On a combative opening day of the NATO summit in Brussels, President Trump called other member countries “delinquent” on military spending and attacked Germany as a “captive” of Russia. We examine where his frustration is coming from. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 12 2018

26mins

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Rank #3: Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

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The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.

May 27 2020

30mins

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Rank #4: Deployed in the U.S., Just Waiting for the Caravan

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At nearly every turn, President Trump’s own generals tried to persuade him not to deploy active-duty troops to the United States border with Mexico. So what are 5,000 troops doing there? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 21 2018

20mins

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Rank #5: Brett Kavanaugh’s Change of Heart

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who has been nominated to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court, once made the case for impeaching a president. He now says that was a mistake. Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times, who examines why Judge Kavanaugh’s views have shifted. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 11 2018

21mins

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Rank #6: The Jungle Prince, Chapter 3: A House in Yorkshire

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In a ruined palace in the woods, rummaging through discarded papers, our reporter finds a clue.

For more information, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 28 2019

34mins

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Rank #7: A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 2: The Future of Genetic Privacy

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The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Jun 07 2019

28mins

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Rank #8: Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

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Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.

“1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.”

Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 23 2019

45mins

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Rank #9: Boeing’s Broken Dreams

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer? 

Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Jan 03 2020

26mins

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Rank #10: Why U.S. Bombs Are Falling in Yemen

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The killing of Jamal Khashoggi has renewed criticism of Saudi Arabia more broadly, including the kingdom’s role in the war in Yemen. It’s a war that has created what has been called the worst humanitarian crisis in the world — and one that the United States has backed from the beginning. Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 20 2018

26mins

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Rank #11: The Candidates: Pete Buttigieg

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Today we launch Part One in our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 presidential front-runners. In studio with “The Daily,” Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., talks about how his lifelong political ambitions were complicated by the secret he kept for decades.

Guests: 

  • Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind., and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate.
  • Jeremy W. Peters, a politics reporter in the Washington bureau of The New York Times.


“The Candidates” is a new series from “The Daily” exploring pivotal moments in the lives of top presidential contenders in the 2020 election. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 22 2019

40mins

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Rank #12: What the Bidens Actually Did in Ukraine

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Yesterday, we looked at the origins of President Trump’s baseless theory that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 election. This theory inspired one of the two investigations he sought from Ukraine that triggered the impeachment inquiry. Today, we look at the origins of the president’s second theory. Guest: Kenneth P. Vogel, a reporter in The New York Times’s Washington bureau. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Nov 27 2019

25mins

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Rank #13: Our Fear Facer Makes a New Friend

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids’ episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella’s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for “The Daily”; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella’s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 31 2019

34mins

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Rank #14: The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

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Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.

May 26 2020

44mins

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Rank #15: The Candidates: Joe Biden

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He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise? 

In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 20 2019

40mins

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Rank #16: The Post-Acquittal Presidency

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Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

Feb 14 2020

26mins

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Rank #17: 'There's No Going Back'

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions — and why retroactive regulation won’t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 27 2019

28mins

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Rank #18: ’1619,’ Episode 2: The Economy That Slavery Built

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Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.

The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “As the large slave-labor camps grew increasingly efficient, enslaved black people became America’s first modern workers,” Matthew Desmond writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 31 2019

33mins

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Rank #19: By Challenging Evangelicals, She Changed Them

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death.

In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. “It tells me there’s a lot of pain in the world,” Mr. Evans said. “I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.” Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans’s husband. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

  • Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.

Dec 24 2019

27mins

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Rank #20: Confronting a Childhood Abuser

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Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The “Daily” producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains descriptions of abuse.

Background reading:

May 24 2019

42mins

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What Went Wrong in Brazil

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Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? 

Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chief

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 02 2020

27mins

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A Russian Plot to Kill U.S. Soldiers

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A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan — and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.

Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 01 2020

21mins

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A Major Ruling on Abortion

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The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why — for the third time in two weeks — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.

Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 30 2020

22mins

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A Conversation With a Police Union Leader

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In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement — and what the role of the police should be.

In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country’s largest police unions.

Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 29 2020

51mins

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The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Saw America'

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In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank — one of the most influential photographers in history — who, through his camera, collected the world.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 28 2020

1hr 3mins

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A Bit of Relief: The Long Distance Chorus

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Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It’s about expressing the meaning of a song — and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.

Jun 27 2020

14mins

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A Dilemma in Texas

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Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state’s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state’s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 26 2020

27mins

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The Voters Trump Is Losing

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This fall’s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 25 2020

24mins

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The Epidemic of Unemployment

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Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can’t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 24 2020

27mins

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The Battle Over the Democratic Party's Future

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This episode contains strong language. 

Today’s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.

Jun 23 2020

24mins

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How Facebook Is Undermining Black Lives Matter

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Companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have come out in support of Black Lives Matter and its mission. But are their platforms undermining the movement for racial justice? Guest: Kevin Roose, who covers technology, business and culture for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Kevin Roose explains why shows of support for Black Lives Matter from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube don’t address the way racists and partisan provocateurs have weaponized the platforms.

Jun 22 2020

30mins

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The Sunday Read: 'Facing the Wind'

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In today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Carvell Wallace considers why, for his kids, a global pandemic that shut down the world was not news — it was the opposite of news. It was a struggle that had, in some ways, always been a part of their lives.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 21 2020

28mins

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The History and Meaning of Juneteenth

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After 155 years, Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of enslaved Americans, is being acknowledged as a holiday by corporations and state governments across the country. Today, we consider why, throughout its history, Juneteenth has gained prominence at moments of pain in the struggle for black liberation in America. We also ask: What does freedom mean now?

Guest: Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In a project examining the history and import of Juneteenth, we ask: What is freedom in America?
  • Opal Lee, 93, an activist and lifelong Texan, has campaigned to make June 19 a national holiday for years. This is her vision for honoring the emancipation of enslaved Americans.

Jun 19 2020

27mins

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The Latest: The Supreme Court Rules on DACA

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In a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Trump may not shut down Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the program that shields immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation. But is this the end of challenges to DACA?

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.

Host: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

Background reading:

  • This is the reasoning Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. gave for reversing the Trump administration decision.
  • For thousands of “Dreamers,” as DACA recipients are known, following the ups and downs of the program’s fate has been a wild ride. Here’s why it’s not over yet.

Jun 18 2020

8mins

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Who Will Be Joe Biden’s Running Mate?

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Joseph R. Biden Jr. is looking for a potential vice president in one of the most tumultuous moments in modern American history. His selection committee is attempting to winnow an exceptionally diverse field. So who’s on the list? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 18 2020

26mins

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The Killing of Rayshard Brooks

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This episode contains strong language.

Rayshard Brooks fell asleep in his car at a Wendy’s drive-through. Soon afterward, he was shot. We look closely at what happened in the minutes in between — and at the unrest his killing has sparked in Georgia.

Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 17 2020

29mins

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A Landmark Supreme Court Ruling

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The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination. We examine the three words the case hung on; what the written opinions had to say about bathrooms, locker rooms, sports, pronouns and religious objections to same-sex marriage; and the implications for the ruling. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times and Aimee Stephens, the lead plaintiff in a transgender discrimination case heard by the Supreme Court. Ms. Stephens died in May; she was 59. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Ms. Stephens was fired after she announced that she would live as a woman. She did not live to see the Supreme Court rule in her favor.
  • Until Monday’s decision, it was legal in more than half of the states to fire workers for being gay, bisexual or transgender.
  • The justices are confronting an unusually potent mix of political and social issues in the middle of both a presidential election year and a public health crisis. Here’s an overview of the major cases this year to get you up to speed.

Jun 16 2020

22mins

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What We’ve Learned About the Coronavirus

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States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” 
  • Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.

Jun 15 2020

24mins

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The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'

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In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it?

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 14 2020

1hr 4mins

Play

Special Episode: The Song That Found Me

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The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle’s live rendition of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. “I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,” he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.

Jun 13 2020

21mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back