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The Daily

Updated 22 days ago

Rank #1 in Daily News category

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Read more

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back

iTunes Ratings

61340 Ratings
Average Ratings
49294
4675
2473
1843
3055

Love it!

By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
Read more
I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Really good. Brought me back
Cover image of The Daily

The Daily

Latest release on Dec 01, 2020

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Rank #1: The (Misunderstood) Story of NATO

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On a combative opening day of the NATO summit in Brussels, President Trump called other member countries “delinquent” on military spending and attacked Germany as a “captive” of Russia. We examine where his frustration is coming from. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 12 2018

26mins

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Rank #2: Monday, Oct. 23, 2017

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“It’s horrible what I went through, horrible what my family went through,” Bill O’Reilly said of the sexual harassment allegations that cost him his job at Fox News. Mr. O’Reilly spoke on the record to two of our reporters, Emily Steel and Michael S. Schmidt, addressing the latest reporting on a $32 million settlement he reached with a longtime network analyst. Guests: Emily Steel, a business reporter for The New York Times; Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Oct 23 2017

22mins

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Rank #3: Deployed in the U.S., Just Waiting for the Caravan

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At nearly every turn, President Trump’s own generals tried to persuade him not to deploy active-duty troops to the United States border with Mexico. So what are 5,000 troops doing there? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 21 2018

20mins

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Rank #4: Brett Kavanaugh’s Change of Heart

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who has been nominated to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court, once made the case for impeaching a president. He now says that was a mistake. Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times, who examines why Judge Kavanaugh’s views have shifted. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Jul 11 2018

21mins

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Rank #5: The Jungle Prince, Chapter 3: A House in Yorkshire

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In a ruined palace in the woods, rummaging through discarded papers, our reporter finds a clue.

For more information, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 28 2019

34mins

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Rank #6: A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 2: The Future of Genetic Privacy

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The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Jun 07 2019

28mins

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Rank #7: Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

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Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.

“1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.”

Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 23 2019

45mins

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Rank #8: Boeing’s Broken Dreams

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer? 

Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Jan 03 2020

26mins

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Rank #9: Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017

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The results of Tuesday’s elections are being called a rejection of President Trump. But Stephen K. Bannon, the president’s former chief strategist, says that’s all wrong. Also, the man who helped Texas to become one of the most gun-friendly states in America says the shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs will, if anything, strengthen the state’s relationship to firearms.  Guests: Jeremy W. Peters, a New York Times reporter based in Washington, who interviewed Mr. Bannon; Jerry Patterson, who wrote the 1995 law that gave Texans the right to carry concealed weapons. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 09 2017

22mins

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Rank #10: Why U.S. Bombs Are Falling in Yemen

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The killing of Jamal Khashoggi has renewed criticism of Saudi Arabia more broadly, including the kingdom’s role in the war in Yemen. It’s a war that has created what has been called the worst humanitarian crisis in the world — and one that the United States has backed from the beginning. Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 20 2018

26mins

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Rank #11: The Candidates: Pete Buttigieg

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Today we launch Part One in our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 presidential front-runners. In studio with “The Daily,” Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., talks about how his lifelong political ambitions were complicated by the secret he kept for decades.

Guests: 

  • Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind., and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate.
  • Jeremy W. Peters, a politics reporter in the Washington bureau of The New York Times.


“The Candidates” is a new series from “The Daily” exploring pivotal moments in the lives of top presidential contenders in the 2020 election. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Nov 22 2019

40mins

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Rank #12: What the Bidens Actually Did in Ukraine

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Yesterday, we looked at the origins of President Trump’s baseless theory that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 election. This theory inspired one of the two investigations he sought from Ukraine that triggered the impeachment inquiry. Today, we look at the origins of the president’s second theory. Guest: Kenneth P. Vogel, a reporter in The New York Times’s Washington bureau. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Nov 27 2019

25mins

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Rank #13: Friday, Oct. 6, 2017

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A New York Times investigation has found three decades of sexual harassment allegations against the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. In response to that reporting, Mr. Weinstein released the following statement: “I realized some time ago that I needed to be a better person. Though I’m trying to do better, I know I have a long way to go.” A lawyer advising him said that the producer “denies many of the accusations as patently false.” Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, Times reporters. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Oct 06 2017

23mins

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Rank #14: Our Fear Facer Makes a New Friend

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids’ episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella’s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for “The Daily”; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella’s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 31 2019

34mins

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Rank #15: The Candidates: Joe Biden

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He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise? 

In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

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Dec 20 2019

40mins

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Rank #16: The Post-Acquittal Presidency

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Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

Feb 14 2020

26mins

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Rank #17: 'There's No Going Back'

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions — and why retroactive regulation won’t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

Dec 27 2019

28mins

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Rank #18: ’1619,’ Episode 2: The Economy That Slavery Built

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Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.

The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”

This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.

Background reading:

  • “As the large slave-labor camps grew increasingly efficient, enslaved black people became America’s first modern workers,” Matthew Desmond writes.
  • The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.

Aug 31 2019

33mins

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Rank #19: By Challenging Evangelicals, She Changed Them

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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death.

In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. “It tells me there’s a lot of pain in the world,” Mr. Evans said. “I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.” Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans’s husband. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading:

  • Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.

Dec 24 2019

27mins

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Rank #20: Confronting a Childhood Abuser

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Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The “Daily” producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains descriptions of abuse.

Background reading:

May 24 2019

42mins

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Biden’s Cabinet Picks, Part 1: Janet Yellen

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Janet Yellen, who is poised to become secretary of the Treasury, will immediately have her work cut out for her. The U.S. economy is in a precarious state and Congress is consumed by partisan politics.

Ms. Yellen, however, is no stranger to crisis. She has already held the government’s other top economic jobs — including chairwoman of the Federal Reserve from 2014 to 2018, helping the country through the last major financial emergency.

Now, facing another steep challenge, we look at the measures she might take to get the economy humming again.


Guest: Jeanna Smialek, who covers the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times. 


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.


Background reading: 


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Dec 01 2020

27mins

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When and How You’ll Get a Vaccine

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For Americans, months of collective isolation and fear could soon be winding down. A coronavirus vaccine may be just weeks away.

According to Dr. Moncef Slaoui, head of Operation Warp Speed, the federal effort to accelerate vaccine development, the first Americans could receive the vaccine in mid-December.

With the vaccine within reach, we turn to more logistical questions: Who will receive the shots first? Who will distribute them? And what could go wrong?


Guest: Katie Thomas, who covers the drug industry for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 30 2020

24mins

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A Day at the Food Pantry

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On a day early this fall, Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times, and the Daily producers Annie Brown and Stella Tan spent a day at Council of Peoples Organization, a food pantry in Brooklyn, speaking to its workers and clients.

As with many other pantries in the city, it has seen its demand rocket during the pandemic as many New Yorkers face food shortages. And with the year drawing to a close, many of New York City’s pantries — often run with private money — face a funding crisis.

Today, the story of one day in the operations of a New York food pantry. 


Guest: Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times; Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The Times; and Stella Tan, an associate audio producer for The Times.  


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

  • Here are five key statistics that show how hunger is worsening in New York City.
  • An estimated 1.5 million New Yorkers can’t afford food, and tens of thousands have shown up at the city’s food pantries since the pandemic began. But there is relief and hope when they are at home cooking.

Nov 25 2020

35mins

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A Failed Attempt to Overturn the Election

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Pressure and litigation appear to have been the pillars of President Trump’s response to his general election loss.

His team filed a litany of court cases in battleground states. In some, such as Georgia and Michigan, the president and his allies took an even more bullish approach, attempting to use their influence to bear down on election officials.

As preparations for the transfer of power finally get underway, we take a look at how the Trump campaign’s attempts to overturn the election played out.


Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine, walks us through the Trump campaign’s strategy in key states. 


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 24 2020

25mins

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New York City’s 3 Percent Problem

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This week New York City’s public schools will close their doors and students will once again undertake online instruction.

The shutdown was triggered when 3 percent of coronavirus tests in the city came back positive over seven days. There are questions, however, around this number being used as a trigger — some health officials maintain that schools are safe.

When is the right time for schools to reopen and what is the right threshold for closures? We explore what lessons New York City’s struggles hold for the rest of the nation.


Guest: Eliza Shapiro, who covers New York City education for The New York Times, walks us through the city’s decision to reopen schools and the difficult decision to shut them down. 


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

  • New York City’s public school system will close this week, moving to all-remote instruction and disrupting the education of roughly 300,000 children.
  • As schools close again, frustrated and angry parents say the decision does not make the city safer.

Nov 23 2020

27mins

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The Sunday Read: 'Man to Man'

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For years, Wil S. Hylton had been drawn to his cousin’s strength and violence. He was pulled in by the archetype that he embodied and was envious of the power he seemed to command.

Wil describes his relative’s violence as “ambient” and “endemic,” but he was sure it wouldn’t turn on him. Until a few years ago, when his cousin tried to kill him.

“My attraction to my cousin and my detachment as a husband both reside in the pantheon of male tropes,” he wrote. “Masculinity is a religion. It’s a compendium of saints: the vaunted patriarch, the taciturn cowboy, the errant knight, the reluctant hero, the gentle giant and omniscient father.”

On today’s Sunday Read, Wil’s wide-ranging exploration of masculinity.

This story was written by Wil S. Hylton and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Nov 22 2020

1hr 25mins

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When the Pandemic Came to Rural Wisconsin

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When the pandemic struck, Patty Schachtner, in her capacity as both a member of the Wisconsin State Senate and chief medical officer for St. Croix County, tried to remain one step ahead. It was an approach criticized by many in her conservative community. 

She was preparing for the worst-case scenario. And now it has arrived — cases and deaths are on the rise in Wisconsin. 

We chart her journey through the months of the pandemic.


Guest: Julie Bosman, who covers the Midwest for The New York Times, spoke with Patty Schachtner over several months about how she was experiencing the pandemic.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 20 2020

29mins

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The Pandemic Economy in 7 Numbers

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There are several figures that tell the story of the American economy right now.

Some are surprisingly positive — the housing market is booming — while others paint a more dire picture.

Using seven key numbers, we look at the sectors that have been affected most profoundly and consider what the path to recovery might look like.


Guest: Ben Casselman, who covers economics and business for The New York Times, walks us through the pandemic’s impact.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 19 2020

24mins

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The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of the Taliban

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President Trump is pushing the military to accelerate the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan, all but guaranteeing a major place for the Taliban in the country’s future.

As a child, Mujib Mashal lived through the Taliban’s takeover of Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan. Now a senior correspondent there for The New York Times, he has for years reported on the extremist group and, more recently, has covered the progress of peace talks.

In this episode of “The Daily,” he shares memories of his childhood and tales from his reporting, and reflects on whether a peaceful resolution is possible.


Guest: Mujib Mashal, senior correspondent in Afghanistan for The New York Times. 


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 18 2020

34mins

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Why Europe Is Flattening the Curve (and the U.S. Isn’t)

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As it became clear that Europe was heading into another deadly wave of the coronavirus, most of the continent returned to lockdown. European leaders pushed largely similar messages, asking citizens to take measures to protect one another again, and governments offered broad financial support.

Weeks later, the effort seems to be working and infection rates are slowing.

In several parts of the United States, it’s a different story. In the Midwest, which is experiencing an explosion of cases similar to that seen earlier in Europe, leaders have not yet managed to come up with a coherent approach to loosen the virus’s grip.

Is it too late for America to learn the lessons from Europe?

Guests: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, who covers the European Union for The New York Times, and Mitch Smith, a national correspondent for The Times based in the Midwest.  

We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Nov 17 2020

29mins

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Division Among the Democrats

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For four years, Democrats had been united behind the mission of defeating President Trump.

But after the election of Joe Biden, the party’s disappointing showing in congressional races — losing seats in the House and facing a struggle for even narrow control of the Senate — has exposed the rifts between progressives and moderates.

In interviews with The New York Times, House members on each side of that divide — Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Representative Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania — shared their views about how the Democrats can win back support in local races.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey  


Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times. 


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

  • In the wake of Joe Biden’s victory, the divides that have long simmered among Democrats are now beginning to burst into the open.
  • In an interview with The New York Times, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez dismissed criticism from House moderates and said the next few weeks would set the tone for how the incoming administration would be received by liberal activists.
  • Representative Conor Lamb told The Times that he expected the Biden team to govern as it had campaigned: with progressives at arm’s length.

Nov 16 2020

36mins

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The Sunday Read: 'Hard Times'

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For the folk duo Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, pandemic isolation brought about a creative boon. In a year that has been defined by uncertainty, they have returned to what they know: songs about the slow, challenging, beautiful heat of living.

This story was written by Hanif Abdurraqib and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Nov 15 2020

44mins

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A Non-Transfer of Power

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Maggie Haberman on why the traditional transfer of power is not happening this year, and the implications of that delay. 

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 13 2020

26mins

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A Vaccine Breakthrough

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It’s a dark time in the struggle with the coronavirus, particularly in the United States, where infections and hospitalizations have surged.

But amid the gloom comes some light: A trial by the drug maker Pfizer has returned preliminary results suggesting that its vaccine is 90 percent effective in preventing Covid-19.

With the virus raging, how strong is this new ray of hope?

Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

  • Pfizer has announced positive early results from its coronavirus vaccine trial, cementing the lead in a frenzied global race that has unfolded at record-breaking speed.
  • Meet the couple behind the German company, BioNTech, that partnered with Pfizer to develop the vaccine.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about this show and others at nytimes.com/thedailysurvey.

Nov 12 2020

24mins

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The (Unfinished) Battle for the Senate

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After the tumult of last week’s voting, one crucial question remains: Who will control the Senate?

The answer lies in Georgia, where two runoff elections in January will decide who has the advantage in the upper chamber.

With so much at stake, we look at how those races might shake out.


Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 


Background reading: 

Nov 11 2020

30mins

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About Those Polls…

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Nate Cohn, an expert on polling for The New York Times, knows that the predictions for the 2016 presidential election were bad.

But this year, he says, they were even worse.

So, what happened?

Nate talks us through a few of his theories and considers whether, after two flawed performances, polling should be ditched.

Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times, speaks to us about the polls and breaks down the election results. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 10 2020

32mins

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Celebration and Sorrow: Americans React to the Election

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This episode contains strong language.

The sound of victory was loud. It was banging pots, honking horns and popping corks as supporters of President-elect Joe Biden celebrated his win.

But loss, too, has a sound. In the days after the U.S. election result was announced, some of the 71 million-plus Americans who backed President Trump are grieving. 

Can the country overcome its differences? In discussions with voters in areas both red and blue, we traced the fault lines of the country’s deep rifts.

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a Times national political reporter, spoke with voters in Mason County, Texas. Robert Jimison, Jessica Cheung and Andy Mills, producers of “The Daily,” and Alix Spiegel, an editor, also reported from across the country.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Nov 09 2020

39mins

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The Sunday Read: ‘Lost in the Deep’

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On the afternoon of Sept. 15, 1942, the U.S.S. Wasp, an aircraft carrier housing 71 planes, 2,247 sailors and a journalist, was hit by torpedoes fired by a Japanese submarine, sending it more than two and a half miles to the bottom of the Pacific. It has remained there ever since.

Last year, a team on the Petrel — perhaps the most successful private vessel on Earth for finding deepwater wrecks — set out to find it.

In his narrated story, Ed Caesar, a contributor to The New York Times Magazine, joins the team aboard the Petrel and speaks to the family of Lt. Cmdr. John Joseph Shea, a heroic naval officer killed in the attack on the Wasp.

This story was written by Ed Caesar and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Nov 08 2020

59mins

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Special Episode: Joe Biden Wins the Presidency

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After days of uncertainty, Joe Biden has been elected president, becoming the first candidate in more than a quarter of a century to beat an incumbent. His running mate, Kamala Harris, is the first woman and woman of color elected vice president.

Mr. Biden’s win is set to be contested — President Trump said in a statement that “the election is far from over.”

Today we host a roundtable of three Times political journalists who discuss the election results, Mr. Biden’s victory and Mr. Trump’s next move.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times; Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The Times; and Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The Times and The New York Times Magazine.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

  • Mr. Biden achieved victory offering a message of healing and unity. He will return to Washington facing a daunting set of crises.
  • He has spent his career devoted to institutions and relationships. Those are the tools he will rely on to govern a fractured nation.

Nov 07 2020

37mins

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The President’s Damaging Lie

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When President Trump took to the podium in the White House briefing room Thursday evening to give a statement on the election count, he lied about the legality of the votes against him in key battleground states and called into question the integrity of poll workers, laying a conspiracy at the feet of Democrats.

Both the Republican establishment and the conservative news media have been split in their responses to his claims.

Inside the White House and the Trump campaign, there is shock at the direction the contest has taken — many in his camp believed that a win was certain.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In a stunning appearance in the White House, Mr. Trump lied about vote-counting, conjuring up a conspiracy of “legal” and “illegal” ballots being tabulated and claiming without evidence that states were trying to deny him re-election.

Nov 06 2020

29mins

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By jdoaodbxosoahfbc - Jun 01 2020
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I love this podcast! I can catch up on everything!

Protest episode

By RapGawd - Jun 01 2020
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Really good. Brought me back