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Rank #9 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Education
Visual Arts
How To

Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #9 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Education
Visual Arts
How To
Read more

Savvy Painter is a weekly podcast for artists who mean business. Antrese Wood talks to experts in the field about the business of art and how it gets created. Want to know how leaders in the fine art world of plein-air and landscape painting got their start? What habits do top artists have in common? Every week, we talk about representational painting, abstract art, alla prima painting, art competitions, art materials, watercolor, oil painting, how to get into an art gallery, how to succeed with your art business and so much more!

Read more

Savvy Painter is a weekly podcast for artists who mean business. Antrese Wood talks to experts in the field about the business of art and how it gets created. Want to know how leaders in the fine art world of plein-air and landscape painting got their start? What habits do top artists have in common? Every week, we talk about representational painting, abstract art, alla prima painting, art competitions, art materials, watercolor, oil painting, how to get into an art gallery, how to succeed with your art business and so much more!

iTunes Ratings

524 Ratings
Average Ratings
468
25
10
13
8

Dean Mitchell

By a. albury - Nov 28 2019
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Excellent podcast. Host and guest were very informative and interesting.

Love the thoughtful, humorous, engaging interviews!

By lzendt - Nov 25 2019
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Thanks for all the help, information and fun.

iTunes Ratings

524 Ratings
Average Ratings
468
25
10
13
8

Dean Mitchell

By a. albury - Nov 28 2019
Read more
Excellent podcast. Host and guest were very informative and interesting.

Love the thoughtful, humorous, engaging interviews!

By lzendt - Nov 25 2019
Read more
Thanks for all the help, information and fun.

Listen to:

Cover image of Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood

Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Savvy Painter is a weekly podcast for artists who mean business. Antrese Wood talks to experts in the field about the business of art and how it gets created. Want to know how leaders in the fine art world of plein-air and landscape painting got their start? What habits do top artists have in common? Every week, we talk about representational painting, abstract art, alla prima painting, art competitions, art materials, watercolor, oil painting, how to get into an art gallery, how to succeed with your art business and so much more!

Diving Deep into the Creative Process, with Cecil Touchon

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How often do you get the chance to do a deep dive into the creative process? Sure, you may have enjoyed the ability to do this when you were in school or early in your career but have you thought about it lately? It was an honor to sit down for a wide-ranging conversation with the artist, Cecil Touchon as we explored the creative process. Cecil creates collage and paintings out of typographic elements; his paintings are called Post-Dogmatic paintings. I know that artists like you are going to a lot out of our in-depth conversation.

Looking closer. 

One of the primary responsibilities of the artist is to look closer at the aspects of the world around us and through their work, help others to do the same. While this responsibility is a great one, the skill of looking closer takes time to develop. Observing the artwork of various artists, you can see this skill or lack thereof in full effect. Cecil Touchon is one of the most thoughtful and detailed artists that I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing. He takes the shapes, angles, and patterns he studies very seriously and does his best to convey this passion in his artwork.

The evolving creative process.

How has your creative process evolved over the years? Do you approach your canvas or your medium the same way today as you did when you first started? What has caused you to change and improve your process over the years? Looking back on his career, Cecil Touchon says that he has remained committed to the process of excellence. Through all the highs and lows of his career, the one constant focus for Cecil has been this strive to produce artwork that can compete with those at the top of his field. The challenge for many artists is staying committed to a certain level of creativity while evolving and adapting their process along the way.

How the digital revolution has impacted the art community. 

Can you think of a primary way you’ve been impacted as an artist by the digital revolution? Has your artwork improved or has it been negatively affected by the technological advancements of our society? According to Cecil Touchon, we are still in the middle of sorting the impact of the technological and digital revolution out. When you consider how quickly everything has changed in the last 20 years or so, you can see what Cecil is referring to. As the rise of the internet has impacted so much of our lives, it seems that many sectors including the art community are still trying to find their bearings.

Don’t let distractions rob you of your creativity.

Given the high-speed environment that the digital revolution has ushered in, many artists find themselves looking for ways to stabilize their process. What habits and routines have worked for you? Do you have a set place and time to practice your craft? Cecil Touchon is convinced that the best way to quiet all the noise that surrounds us both audibly and visually is to stay committed to a schedule. Throughout his career, Cecil has enjoyed the consistency and predictability of his set time and place to work on his art. Do you thrive in that type of environment or you do you feed off of a more haphazard approach?

Outline of This Episode
  • [3:15] I introduce my guest, Cecil Touchon.
  • [5:30] Cecil talks about how he got started as an artist.
  • [9:30] How does Cecil describe his artwork?
  • [12:00] The evolution of an artist.
  • [20:30] Exploring creativity and going deeper.
  • [25:30] Learning to notice and appreciate depth, angels, and shapes.
  • [43:30] Cecil talks about what he is trying to accomplish with his artwork.
  • [55:30] What has been the impact of the information age on the art community?
  • [1:02:30] Moving from a looking culture to a watching culture.
  • [1:09:00] Why you need a designated space and time to work on your art.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Nov 29 2018

1hr 11mins

Play

Exploring the Language of Painting, with Maggie Siner

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What does it look like to explore the language of painting? How do you understand the language? What does it take to become fluent in it? I had the incredible honor of sitting down and discussing this fascinating topic with the artist, Maggie Siner. Maggie grew up in New Jersey and currently resides in France. She began her studies at the Art Students League of New York in 1968, graduated from Boston University (BFA) in 1973 and from American University (MFA) in 1976. I can’t wait for you to learn from Maggie’s fascinating and unique perspective!

Habits learned early.

Do you have certain habits and lessons you learned early in your career that shaped you as an artist? What made those habits stand out in your mind? For Maggie Siner, those early habits came from her time at Boston University. There she learned the value of a steadfast work habit and working through the challenges and hurdles that life puts in the way. Maggie also discovered profound respect for the materials of her craft that has stayed with her all these years later. Maggie stresses that she is the artist she is today due to the valuable lessons that were instilled in her during those formative years.

The language of painting.

What comes to mind when you hear the phrase, “The language of painting?” Does it take you to a place of deep intellectual contemplation or does the phrase bounce off of you with little meaning? Maggie Siner says that the language of painting is not merely about color, it's about the transformation of materials. She goes on to explain that it also has to do with the abstract structure and arrangement of color and shape that creates the meaning of a painting. I was thrilled to hear Maggie’s compelling explanation of this beautiful phrase; I hope you get value from it too!

Painting from real life.

When I asked Maggie to describe her artwork, she was quick to tell me that she doesn’t like classifications because their meanings change so often. I was able to get her to open up about her artwork and what she tries to accomplish when she approaches the canvas. Maggie pains from life, meaning she is looking at her subject as she paints it. In her approach, Maggie doesn’t like to use photos or her imagination, the subject in front of her is of the utmost value. Ultimately, her goal is to extract meaning from the chaos of the world around her.

Stay committed to the process.

Let’s face it, our line of work isn’t the easiest or most forgiving. We all struggle with self-doubt and bouts of creative block. What have you found to help you through these challenges? For Maggie Siner, it all comes down to staying committed to the process. Much of her tenacity and determination harkens back to those early days and lessons learned at Boston University. She says that persistence and hard work are the secret weapons that keep her focused on her work through the good and the bad.

Outline of This Episode
  • [3:15] I introduce my guest, Maggie Siner.
  • [4:45] What led Maggie to a career in art?
  • [11:30] Work habits that Maggie learned early in her career.
  • [14:45] The language of painting.
  • [22:45] How did Maggie end up in France?
  • [32:45] Maggie describes her artwork.
  • [45:00] Creating beauty in the midst of chaos.
  • [47:50] Why it's important to stay committed to the process.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Nov 15 2018

50mins

Play

The Path of a Self Taught Artist, with Julian Merrow Smith

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Have you ever wondered how a self taught artist fares in today’s art scene? Do they have the same difficulties and opportunities as artists who have been through the traditional route? What unique lessons can we learn from this subset of creators who defy conventional expectations? My guest, Julian Merrow Smith is a self taught artist who has plenty of insight to share about his journey. In our conversation, we touched on his move to France, how he taught himself how to paint, why he decided to start teaching workshops, how he works through disappointment, and much more. I can’t wait for you to get to know the side of Julian that came out in our interview!

Creative Inspiration

What inspires you to create your artwork? Is it people, places, concepts, or something else? When I get the chance to peer into the mind of an artist I enjoy the wonderful opportunity to explore what inspires them, what really makes them come alive. It intrigues me to hear what inspires various artists as they approach their canvas. Artist Julian Merrow Smith shared with me that he likes to use what he sees around him each day at his home in the countryside of France. He draws inspiration from peaches at this point in the season when I spoke with him. Catch a glimpse of Julian’s work captured in the images section at the end of this post!

Discovering What NOT to do

It’s always a privilege when I get to sit down and talk to artists whose career path has been different than my own. I love hearing from artists who discovered their passion for art late in life and from others who found their way as a self taught artist. Julian Merrow Smith took the time to share with me his journey and the lessons he has taken away from the experience of teaching himself how to paint. One of the key insights that Julian shared with me is how he was able to discover his unique voice and creative path by putting in the long hard hours and by deciding after each completed work what aspect he did NOT want to continue to produce from that painting. Julian was kind enough to share many more insights and lessons from his art career - I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

From Self Taught Artist to Teacher

Can you imagine the pressure and stress that comes with teaching students to do what you’ve only discovered how to do on your own? Imagine you have no frame of reference to look back upon, no formal teaching in the subject matter in which you are being asked to teach. Self taught artist Julian Merrow Smith found himself in that very scenario. Students and established artists alike have been drawn to Julian’s work and want to learn from him. In proper response, Julian has begun offering workshops. The unique circumstance is not lost on Julian, in our conversation we discussed his feelings of serving as a teacher in a subject where he didn’t have one.

Momentum can be KEY

How do you keep the ball moving as an artist? What practices do you turn to that keep you coming back to the canvas over and over again to hone your craft? I’ve heard from artists over and over again that once they’ve stepped away from their work for a period of time, they find it very difficult to return. Yet, I also have heard from well-known artists that stepping away for a period of time has been essential for their mental and emotional capacity to continue to create. In my conversation with Julian Merrow Smith, we discussed how this topic has played out in his creative journey. There may not be a one size fits all solution, but the KEY is figuring out what works for YOU.

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:40] I introduce my guest, Julian Merrow Smith.
  • [3:30] How Julian got his start as an artist.
  • [8:30] Why did Julian move to France?
  • [11:00] Julian talks about teaching himself how to paint.
  • [13:00] How do you find your voice as an artist?
  • [16:00] Julian’s process in the studio and what inspires his paintings.
  • [21:30] What led Julian to start teaching workshops?
  • [30:30] Julian talks about his approach to the canvas.
  • [35:30] Working through disappointment.
  • [42:30] The difficulty of stopping and starting.
  • [45:30] Sometimes you just need to go paint.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jul 13 2017

52mins

Play

Oil Painting Questions and Answers, with Gamblin

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Do you have questions about oil painting and the best materials to use? Look no further, it’s here! Robert Gamblin, Mary, and Pete Cole join me to answer your biggest questions about oil painting and more! I’m so excited for you to hear their helpful insights into some really great topics. You’ll hear them go over questions about pigments, stories about pigment sources, why some paints have more oil separation, some great information on oil paints and toxicity, and much more! This will serve as a great resource for artists like you to keep in your back pocket. Learn how you can connect with Gamblin and utilize their great resources!

A Dedicated Focus on Oil Painting

You’ve heard that old phrase, “Jack of all trades and master of none” right? That’s what comes to mind when I hear Robert Gablin talk about why his company solely focuses on oil painting instead of branching out to provide water colors, acrylic paints, and other materials. Instead of being a jack of all trades, Robert and his team have decided to focus on being a master of one, oil paint products. Their narrow focus has paid off, they have displayed an amazing passion for detail and improvement on their niche subject. Just hearing from Robert, Mary, and Pete I could tell that they really know their field - they are the experts when it comes to oil paint!

Is the New Blue Worth it?

If you follow news about pigments and breaking developments around that subject like I do, then you’ve heard of the new “YInMn Blue” that was discovered at Oregon State University. This new color was discovered in 2009 as a byproduct of an experimentation. Since this news has recently been making the rounds on social media again it led me to get Robert Gamblin’s take on the new color and if they’ve found it worth it to start producing the color themselves. Robert explained that they found that it is not effective to produce the color for a few reasons. Their primary reason is the enormous cost it requires to create the color. This is due to the fact that the color requires three compounds and two of them are rare earth minerals. Robert’s vast knowledge was on display during our conversation and I know that artists like you will find his insights very helpful.

Mitigating Toxicity Risks

Do you find yourself concerned about your health when it comes to your time in the studio? Are you nervous about how your lifestyle as an artist will impact your health in long run? What would it mean for you to have supplies that are responsible, not only for the environment but for artists like you? My guests from Gamblin are happy to share with artists like you that their line of high-quality products are free of toxins. They want to see more artists use products that are sustainable and health conscious. Don’t let your time in the studio get clouded by concern for your health. Hear from the Gamlin team and how their products could be the best fit for you!

What is FastMatte?

Don’t you hate it when you are in a creative flow and you have to make the decision to pause and let your paint dry before you can proceed? What if there was a way to avoid that pause and continue with your creative momentum? That’s where Gamblin’s helpful product, FastMatte come in. FastMatte colors are a unique type of oil colors, every color dries fast, every color dries matte. These qualities make them perfect for underpainting techniques. FastMatte also serves as an excellent way to come back to oil painting for those painters who have switched to acrylics

because of the need for a faster drying rate. I was seriously impressed with this helpful solution that Gamblin has developed and I hope you get the chance to find out for yourself!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:15] I introduce today’s special Q&A session with the Gamblin team.
  • [2:30] Robert Gamblin joins the podcast and shares how he started Gamblin.
  • [6:00] Why does Gamblin only provide oil paint?
  • [8:00] Robert shares some interesting pigment formulations.
  • [16:00] Dreaming about color combinations.
  • [17:30] Has Gamblin made custom colors for well known artists?
  • [23:00] What is the value of white in the painting process?
  • [32:30] Advice for artists who have never used oils before.
  • [38:30] Warm and cool objects.
  • [44:30] Explaining the reason behind oil separation.
  • [47:30] Does Gamblin have any plans to start making water mixable oil paints?
  • [52:30] Pigment history and toxic pigments.
  • [1:00:30] Advice for artists who work in small enclosed spaces.
  • [1:04:00] Avoiding toxins and working with a baby nearby.
  • [1:06:00] Should I use a retouch varnish? Why varnish in the first place?
  • [1:11:30] Is there a good alternative to cadmiums that are opaque?
  • [1:14:30] Working with the cold wax medium.
  • [1:17:00] Solvent free mediums.
  • [1:22:00] What is the shelf life of oil paint?
  • [1:24:00] Will Gamblin consider changing the size of their caps?
  • [1:26:00] What is FastMatte?
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 10 2017

1hr 30mins

Play

Discover How to Sell Your Art Online and Grow Your Audience, with Jenni Waldrop

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What does it take to sell your art online successfully? Do you need to hire someone else to do it or are there tools and resources out there to empower artists like you to run your business effectively? My guest, Jenni Waldrop has built a successful online business herself and now works to help others do the same. In our conversation, Jenni opens up about how she got started, lessons she has learned along the way, what you need to do to start building an online store, and a whole lot more. If you are looking for a way to cut through all the complicated and confusing barriers to building your online business, this is the episode for you!

Leveraging online platforms can help you succeed.

Let’s face it, building something from scratch is difficult. While you probably aren’t afraid of hard work, wouldn’t you rather spend your time on your art than building an online presence that garners enough traffic to sustain you financially? That’s where utilizing online platforms like Etsy come into play. My guest, Jenni Waldrop is a pro at getting the most out of platforms like Etsy to help artists like you sell your art online. Learn from Jenni about all the advantages and yes, the work that’s necessary to build an online shop and in a successful and sustainable way.

Why it’s important to understand your target audience.

If you want to sell your art online, you’ve got to know who your target audience is and what they are looking for. This doesn't mean you have to compromise your principles or “Sell out.” Rather, think of it as a method for you to find out how you can connect with your fans in a way that allows them to support your work. Remember, the majority of your target audience doesn’t look like you! They don’t think like you, shop like you, or spend their time online the same way you do. Find out how to understand and connect with your audience by listening to Jenni Waldrop’s expert advice!

Work smarter, not harder!

Did you know that understanding how to read data and analytics can help you sell your art online more effectively? It’s true! You don’t always have to work harder to get the results you are looking for, sometimes is better to work smarter. In my conversation with Jenni, she explains how artists like you can locate and understand data from online sources like Instagram, Pinterest, and Etsy that will help you better understand where your audience is connecting with your activity. Wrapping your mind around this data is easier than you might think, once you’ve done that you’ll be better equipped to build your business and market your artwork.

Building an online shop can really pay off.

Trust me, I can understand how you may think that all of this talk about data and building an online shop to sell your art can be overwhelming and even daunting. I’ve built my Etsy shop and experienced less than impressive results. However, I’m convinced that Jenni Waldrop’s approach can work for artists like you and me. After considering all of Jenni’s advice and spending time with the information she’s provided, I’m ready to put give it another shot. Stay tuned as Jenni and I work on a special venture to rehab my Etsy shop and test how her approach can work for artists.

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:05] I introduce my guest, Jenni Waldrop.
  • [3:00] Jenni talks about her background and what she does.
  • [5:30] How do artists on Etsy make themselves discoverable?
  • [7:30] If you build it, will they really come?
  • [10:00] What would Jenni suggest to revive or grow an Etsy business?
  • [14:00] Jenni talks about print on demand options.
  • [17:30] How do you build up and establish an audience?
  • [20:00] Why it’s important to understand who your audience is.
  • [25:30] Following the data can help you work smarter, not harder.
  • [28:30] What does it take to get an Etsy shop off of the ground?
  • [34:00] Advice Jenni would give to her younger self.
  • [38:30] Selling original pieces of art instead of prints.
  • [43:00] Parting advice for artists looking to sell their art online.
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Apr 05 2018

50mins

Play

Tips for Artists (From a Gallery’s Perspective), with Jennifer Farris

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Wouldn’t it be great to hear inside tips for artists from a gallery’s perspective? Most of my interviews are with artists but I jump at the chance when I get to connect with a gallery owner. They provide such a helpful and unique perspective! My guest Jennifer Farris is the owner of Studio Gallery. Jennifer and Rab opened the gallery in 2003 to showcase the work of Bay Area artists. Jennifer and I discuss the role of social media in the art world, the story behind the artwork, setting the right prices, helpful tips for artist engaging with galleries and much more!

Leveraging Social Media to Promote Art

With the interconnectedness the internet age gives us, it can seem like brick and mortar stores are becoming increasingly irrelevant. You might be tempted to think that social media promotion threatens the role of galleries in the art world. Gallery owner Jennifer Farris doesn’t see social media promotion as an obstacle but rather as a platform she can leverage alongside the artists her gallery works with. In our conversation, Jennifer paints a helpful picture of the relationship between social media, artists, and galleries. If you are interested in hearing her inside tips for artists, make sure to catch this interview.

The Story Behind the Artwork

Don’t forget that one of the most powerful tools you have is your story! It doesn’t matter what type of medium you are engaged in, people want to hear the story behind the artwork. What inspired you, what moved you, what were you going through when you created your art? This is what resonates with people. I know it can be scary to put yourself out there, and not every artist is ready to do that - that’s OK. When you are ready, share your story. In most cases, it’s the story that enhances the artwork in a similar way a quality frame helps it pop. If I haven’t convinced you, my guest and gallery owner Jennifer Farris will. She has seen the power a story can have in appreciating and selling a work of art.

Setting the Right Price for Artwork

Figuring out the right price point for their artwork is something that many artists, especially inexperienced artists struggle with. How do you determine the right price range for your work? What is the best process and approach? My guest, Jennifer Farris is happy to shed some light and share some tips for artists on this otherwise difficult process. Jennifer is the owner of Studio Gallery and regularly walks new artists through the process of pricing and showing their work for the first time. Her helpful perspective will help you get an inside look at the art world from the gallery angle.

Do’s and Don’t’s of Approaching a Gallery

As an artist, have you ever wondered what would be the best way to approach a gallery you want to go into business with? You are in luck! Gallery owner Jennifer Farris is eager to share some tips for artists who want to start off on the right foot with galleries.

  1. Visit the gallery if possible. Get to know the feel for the type of work they show. Is it a fit?
  2. Understand the right timing. Don’t ambush a gallery owner, make an appointment.
  3. Respect the process. Don’t expect special treatment. Work with the gallery’s process.

Jennifer has some wonderful insights that will help artists navigate the gallery landscape. I had a wonderful time learning about her gallery’s process and I know you will too!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:35] My introduction to this episode.
  • [2:00] Jennifer shares the story behind Studio Gallery.
  • [4:20] The difficulty Jennifer and Rab faced opening their gallery.
  • [7:40] How does Jennifer help an artist decide which artwork to show?
  • [10:45] What criteria is used to determine if an artist is ready for a solo show?
  • [12:20] How can artists work with galleries in a harmonious way?
  • [15:00] The story behind the artwork.
  • [21:00] Social Media’s influence on galleries.
  • [25:00] Setting prices for artwork.
  • [32:40] Do’s and Don'ts of approaching a gallery as an artist.
  • [39:20] Jennifer’s plans for her gallery’s future.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Apr 06 2017

44mins

Play

Oil Painting and Learning to Manage Distractions, with Michelle Dunaway 

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When was the last time you really took a moment to slow down and notice your surroundings? Do you find that you are easily distracted by your cell phone notifications or the million other things demanding your attention? You aren’t alone! I’ve struggled with managing my distractions for years, so I was thrilled to hear my guest, Michelle Dunaway address this critical topic. In our conversation, we also discuss Michelle’s oil painting, her recent arm injury, how to be honest with yourself, and much more. I know that artists like you will get a ton of value from Michelle’s thoughtful perspective, enjoy! 

Space to daydream and wonder

What was your childhood like? Did you have a ton of expectations placed on you from an early age or were you free to find your own path? While many parents have nothing but the best of intentions - the truth is - a carefree childhood can quickly get pushed to the wayside. Thankfully, Michelle was given permission and encouragement to explore her creativity. Looking back, she is especially fond of the moments where she would get lost in a daydream or playing in a field. Michelle also points to a critical influence in her life, Richard Schmidt - he also took time to invest in Michelle and encourage her abilities both professionally and as a peer.

An unexpected injury 

Don’t you hate it when life throws you a huge curveball that you never saw coming? Maybe for you, it was an unexpected expense like a car repair or the illness of a loved one, or maybe your story is a lot like Michelle’s and you’ve experienced a personal injury that you have to overcome. After recovering from a misstep that caused an injury to her arm, Michelle started to get back into the swing of things. Before long, she realized that she wasn’t able to put in the hours painting as she had before the accident. It turns out that Michelle had re-injured her arm and now has to undergo surgery and an extensive recovery process. 

Managing distractions 

The experience with her arm injury highlighted an important aspect that Michelle had been working to focus on for years - managing distractions. From her cellphone to the news and everything in between - Michelle’s life felt like it was full of distractions. As a spiritual person, Michelle looks to prayer and meditation to help her find her center. Cutting through all the noise of daily life is no easy task! The injury to her arm has forced Michelle to become more aware and present - she still struggles with the distraction of her cell phone, but she’s making progress. What can you take away from Michelle’s story? 

The moments that make you smile 

Have you had a moment in your art career that made you pause in gratitude? Let’s face it; gratitude is not an easy attitude to cultivate. We can get so focused and caught up in what we don’t have or what isn’t going right that we fail to reflect on the good things in life. Michelle will be the first person to tell you that her life is filled with things to be grateful for. Looking back on her career - Michelle points out one person’s reaction to her oil painting of Richard Schmidt as a particularly remarkable experience. The man that was viewing her painting was moved to tears and explained that Michelle’s painting made him feel like he had met Richard Schmidt. What a compliment!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:00] I introduce my guest, Michelle Dunaway. 
  • [2:30] Michelle talks about her influences and why she started a career in art. 
  • [5:30] How has Michelle’s arm injury impacted her journey? 
  • [19:20] Michelle and I discuss the “Artist’s eye.” 
  • [21:00] Learning to be honest with yourself. 
  • [29:30] What does Michelle look for in a subject? 
  • [39:00] Michelle talks about her experience working with Faso. 
  • [42:00] A typical day in Michelle’s studio.
  • [50:00] Removing distractions. 
  • [54:40] Proud moments from Michelle’s career. 
  • [1:04:00] Michelle shares a story about a painting that moved her. 
  • [1:13:30] What is Michelle’s dream project? 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Sep 19 2019

1hr 21mins

Play

Paint Colors, Techniques, Best Practices, and more! Special Q&A Session with Gamblin

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Have you been experimenting with your paint colors lately? Do you have questions about different colors and the best way to mix them? You are in luck! As I’ve been promising, our special color episode with Gamblin featuring Scott Gellatly and Robert Gamblin is here! In our conversation, we go over the pigments used in modern paints, the emotional content of a color, what makes student grade paints, “student grade,” the best paints to use for plein air painting, and so much more. You don’t want to miss a minute of this in-depth and fascinating conversation with Robert and Scott!

Why modern paints have more pigments.

Have you ever wondered why modern oil paints have so many more pigments than older ones you see on display in galleries and museums? What has changed with the process over the years to account for this? My guest, Robert Gamblin was kind enough to give a bit of a history lesson on the production and use of colors and pigments from historical eras and why it’s so different today. I’m excited for you to get the chance to learn from Robert’s expert perspective and dig a little bit into the process and production of the paints you use day in and day out.

What is the emotional content of colors?

Did you know that colors have an emotional content? How does that impact the paint production process? Robert Gamblin says that the emotional content of a color is its primary communication. He goes on to give the example of Cadmium Red Medium, saying that it presents as a very hot and intense color, it could be used to express the feeling of rage or the intensity of a love that you can’t handle. Robert contrasts this color with Magnesium Blue Hue, which presents as a very cool color. I hope you find Robert’s explanation of the emotional content of colors as fascinating as I did!

What makes student grade paints, “Student grade?”

You’ve probably used student grade paints before, but have you ever wanted to know what makes them, “Student grade?” Do you still use student grade paints for some of your projects? My guest, Robert Gamblin took the time to explain what student grade means and how it varies from some of the other paints they offer. According to Robert, the difference between student grade and more premium paints comes down to the pigments. At Gamblin, student grade paints are made with 50% of the pigment load that is used in their artist grade paints. The remainder of the student grade paints are made up of extender pigments, other than that, the production quality and process is the same as the rest of their top quality products. What ways will you use student grade paints in the future?

The different characteristics of black oil colors.

The last time I had the chance to speak with Robert, we talked about the different characteristics of white oil colors. This time around, Robert goes over the characteristics and uses of black oil colors. He starts off talking about the most commonly used black, Ivory Black which is made of burnt bone. Ivory Black is so common because it is an all-around good mixing black color. Robert then goes on to explain how Mars Black differs from Ivory Black because of its opaque nature. Mars Black is best used when you want to utilize black as a color in your paintings because of its strength. Robert has so much to say about all the different blacks and how to best use them, I hope you enjoy his expert perspective!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:15] I introduce my guests, Robert Gamblin and Scott Gellatly.
  • [3:00] Why does modern oil paints have more pigments than older ones?
  • [6:00] What is Gamblin’s guide to color making?
  • [8:30] Robert talks about the emotional content of a color.
  • [10:30] Are there paints out there that painters often misuse?
  • [15:00] The difference between modern pigments and mineral pigments.
  • [20:00] Robert talks about Gamblin’s color pallet.
  • [24:00] What are lake colors?
  • [26:00] What is a hue and what hues does Gamblin feature?
  • [29:00] What makes student grade paints, “student grade?”
  • [34:30] What is the best medium to use prevent “dead spots” in my painting?
  • [40:30] Are their plans in works to expand more skin tone colors?
  • [49:00] Common mistakes to avoid when putting together a personal pallet.
  • [52:00] What are the different characteristics of black oil colors?
  • [59:00] What are the best paints to use for plein air painting?
  • [1:04:30] A question about creating a pallet and the relationship between pigments.
  • [1:08:00] What are Scott’s “Secret weapon” colors.
  • [1:10:30] Robert talks about his trip to Greenland and his work painting icebergs.
  • [1:15:00] What is a good white for glazing?
  • [1:17:00] How are transparent earth colors different from ochres, umbers, and siennas?
  • [1:19:30] Why are cadmium and cobalt colors so expensive and are they really worth it?
  • [1:22:30] What are some of the best colors for blacking out a painting in the beginning?
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jan 25 2018

1hr 28mins

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Components of “Good Art”, with Burton Silverman pt. 1

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What does it take to create “Good Art?” Who decides? What elements or components are necessary to deem something good? My guest today is the renowned artist, Burton Silverman. This is part one of our two part conversation where we discuss a wide range of topics from the components of “Good Art,” discovering your artistic voice, the role of setting and presentation in art, racism and the fear of “the other,” and so much more! Burt draws from his vast wealth of experience and thoughtfulness and I know artists like you will value his contributions as much as I have.

What makes for “Good Art?”

How would you describe “Good Art?” Have you thought about it? Do you have a definition of it? How did you arrive at that conclusion? Artist, Burt Silverman opened up to me about what he thinks are the components of good art. Burt says that it comes down to craftsmanship and the ability to record the world in an accurate way. He further elaborates on this idea by explaining that there is an element in good artwork that transcends technical ability and taps into something deeper. In our conversation, Burt didn’t explain this “deeper” aspect further but I appreciate that he was willing to welcome an element of mystery and the unknown.

The Artistic Voice

A common question I get when it comes to diving deeper into the life of an artist is, “How do you discover your artistic voice?” So what was it like for you? What was your journey like that led you to move more and more into creating the art that you are passionate about? My guest, Burton Silverman was kind enough to consider this question and provide his insights. Burt says that for him it comes down to tapping into an inner sense from your gut and out of that flows the feelings that you believe you are compelled to share with the world. There are so many angles to this topic I know there will be some of you that really resonate with what Burt shared and others who come from a different approach - the diversity of thought is wonderful!

Setting and Presentation

What role do context, setting, and presentation have to play when it comes to viewing art work? In your opinion, does it play a role at all? Is there any difference between art that is completed and admired in the studio and artwork that is presented and shown in a gallery? How does setting impact the viewing? These are all questions and lines of thought that Burton Silverman and I discussed in our recent conversation. Burt pointed out that there is some sort of transformation that takes place from the studio setting and context to when the artwork is displayed in an intentional and meaningful way.

Creating Room for Freedom and Expression

What is your relationship to the concept of freedom when it comes to the creative process? Do you feel free to express yourself and work in a place outside of the lines? Or do you find yourself shackled to rules and boxes that you can’t cross? In our conversation, Burton Silverman and I talk about the role of rules and school of thought. Of course, they have an important role to play but they can also get in the way of our ability to push the limits and think outside of preconceived norms and expectations. I hope you get a sense of the freedom of expression that Burt and I discussed and make sure to come back next week for part two of our conversation!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:50] I introduce my guest, Burton Silverman.
  • [4:30] Burt talks about attending Fiorello Laguardia School of the Arts.
  • [10:30] What is it that makes a work of art “good?”
  • [15:00] Discovering the artistic voice.
  • [24:00] The role of setting and presentation in art.
  • [39:00] Racism and fear of the “other”
  • [47:00] The role of rules and schools of thought.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 31 2017

52mins

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Striking Landscape Paintings, with Marie Thibeault

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Have you ever viewed a landscape painting that stayed with you for days after your viewing? Many people have had that type of response to Marie Thibeault's amazing artwork. In our conversation, Marie opened up about the inspiration for her artwork, what she wants people to take away from viewing her paintings, her process when approaching the canvas, and so much more. I was thrilled to dive deep into the topic of landscape paintings with an artist like Marie and I know you will get a lot out of her insights too.

Landscapes and tragedy.

While many landscape artists can tend to paint serene settings, Marie Thibeault takes her landscape paintings in a less common direction. Marie is interested in evoking a striking contrast that shows the beauty of the landscape in the midst of turmoil. Her early inspiration for this type of landscape painting came from plane crashes and other various disasters involving a landscape scene. Marie also created a fascinating series of paintings that centered around the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Make sure to take a look at images of Marie’s artwork located at the end of this post.

Getting unstuck.

Don’t you hate it when you get stuck creatively? Do you have any good tricks or tips that help you find your way out of that funk and back to doing what you love? Over the years I’ve had my fair share of creative block and I’m always eager to hear what has worked for my peers. Marie Thibeault says that her best method for getting back on track is to simply go through the motions. In her experience, Marie has found that time in the studio and patiently waiting for inspiration to return does the trick. She also notes that getting stuck creatively is a normal part of the artist’s experience, which is an important reminder for us all!

The role of painting, today.

What is the role of painting in the art community, today? Has it changed or shifted significantly over the years? Through her role as an educator, Marie has seen many of her students experiment with painting only to veer off into other mediums. Marie is very supportive of this process as her students learn to find the right channel for their message to take its form but she remains adamant that painting is that medium for her. She has found through her career that painting is the best way for her to explore the concepts and images that she is drawn to creatively. How did your medium capture your imagination?

You have a unique perspective to share.

Do you really believe that you have a unique and valuable perspective to share through your art? For many artists, the voices of doubt and worthlessness tend to creep up and rob precious time that could be spent basking in the light of creativity. What do you do when that happens? How do you remain focused on the work at hand? Marie is convinced that each artist has a valuable perspective to contribute to the community at large. In many ways, what she describes is a mosaic. While we aren’t all coming together to form one massive piece, we do suffer when one piece is missing from the collective.

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:45] I introduce my guest, Marie Thibeault.
  • [3:00] What inspires Marie to create her artwork?
  • [5:45] Marie talks about her landscape influences.
  • [8:00] How do the concepts of chaos and order influence Marie’s work?
  • [10:00] What does Marie want people to take away from viewing her paintings?
  • [12:00] Marie talks about her process of approaching the canvas.
  • [14:30] How do you get unstuck?
  • [18:00] What are you trying to say with your artwork?
  • [20:30] The danger of rushing through a project.
  • [22:45] What is the role of painting today?
  • [26:30] Memorable reactions to Marie’s artwork.
  • [28:00] Marie talks about challenges she has faced in her career.
  • [34:00] The contrast between natural disasters and man-made disasters.
  • [39:00] Every artist has their own unique voice and perceptive to share.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Nov 01 2018

42mins

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The Hard Work of An Artist, with Steve DaLuz

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Do you struggle with putting in the focused and hard work required of you as an artist? You aren’t alone! I’ve struggled with carving out the time and maintaining that focused attention to the craft that I love. All artists struggle at some point with staying focused. What has worked for you? How have you been able to push through the difficulty? My guest, Steve Da Luz opens up and shares how he has wrestled with this obstacle in his life. I value Steve’s transparency and honesty and I know that you’ll find it just as refreshing and inspiring as I did.

Misconceptions of the “Art World”

What does it mean to follow the guidelines of the “Art World?” Is that something that you are bound to as an artist? Who are the gatekeepers of the art world? My guest, artist Steve Da Luz discusses with me what it means to be an active participant of the art world. We come to the conclusion that there isn’t some abstract and amorphous art world “out there” somewhere, but that it’s creative individuals like you and me that make up this community of artists. I’d love to hear your thoughts on mine and Steve’s discussion and how you feel about the concept of the art world.

Moving to an “Off Site” Studio

What works best for you as an artist, working from a studio space at home or having an “off site” space that you can use as your creative space? Does it really matter where we end up creating our art? What role does space play in our motivations to create? Artist Steve Da Luz walks through his decision to create an “off site” studio where he can focus on his work away from his home life and all the distractions that can bring about. It was fascinating to hear from Steve as he explained why this separate location really motivated him and spurred on his creative process. I’m excited for you to hear from Steve’s intriguing insights and the unique story that he has to share.

Luck Favors the Prepared

I know, it’s a hot topic among many in the “Art World” but I went there again with my guest Steve Da Luz as we discussed the role of luck and talent in the career of an artist. Steve comes out strong with the opinion that if you are ever going to “make it” as an artist, you need to put in the work and as prepared as possible for that “lucky moment” if it ever arrives. He used the phrase “Luck favors the prepared” and I think that he made a lot of valid points in our discussion. Wherever you land on this topic, if it’s pure luck or if it’s solely based on talent or a combination of the two, I hope you take the time to hear from Steve’s experienced perspective.

Surviving Slings and Arrows

The hard work of an artist not only includes finding the time and space to practice your creative process but it also includes taking your share of ups and downs and surviving the slings and arrows tossed your way. These can be literal roadblocks and difficulties that arise in the form of finances and critics but it can also include your own demons that can trip up your artistic expression. How will you survive the slings and arrows that come your way? Take a moment and hear from Steve Da Luz as he shares his story and how he’s been able to overcome the difficulties that have come his way in his prolific career.

Outline of This Episode
  • [2:00] I introduce my guest, Steve Da Luz.
  • [4:00] How Steve decided to develop the focus of his work.
  • [9:30] Misconceptions of the “Art World.”
  • [15:00] Steve talks about his decision to move to a off site studio.
  • [19:00] The financial struggle to survive as an artist.
  • [22:00] The role of luck and preparedness regarding success as an artist.
  • [27:00] Not everyone is going to connect with your work.
  • [31:00] Surviving the slings and arrows.
  • [37:00] Facing setbacks.
  • [42:30] Steve talks about his process and technical aspects of his paintings.
  • [58:30] The common thread in Steve’s work.
  • [1:02:30] What painting would Steve LOVE to own?
  • [1:07:00] Projects that Steve is currently working on.
  • [1:11:00] Steve talks about paintings of his that he’ll always keep.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 24 2017

1hr 15mins

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Finding Your Artistic Voice, with Nancy Gruskin

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Often it can take an artist years to discover their “Artistic voice.” It comes to each artist in a different way, some find it by learning from mentors and instructors over years, others find it by teaching the nuances of art theory or art history. There are so many beautiful paths that different individuals take to discover their unique artistic voice. My guest, Nancy Gruskin had a fascinating story to tell as she spoke with me about her journey to discovering and sharing her artistic voice. She didn’t take the “Typical” route to her career as an artist but it makes total sense for Nancy and it's an inspiring one that I know you will enjoy!

Getting “Established” as an Artist

Part of the process of discovering your voice as an artist is getting to that place where you feel “Established.” Similar to finding your voice, getting established comes at different points for each artist. For Nancy Gruskin, her career as an art history instructor has played a significant role in her journey and arriving at that place of feeling established in her career. She talks about how teaching and bringing value to students even when her art isn’t selling is still validating for her. Nancy was very forthcoming in sharing her thoughts and feelings in our conversation and I know her story will have an impact on other artists that get the chance to hear from her.

Acrylic Wash and Finding What Works

How did you discover what medium or process works best for your creative expression? Have you stuck with that same method for years or have you adjusted and changed it over time? My guest, Nancy Gruskin shares how she had modified and stumbled upon different approaches in her paintings and artwork over the years. In our conversation, Nancy told me how she stumbled into working with acrylic wash and how working with acrylic works much better in her home studio than working with oils like she did in the past. It was great to hear from Nancy and how she has adjusted her approach over the years and is still finding her creative impulses shine through that adaptation.

Creative Inspiration

Some artists share that they find their creative inspiration in some of the most mundane aspects of their life, others still find that inspiration strikes through the abstract. There is no “Right way” to tap into that creative inspiration, each artist must find what it is that inspires them. My guest Nancy Gruskin shared a touching moment from her life that inspired one of her paintings. Nancy’s story just goes to show you that you can’t bottle the creative process! It was great to hear how yet another individual uses the flow and circumstance of their life to create something beautiful. Make sure to catch images of Nancy’s paintings at the end of this post!

Overcoming Self-Doubt

It takes a lot of courage to bare your soul and share with a large audience a glimpse into your inner thoughts and feelings. Is that something you can imagine doing? My guest, Nancy Gruskin felt bold enough to share that she struggles with self-doubt from time to time. In our conversation, Nancy told me that she felt like she wouldn't’ have anything noteworthy to share with a wider audience. This could not have been further from the truth! I had a wonderful time speaking with Nancy about her journey to become an artist and how she has tackled other challenges along the way. I know you will also enjoy hearing from such a transparent, unique and bold artistic voice!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:50] I introduce my guest, Nancy Gruskin.
  • [2:00] Nancy’s journey to becoming an artist.
  • [10:30] How has Nancy’s background with Art History influenced her artwork?
  • [13:00] Finding your voice.
  • [18:00] Nancy talks about being included in a group art show.
  • [22:00] Feeling “Established” as an artist.
  • [27:30] Nancy’s process in approaching her time in the studio.
  • [34:30] Technical aspects of Nancy’s artwork.
  • [47:30] Facing self doubt and challenges along the way.
  • [53:30] Healthy habits.
  • [56:30] What art would Nancy LOVE to own if money wasn’t an issue?
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jun 15 2017

1hr 1min

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Becoming An Artist, with Kami Mendlik

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The public perception of a person's journey toward becoming an artist is usually an ethereal and happy go lucky one. As many of you know, that’s not the case. In my conversation with artist Kami Mendlik, we discuss her journey of becoming an artist. Kami emphasis that luck had nothing to do with her skill, talent, and success as an artist. She isn’t shy talking about the stubbornness, difficulty, and perseverance that is required to have a thriving art career. In our conversation we also touch on the impact of a mentor, finding the time to paint, her life raising children and much more.

The impact of a mentor

Can you think back to a time when someone helped you on your career path in vital ways? Everyone doesn’t get such a special person in their life. Usually, a mentoring relationship doesn’t just fall into your lap. Kami Mendlik had to hunt down and pursue her mentor Mary Pettis. Kami was relentless because she knew she had to learn from one of the best in her field. Mary was a huge hero and mentor to Kami and only asked for one thing in return for the time and insight she gave, that one day Kami would do the same for another young artist. Kami has fulfilled that promise and delights in the joy of passing down what she has learned on her journey to up and coming artists.

Finding the time to paint

One of the most common refrains among aspiring artist is “I’ve got to find the time to paint.” The struggle to carve out the time to focus on something so important and intimate can be difficult. Artist Kami Mendlik empathizes with this struggle but is a strong advocate of helping artists push through this difficulty. In order to succeed as an artist and a single mother, Kami had to get creative with her time. In our conversation, she tells me a few beautiful stories of her children growing up around her painting habits. If you’ve ever struggled to find the time to paint this conversation will be a huge encouragement to you.

Don’t wait until you’ve “Arrived”

The difficulty of navigating a career toward becoming an artist is fighting off the mindset that everything will come together once you’ve “Arrived.” My guest, Kami Mendlik strongly urges that artists fight that impulse. Kami describes her career as a journey. In fact, she couldn’t pick a particular moment in her career where she “Felt like an artist.” Rather, Kami describes her path as a series of stepping stones along the way. She encourages budding artists to avoid the trap of comparison and focus on discovering their own journey and finding their “Voice” in the process.

Incorporating children into life as an artist

Many professionals and even some artists are tempted to compartmentalize their work life from their life as a parent. To some degree, this has to be done to carve out that time where you can get “In the zone” and focus on your work. But because much of an artist’s process bleeds into the rest of their life you have to find a way to incorporate family life into the artistic journey. My guest, Kami Mendlik shares her experiences raising her children and navigating her path toward becoming an artist. Kami is delightfully transparent and honest as she explains the joys and difficulties that have come along the way. I know you will benefit greatly from our candid and in-depth conversation.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:55] My introduction to today’s guest; Kami Mendlik
  • [2:30] Kami’s journey to become an artist.
  • [5:20] Every step an arrival.
  • [11:00] Not luck, hard work.
  • [20:30] The difficulty of finding your way after art school.
  • [23:00] Determination and making your way.
  • [29:00] The impact of a mentor.
  • [34:00] Raising children and pursuing an art career.
  • [40:00] Fighting the impulse to make “Perfect art”
  • [45:40] Pushing through fear.
  • [51:00] Don’t wait until you’ve “Arrived”
  • [54:45] Incorporating children into life as an artist.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Apr 13 2017

1hr 3mins

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Reflections and Lessons Learned from Various Artists 

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I still can’t believe that it’s been five years since I started the Savvy Painter podcast. Back when I first started, there were hardly any podcasts about, by, or for artists. Today, there are a ton of options out there, and I’m happy to call many of them friends! On this episode - I decided to do something different - I sat down with a handful of fellow podcasters to answer three questions. 

  1.  What is one common thread you noticed from speaking to so many artists? 
  2. What advice would you give to an emerging artist who sometimes questions their resolve? 
  3. What is the worst advice you hear given to artists? 

Not surprisingly, each of my guests had varied answers that kept me engaged and curious. I can’t wait for artists like you to dig in and hear from their unique and fascinating perspectives!

A common thread

What would you say is the common thread that ties artists together? As I asked this question to my guests, I was encouraged by their answers. Again and again, the common thread that binds many artists’ seems to be freedom and autonomy. Each person that chooses the path of an artist will follow the call to creativity by creating their own path. I love the boldness that each of my guests tapped into when they answered this question - they weren’t afraid to get it wrong! I hope you get a lot of helpful insights from their unique perspectives and make sure to check out their podcasts.

Advice for emerging artists 

There are so many things that I wish I would have heard when I first started out as an artist. What are some of the tips and insights you wish you could have heard? Many of my guests stressed the value of putting in the work - and hard work at that! Too often artists get portrayed as struggling and starving or esoteric and whimsical - but what about the hard-working artist? At the end of the day - if you aren’t working hard and creating - do you really want to be an artist? Another one of my guests encouraged their peers to give yourself permission to call yourself an artist - yes, you can wear that title. 

Terrible advice to avoid 

Sometimes the best advice is to avoid bad advice. What are some terrible pieces of advice that people have given you over the course of your career? I can think of one person who decided that it was their calling to make sure I knew how unbelievably hard it would be to make it as an artist. Yes, it is hard to succeed as an artist, but it’s also hard to succeed as a doctor or a business leader, but we don’t go out of the way to highlight the difficulties of those professions! My guests have a ton of bad advice that you should avoid - let me know which ones resonated with you.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:20] I introduce the three questions I ask fellow podcasting artists. 
  • [3:00] Amanda Adams and Nicole Mueller (Beyond the Studio) answer question #1. 
  • [6:10] David Sherry (Creative Caffeine) answers question #2. 
  • [8:00] Kaylan Buteyn (Artist/Mother) answers question #1. 
  • [11:10] Marissa Huber (Carve Out Time for Art) answers question #1. 
  • [12:50] Yoshino (Artist Decoded) answers question #1. 
  • [20:30] Andy Pizza (Creative Pep Talk) answers question #1. 
  • [28:40] Erika Hess (I Like Your Work) answers question #1. 
  • [31:00] Andy Pizza answers question #2. 
  • [41:15] Brian Alfred (Sound and Vision) answers question #2. 
  • [43:30] Erika Hess answers question #2. 
  • [44:30] John Dalton (Gently Does It) answers question #2. 
  • [46:00] Stan Prokopenko (Draftsmen) answers question #2. 
  • [49:50] Amanda Adams and Nicole Mueller answer question #3. 
  • [51:45] Erika Hess answers question #3. 
  • [55:30] Andy Pizza answers question #3.
  • [59:00] Brian Alfred answers question #3.
  • [1:02:20] David Sherry answers question #3
  • [1:03:55] Kaylan Buteyn answers question #3.
  • [1:10:00] Yoshino answers question #3. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 08 2019

1hr 15mins

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How to Build a Presence on Etsy and Sell Your Art, with Jenni Waldrop

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What does it take to branch out from traditional practices and sell your art on platforms like Etsy? Can you make a living off of an Etsy business? What should you look out for? Good news! I put all these questions and more to my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop. 

In our conversation, Jenni opens up about realistic expectations, why it’s not enough to just build a shop on Etsy, how to plan for seasonal changes, and much more. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to build a presence on a platform like Etsy - this is the episode for you! 

Addressing Criticism

The last time I had Jenni on as a guest, we had an excellent discussion that resonated with a lot of Savvy Painter listeners. Just recently, I received a message that had some pointed criticism for Jenni and the numbers she shared regarding her Etsy earnings. In our conversation, Jenni breaks down why she shared the numbers that she shared and why she had to split up her shops to increase her earning potential. After our conversation, I’m confident that you’ll have a greater understanding of what to expect when it comes to building a presence on Etsy. 

Don’t be afraid to test

What is the best product to sell on Etsy? For each artist and seller, the answer to this question will change - especially depending on the season! While small prints will sell well for one artist - large prints will sell better for another. The key is to give yourself permission to test the market and find out what works. When it comes to selling your art - there is no one size fits all solution you’ve got to be willing to make adjustments and learn as you go. Jenni encourages artists to look around at what is selling, especially given the season. 

If you build it - will they come? 

Remember that old Kevin Costner movie, “Field of Dreams?” Wouldn’t it be nice if your business were as simple as setting it up and waiting for the customers to flock to your doorstep? Unfortunately - as many of you know - selling your art isn’t easy. Just like nurturing relationships with a gallery - you’ve got to nurture a relationship with your audience on platforms like Etsy. Consider sharing part of your story or starting a blog to feature artwork and projects you’ve worked on in the past. 

One step at a time

How do you feel about starting your Etsy store? Does it sound daunting and overwhelming? If so - you aren’t alone. There are so many artists out there who want to begin selling on Etsy and other platforms, but they don’t know where to start. I get it - I’ve been there! Don’t think that you need to have everything up and running right away - you don’t! Listen to Jenni’s advice and start one step at a time - break it down into manageable steps that you can accomplish at your own pace. For more information on how to start an Etsy shop - make sure to check out Jenni’s website!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:10] I introduce my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop. 
  • [5:00] Jenni addresses some criticism from our first episode together. 
  • [12:30] Setting realistic expectations. Jenni shares some helpful examples. 
  • [19:50] Testing what works and learning from what doesn’t. 
  • [27:00] Should you be worried about people ripping off your artwork on Etsy? 
  • [35:30] What is going on with Etsy’s shipping promotions? 
  • [38:30] If you build it - they will come - right? 
  • [42:30] Jenni explains how to break down your priorities. 
  • [45:00] How do you deal with audience burnout? 
  • [50:20] Preparing for seasonal trends. 
  • [53:30] Building a presence and making a connection. 
  • [56:45] Tips for building up your business and planning out your month. 
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 22 2019

1hr 1min

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How to Crush the Inner Critic, Get Over Perfectionism, and Get Out of Your Own Way So You Can Create Your Best Work

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I’m trying something new on this special episode! I want to tackle some of the common questions that I get from many of my listeners and fellow artists like you. On this episode, we will cover mindset mastery and how understanding and exploring your mindset can help you succeed and thrive as an artist. I also touch on an important topic, battling the inner critic as well as the significance of scheduling the important things in your life including downtime and studio time. I’m excited to share all of this with you and I look forward to hearing your feedback!

Why mindset is so important.

Did you know that your mindset impacts everything in your life? It’s true! It affects how you see your paintings, how you manage your career, your family life, the list goes on and on. What steps can you take to actively engage and direct your mindset so you can grow and thrive as an artist? The first step is becoming aware of the current state of your mindset, are you in a good place producing good results or have you taken a bit of a nosedive lately? Once you recognize what state your mindset is in and the tendencies you lean toward, you empower yourself! I hope you get a lot of value out of this framing of mindset mastery, I truly believe it can transform the way you work and create as an artist.

Keeping a schedule can be a game-changer!

What has your relationship with your calendar been like? Are you on good terms or is it in need of some rehabilitation? While most people don’t fit into that stereotypical “Type A” personality, even the most unstructured individuals among us would benefit from the use of a schedule or calendar. This simple shift can help organize and prioritize the most important things we want to dedicate our time to. It’s been said that what you put your attention on becomes important. Based on how you spend your time, what are the most important things in your life right now? Do you want to make a change and shift your time to something else? Schedule it! I’m not saying that it’s easy by any stretch and I’m happy to share my struggles, but I’ve learned the hard way that keeping a schedule can be a game-changer for your creativity and productivity.

Don’t let that inner critic hijack your life.

The first thing you need to know about your inner critic is that you aren’t alone! As I’ve talked to and interviewed many artists over the years, one thing is constant, we all struggle with pushing back the voice of our inner critic. Don’t fall for the lies that your inner critic likes to pedal! Here are three helpful starring places to minimize the influence of your inner critic. One, hold on to the truth that you aren’t alone, these negative or critical thoughts happen to every artist, this helps to break it’s isolating power. Two, you can choose to ignore your inner critic, you have that power. Three, you can opt for defeating it with humor, laugh at it, go ahead what is it going to hurt? Some artists have found this approach to be really effective! Find what works for you and consider taking the step to discuss it with your fellow artists, this can help break it’s power too.

Make sure to be strategic about your focus.

If you are looking to make a change in your mindset and your general approach to life as an artist, consider how you can be strategic about your focus. This goes back to what we talked about with scheduling, what you put your attention on becomes important. Don’t put it off and think that you’ll make changes down the road, now is the time! As an artist, you know that where you put your focus can significantly change the way you view your subject. Take the time to consider and implement some of these concepts, your career and your life is worth the investment! I’d also love to hear about what strategies and practices have helped you find focus, get in the right mindset, and battle your inner critic.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:05] I introduce this special episode tackling some of your questions.
  • [1:00] Mindset impacts everything!
  • [2:10] How do you carve out time for painting between life with kids, a partner, and everything in between?
  • [4:15] I share a personal story of how I struggled to find enough time to paint.
  • [10:00] Why it’s important to schedule your time, especially down time!
  • [14:00] What you put your attention on becomes important.
  • [17:00] Be aware of what is going on inside of your head!
  • [19:00] How you can start fighting against the inner critic.
  • [24:00] Why you should be strategic about your focus.
  • [28:30] Mastering your mindset is about being present.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Mar 01 2018

31mins

Play

How to Sell Your Art Without Selling Out and More! With Maria Brophy

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Like most artists you’ve probably wondered how you can sell your art at some point along your journey. Some artists pick it up quickly or partner with someone who can help this navigate the business side of making a living as an artist. Then there are others who really struggle with this aspect of surviving as an artist. Where do you land? Wouldn’t it be great to get some helpful professional insight on this topic? Then you’ve come to the right place! My guest, Maria Brophy has spent the last decade and a half, acting as agent and brand manager for her husband, artist Drew Brophy. In our conversation, Maria opens up about the process of moving to a full-time career as an artist, when to say no, how to position yourself as a high-value artist, and much more. I know artists like you will get a ton of value out of our fascinating and wide-ranging conversation!

Know What You Want

What do you want out of your career as an artist? Really!? For too long, we have been trained by society to think that what we want isn’t realistic or right. Maybe you find that you’ve pushed what you want aside for so long that you found yourself spending energy and time doing what others have directed you to do. It’s time to put that thinking behind you! Really take the time to discover what it is that you want out of your profession as an artist. Maria believes that if you learn how to take the time to hone in on what it is you really want, you’ll end up being more productive and happy in the process. Maria has lots of helpful insight like this that I know will be of great value to artists like you!

Moving To A Full-Time Art Career

Have you taken the plunge yet and moved into a full-time commitment to your artwork? If not, what is holding you back? I’ve been there, I know the struggle and I want to do everything I can to encourage you and support you along the way. That’s why I knew that I needed to sit down with Maria and get some tips from her to help artists like you looking for motivation. Maria has traveled this road too, she helped her husband move toward and eventually completely transition to a career as a full-time artist. In our conversation, Maria shares what this process was like as well as practical advice that you can use if you are struggling at this stage on your journey.

What Would Richard Branson Do?

Let’s face it, most artists aren’t cut out to be successful businesspeople right off the bat. In fact, this tension between making art and selling art can really cause a lot of sleepless nights. You are not alone! I’ve struggled with the business aspect of my art career too. In my conversation with Maria, she shared a funny tool that helps her and her husband make tough business decisions. She simply thinks to herself, “What would Richard Branson do?” It sounds funny but it really helps her frame the decision-making process based on business parameters rather than emotional or egotistical ones. I hope you get the chance to hear more of our conversation and the additional insights and tips Maria has to share.

How to Sell Your Art

How do you sell your art? What is your strategy? Do you have a good idea on how to show, market, and price your artwork? Could your approach use an update? In my conversation with Maria, she shares the driving mindset that will help you sell your art. Maria explains that one of the best ways to get started is to remember that your artwork is valuable to someone. Never lose sight of the fact that your creation will become valuable to someone in the marketplace! This mental shift can make all the difference in your approach to selling your art. Maria has many more tips and lessons for artists like you, make sure to listen to more of our conversation and check out her book, “Art, Money, and Success!”

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:50] I introduce my guest, Maria Brophy.
  • [3:30] Maria talks about how she started managing her husband.
  • [6:30] Knowing what you want.
  • [15:00] Steps toward working as a full-time artist.
  • [18:00] Lessons Maria and Drew learned from stepping out on their own.
  • [23:30] What would Richard Branson do?
  • [29:00] Knowing when to say no.
  • [31:00] Communicating your worth to friends and family.
  • [40:00] How to price your work.
  • [44:00] Positioning yourself as a high-value artist.
  • [49:00] How to sell your art without selling out.
  • [55:30] Habits of successful artists.
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Sep 28 2017

59mins

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Following Your Intuition, with Jordan Wolfson

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What role has your intuition played in your development as an artist? Have you always followed it or has it been a struggle to give yourself that permission? My guest, Jordan Wolfson has embraced his intuition and followed it down some fascinating creative corridors. In our conversation, Jordan opens up about how he got started as an artist, what his process looks like, the contrast between language and art, how he honed his skill set, and so much more. I can’t wait for you to get a glimpse of Jordan’s fascinating perspective!

Wandering in the dark and finding a path forward.

Can you think back to the start of your career in art? Did you have a clear moment when you knew that this was what you wanted to dedicate your life to or was it more of a gradual awakening? The way Jordan Wolfson tells it, his path into an art career was more of a discovery than an actual experience or decision. For the longest time, Jordan had a deep desire to spend time painting and he’s kept following that desire which led him through college and into his career today. Looking back, Jordan speaks fondly of the studio classes he took during his undergrad at UC Santa Cruz. During that time, Jordan felt like he had fallen in love with the craft of painting. Do you have a similar story, what set you on your path?

Honing the craft.

As an artist you are constantly honing and refining your craft, let’s face it, you never truly, “Arrive.” This process can look different for each of us and a lot of benefits can be found when we take the time to hear each other's stories. Jordan Wolfson’s story is no different, he has several stories to tell of renowned artists like John Walker and Andrew Forge who entered his story at critical times in his development to challenge and encourage him in his work. Listening to Jordan, you really get the sense that he knows that he has a lot to learn even though he’s quite accomplished!

Can you really follow your intuition?

Which is more important to follow, your training or your intuition? Do you have to choose between the two? In my experience, if you want to follow your intuition, you’ve got to develop an ear for it as you progress in your career. If you are constantly ignoring your intuition, eventually it’ll fade into the background. Jordan Wolfson describes following his intuition as tracking down a glimmer of light or thread to see where it came from and where it’s leading. While Jordan is quick to emphasize the influence of his art school training, he also points to this cultivation of listening to his intuition that has had a huge impact on his artwork over the years.

Clearing the mind and getting centered.

What are some of the most important aspects of your creative process? Do you have certain rituals that you follow when you enter your studio space and approach your canvas? For Jordan Wolfson, his process starts with a morning practice of sitting and meditation. He places a lot of value on being present in mind and body before he proceeds with his work at the canvas. Its Jordan’s hope that this deliberate practice of presence and centering his mind have a direct impact on his artwork. Take a look at some of the images of his art located at the end of this post and see for yourself!

Outline of This Episode
  • [3:20] I introduce my guest, Jordan Wolfson.
  • [4:50] How Jordan decided to become an artist.
  • [7:00] Jordan talks about his post-college pursuits.
  • [10:30] What it took for Jordan to hone his painting skills.
  • [15:30] Painting and presence.
  • [17:20] The contrast between language and art.
  • [20:45] Jordan talks about what he is currently working on.
  • [26:00] Trusting your intuition and seeing where it leads.
  • [33:30] Jordan opens up about his process of creating his artwork.
  • [44:15] The value of meditation and centering your thoughts.
  • [46:45] Artwork that Jordan would love to own.
  • [48:50] Jordan talks about the recontextualization of painting.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Oct 04 2018

53mins

Play

Large Scale Paintings and Trusting Your Instincts, with Palden Hamilton

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What captures an artist’s imagination to create large-scale paintings? How do you tap into the boldness that's necessary to follow your instincts and create something that feels impossible? My guest is Palden Hamilton, a representational painter from Baltimore, Maryland. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago where he earned his BFA. In our conversation, we talk about chaos and order, finding your voice, what materials Palden uses to paint on, his upcoming large-scale paintings, his desire to connect with the external world and so much more! I can’t wait for you to hear from Palden’s unique take on life as an artist.

Life lessons from observing trees.

What is it that inspires your creativity? Is it great literature? Is it beautifully composed music? What resonates so deeply in you that it ignites the spark of creativity? For artist, Palden Hamilton it's a desire to connect with the external world. It was a feeling of longing and an emotional response to nature that led Palden to start drawing. In our conversation, Palden also touched on some life lessons he has learned from observing nature and in particular, trees. As an artist in residence at the Ladew Topiary Gardens, Palden enjoyed studying the trees and observed how they are a great analogy to many aspects of life.

Branding, telling your story and cultivating curiosity.

Let’s face it, in the art community, “Branding” is often a dirty word. It doesn’t have to be! Think of it this way, branding is just a way of communicating your story. What is the story that you want to tell with your art? As an artist, you’ve cultivated a sense of curiosity for the world around you. Don’t stop! Continue to cultivate and nurture that sense of curiosity in your work and use it to tell your story. Palden Hamilton is passionate about telling his story and continuing to explore various aspects of his creativity as an artist. At the end of the day, Palden refuses to let others dictate his direction as an artist and he encourages artists like you to do the same. Tell your story with boldness, the world needs your voice!

Pursuing the dream to create large-scale paintings.

When was the last time you allowed yourself to go crazy and chase that rabbit on an unexpected adventure? As you follow your curiosity, you’ll discover different angles that will spark a new perspective. It’s up to you if you are ready to pull that thread and see what unravels. Palden Hamilton has been pulling those threads for a while and has arrived at a new project, large-scale paintings. He’s been considering this new project for some time and now he is ready to move forward. I loved hearing Palden’s passion and excitement for his new project and I know artists like you will geek out with me as he describes his intended approach.

Find your voice and be you!

One of the biggest themes from my conversation with Palden Hamilton was the desire to find, articulate, and communicate his voice as an artist. I’ve struggled with this topic over the course of my art career and I know that many of you have as well. From our discussion about his new large-scale paintings to his observations from nature, Palden was kind enough to open up about these topics and everything in between. I hope you are inspired by Palden’s boldness and the risks he takes with his art. Don’t forget, your voice is valuable! Make sure to check out images of his artwork located at the end of this post!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:00] I introduce my guest, Palden Hamilton.
  • [2:30] Palden talks about how he started with his passion for art.
  • [5:00] What was it like growing up with Japanese and Himalayan influences?
  • [8:20] How Palden decided to pursue an art career.
  • [10:20] Life lessons learned from observing trees.
  • [12:30] Tackling the unknown and cultivating curiosity.
  • [15:40] Palden describes his artwork.
  • [17:15] A desire to connect with the external world.
  • [20:20] How dreams have impacted Palden’s imagination.
  • [24:30] Palden talks about his plans to create monumental paintings.
  • [33:20] Stepping back and getting perspective.
  • [35:00] The struggle of second-guessing yourself.
  • [41:00] Why it's important to find your voice and be you!
  • [42:30] Trust your instincts.
  • [46:00] Why we shouldn’t live with regrets.
  • [51:00] Wrestling with the “Truth.”
  • [54:00] Palden talks about getting an “Epiphany.”
  • [57:00] Setting parameters on creativity.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jun 14 2018

1hr

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Light and Art, with Peter Fiore

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The relationship between light and art is a beautiful and nuanced one. You can really tell when an artist has a deep passion and knowledge of how to use light in innovative and unique ways. My guest, Peter Fiore is an expert when it comes to experimenting with light in his artwork. In our conversation, we discuss his fascination with nature, his artistic process, why he uses music in the studio, the importance of fighting back fear, and much more! Our conversation takes a lot of twists and turns but I know artists like you will get a lot of enjoyment from Peter’s depth of experience.

Embracing a Fascination with Nature

What is your relationship with nature like? Do you find a significant level of inspiration and creativity well up when you are in the wilderness? Or is it the city and an urban environment that fires you up and excites you? My guest, Peter Fiore has a deep love and appreciation for nature. In fact, this love for the wilderness caused him to move out of the city and into a more quiet and serene setting. Peter described for me how much this move impacted his creative process and how connecting with nature resonates with him on a spiritual level. To hear Peter talk about his area and the beauty and creativity it draws out of him can be quite moving. What can you learn from Peter’s articulation? Where do you tap into that source of creativity?

The Role of Music in the Creative Process

Have you ever been moved by a song? Seriously, think about it. There seems to be an interesting divide on this issue among the general public. Some people love music and the way it intensifies their thoughts and feelings, then there are others who don’t feel particularly strong about it. Artist Peter Fiore definitely falls in the camp that loves music. He enjoys music so much that he has incorporated it into his creative process. You’ve got to hear him describe how he feels and reacts when he turns on Beethoven in his studio as he goes to work on his art projects. Does this resonate with you? If it’s not music, is there something that animates you when you are in your studio?

Pushing Fear Aside

What would your advice to young artists just starting out in their career? Maybe you are a young artist who is looking for helpful advice so you can learn from those who came before you. My guest, Peter Fiore was kind enough to open up and share some helpful wisdom that he received from his father that he wants to pass down to young artists including his own children. The primary advice that Peter shares is to never let your fears dictate the art that you make. As difficult as that advice can be to follow, I know that there is a lot of truth to that statement. Don’t let yourself be consumed with regret when you are older because you failed to push fear aside!

Creating Art from Passion

There seems to be a certain element that is almost indescribable when you see artwork that comes from a place deep in a person’s soul. Have you experienced that? Art that comes from a place of passion and creativity has a certain texture to it. Artist Peter Fiore wants to encourage artists like you to find that place where you can create your artwork from. Even if you can’t profit from your passion projects, it's really important to consider creating a space where you can exercise the creative pursuits that make you come alive. Peter shares this advice in light of his years of experience as an artist and I hope you can catch a glimpse of what he is trying to convey. Make sure to check out images of his artwork located at the end of this post!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:50] I introduce my guest, Peter Fiore.
  • [4:00] How Peter got his start as an artist.
  • [12:30] Peter talks about his series on trees and a car crash he survived.
  • [17:00] A relationship with nature.
  • [20:00] Why is Peter so drawn to the subject of trees?
  • [26:30] Peter’s steps after he identifies a motif.
  • [35:00] Using music to facilitate creativity.
  • [39:00] How many studies does Peter go through in a series?
  • [46:30] No one needs another painting, you’ve got to make them want it!
  • [48:30] Peter’s advice to young artists.
  • [57:00] Don’t let fear hold you back.
  • [1:08:00] Working on multiple projects.
  • [1:11:00] Understanding the “Why.”
  • [1:13:00] Suffering and Art.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Oct 19 2017

1hr 28mins

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Letting Go of Art “Rules” with Michael McCaffrey

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Do you ever find yourself wondering why you feel like a square peg forced into a round hole when it comes to following art “Rules?” Is there something wrong with you, the system, gatekeepers, or all the above? I was thrilled to sit down and discuss this topic and much more with my friend, Michael McCaffrey. In our conversation, we also touch on his work inspired by his father, the difference between figurative and abstract work, why putting in time matters, and so much more. I can’t wait for you to learn from Michael’s fascinating perceptive and expertise! 

Follow the “Rules” or forge your own path? 

Are you a rule follower or a rule breaker? Most people who see that question will automatically know which category they fall in. Have you always been on one side of that question, or have you shifted over time? For Michael McCaffrey - permission to break from certain art “Rules” evolved. Practically, Michael had to change is approach to painting his father because he simply wouldn’t sit still for portraits. Even when he took photos of his father and brought them to the canvas for a reference point - Michael still had to give himself permission to push the boundaries and create his own set of “Rules.” 

A unique take on the familiar 

When I first visited Michael’s website, I was like a kid in a candy shop, seriously! Taking a look around at all the different subjects and perspectives he paints is truly inspiring. Most notably, I wanted to hone in on Michael’s work with his father. Michael and I both have parents in their 80’s, and I was curious to hear how Michael’s experience has been spending time and incorporating his father into his artwork. As he observed his father in his home of nearly 40 years, Michael started to notice how his father would pay particular interest and care to one part of his home while neglecting other parts for years. Make sure to check out the images of Michael’s work located at the end of this post - I know you’ll find it as fascinating as I did! 

Putting in the time

If you’ve been around the Savvy Painter community for very long, you know that one of the big mantras that we often hear from seasoned artists like Michael is to put in the time at your canvas. It’s tempting to succumb to apathy or indifference, but the truth is, nothing can get you out of a funk quite like time in your studio. It’s also in the studio where you begin to refine and hone your skills as an artist - you can’t microwave skill and success. Think of your time growing and developing as an artist like slow cooking a good meal - you have to give time for those flavors to work together! 

Tearing it down and building it up again 

While Michael is quick to point out the “Rules” that don’t work for him as an artist - he’s also quick to explain that tearing down inevitably leads to building something in its place. Facing the institutional challenges and personal struggles of life as an artist isn’t easy, but don’t forget that there is a community of peers who can help spur you along. Michael found that through the process of tearing down rules, ideas, or even his own artwork, there was a kind of freedom to reinvent and breath new life into his artwork. What do you think of Michael’s perspective? 

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:30] I introduce my guest, Michael McCaffrey. 
  • [3:00] Michael describes his work. 
  • [6:40] Working from photographs and memories. 
  • [12:00] Michael explains how his concepts develop from his time with his father. 
  • [17:00] Bucking against the “Rules.” 
  • [26:30] Abstract vs. figurative work. 
  • [32:30] Putting in the time. 
  • [37:40] Why Michael likes the idea of deconstruction and reconstruction. 
  • [44:30] Change is growth. 
  • [48:20] Art that Michael would love to own. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Dec 12 2019

50mins

Play

The Transformative Power of Art, with Dean Mitchell

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Can you think back to a point in your career where you started to appreciate the transformative power of art? Maybe for you, it was the first time you went to an art museum or that one art class that opened your eyes to a whole new world of possibilities. From early childhood experiences to forging his own path in the art world - my guest, Dean Mitchell, came prepared to explore the whole spectrum in our wide-ranging conversation. I know that artists like you will really appreciate Dean’s valuable and seasoned perspective!

Early influences matter

As you look back on your start as an artist, was there an individual who encouraged you along the way? How did your early influences shape your journey as an artist? For Dean Mitchell, two key influences changed the course of his career and his life. The crucial first influence for Dean was his grandmother - not only did she raise Dean, but she also encouraged and empowered him on his journey to becoming an artist. The other key influence for Dean was his junior high school art teacher who wouldn’t let him drop out of art competitions. While we often shrug off these early influences in our lives, the truth is, they matter more than we care to give them credit for!

How art can make you feel

One of the most amazing aspects of art is the ability to evoke an emotional reaction out of the viewer. From sculptures that draw you closer to watercolors that transport you to another place entirely - art has the power to take you on a deep and personal journey. In our conversation, Dean was kind enough to open up about what he hopes to accomplish with his art. Beyond painting what most people want to see, Dean has been able to position his career in a way where he can challenge people with his art in ways they never thought possible. When was the last time artwork on an emotional level moved you?

Taking risks

Dean Mitchell will be the first person to tell you that the road hasn’t been an easy one throughout his career. From growing up poor and isolated from many of the opportunities, his peers outside of the south had to institutional roadblocks that are all too real for many black artists - Dean knew he was in for a challenge. To overcome these challenges, Dean needed to take some risks that most people would shy away from. Facing rejection and defeat at an early age would crush most budding artists, but Dean was determined that all these risks would eventually pay off - and he was right!

Looking beyond social constructs

What hope do you have for our society? Do you think things are getting better or are they getting worse? Let’s face it - headlines and news stories often push and pull us toward confirming our biases and keeping our culture compartmentalized. Imagine what it would look like if we started peeling away and tearing down harmful social constructs like the idea that one group of people is inherently superior to others. Dean Mitchell is convinced that art exists to play a definitive role in growing our imaginations and our expectations of how the world should work. What can you learn from Dean’s fascinating perspective? I hope you enjoyed getting a peek inside the mind of this talented and renowned artist!

Outline of This Episode
  • [2:15] I introduce my guest, Dean Mitchell.
  • [4:20] Dean talks about what led him to his career as an artist.
  • [10:50] Family dynamics and growing up poor in Flordia.
  • [17:00] The value of early childhood art education.
  • [26:50] Beauty in the midst of pain.
  • [31:30] How art can bring hope.
  • [38:00] Going to college and taking risks.
  • [45:30] Dean explains how he became financially stable.
  • [57:00] An insight into the mindset of many art collectors.
  • [59:20] Dean opens up about his experience entering art competitions.
  • [1:06:30] How art can grab you on a visceral level.
  • [1:20:00] Why we need to see beyond our social constructs.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Nov 28 2019

1hr 32mins

Play

Landscape Painting and the Power of Persistence, with Adam Hall 

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When was the last time you found yourself moved deep in the core of your being by a work of art or natural beauty? As an artist, you can appreciate the power that we have to draw on people’s perceptions and emotions. It was a pleasure to speak with the talented Nashville based landscape artist, Adam Hall. In our conversation, Adam was kind enough to open up about his connection to the ocean, how his time working in the music industry influenced his artwork, challenges he has faced along the way, and much more. You’ll want to pay close attention, Adam has some helpful insights and suggestions for fellow artists and parents. 

Disaster and opportunity 

Do you remember that moment when you realized that you needed to commit yourself to become an artist? Was it a decision to go to art school? Or did you find yourself slowly realizing that you needed to start drawing out your creative side? For Adam hall, the turning point in his career came when he went with his musician friends to volunteer for the Red Cross.

In the wake of a massive tornado storm that impacted the Nashville area, Adam and his friends decided that they wanted to help the situation. In a twist of fate, Adam and his friends found themselves at the home of renowned Nashville artist, David Wright. Seizing on the opportunity, Adam peppered David with questions and sought his advice on how to move forward in his budding career as an artist. 

Overwhelmed

Fast-forward many years later, and you’ll find Adam thriving as a landscape artist in the Nashville area. Adam’s journey hasn’t always been an easy one; he has experienced his fair share of stress, creative struggles, and moments of overwhelm. Do you think that feeling overwhelmed could ever be a good thing? What if you could draw on the enormity and scale of an image or scene that was so powerful that it elicited an emotional response? 

When Adam was faced with a particularly busy season of his life, he found himself going for an early run one morning. His mind was weighed down by the stress and frantic energy that seemed endless. Reaching the end of his run at the beach - Adam was moved to tears as the sun crested over the horizon. At that moment at the ocean, Adam experienced something that transcended all the chaos in his mind - it was almost like hitting the reset button. In Adam’s experience, feeling overwhelmed can lead to a positive outcome. 

Navigating parenthood as an artist 

I love to take the opportunity to explore the insights and lessons that my fellow artists have for their peers who also happen to be parents. Having explored this facet of life with many of my guests over the years, it never ceases to surprise me that while there are many similarities, everyone has their own unique take on parenting as an artist. For Adam and his wife, they found that their creative and professional lives thrived when they were able to plan and schedule their time effectively. Instead of a combative and haphazard approach to parenting - Adam and his wife were committed to carving time to their creative pursuits. What can you learn from Adam’s story?

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:55] I welcome my guest, Adam Hall. 
  • [3:00] Adam talks about how he got his start as an artist. 
  • [14:00] How has Adam’s approach to the canvas changed over the years? 
  • [16:00] Artists who have influenced Adam. 
  • [20:00] Adam talks about his connection to the ocean. 
  • [26:45] How does Adam describe his style and artistic approach? 
  • [31:20] Adam shares his routine and studio practices. 
  • [35:00] How has Adam navigated life as a parent and an artist? 
  • [40:00] Building relationships and networking. 
  • [48:00] Refusing to take no for an answer. 
  • [51:15] Adam talks about the challenges he has faced along the way. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Nov 14 2019

56mins

Play

Fine Art Prints Q&A, with Jake Hawley from Picture Salon

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Normally when I do these question and answer episodes, I get anywhere from 20 to 30 questions to ask my guest - for this topic - the questions numbered in the 100’s! Thankfully, Jake Hawley from Picture Salon was willing to take time out of his schedule to answer many of your questions here on the podcast. In our conversation, Jake touches on file sizes, how to take the best pictures of your art, tips for pricing your fine art prints, and much more. If you’ve ever considered selling prints of your artwork - this is the episode for you! 

Should I buy a large format printer? 

Finding a good print shop to work with can be difficult, and you may be tempted to invest in a large format printer to take care of it all yourself. While buying a large format printer might work for some artists, the truth is - unless you are planning on using the printer regularly - it’s a poor investment. Instead, consider taking the time to research and explore some of the print shops in your area or even using a service like Picture Salon.

How to get the best lighting

One of the challenges of getting good fine art prints is taking a high-quality picture of your artwork. Many artists think that snapping a photo on their iPhone will suffice - unfortunately, there are many additional factors to take into consideration. Jake encourages artists like you to use a tripod when taking a photo of your artwork; he also stresses the value of paying close attention to your lighting and how it impacts the image. Ultimately, if possible, Jake suggests connecting with a professional photographer who has experience photographing fine art for reproduction. 

Materials matter

Did you know that the material you choose to have your art printed on can make all the difference? It’s true! In our conversation, Jake’s answers to various material questions took us on a tour of papers, metals, and more. I’ve had first-hand experience working with Jake and his team while I agonized over which type of paper I wanted to use when printing my art. If you are wondering what type of paper to use with your art - consider giving Jake a call. At Picture Salon, they’ll help you figure out what paper works best with your art and they’ll even send you some free samples. 

Tips for setting a price on fine art prints

If I had one, I had a dozen questions about pricing fine art prints. I get it, putting a number on your art can be challenging - especially when it comes to prints of your artwork. In our conversation, Jake was kind enough to share several tips on accurately pricing your fine art prints. Jake suggests pricing a print between 3 and 5 times the cost it took to produce the print. Make sure to factor into your price the time the original took you to create as well as the time it took to get the captures. Follow up with Jake and his team at Picture Salon to get more helpful information like this!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:50] I welcome my guest, Jake Hawley. 
  • [2:00] What do I need to know about setting up a print shop on my website? 
  • [5:40] Should I buy a large format printer or just use a print shop? 
  • [8:40] What are the minimum requirements for a photograph of a painting for reproduction?
  • [15:00] Is there a difference between flat color images and something that is more textured when it comes to file sizes? 
  • [19:45] I share a story about trying to ship some of my paintings. 
  • [26:45] Dealing with an under-exposed print. 
  • [30:10] Why it’s a good idea to get paper samples before printing. 
  • [34:50] Why lighting is so important when photographing artwork. 
  • [43:30] What is the best way to take a picture of a painting with a glossy finish? 
  • [52:50] How large should my photo capture be? What about file sizes? 
  • [56:40] What does it take to keep an art reproduction safe in high humidity? 
  • [59:30] Do you include an invoice when shipping to customers? What about dropshipping? 
  • [1:06:30] What is the best way to sell your art? 
  • [1:10:20] When blowing up an image 10 times the size, what is a good approach? 
  • [1:17:00] Why it’s a good idea to keep in mind how your customers will hang your art. 
  • [1:21:00] Jake shares some helpful tips for pricing your art prints. 
  • [1:23:00] How to connect with Jake. 
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Oct 31 2019

1hr 27mins

Play

Exploring Creativity and Understanding How You Tick, with Andy J. Pizza

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As an artist, one of the hardest things you can do is to push past your limits and dive right into exploring creativity. Do you find pushing the boundaries of your abilities exciting or nerve-racking? My guest, Andy J. Pizza, is ready to explore this question and a whole lot more. In our conversation, Andy opens up about his creative journey, what it’s like to embrace his ADHD, the challenge of copyright laws, and more. I know artists like you will get a ton of value from Andy’s valuable and unique perspective!

Helping others

Why in the world would someone start a podcast? I get that question a lot! While every podcaster will have their own unique spin on this question - I wanted to hear from Andy J. Pizza. According to Andy, the reason he started his podcast was to help more creative people like him! Too often, Andy saw podcasts and books written by creatives who looked a certain way and acted a certain way, but no one quite like him. Banking on the fact that there were others out there who wanted a fresh take on the creative journey - Andy launched his podcast, Creative Pep Talk. Make sure to listen to Andy’s podcast; you can find the link in the resources section at the end of this post.

Let your freak flag fly!

Have you ever felt like you were a square peg that was forced to fit into a round hole? That’s what Andy felt all those years as a creative who couldn’t quite fit in. After years of introspection and reflection, Andy finally concluded that he shouldn’t minimize what set him apart from others but that he should embrace it. How do you feel about Andy’s take? Are you ready to take on the challenge and let your freak flag fly high, or are you more comfortable playing it safe? Let’s face it; we need both bold leaders and pragmatic individuals who are ready to put in the work - which one sounds more like you?

Finding the right pace

I am so honored to get amazing questions and comments every day from artists like you - some just want to ask a simple technical question, and others want to dive right in with challenging ones. Over the years, I’ve learned a healthy balance between my work on this podcast and my own artwork. Have you found the right balance in your career? Andy encourages artists like you to jump at every opportunity you can get when you are young and inexperienced. He also urges more seasoned artists to slow down and find the right pace as they become more experienced in their careers. What do you think of Andy’s advice?

Know thy self

What is at the heart of your desire to create? Do you love to push the boundaries of your abilities, or do you simply enjoy the process? Maybe for you, it’s the ability to go at your own pace and follow your own inspiration that draws you to your work as an artist. Whatever your unique offering to the world is - discover it and embrace it! You are the only you that has ever been made - the world needs your voice and your creativity. Don’t be content to sit on the sidelines, learn from Andy’s helpful advice, and leverage your unique abilities to make the world just a little bit brighter.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:45] I introduce my guest, Andy J. Pizza.
  • [2:30] Andy shares his background and why he started his podcast.
  • [12:30] I share a personal story about my family.
  • [15:00] The real story behind ADHD according to Andy.
  • [19:20] Andy talks about the impact his father has had on him.
  • [22:50] Let your freak flag fly!
  • [27:40] Andy and I talk about copyright laws.
  • [46:00] Should you take that opportunity or let it pass by?
  • [56:00] What to do when the opportunities start to slow down.
  • [58:40] A missed opportunity.
  • [1:01:30] Why masterminds and coaches ROCK.
  • [1:05:45] Understanding how you tick.
  • [1:13:30] Closing thoughts from Andy.
  Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Oct 17 2019

1hr 17mins

Play

Painting from Sketch Drawings, with Tom Hughes

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Do you ever find yourself fascinated by the stories of artists who paint from sketch drawings? What do those artists look for when they sketch? How do they remember the right colors or where the light was coming from? Hoping to get some answers to these questions and a whole lot more, I was pleased to sit down with the artist, Tom Hughes. In our conversation, Tom opens up about how he found his path as an artist, what it was like working for the Christian Science Monitor, and more. I can’t wait for you all to get a peek into the world of Tom Hughes! 

Hearing the call

Can you remember that moment when you decided you wanted to pursue your career as an artist? Or maybe for you, the draw to an art career was more of a gradual revelation. Slow or sudden, each artist has their own version of realizing their unique path as an artist. For Tom Hughes, the decision to embrace life as an artist was more along the lines of answering a “Calling.” If you are religious, spiritual, something in between, or nothing at all, I’m sure you can relate to what Tom talks about when he describes his draw to art as a “Calling.” For some reason, I’ve found that language to resonate with many artists, does it resonate with you? 

Picking up skills along the way 

As you’ve grown as an artist over the years, do you attribute it to practice or learning new skills along the way? While some artists love to explore new methods and push the limits, others like to hunker down and become proficient at one particular approach. Tom Hughes did not receive formal art training at a university for college; he took the route that included self-education. As you can imagine, Tom’s journey hasn’t always been easy. He has had significant moments of confidence, like his time at the Christian Science Monitor, and he’s had periods where he had to take a break and step away. 

Finding the right process

Through all of the highs and lows of Tom’s career, the one constant that gets to the heart of Tom’s career is his willingness to adapt and discover the right process. Rarely do artists get described as process-oriented. We artists often get painted with a broad stroke and labelled as flighty, inconsistent, and emotional, just to name a few! Tom worked hard for years to hone in on the process that would work best for him. One of the ways Tom likes to work is by sketching his subjects before he goes to the canvas. Are you drawn to a more process-focused approach in your art? 

It’s OK to change over time

I am still blown away when I look back to the start of this fledgeling little podcast and the few friends I knew who would listen to see the massive following we enjoy today - it’s incredible! There are a few elements from those early episodes that you’ll still notice as part of the podcast today, but there have been many changes. If you don’t learn and adapt over time, what is the point? Too often, I find my fellow artists are more adverse to change and evolution then I had expected. We are the ones who get the opportunity to push the envelope and help the public look deeper - it’s OK to change over time!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:50] I introduce my guest, Tom Hughes. 
  • [2:20] How Tom got started as an artist. 
  • [9:00] Skills that Tom picked up and learned along the way. 
  • [14:00] Tom’s studio process. 
  • [19:00] Diving into the details of Tom’s sketching sessions. 
  • [26:40] Tom’s process when it comes to plein air painting. 
  • [34:15] What is Tom’s color pallet like? 
  • [40:00] How we change as artists over time. 
  • [46:20] Tom’s struggle with watercolours. 
  • [50:20] Why I love watercolours and life as an artist. 
  • [1:00:00] Have tolerance for your bad paintings! 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Oct 03 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

Oil Painting and Learning to Manage Distractions, with Michelle Dunaway 

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When was the last time you really took a moment to slow down and notice your surroundings? Do you find that you are easily distracted by your cell phone notifications or the million other things demanding your attention? You aren’t alone! I’ve struggled with managing my distractions for years, so I was thrilled to hear my guest, Michelle Dunaway address this critical topic. In our conversation, we also discuss Michelle’s oil painting, her recent arm injury, how to be honest with yourself, and much more. I know that artists like you will get a ton of value from Michelle’s thoughtful perspective, enjoy! 

Space to daydream and wonder

What was your childhood like? Did you have a ton of expectations placed on you from an early age or were you free to find your own path? While many parents have nothing but the best of intentions - the truth is - a carefree childhood can quickly get pushed to the wayside. Thankfully, Michelle was given permission and encouragement to explore her creativity. Looking back, she is especially fond of the moments where she would get lost in a daydream or playing in a field. Michelle also points to a critical influence in her life, Richard Schmidt - he also took time to invest in Michelle and encourage her abilities both professionally and as a peer.

An unexpected injury 

Don’t you hate it when life throws you a huge curveball that you never saw coming? Maybe for you, it was an unexpected expense like a car repair or the illness of a loved one, or maybe your story is a lot like Michelle’s and you’ve experienced a personal injury that you have to overcome. After recovering from a misstep that caused an injury to her arm, Michelle started to get back into the swing of things. Before long, she realized that she wasn’t able to put in the hours painting as she had before the accident. It turns out that Michelle had re-injured her arm and now has to undergo surgery and an extensive recovery process. 

Managing distractions 

The experience with her arm injury highlighted an important aspect that Michelle had been working to focus on for years - managing distractions. From her cellphone to the news and everything in between - Michelle’s life felt like it was full of distractions. As a spiritual person, Michelle looks to prayer and meditation to help her find her center. Cutting through all the noise of daily life is no easy task! The injury to her arm has forced Michelle to become more aware and present - she still struggles with the distraction of her cell phone, but she’s making progress. What can you take away from Michelle’s story? 

The moments that make you smile 

Have you had a moment in your art career that made you pause in gratitude? Let’s face it; gratitude is not an easy attitude to cultivate. We can get so focused and caught up in what we don’t have or what isn’t going right that we fail to reflect on the good things in life. Michelle will be the first person to tell you that her life is filled with things to be grateful for. Looking back on her career - Michelle points out one person’s reaction to her oil painting of Richard Schmidt as a particularly remarkable experience. The man that was viewing her painting was moved to tears and explained that Michelle’s painting made him feel like he had met Richard Schmidt. What a compliment!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:00] I introduce my guest, Michelle Dunaway. 
  • [2:30] Michelle talks about her influences and why she started a career in art. 
  • [5:30] How has Michelle’s arm injury impacted her journey? 
  • [19:20] Michelle and I discuss the “Artist’s eye.” 
  • [21:00] Learning to be honest with yourself. 
  • [29:30] What does Michelle look for in a subject? 
  • [39:00] Michelle talks about her experience working with Faso. 
  • [42:00] A typical day in Michelle’s studio.
  • [50:00] Removing distractions. 
  • [54:40] Proud moments from Michelle’s career. 
  • [1:04:00] Michelle shares a story about a painting that moved her. 
  • [1:13:30] What is Michelle’s dream project? 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Sep 19 2019

1hr 21mins

Play

Painting Americana and Looking Deeper, with Susan Lyon

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Have you found artists who paint Americana inspiring? Are you drawn to the romanticism and grandeur of the genre? How do artists who focus on painting Americana feel about their genre of work? I was thrilled to sit down with the talented and generous artist, Susan Lyon. In our conversation, Susan opened up about what led her to her career as an artist, why she decides to change things up, her dream of mentoring young artists, and much more. I can't wait for you to get to know Susan's inspiring story! 

A captured imagination 

When you look back at your start as an artist, who do you point to for inspiration? Was your imagination captured by the likes of Georgia O'Keeffe and N. C. Wyeth? Susan Lyon's imagination was ignited by a whole range of artists, including O'Keeffe and Wyeth. Today, Susan finds herself encouraged and inspired by her peers who paint Americana. Susan also enjoys studying and painting the faces of people she loves. Listening to Susan, you really get the sense that her heart is poured out into her artwork. 

Practicing meditation 

How do you deal with all the stress and challenges of life as an artist? What practices help you focus and unlock your creativity? For years Susan Lyon would practice meditation, but it wasn't until the last couple of years when everything started to "Click." By practicing meditation, Susan has learned how to calm her nervous system and ask open-ended questions. Meditation has given Susan the gift of perspective and peace - key elements for a healthy career as an artist! What can you learn from Susan's story? What practices have helped you in your career? 

Don't chase perfection! 

Have you been caught up in the perfection game? Some artists learn quickly how detrimental the pursuit of perfection can be - for others, it can take years. We've all been there - you have a particular idea of how you want your artwork to turn out but reality jumps in and messes everything up. It's at that point where you need to decide if you are going to keep pouring in your time and energy or cut your losses and start something new. Susan recalls how challenging it can be to realize that you've sunk way too much time into a project that needs to end. I hope you find her advice and insights as helpful as I did! 

The power of group energy

When was the last time you got so caught up in the electric energy and positive influence of your fellow artists? Some artists love to get alone with their canvas and explore the depths of their creativity while others feed off of and thrive in a more communal environment. Beyond personal preferences - Susan makes an excellent point about the power of group energy, especially when it comes to artists. In her experience, when like-minded artists gather and encourage one another - powerful energy is unlocked. Have you experienced that time group energy?

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:53] I introduce my guest, Susan Lyon. 
  • [3:05] What led Susan to her career as an artist. 
  • [12:00] Susan talks about changing things up. 
  • [17:15] Reverting back to a safety zone. 
  • [19:50] Susan shares the benefit of practicing meditation. 
  • [29:30] Why Susan enjoys painting the image of people she loves.
  • [35:00] The challenge of chasing perfection. 
  • [40:10] What is Susan’s process like in the studio? 
  • [45:30] Susan’s dream of mentoring younger artists. 
  • [50:10] The power of group energy. 
  • [53:30] Branching out with a one-person show and teaching. 
  • [1:06:00] The power of vulnerability. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Sep 05 2019

1hr 11mins

Play

How to Build a Presence on Etsy and Sell Your Art, with Jenni Waldrop

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What does it take to branch out from traditional practices and sell your art on platforms like Etsy? Can you make a living off of an Etsy business? What should you look out for? Good news! I put all these questions and more to my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop. 

In our conversation, Jenni opens up about realistic expectations, why it’s not enough to just build a shop on Etsy, how to plan for seasonal changes, and much more. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to build a presence on a platform like Etsy - this is the episode for you! 

Addressing Criticism

The last time I had Jenni on as a guest, we had an excellent discussion that resonated with a lot of Savvy Painter listeners. Just recently, I received a message that had some pointed criticism for Jenni and the numbers she shared regarding her Etsy earnings. In our conversation, Jenni breaks down why she shared the numbers that she shared and why she had to split up her shops to increase her earning potential. After our conversation, I’m confident that you’ll have a greater understanding of what to expect when it comes to building a presence on Etsy. 

Don’t be afraid to test

What is the best product to sell on Etsy? For each artist and seller, the answer to this question will change - especially depending on the season! While small prints will sell well for one artist - large prints will sell better for another. The key is to give yourself permission to test the market and find out what works. When it comes to selling your art - there is no one size fits all solution you’ve got to be willing to make adjustments and learn as you go. Jenni encourages artists to look around at what is selling, especially given the season. 

If you build it - will they come? 

Remember that old Kevin Costner movie, “Field of Dreams?” Wouldn’t it be nice if your business were as simple as setting it up and waiting for the customers to flock to your doorstep? Unfortunately - as many of you know - selling your art isn’t easy. Just like nurturing relationships with a gallery - you’ve got to nurture a relationship with your audience on platforms like Etsy. Consider sharing part of your story or starting a blog to feature artwork and projects you’ve worked on in the past. 

One step at a time

How do you feel about starting your Etsy store? Does it sound daunting and overwhelming? If so - you aren’t alone. There are so many artists out there who want to begin selling on Etsy and other platforms, but they don’t know where to start. I get it - I’ve been there! Don’t think that you need to have everything up and running right away - you don’t! Listen to Jenni’s advice and start one step at a time - break it down into manageable steps that you can accomplish at your own pace. For more information on how to start an Etsy shop - make sure to check out Jenni’s website!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:10] I introduce my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop. 
  • [5:00] Jenni addresses some criticism from our first episode together. 
  • [12:30] Setting realistic expectations. Jenni shares some helpful examples. 
  • [19:50] Testing what works and learning from what doesn’t. 
  • [27:00] Should you be worried about people ripping off your artwork on Etsy? 
  • [35:30] What is going on with Etsy’s shipping promotions? 
  • [38:30] If you build it - they will come - right? 
  • [42:30] Jenni explains how to break down your priorities. 
  • [45:00] How do you deal with audience burnout? 
  • [50:20] Preparing for seasonal trends. 
  • [53:30] Building a presence and making a connection. 
  • [56:45] Tips for building up your business and planning out your month. 
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 22 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Reflections and Lessons Learned from Various Artists 

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I still can’t believe that it’s been five years since I started the Savvy Painter podcast. Back when I first started, there were hardly any podcasts about, by, or for artists. Today, there are a ton of options out there, and I’m happy to call many of them friends! On this episode - I decided to do something different - I sat down with a handful of fellow podcasters to answer three questions. 

  1.  What is one common thread you noticed from speaking to so many artists? 
  2. What advice would you give to an emerging artist who sometimes questions their resolve? 
  3. What is the worst advice you hear given to artists? 

Not surprisingly, each of my guests had varied answers that kept me engaged and curious. I can’t wait for artists like you to dig in and hear from their unique and fascinating perspectives!

A common thread

What would you say is the common thread that ties artists together? As I asked this question to my guests, I was encouraged by their answers. Again and again, the common thread that binds many artists’ seems to be freedom and autonomy. Each person that chooses the path of an artist will follow the call to creativity by creating their own path. I love the boldness that each of my guests tapped into when they answered this question - they weren’t afraid to get it wrong! I hope you get a lot of helpful insights from their unique perspectives and make sure to check out their podcasts.

Advice for emerging artists 

There are so many things that I wish I would have heard when I first started out as an artist. What are some of the tips and insights you wish you could have heard? Many of my guests stressed the value of putting in the work - and hard work at that! Too often artists get portrayed as struggling and starving or esoteric and whimsical - but what about the hard-working artist? At the end of the day - if you aren’t working hard and creating - do you really want to be an artist? Another one of my guests encouraged their peers to give yourself permission to call yourself an artist - yes, you can wear that title. 

Terrible advice to avoid 

Sometimes the best advice is to avoid bad advice. What are some terrible pieces of advice that people have given you over the course of your career? I can think of one person who decided that it was their calling to make sure I knew how unbelievably hard it would be to make it as an artist. Yes, it is hard to succeed as an artist, but it’s also hard to succeed as a doctor or a business leader, but we don’t go out of the way to highlight the difficulties of those professions! My guests have a ton of bad advice that you should avoid - let me know which ones resonated with you.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:20] I introduce the three questions I ask fellow podcasting artists. 
  • [3:00] Amanda Adams and Nicole Mueller (Beyond the Studio) answer question #1. 
  • [6:10] David Sherry (Creative Caffeine) answers question #2. 
  • [8:00] Kaylan Buteyn (Artist/Mother) answers question #1. 
  • [11:10] Marissa Huber (Carve Out Time for Art) answers question #1. 
  • [12:50] Yoshino (Artist Decoded) answers question #1. 
  • [20:30] Andy Pizza (Creative Pep Talk) answers question #1. 
  • [28:40] Erika Hess (I Like Your Work) answers question #1. 
  • [31:00] Andy Pizza answers question #2. 
  • [41:15] Brian Alfred (Sound and Vision) answers question #2. 
  • [43:30] Erika Hess answers question #2. 
  • [44:30] John Dalton (Gently Does It) answers question #2. 
  • [46:00] Stan Prokopenko (Draftsmen) answers question #2. 
  • [49:50] Amanda Adams and Nicole Mueller answer question #3. 
  • [51:45] Erika Hess answers question #3. 
  • [55:30] Andy Pizza answers question #3.
  • [59:00] Brian Alfred answers question #3.
  • [1:02:20] David Sherry answers question #3
  • [1:03:55] Kaylan Buteyn answers question #3.
  • [1:10:00] Yoshino answers question #3. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Aug 08 2019

1hr 15mins

Play

The Joy of Painting Animals and Exploring the Color Palette, with Jennifer Gennari

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When was the last time that you found deep and abiding joy in your artwork? Have you explored the joy of painting animals and pets? Most of you know how excited I am about Trekell’s new Pet Portrait Competition. Guess what? I’ve got the judge for that competition joining me for this episode of the podcast! 

Jennifer Gennari is a classically trained figurative artist. She graduated in 2005 from Ringling College of Art and Design and in 2008 left for Italy to study at the Florence Academy of Art where she spent three years abroad studying classical realism. In our conversation, Jennifer opens up about her time at the Florence Academy, how she trained herself to see colors differently, how she views commissioned paintings, and much more. 

Florence Academy

I don’t know about you, but for years I dreamt of attending the Florence Academy - so I jumped at the chance to get Jennifer’s insights from her time there. While she was overwhelmed by many aspects of her time at the Florence Academy - drawing was not one of them. Jennifer was able to pull from her rich childhood memory of obsessively drawing the same Disney characters over and over again. When the time came to drawing with charcoal - Jennifer was out of her element - but thankfully that didn’t last long.

Looking at color differently 

How did you develop your feel for using color? Did it come easy for you, or did you find the work challenging? I remember one torturous assignment I was given in school where I had to match the color of this massive collage that I had created - the result? I can now match just about any color I encounter! Jennifer’s story is a little bit different - but she also struggled with finding the right way to incorporate color into her artwork. Looking back - Jennifer notices that while the Florence Academy was great for many valuable lessons - color development wasn’t one of them.

Painting animals 

Some of you love painting animals and pets in particular - if that is you - you’ve got to check out Trekell’s new Pet Portrait Competition. Jennifer got started painting animals when she got tired of painting people. Still wanting to improve her skill at painting skin - Jennifer came up with a great solution - painting hairless cats! From there - Jennifer branched out and starting painting animals with fur and then she started dabbling in commissioned paintings of animals and pets. If you are interested in entering Trekell’s Pet Portrait Competition, make sure to check out the link in the resources section! 

Are you a “Sell out” if you create commissioned paintings? 

Speaking of commissioned paintings - what is your take? Have you created a commissioned painting? Do you feel like creating commissioned paintings is selling out? I know that many of you have strong feelings about commissioned paintings - but I’d love for you to hear Jennifer out. In her view - commissioned paintings are only as good as the joy and fulfilment you experience creating them. Creating a commissioned painting for someone who has a special connection to animal or pet is what makes the endeavour worth it. Jennifer only sees creating commissioned paintings as a “Sell out” when the artist is in it exclusively for the money. 

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:05] I introduce my guest, Jennifer Gennari. 
  • [3:10] Jennifer shares her early artistic influences and her first career moves. 
  • [9:20] What was it like at the Florence Academy? 
  • [16:00] How did Jennifer train herself to see color differently? 
  • [30:30] Jennifer talks about why she loves painting animals. 
  • [38:00] What is Jennifer’s studio process like? 
  • [44:40] Jennifer talks about her color pallet. 
  • [51:20] Why does Jen always start off with warm colors? 
  • [56:00] Commissioned paintings - is it “Selling out?”
  • [1:04:00] What is Jennifer currently obsessed with? What is she working on? 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jul 25 2019

1hr 12mins

Play

Dealing with the Inner Critic and How to Stay Creative, with Danny Gregory

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If you are anything like me - you’ve struggled with how to deal with your inner critic over the years. There are a few things that have helped me deal with my inner critic, but I am always excited to hear what my peers have done to address this common issue in the art community. Here to share his unique and valuable perspective is the artist - Danny Gregory. 

Danny is an artist, and he has written nearly a dozen internationally best-selling books on art and creativity. He is also the co-founder of Sketchbook Skool with tens of thousands of students worldwide. In our conversation, Danny opens up about how he got started as an artist, why he loves working on “Zines,” how he deals with his inner critic, what it takes to stay creative, and much more. I know you’ll get a ton of benefit from Danny’s thoughtful perspective. 

Find your people!

If you’ve been around the Savvy Painter community for any stretch of time, you know that I am passionate about encouraging artists like you to find your people. Let’s face it - life as an artist can be a lonely existence - but it doesn’t have to be! Even back in the ’90s, artists like Danny Gregory found a way to connect with peers who would encourage and challenge them in their creative pursuits. Discovering an artist from eastern Oregon by flipping through a “Zine” at Tower Records in New York City changed Danny’s life. He quickly befriended this artist via correspondence, and the two went on many trips together. Have you found your people yet? 

Why “Zines” are so appealing

Speaking of “Zines,” have you ever encountered one before? When Danny mentioned reading zines in Tower Records back in the 90’s I had a total flashback to my college years. For my millennial followers - zines or fanzines are publications produced by enthusiasts of a particular niche interest. Traditionally, zines are circulated free of charge, or for a nominal cost to defray postage or production expenses. There are so many amazing things you can do with the zine medium - and according to Danny, they are starting to make a comeback!

Nurturing a creative focus 

A few years ago, Danny wrote a book called “Art Before Breakfast.” I love that title by the way! His book explored several small ways he incorporated his drive for creativity each day. From keeping a sketchbook next to the kettle in the kitchen to sketching an image while waiting for his wife to finish shopping - there are a ton of helpful ideas that artists like you can use. At the heart of Danny’s message is this - you can fit creativity and art making throughout your day if you just redefine what that means. For many of you - Danny’s approach will be a bit of stretch - after all, we are conditioned to think of “Art-making” as a structured and specific time we set aside. 

Dealing with the inner critic 

Another book Danny wrote is called, “Shut Your Monkey: How to Control Your Inner Critic.” In this book, Danny explains how he’s dealt with and learned to live with his inner critic. Do you still struggle with silencing your inner critic? If so - I can’t recommend Danny’s book enough! He dove deep into where the inner critic comes from in our minds and how to better understand it. Danny discovered that the voice of the inner critic actually is there to protect us from making risky decisions - which is great when it comes to danger - not so great when it comes to creating art. Make sure to check out the links to Danny’s website and his books in the resources section - I know that many of you will find them helpful! 

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:15] I introduce my guest, Danny Gregory.
  • [2:50] How Danny got interested in art. 
  • [9:10] Danny explains how he connected with like-minded artists. 
  • [11:15] What is a “Zine” or “Fanzine?” 
  • [13:40] How Danny came to publish drawings from his sketchbook. 
  • [20:15] Creating vs. consuming. 
  • [22:00] Dealing with the inner critic. 
  • [31:00] Being uncomfortable with the label, “Artist.” 
  • [34:40] A special message from Kate Zambrano about using Trekell Art Supplies. 
  • [41:30] Art before breakfast - feeding your creativity. 
  • [52:00] We are meant to be making things!
  • [59:00] The book that has made a huge impact on Danny. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jul 11 2019

1hr 2mins

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Trying to Make It As An Artist on Instagram, with Kate Zambrano

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What does it look like to see your career take off as an artist on Instagram? Is it a sustainable model or has Facebook’s acquisition taken all fun and profitability out the platform? I put all of these questions and a lot more to my guest, Kate Zambrano. 

Kate is a fine artist based in California specializing in realistic portrait art and figurative art, made up mostly of females. Sometimes described as dark art, her work is a personal study of human psychology and complexity. Kate creates melancholic body languages and expressions, capturing the nuanced truth. 

I can’t wait for you to learn from Kate’s unique perspective - I know you’ll find what she has to say is knowledgeable and entertaining!

Putting in the hours 

Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy, and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal, and you can tell!

Falling in love with charcoal

Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal and you can tell!

Navigating Instagram 

Instagram - do you love it or hate it as an artist? Have been able to grow your audience and deepen your connection to your followers? Kate enjoyed a huge boon to her business and her career as an artist once she began posting on Instagram. Quickly, Kate became quite the force as a popular artist on Instagram - then the bottom fell out.

A year and a half ago, everything changed with Instagram’s algorithm - small businesses that were thriving on the platform started shutting down left and right. Since they reworked the platform, artists like Kate have noticed that their content hasn’t been getting nearly as many likes or engagement as years past. Instagram’s change has had a huge negative impact on Kate and her business. She thought the decline in support was attributed to her skill and ability as an artist. Today, Kate is doing a lot better - she found a new way forward and shifted her view of success. 

Kate’s view of success

What does success look like for Kate today? With all the instant validation of Instagram no longer factoring into her view of success - Kate has had to rethink her personal definition of success. Kate is now focused on maintaining a positive attitude and a healthy mindset - she believes that forward thinking and staying in-tune with her emotions will put her back on the right track. Professionally, Kate finds encouragement in the positive feedback she gets from her peers - she’s not chasing approval, but she’s grateful to get it from her friends.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:45] I introduce my guest, Kate Zambrano. 
  • [2:45] How Kate decided to pursue a career as an artist. 
  • [6:00] Practice and repetition. 
  • [12:30] How Kate taught herself to draw. 
  • [15:10] Kate describes her artwork. 
  • [20:45] Why charcoal is Kate’s favorite medium. 
  • [26:25] How to enter Trekell’s pet portrait competition. 
  • [35:10] Kate explains how she got started on Instagram and what has changed. 
  • [44:30] The challenge of making it as a female artist. 
  • [50:10] Kate’s view of personal and professional success. 
  • [53:30] What Kate is obsessed with. 
  • [1:01:20] How to connect with Kate. 
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jun 27 2019

1hr 2mins

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Living on a Boat and Working with Acrylic Paint, with Kaethe Bealer

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Imagine living on a boat in the San Francisco Bay area - doesn’t that sound AMAZING? How would you optimize your working area? What materials would you use? Instead of guessing the answers to this beautiful scenario - I got to ask my friend Kaethe Bealer all about it!

Kaethe is a long time listener of Savvy Painter and she’s participated in several of my workshops over the years. I have been so impressed with Kaethe’s growth as an artist. From life on a boat to her process using acrylic paint I know Kaethe’s unique insights and reflections will help artists like you in a number of ways.

Life on a boat

Seriously though - what is it like living on a boat near San Francisco? Don’t you want to know? Apparently, it is not always as romantic as it sounds. As you can imagine space is at a premium. Forget leaving a studio space set up - if space isn’t being used - then things have to be put away. Thankfully, Kaethe has a supportive spouse who encourages her and supports her in her growth as an artist. While life on a boat sounds challenging - Kaethe also has some stellar work to show for it - which she has to store off boat at her father-in-law's house.

Why acrylic paint?

Speaking of Kaethe’s artwork - I was interested to hear what type of paint she uses on her boat and why. Kaethe uses acrylic paint and works mostly on pannel - her subject matter is all over the place - she loves to explore whatever catches her interest. With her life on the boat - Kathe has found acrylic paint to be the best material to use - it’s easy to clean up! She has a little evaporation bucket outside that she uses to discard her dirty water. Kaethe also uses Open Golden which is an extended drying acrylic paint.

Just keep painting

“Just keep painting” is one of the mantras that has impacted Kaethe’s on her journey as an artist. She experienced a significant period in her life where she stopped painting and it took her while to get back into the rhythm. These days Kaethe is committed to putting in the time and logging those hours at the canvas. She wants to encourage her artisitc peers to keep at it and stay in the game. Selling her work on the internet was a huge turning point for Kaethe - that experience also buoyed her spirits and emboldened her to get her work featured in art galleries.

Workshop junkie

Have you heard the term, “Workshop junkie?” I would consider myself a workshop junkie - I LOVE workshops. If money wasn’t a factor I’d fill up my days in workshops with fellow artists honing my skills and learning new techniques and insights. In our conversation - Kaethe and I also discussed the danger of using workshops as a crutch. Attending too many workshops can lead to thinking too little of your abilities and hamstringing your growth. Finding the balance is not an easy task but it is crucial - you need to have a healthy mindset!

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:45] I introduce my guest, Kaethe Bealer.
  • [3:15] What led Kaethe to her current work with acrylic paint?
  • [5:15] Living on a boat, is it as romantic as it sounds? How does Kaethe manage it?
  • [8:45] Kaethe describes her process and how she works with various acrylic colors.
  • [15:30] How did Kaethe lose the “Chalky” feel of her paintings?
  • [20:30] Kaethe and I talk about the influence of Peggi Kroll Robers.
  • [23:30] Make sure to check out the Trekell Art Supplies competition.
  • [25:30] Just keep painting.
  • [30:00] Kaethe describes her evolution as an artist.
  • [37:30] Advice Kaethe has for fellow artists.
  • [40:30] How does Kaethe decide which art competitions to enter?
  • [45:00] Kaethe and I discuss the value of workshops.
  • [47:00] What led Kaethe to jump back into her artwork?
  • [49:00] Closing thoughts from Kaethe.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Jun 13 2019

51mins

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Special Q&A: Navigating Art Competitions, Argentina Update, and Productivity Tips, and more!

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I’ve got a special episode in store for you all this week including questions and answers to a few select topics. I wanted to experiment with a new format, and I’m glad to have you along for the ride! On this episode - I cover how artists like you can navigate art competitions, I give an update about my move to Argentina, and I go over some productivity tips. I’m so thankful to all of you who have been so supportive and encouraging as I’ve made the transition back to Argentina - I excited to roll out some exciting new interviews and innovative episodes like this one!

How to find the right art competitions

I know it might feel that way, but here is the truth - not all art competitions are shady. It is also unfair to lump them all into the same category, some art competitions will be a great fit for one artist, and they’ll be a terrible fit for others. Here are my four tips for finding the right art competitions.

  1. Understand your goal.
  2. Do your homework.
  3. Celebrate when you get in!
  4. Just move on when you don’t get in.

You are responsible for your own career - so act like it! Don’t get upset about the cost of entering into an art competition, if you think it’s a right fit and that you have a shot then go for it. As you can tell, I’ve got a lot to say about this topic, and I know it’s not an easy one. I’d love to hear from you - what tips do you have to share about finding the right art competitions?

Argentina update

We did it! We’ve made it to our new home in Villa Carlos Paz in Argentina. It’s been great to hear from many of you as you’ve patiently waited to hear from me during this whole transition process. My new studio is all set up, and I am ready to jump back into my routine. One thing that is a bit of a love/hate factor of life here in Villa Carlos Paz is all the mom and pop stores. I love that I get to directly support the local economy with my purchases - I hate that it can take weeks and weeks to get something as simple as binder clips. All-in-all life is good, and I’m glad for this new chapter of life!

Be kind to yourself!

As an artist, you want to create worthwhile art, and that’s great! Let’s be honest - when you fail to create the stellar art you have envisioned in your mind - you let yourself have it. We are notorious at holding ourselves to such high and lofty standards that when we fail, we are our own worst critics. Self-reflection is great! Beating yourself up is not so great. Think of it this way - you wouldn’t let your friend beat themselves up - so don’t do it to the person in the mirror! I firmly believe that you cannot create from a place of frustration or negativity - if that sounds too fluffy - too bad :)

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:15] I introduce this special question and answer episode.
  • [2:20] My tips for navigating juried art competitions.
  • [8:00] What is a reasonable price to expect for entering an art competition?
  • [10:00] I give an update on my move to Argentina.
  • [12:20] How do you keep moving forward when life keeps getting in the way?
  • [17:00] Tips for good results when plein air painting.
  • [19:30] Closing thoughts.
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

May 30 2019

21mins

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Why You Need to Follow Your Gut and Create Art, with Kristin Cronic

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When was the last time you decided to quite all the voices and just focus on your desire to create art? Is it hard for you to carve out the time in your life or have you found the right formula to make it work? Wherever you are at in your journey, I know you’ll appreciate hearing from the amazing Jacksonville based artist - Kristin Cronic.

In our conversation, Kristin opens up about how she got started as an artist, what it was like navigating life as a Navy officer, how she recovered when her whole world was flipped upside down, and so much more. Don’t forget to check out images of Kristin’s artwork located at the end of this post.

Paint on the floor and permission to create art

Do you remember when you were first given permission to paint? Remember the joy you had? What happened to that joy? Have you fanned those flames over the years or are you just now starting to re-light the fire?

Kristin Cronic looks back to the early years of her life when her mother would allow her to paint and explore to heart's content. Her mother still has a paint-covered floor in her room at that house to this day! Kristin also received early encouragement from her aunt, Kathy Strauss who is also an artist.

Surviving a hurricane

Several years ago in 2017, Hurricane Irma struck the Florida coast, the Florida Keys, and the Caribbean. Irma also happened to strike just as Kristin and her family were planning a major shift in their lives - Kristin was resigning from the Navy to pursue her career in art. Also - Kristin was six weeks pregnant with their second child.

As crazy as that time was, thankfully, Kristin and her family made it through the whole ordeal safely. In the ensuing months, Kristin and her family went to work picking up the pieces as they began to rebuild. Two months after the chaos - Kristin started to really struggle with all the challenges that were building up. Thankfully, her husband stepped in with some helpful advice.

Follow your gut

In the middle of trying to bring order to chaos, Kristin followed her husband’s advice, and she started painting again. He knew, even when she had forgotten that taking the time to create art would help her find peace. It’s wonderful when you have people in your corner who help you follow your gut even when you can’t hear it speaking up!

As Kristin started to follow her gut and get back into what brought her joy, she found herself struggling with a direction. Listening to the Savvy Painter podcast helped Kristin reconnect with her inner artist and begin the path toward creating art again. Listening to the podcast wasn’t the silver bullet for Kristin, she also reached out to a local artist, and she enrolled in the Savvy Painter Growth Studio.

It’s never too late

Hopefully, you’ll find Kristin’s powerful story of finding her way and following her gut inspiring - I know I did! What I want artists like you to know is this; it’s never too late. You aren’t too old or too out of touch with the art community. No excuse is big enough to keep you from creating art.

The world needs your story and your art just as much as it needs Kristin’s! I’m so encouraged that this podcast and the community we’ve built has helped artists like Kristin find their way. Please, continue offering your feedback and your insights as we continue to work together to create something meaningful in this space.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:08] An update on my move to Argentina.
  • [2:00] I introduce my guest, Kristin Cronic.
  • [3:20] How did Kristin get started as an artist?
  • [7:30] Kristin talks about how this podcast and a local artist encouraged her to get back involved with painting.
  • [13:00] How Kristin’s world turned upside down.
  • [17:30] The differences between the Navy culture and life as an artist.
  • [21:15] Kristin explains how she started to find her voice.
  • [26:45] How Kristin got her art featured in two art shows.
  • [34:00] Insights Kristin has learned by listening to artists featured on this podcast.
  • [37:30] Advice that Kristin has for fellow artists.
  • [39:45] Closing thoughts.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

May 16 2019

41mins

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Your Questions Answered! With Gamblin Artist's Colors

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Do you have questions about oil painting and the best materials to use? Look no further, it’s here! Robert Gamblin, Mary Weisenburger, and Pete Cole join me to answer your biggest questions about oil painting and more! I’m so excited for you to hear their helpful insights into some really great topics. You’ll hear them go over questions about pigments, stories about pigment sources, why some paints have more oil separation, some great information on oil paints and toxicity, and much more! This will serve as a great resource for artists like you to keep in your back pocket. Learn how you can connect with Gamblin and utilize their great resources!

A Dedicated Focus on Oil Painting

You’ve heard that old phrase, “Jack of all trades and master of none” right? That’s what comes to mind when I hear Robert Gablin talk about why his company solely focuses on oil painting instead of branching out to provide water colors, acrylic paints, and other materials. Instead of being a jack of all trades, Robert and his team have decided to focus on being a master of one, oil paint products. Their narrow focus has paid off, they have displayed an amazing passion for detail and improvement on their niche subject. Just hearing from Robert, Mary, and Pete I could tell that they really know their field – they are the experts when it comes to oil paint!

Is the New Blue Worth it?

If you follow news about pigments and breaking developments around that subject like I do, then you’ve heard of the new “YInMn Blue” that was discovered at Oregon State University. This new color was discovered in 2009 as a byproduct of an experimentation. Since this news has recently been making the rounds on social media again it led me to get Robert Gamblin’s take on the new color and if they’ve found it worth it to start producing the color themselves. Robert explained that they found that it is not effective to produce the color for a few reasons. Their primary reason is the enormous cost it requires to create the color. This is due to the fact that the color requires three compounds and two of them are rare earth minerals. Robert’s vast knowledge was on display during our conversation and I know that artists like you will find his insights very helpful.

Mitigating Toxicity Risks

Do you find yourself concerned about your health when it comes to your time in the studio? Are you nervous about how your lifestyle as an artist will impact your health in long run? What would it mean for you to have supplies that are responsible, not only for the environment but for artists like you? My guests from Gamblin are happy to share with artists like you that their line of high-quality products are free of toxins. They want to see more artists use products that are sustainable and health conscious. Don’t let your time in the studio get clouded by concern for your health. Hear from the Gamblin team and how their products could be the best fit for you!

What is FastMatte?

Don’t you hate it when you are in a creative flow and you have to make the decision to pause and let your paint dry before you can proceed? What if there was a way to avoid that pause and continue with your creative momentum? That’s where Gamblin’s helpful product, FastMatte come in. FastMatte colors are a unique type of oil colors, every color dries fast, every color dries matte. These qualities make them perfect for underpainting techniques. FastMatte also serves as an excellent way to come back to oil painting for those painters who have switched to acrylics because of the need for a faster drying rate. I was seriously impressed with this helpful solution that Gamblin has developed and I hope you get the chance to find out for yourself!

Apr 11 2019

1hr 31mins

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A Peek Inside the World of Collecting Art, with Tracy Kinnally

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What is that people look for when they invest time and money into collecting art? Are they looking for a particular style? Is it for their personal enjoyment or do they want it to serve as a conversation starter? Here to give us a great peek inside the world of collecting art is art advisor, Tracy Kinnally. In our conversation, Tracy explains how she got started as an art advisor, where the art market is headed, advice for artists and collectors, and much more. I know that artists like you will really appreciate our conversation especially the turn it takes toward the end.

How do you get started as an art advisor?

Have you ever wondered how someone gets started as an art advisor? Did they dream of helping people find art from an early age? Tracy Kinnally studied at Christie’s in London and then went on to intern at the Chelsea gallery in New York and the Guggenheim in Venice. These days, Tracy is hard at work on her business helping people all over the world find the right art to feature in their home or workplace. You can connect with Tracy by going to her website; the link is located in the resources section.

What are art collectors looking for?

As many people can attest to, collecting art can become a sort of obsession. What is it that these collectors are looking for? Do they get connected to a particular artist or a style? Tracy has found that each person is looking for something a little bit different and that is why she enjoys meeting people in their homes to get a sense of what would fit for that individual. She even finds that what a collector says they want and what they really want are two different things. I found Tracy’s perspective fascinating and helpful, and I know that you will too!

Advice for artists and collectors.

If you are going to start collecting art, you should connect with someone like Tracy Kinnally, seriously. Art advisors can help you make the right decision and even expose you to options would have never otherwise considered. If you don’t want to connect with an art advisor, Tracy says that you should follow your gut. When you see something you like, go with it, don’t buy a painting that you are unsure about.

As for artists, Tracy says that they should make their work as easily accessible as possible. She encourages artists to build up a body of work and to have contact channels easy to find and responsive. The worst thing you can do is to ignore or never follow up with a collector who is interested in your artwork!

Where the art market is headed.

Without a doubt, the art market is headed into an exciting period. Even right now, there are so many possibilities open to artists and those collecting art. Gone are the days where you could only sell your art in a gallery or at an art show, the internet has made it so much easier than it was in the past. Yes, there are challenges that come with this new direction for the art market, but there is no going back, you have to adapt. What is your take on this topic? Do you agree with Tracy’s take, let me know!

Outline of This Episode
  • [5:20] I introduce my guest, Tracy Kinnally.
  • [6:45] How did Tracy get into her work as an art advisor.
  • [9:30] Tracy talks about her work with private art collectors.
  • [17:00] How does Tracy create her catalogue of paintings and artists?
  • [20:40] Tracy talks about curating a space and picking the right piece of art to feature.
  • [32:00] Advice for collectors and artists.
  • [35:20] Where is the art market headed?
  • [38:00] Tracy and I talk about some of the artists that we are obsessed about right now.
  • [45:00] Where did portrait paintings come from? Why do we collect them?
  • [47:00] Painting the female image.
  • [54:30] Closing thoughts.
Other artists mentioned on this episode Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Mar 28 2019

56mins

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What does success mean to you?

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Last week I sent out an email to my subscribers asking them, “What does success mean to you?” I received over two hundred responses from Savvy Painter followers! People have a lot to say about this topic and as you can imagine each answer was different and had a unique perspective.

I want to take this opportunity to highlight some of those responses and engage in a larger conversation about life as an artist trying to attain “Success.” I want you to join the discussion about success, and I want to hear what other topics you’d like me to showcase.

You need to determine your definition of success.

Let’s face it; the answer to this question is not an easy one. As many of you noted, a quick definition might pop into your mind, but upon further consideration, you struggle to come up with a definition that fits. Ultimately, I believe that each person has to answer this question for themselves, but they do need to answer it. Don’t trick yourself into believing that you can leave this question unanswered and still somehow become “Successful.” How can you achieve something that you haven’t taken the time to define?

An action step, if you dare, come up with a working definition of success that fits you. Once you’ve got that definition, write it down!

Can we talk about the financial side of success?

I know it’s a “Dirty” word, but we are going to talk about money. So many of you, and rightfully so, are concerned about the financial side of the success conversation. I know that you didn’t get into your career as an artist for the money, nobody would choose this profession with that goal. Unfortunately, our society often propagates the idea that our income level is tied to our worth or value. There is no way around it, the financial aspect is part of the success conversation, but I’m so glad that many of you know that it’s not the only factor defining of success. Here is the truth, you need money to live and deserve to get paid for your hard work!

Show up and put in the work.

Whatever your definition of success is, the fact is, you won’t succeed if you don’t stay in the game. It’s not easy to stay in the habit of working on your artwork; this is why I ask so many of my guests to give us a peek behind the curtain and let us in on their process when it comes to time in the studio. Every day that you choose to paint, you are choosing in your favour. Are you putting in the time? Do you have a process that works for you and keeps you on track? If so, let me know!

My definition of success.

Thank you to everyone who joined the conversation by responding to my question, I read all the replies, and I was so encouraged to hear all your perspectives! I’d like to leave you with my definition of success.

Success is continued growth; it means continually expanding my horizons. For me, success means staying true to my values and staying curious.

This whole art journey for me is about the process. The process of painting is more important to me than the outcome. I don’t mind failing; I don’t see failure as the opposite of success. I can learn from failure; I can’t learn if I quit on myself or my art.

I hope you find this conversation on the definition of success helpful. The final message that I want to leave you with is; you are so much more than the Hollywood version of success!

Outline of This Episode
  • [1:35] I introduce the topic for this episode; “What does success mean to you?”
  • [6:45] Why you need to define success for yourself.
  • [16:00] Considering the financial aspect of success.
  • [21:20] You need money to live, there is no shame in getting paid for your art.
  • [28:30] Showing up and putting in the work.
  • [31:15] Success is multifaceted.
  • [35:20] I share my definition of success.
  • [39:00] You are so much more than the Hollywood version of success!
Connect With Antrese

Mar 14 2019

41mins

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Plein Air Painting on the John Muir Trail, with Therese Morgan

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Have you ever wanted to grab your materials and head for the mountains for a plein air painting session? While that specific scenario may not resonate with every artist, I know the desire to change things up and get out of a creative slump will. My guest, Therese Morgan along with her friend and fellow artist, Mark David took off for the adventure of a lifetime backpacking the John Muir Trail.

In our conversation, we discuss what led Therese to embark on this crazy expedition, challenges she faced along the way, how the trip impacted her artwork, what she learned from her journey, and much more. Caution, this episode may cause you to pack your bags and head for the hills (in a good way!)

Hitting a wall.

If you’ve been an artist for very long, chance are you’ve hit a wall, creatively. If you haven’t yet, consider yourself extremely lucky! What should you do when you hit a wall, find yourself in a slump, experience a creative block, or whatever you want to call it? Many artists have a unique take on how to get past a creative block. Some will say, to keep your head down and stick to your schedule while others will encourage you to take a break and pick up a book. Then there are crazy people like Therese Morgan who pack up their studio and go for a hike, and not just any hike, a twenty-seven-day hike along the John Muir Trail in California!

Plein air painting, where?

Have you experimented with plein air painting? Where have you explored and enjoyed the outdoors with your artwork? Have you ever done something as crazy as a twenty-seven-day hike with your shelter, clothing, food, water, and painting supplies strapped to your back?

To some, plein air painting while on a multi-week hike might sound crazy, and to others (like me) it sounds like fun! Therese Morgan and her friend Mark David came to this idea one night over dinner. Their idea seemed great on paper, but they both wondered, could they pull it off? You might be under the assumption that Therese and Mark are avid and experienced backpackers; they were not. You also might assume that they had just received a generous grant or they had some other means of financial security; they did not.

Lacking experience and the requisite finances, Therese and Mark forged ahead, convinced that their dream would be worth all foreseen and unforeseen challenges they’d face along the way. After some careful planning, the pair decided to embark on an almost month-long journey on the John Muir Trail. The John Muir Trail is a long-distance trail in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, passing through Yosemite, Kings Canyon, and Sequoia National Parks. The trail's length is 211 miles long with an elevation gain of approximately 47,000 feet. For almost all of its length, the trail is in the High Sierra backcountry and wilderness areas, not exactly a “relaxing” experience.

Lessons learned and brush miles logged.

As you can imagine, Therese and Mark’s journey was challenging, to say the least. Hiker after hiker in the backcountry would pass them by, surprised that they’d take on such an adventure with their art supplies. Looking back, Therese is proud of the amazing feat that she accomplished by finishing her journey but also of the artwork she had created along the way. Combining their efforts, Therese and Mark have created the “Brushmiles” project. Brushmiles was a term their mutual teacher, Craig Nelson would say to them, in reference to putting in the effort to paint often, to put in the miles as a painter. You can get a glimpse of their journey by checking out the link to their page located in the resources section below.

Outline of This Episode
  • [0:55] I introduce my guest, Therese Morgan.
  • [2:40] How did Therese get involved with painting?
  • [5:30] Therese talks about her post-college creative slump.
  • [11:50] The challenge of finding the right artistic community.
  • [17:00] What led Therese and her friend to hike the John Muir Trail?
  • [29:20] Therese talks about hitting the John Muir Trail.
  • [36:00] What did Therese learn from her trip?
  • [41:00] Things that went wrong on Therese’s trip.
  • [43:15] How many paintings did Therese complete on the trail? What was her schedule?
  • [46:30] Therese talks about the benefits and challenges of hiking with her peer.
  • [48:30] How has the John Muir Trail experience influenced Therese’s artwork?
Resources Mentioned on this episode Connect With Antrese

Feb 28 2019

55mins

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