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Rank #49 in Natural Sciences category

Science
Natural Sciences

The Permaculture Podcast

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #49 in Natural Sciences category

Science
Natural Sciences
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Caring for Earth, Ourselves, and Each Other.

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Caring for Earth, Ourselves, and Each Other.

iTunes Ratings

175 Ratings
Average Ratings
141
13
16
2
3

Great pod

By A nerd among the birds - Nov 15 2019
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One of my favorite podcasts, inspiring to hear all the great work folks are doing.

Fair and Enlightening

By MidshipmenVoyage - Mar 08 2016
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Very good dialogue and reviews.

iTunes Ratings

175 Ratings
Average Ratings
141
13
16
2
3

Great pod

By A nerd among the birds - Nov 15 2019
Read more
One of my favorite podcasts, inspiring to hear all the great work folks are doing.

Fair and Enlightening

By MidshipmenVoyage - Mar 08 2016
Read more
Very good dialogue and reviews.
Cover image of The Permaculture Podcast

The Permaculture Podcast

Latest release on Jul 04, 2020

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Caring for Earth, Ourselves, and Each Other.

Rank #1: 1826 – Essential Earthbag Construction with Kelly Hart

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Our guest for this episode is the carpenter, architect, and builder Kelly Hart. He joins me today to talk about Earthbag Construction, the subject of his recently published book Essential Earthbag Construction from New Society Publishers.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Episode1826.mp3

Click here to download the episode. | Open Player in New Window

Learn more about my Moment of Need

In this interview, Kelly walks us through many of the steps required for building with earthbags, including the practical needs of what bags to use, what you can fill the bags with for thermal mass or insulation, some of the tools and equipment you’ll need, establishing a foundation, laying the courses, tying each layer together, and also how to secure your doors and windows.

After you’ve listened to this interview, you’ll have a basic understanding of how to use earthbags for construction. With a copy of Kelly’s book you can learn the rest.

Find out more about Kelly and his work, including his DVD A Sampler of Alternative Homes, at naturalbuildingblog.com, and his book at NewSociety.com.

I like this interview because Kelly invites us to try our hand at building with earthbags. I find that invitation in, to try, to make mistakes, and to learn, incredibly powerful and empowering.

We can start with simple structures, like an above-ground root cellar or domed storage shed, to get comfortable with the necessary techniques before proceeding to something more complicated. With the way earthbags go together we can stack, pull down, and try again, with our first structure serving as an in-depth learning experience.

This is also an inexpensive technique, making it affordable and accessible in ways other methods, where mistakes can be costly, are not. Looking at the cost of supplies and some sample projects, 1,000 of the polypropylene bags that Kelly mentioned, are less than $400. Another $80 for a 440-yard roll of 4-point barbed wire.

From there you’ll need rebar, lumber, windows, doors, and your tools, but over and over again I found many owner-built earthbag homes, all over the world, for under $10,000, in all shapes and sizes.

Multi-story. Rectilinear. Rounded. Any combination you can imagine. As a lover of cob and the feel of Earthships, there is something about the earthbag as a base that appeals to me.

Its natural building meets LEGO.

Earth risen into walls and offering us security, in a structure we can build with our own hands.

I can think of few things more comfortable than that.

What do you think of this conversation? Has this changed your thoughts on building with earthbags? Is this a method you’ve used?

Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast.
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next regular episode is a conversation with Ben Goldfarb to talk about his book Eager and the role of one of the world’s greatest ecosystem engineers, the beaver.

Until then, spend each day creating the world, and homes, you want to live in, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Essential Earthbag Construction
Natural Building Blog (Kelly’s Website)
A Sampler of Alternative Homes (Kelly’s DVD)
Nader Khalili (1936 – 2008)
The $50 and Up Underground House Book (undergroundhousing.com)

Jul 30 2018

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Rank #2: 1905 – So You Want To Be A Modern Homesteader with Kirsten Lie-Nielsen

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In this episode, Kirsten Lie-Nielsen, author of So You Want to be a Modern Homesteader, joins me to share her journey in becoming a modern homesteader and the advice she has for anyone interested in pursuing a similar path. Residing in Maine, I like her story because of how she and her partner had this dream and began on the land they were on. Continuing to develop their skills, in a space that was definitely not a farm, they spent this time seeking out the right piece of property for their goals.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Episode1905.mp3

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Through our chat together Kirsten shares what and why she and her husband focused on when moving to the land. That she earns an income off the farm, and what they are developing to make one on it. The value of a partner who shares your dream, which she has in her husband. The relationship we have with our animals, including what develops from bottle feeding a baby goat, when your geese imprint on you and having a guardian dog as part of your family. Engaging your local community, while also leveraging social media to stay connected, learn new skills, and promote your farm and farm business.

We get into quite a bit in our time together, which also reminded me of how technology is not always the most reliable at the end of a rural lane. You’ll hear a few places where we have less than perfect audio, but those are minor compared to the wealth of information Kirsten shares with us in this conversation.

You can read Kirsten’s blog and learn more about her journey at HostileValleyLiving.com, and you’ll find her book at newsociety.com.

In cooperation with New Society Publishers, I’m giving away a copy of her book to a listener on Patreon. For those of you who support the podcast there, you’ll find this in your feed beginning February 18th.

Not a Patreon supporter? That’s okay, this drawing is open to everyone. All you need to do is register with Patreon and leave a comment in the link below. This giveaway only runs through February 28th, so head over there today.

Book Giveaway: So You Want To Be A Modern Homesteader

While lauding Kirsten’s book, I mention that I like the questions she asks to help you perform a self-assessment and decide whether or not this really is the path you want to pursue, something we don’t talk about enough within the permaculture community. Those questions can help you with preparing for rural life, understanding the seasonality of living on a farm, the reality of raising children on the homestead, and more.

A few of those questions, from the chapter on Skills and Resources for Rural Living, include:

What is your plan for keeping food fresh or preserved?
How will you bathe and get fresh drinking water?
How will you keep your animals warm in winter?

As you read each chapter and answer those questions, if you want to learn more and dig deeper, Kirsten provides a relatively comprehensive list of books for each topic. From the same chapter, some of the books she recommends:

The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
Raising Goats Naturally by Deborah Niemann

I’m a fan of her suggested reading because many of the books are ones I would personally recommend from my own library, or have been suggested by guests at one point or another.

Overall, if you are called to the land, you can learn a lot from Kirsten, her blog, and her books.

I missed her at Mother Earth News Fair in PA this past year, as I was hanging out with Jereme Zimmerman at the time talking mead, but look forward to meeting her this September and sitting through some of her presentations. If you can make it to that or any of the other events, she’ll be at, seek out the opportunity. If not, read her work.

After listening to this episode, what do you think about making a move to a homestead? Have Kirsten’s insights changed your views? Will you need to take some time to build your skills?

Let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or if you still like to seal an envelope and mail a letter, that address is:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, the next episode is a conversation with Zev Friedman of Co-operate WNC as we sit down to talk about mutual aid and the scale of cooperation. That’s out on February 27 for Patreon supporters and regular release on February 28.

To go with that episode is a giveaway for copies of Peter Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid and The Conquest of Bread.

Until the next time, consider whether or not a homestead is right for you and your plans, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Feb 20 2019

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Rank #3: Restoration Agriculture with Mark Shepard (Part I)

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(Originally Aired: 16.July.2014)

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My guest for this episode is Mark Shepard, author of Restoration Agriculture.

As you might expect from this show we start with his biography and background, work our way through a call to action for permaculture practitioners and a need to be realistic in our efforts, and finally wrap up this conversation by discussing his work of restoration agriculture. Don’t worry though, this is the first piece that Mark and I recorded together, so there will be more on this subject to follow, including listener questions in episodes two and three.

I’m can produce episodes like this one, and those that follow in this series, because of your support. You allow me to schedule large blocks of time to have expansive candid conversations with interesting guests for the good of the permaculture community and beyond. If you value this show and these experiences, and I think you do since you choose to tune in, then support the show. Go to www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support to find out how.

I found this interview, and the other time I spent with Mark, delightful and challenging. He asks hard questions and proposes solutions that at first glance seem difficult, but that ultimately are necessary to doing this work in a meaningful way and getting beyond the “feel good” actions of a little here and a little there. The potentially unstable future posed by weather weirding and climate change requires action.

Now.

As part of that, and because I don’t believe in asking anyone to do something that I wouldn’t or haven’t done, I’m going to take up Mark’s challenge to eat a diet free of annual grains and annual legumes for 30 days. Actually, I’ll be doing it for 31, from August 1st through the 31st, 2014. Will you join me on this journey and see what the experience is like in a world of mass-produced foods and perceived scarcity? Together we can show the possible abundance that lurks beyond the shelves of our local supermarket.

Expect a month or so to pass until the next of these pieces with Mark, and the final one to come out in late September or early October.

Are you practicing restoration agriculture? Or just want to talk permaculture? Let me know:

E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266
Twitter: @permaculturecst

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Jan 25 2020

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Rank #4: Climate Change and The Path Ahead

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(Originally Released: May 25, 2017)

Giulianna Maria Lamanna, of The Fifth World , drops a huge two-part question on us in this episode, a continuation of the MAPC 2016 Q&A.

1. Are there people in the permaculture community talking about climate change and the impact of global warming on invasive species?

2. Is it our responsibility as permaculture practitioners to create new ecosystems for the changing climate?

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Episode1716.mp3

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This conversation leads to thoughts on preserving native ecosystems, the creation of novel ecosystems, the role and influence of exotic species, human disturbance, and the forces of erosion. We’re also asked to examine our own  role we have in tending the wild, and what responsibility, if any, we have to domesticated species such as chickens?

In doing so, can we take back the stewardship of our own habitat?

Voices you’ll hear include:

Eva Taylor of Ironwood Farms
Zach Elfers of Nomad Seed Project
Ben Weiss of Susquehanna Permaculture
Jason Godesky of The Fifth World
Nicole Luttrell of Wind Song Farm
Claudia Joseph of New York Permaculture Exchange
Seppi Garrett
Dale Hendricks of Green Light Plants
Dr. Christopher Huvos

Get in touch
show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Instagram
Twitter

Podcast Needs

Living in the Gift, as Ethan Hughes reminds me, requires asking for our needs to be met.

The following are some things I could use right now to make continuing the podcast easier:

– A laptop capable of running the Adobe Creative Cloud Suite, including a full HD (1080p) screen, 8GB RAM, and an i5 processor. Due to the amount of data I handle, a 512GB HDD or larger would be great. Any specs above those are golden.

If you would like to discuss or know more about any of these, feel free to send me an email.

show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

If you are able to give towards any of these efforts:
https://www.paypal.me/permaculturepodcast

Drop something in the mail:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Or via BitCoin, my wallet address is:
193R8iDwyqN4EmqzWBabMQgwLU4T2ovwVB

Resources
MACP 2017 Event Information and Tickets

Timothy Lee Scott , author of Invasive Plant Medicine
Tao Orion  (Her Facebook Page)
1535 – Beyond the War on Invasive Species , my interview with Tao.
1321 – David Homgren on Permaculture. An Interview.

Nov 12 2019

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Rank #5: 1830 – Optical Surveying and Social Forestry with Hazel

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What does it mean to go back to the ground and learn the fading skills necessary to work the forest with our hands? To read the land assisted by tools we sight with our own eyes? To create new visions of old roles, such as a land steward or cottager?

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Episode1830.mp3

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I explore those thoughts and more with my guest today, Hazel, who some of you may know as Tom Ward. A long-time permaculture practitioner, he remains one of the few people who I feel comfortable calling an elder in the community. As you’ll hear during the conversation today, he carries an impeccable reputation and is known for his respect for people and respect for the land. Ask around among your circles, and you’ll likely hear this echoed by someone whose life was impacted by Hazel’s work as a teacher and storyteller to generations of permaculture practitioners. Which is funny, because, in this digital age, he’s not always the easiest person to find.

Drawing from his breadth of experience, Hazel shares with us the importance of putting away the gadgets and technology and embedding ourselves in a deep sense of place. To listen and be part of the land around us, and to work with those who are ready.

You can find out more about Hazel and his work, including upcoming social forestry and optical surveying classes, at siskiyoupermaculture.com.

If you have any thoughts or questions from this conversation with Hazel, leave a comment in the show notes or get in touch.

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, dig deep and create the world you want to live in where you are by taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Recommended Reading
Beyond the War on Invasive Species by Tao Orion
Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
Daughters of Copper Woman by Anne Cameron
Emergent Strategy by Adrienne Brown
Keeping it Living by Nancy Turner
The Shallows by Nicholas Carr
The Spell of the Sensuous by David Abram
Tending the Wild by Kat Anderson
World Without Mind by Franklin Foer

Resources
Siskiyou Permaculture
Social Forestry Course
Optical Surveying Course
Hazel’s Collected Videos and Recordings

Heartwood Institute
Brock DolmanOccidental Arts & Ecology
Traditional Aboriginal Burning (Cool Burning)

Sep 20 2018

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Rank #6: 1825 – The Wildcrafting Brewer with Pascal Baudar

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Author, teacher, and forager Pascal Baudar joins me to discuss his exploration of primitive brews and fermentation, the basis for his latest book The Wildcrafting Brewer.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Episode1825.mp3

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He shares with us the way we can combine local ingredients as flavor, with water, sugar, and yeast to create sodas, beer, wine, and mead with local flavor and sense of place. If you are familiar with his first book, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, then you know his thoughts push the limits of what we might think of when considering what to toss into our brew pot. Taking these methods, he again takes us in an unexpected direction that goes from the social drinks we might expect, to discuss how we might consider making culinary, healing, or even psychotropic beverages.

Find out more about Pascal and his work as a forager and teacher at urbanoutdoorskills.com and his books, including The Wildcrafting Brewer at ChelseaGreen.com.

Visit our Partner: Acres U.S.A.

Stepping away from this conversation, though he and I spoke about brewing and making wild-flavored beverages, I’m thinking more generally about how easy it is to complicate and over-analyze our journey and arrive at a place where the results we wish to accomplish gets lost in a messy process requiring more work than needed.

Pascal shows us that with his primitive, or as he also says archaic, brews and how the modern steps, and commercial flavors, limit the range of experiences we create as we scrub and sanitize our pots and fermentation vessels, or leave our brews alone; watched but untouched as the liquid transforms from sugary concoction into alcoholic elixir.

How often do we do seek this same sterile approach in our other work, only to find the effort falls flat because of a singular direction and only considering one way?

What if we tried more simplicity and creativity in our work as permaculture designers, and in our relationships and initiatives for community building? Can we strip away the unnecessary and arrive and something more concise, clear, whole, productive, and enjoyable?

I think so, and the skills of creating wild foods and beverages provide a place where we can safely explore these patterns, before searching for similar details in our other work.

What do you think of this conversation with Pascal? Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch with me if you would like to discuss this further.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, the next regular episode is with Kelly Hart to discuss his book Essential Earthbag Construction.

Until then, explore the wild and the uncivilized, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Outdoor Urban Skills
The Wildcrafting Brewer
The New Wildcrafted Cuisine
Chelsea Green Publishing

Jul 20 2018

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Rank #7: Interview: David Holmgren – RetroSuburbia

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In this episode recorded by co-host David Bilbrey, David Holmgren returns for the first of a two-part conversation about his latest book RetroSuburbia.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Episode1919.mp3

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Visit Our Partner: Food Forest Card Game

This work and the discussion today looks at how people are and can adapt in-place, as individuals and communities, by retrofitting where many of us live: in the spaces around cities, the suburbs.

Throughout David Holmgren shares how we found ourselves in the suburbs and the importance of getting out of the debt, commute, and consume treadmill. Together, David and David also discuss self-reliance, the revitalization of suburbia, and understanding and applying the context of where we live to the creation of our solutions.

You can find David Holmgren, his work, and his books at holmgren.com.au. From there you can also buy RetroSuburbia! online, to have shipped wherever you live in the world.

To go along with this episode, I also have a giveaway thanks to David and the folks at Holmgren Design, Permaculture Design Magazine, and PermaculturePrinciples.com.

I have a copy of RetroSuburbia! and copies of the 2020 Permaculture Calendar to share with listeners. I’ll be giving the book and a calendar away to one listener, and one copy each of the calendars to two others.

You’ll find this giveaway here at Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast starting on October 10th, 2019 and running until October 30th, 2019.

If you’d like to make sure you get a copy of the calendar for yourself or to give to friends and family, you’ll find those at permacultureprinciples.com. This year the calendar features awesome images to illustrate the principles of permaculture, thicker print stock, and better print quality. You get all of that for just $11.95 US, with 100% of the sales profits going to the Permafund, a charitable organization supporting permaculture projects around the world.

Any conversation with David Holmgren leaves me with enough to ponder for weeks and months to come after I first listen, and new thoughts arising each time I revisit the interview. Until the release of the second half of this conversation comes out in a few weeks, I’d like you to consider the ideas of replication and context for the design and refit of the suburbs.

How does where you live change and shape what you can accomplish? This includes things like what you would grow in your gardens. The rules and regulations that determine where you can live and who you can live with. Whether calling on help for repairs can come from your own sweat equity, the capitalist economy, or an informal network of support. And what sustainable solutions are permitted or illegal.

Think about those for now, and we’ll revisit this in the closing notes of the next episode.

From here, the next interview is the second half of the conversation with David Holmgren. Until then, spend each day retrofitting suburbia, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Fall Fundraiser
If you enjoy this show, you can help it to grow and continue to explore the edges of ecological design and what it means to practice permaculture in the landscape, our lives, and our communities by donating today.

Give online at paypal.me/permaculturepodcast
Become an ongoing supporter at Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast
Or by mail:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Oct 10 2019

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Rank #8: 1837 – Permaculture play, design considerations, and a casual conversation with Karl Treen

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My guest today is Karl Treen of Food Forest Card Game. He joins me to share where his life has gone since our interview last year.

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Support the Podcast on Patreon

A longtime permaculture practitioner, Karl is one of the people whose work I follow off the air and I find quite a bit of inspiration from what he’s doing with his card game and working on implementing his designs in an urban environment where he lives in Rhode Island near the Atlantic Coast here in the United States. Though we’ve never met in person, knowing Karl as I do we wound talking as soon as we connected without a formal start to the interview. As a result what you’re about to hear drops directly into the conversation, but is not where we began nor ultimately where we ended when I turned off the recording.

Where we do pick up is a few moments after he shared that he made a move to a new house with a larger yard and how this change influences his permaculture work. Along the way, we talk about a variety of thoughts. Those include different uses for his game inside the permaculture or school classroom; accepting that we can’t know everything and with that what we can do to be better teachers and designers; and why Instagram is our favorite place to learn and share new ideas, and some folks he recommends following.

Find out more about Karl and his work at foodforestcardgame.com. While you are there consider picking up a couple of sets of cards as stocking stuffers for the holidays and introduce your friends and family to permaculture design.

I also recommend following Karl on Instagram. As we mentioned there at the end of the interview, you can find him at foodforestcardgame. In his feed, you can see images from his mushroom logs, which he inoculated a few days after recording this interview in early November. You’ll find links to his Instagram account, his mushroom project, and the people he mentioned worth following in the show notes.

To go with this interview, I’m giving away a deck of Food Forest Card Game cards and a copy of Mary Appelhof’s Worms Eat my Garbage.

I like sitting down with Karl to talk about his work because I find what he’s doing, even after his many years of practice, reflects the experiences of other permaculture folks who work a job, have a little bit of land and are doing the best they can. As with his conversation about composting and black soldier flies, we have many decisions to make on what works best for us, our design, and goals. Yes, he has the perfect start to growing the fly larva, but at this time there are other places to focus his time and energy.

Though he’s studied permaculture; created a design and education aid for the community, and remains connected with myself and others; he still finds inspiration from others. By focusing on a particular area for practice, he expands his knowledge, and direct experience becomes an in-depth resource for anyone who contacts him, while still absorbing what interests him from others.

Similarly, as I continue down my own path, my own role is influenced by sitting in the chair as the show host, to have conversations with guests, read the latest books and newest articles, and act as a curator of information about permaculture. To pull upon all these connections to help you find the people, books, organizations, and resources that help you meet your goals. As one of my teachers used to say, to be a guide on the side rather than a sage on the stage.

Continuing to stay in touch with Karl and others in our community, I’d like to have more casual conversations like this. We can learn so much from the informal understanding of the day to day lives of others putting the ideas of permaculture into practice.

If there’s someone who appeared on the show in the past that you thought I had a good conversation with and you’d like to hear back on the air for something less formal, let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation should be my interview with mycologist Lindsay Bender of Field and Forest Products.

Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in my playing games, applying design to your life, and taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Visit our Affiliates Page for a discount on the Women’s Permaculture Guild Permaculture Design Course, Classes with Heather Jo Flores of Food Not Laws, Herbal Medicine from Susquehanna Apothecary, and with Rebel Garden Tools, the best hand tools for gardening and forest farming.

Giveaway
Worms Eat my Garbage and a set of Food Forest Card Game Cards

Resources
Food Forest Card Game
Foodforestcardgame on Instagram
Haskap Edible Honeysuckle
Karl’s Mushroom Inoculation
Patrick Whitefield

Instagram Worth Following
The Permaculture Podcast
That Vinegar Guy
Greenwood Farm
Veggie Garden Vermont

Nov 20 2018

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Rank #9: 1827 – Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter

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Ben Goldfarb joins me to talk about his new book,Eager: the surprising, secret life of beavers and why they matter. Drawing from his work and our experiences in resource management, conservation, and environmental education we talk about the role beavers had in creating and shaping the landscape, history, and people of the United States, and the importance of reintroducing and protecting beavers to return the world to the wetter, boggier place it once was.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Episode1827.mp3

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Visit our Partner: HomeBiogas

Find out more about Ben’s work at bengoldfarb.com and Eager at chelseagreen.com.

What I love about this conversation is the way Ben talks about beavers and how we can connect to the world through the stories of others. From that, as I mentioned and he and I touch on, there is a deep value in good nature writing and how it can move us. Beautifully written, we hear the sound of a beaver’s tail on the water or the concern of a conservationist to ensure a mother and her kit stay together. Through those words, we get a sense of place and loving bond with the other than human we may never know personally or get a chance to visit. We can care about something beyond our self or our local biome.

If you’d like to read some of the best nature writing available, start with Ben’s book. It is absolutely fantastic and one of the finest books I’ve read in years as he leads us through the importance of beavers in a funny, witty, and captivating way. You’ll learn as much about beavers as you will the people, organizations, and history of human contact and interaction with these charismatic ecosystem engineers.

If you’d like to read more, I then suggest you check out Dan Flores, who wrote the forward for Eager, and his book, Coyote America: A natural and supernatural history, and The Beekeeper’s Lament, by Hannah Nordhaus. Both are excellent looks at the different connections between our lives and those of other animals, wild and domestic.

After reading those, should you like to learn more about the other-than-human and how we interact with that side of the world, read David Abram’s The Spell of the Sensuous. This book has had one of the most significant impacts on me and my understanding of how interrelated our relationships are with the sun and sky, earth and water, fish, fowl, insects, and mammals. How we are not alone, cannot live alone, and would not be human without them.

What are some of your favorite works of nature writing? What do you think about this conversation with Ben? Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, give me a call: 717-827-6266, send me an email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com, or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next episode is an interview recorded by David Bilbrey with Gregory Landua to follow-up on a discussion they started at ReGen 18 on regenerative business.

Until then, spend each day looking for the impacts for rural beavers and their cosmopolitan siblings, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Ben Goldfarb
Eager
The Methow Beaver Project
Thinking Like a Mountain – Aldo Leopold
The Beaver Institute
Worth a Dam

Aug 10 2018

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Rank #10: Joel Salatin on Farming, Experience and Mastery.

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Joel Salatin shares his thoughts on farming, the importance of experience, and the role of mastery over ourselves and our chosen discipline.

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These topics layout the major themes of the conversation that follows but touch only on the barest of the depth you’ll hear. Together  Joel and I explore land access for new farmers, living frugally,  agriculture based on skilled people, mentoring and apprenticeship, the nature of wisdom, and what it means to be well-read and with it well rounded: to be an interesting conversationalist with something to say and a provocative way to say it, so others find us and our message appealing.

I left this conversation thinking about the personal changes we can make now to become experts in our chosen field and how that serves as a model for others that continues the change that already began. Eventually, that daily change becomes the future we cannot imagine for generations to come.

Once you’ve given this interview a  listen, leave a comment below and let me know your thoughts. Or, you can also get in touch with me directly in the usual ways.

Giveaway: Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal

Resources
Polyface Farms
Eager Farmer

Feb 15 2020

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Rank #11: 1839 – Reclaiming our Nutritional Wisdom: Nourishment with Fred Provenza

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My guest today is the renowned animal behaviorist Fred Provenza, who joins me to talk about how we can reconnect with the foods that feed our bodies and reclaim our nutritional wisdom.

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Visit Our Partner: Food Forest Card Game

Drawing on decades of research with animals, upon retirement from Utah State University he turned his lens towards human beings to pull together the best studies and his own personal journey to provide a way we can begin to eat well for ourselves by outlining where we’ve gone wrong and what we can do to make a positive change.

You can find Fred’s book, Nourishment, at chelseagreen.com.

What do you think of what Fred shares with us today? Can you see the relationships between flavor-feedback, culture, and alternative availability on our nutritional wisdom

Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, call 717-827-6266, email: show@thepermacutlurepodcast.com, or write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018.

Resources
Nourishment

Chemical Ecology (Wiki)
Dying To Be Me by Anita Moorjani
Edward R Murrow’s This I Believe (Wiki)

Dec 10 2018

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Rank #12: 1904 – Rob Avis on the Essentials of Rainwater Harvesting

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Verge Permaculture 2016
Gavin Young Photography

In this episode of The Permaculture Podcast, Rob Avis, of Verge Permaculture, joins me to talk about rainwater harvesting.

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This conversation is based on his new book from New Society Publishers, Essential Rainwater Harvesting. Rob wrote this book along with his wife and Verge Permaculture Partner, Michelle. Though they began their professional careers as engineers designing solutions in the oil fields, they now live on a productive permaculture homestead in Alberta, Canada, and use that experience to create and share all the formulas, calculations, and components needed to create a productive system for capturing clean, healthy water.

You can find more about Rob’s work at VergePermaculture.ca, and his book, Essential Rainwater Harvesting at NewSociety.com. You’ll, of course, find links to those and other resources, including his Rainwater Harvesting Toolkit, in the Resources section below.


To go with this conversation, In cooperation with New Society Publishers, I’m giving away a copy of Essential Rainwater Harvesting. That drawing runs from February 8th through at least the 18th. To enter, all you need to do is follow the link below and leave a comment in the post. I’ll then randomly select the recipient once this giveaway closes.

Book Giveaway: Essential Rainwater Harvesting

In the book, Rob and Michelle break down what we need in order to install a rainwater harvesting system, and they back that up with their professional experience and the sources, that lead them to their conclusions. They also hold the additional need to understand the liability and risks of such a system as engineers who put their stamp on a design. I mention this latter part as one of my earliest lessons in rainwater capture was just how heavy a rain barrel, even a 50 gallon one, can get—over 400lbs/180kils—and what we need to consider when placing them, such as a solid foundation, so they can be productive and not create any hazards for the user or surrounding neighbors.

One of the mystifying parts of rainwater harvesting for me, in the beginning, was calculating just how much water would fall on a given area and the necessary size for a storage container to hold it all. Once you start doing those calculations you quickly find that a lot of water, whether you count the volume in liters or gallons, comes off of a roof or parking lot with just a centimeter or half-inch of rain. Accounting for that, how your surfaces or gutters divide and divert those flows, and where they’ll go can help to understand how to use this resource around your home or in your landscape.

And with Essential Rainwater Harvesting, you’ll find all the details for that and so much more.

Which is a long way to say, I like this book and like the others in the Essential series from New Society Publishers, think you will too.

What did you think of this conversation with Rob? Do you have questions for him? Would you like to hear more about this work or his other projects at Verge Permaculture?

Get in touch:
show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
717-827-6266

And for those of you who still like to put a stamp on an envelope, I love finding your mail in my mailbox.

The Permaculture Podcast
PO Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation is with Kirsten Lei-Nielsen to talk about whether or not you should become a homesteader.

Until then, spend each day making smart use of your resources while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Verge Permaculture – Rob and Michelle Avis
Essential Rainwater Harvesting
Rainwater Harvesting Toolkit

Peter Coombes – Urban Water Cycle Solutions
Dr. Anthony Spinks PhD Thesis on Biofilms and Sludges

American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA)
North American Rainwater Harvesting Code

Feb 10 2019

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Rank #13: 1913 – Farming and Foraging a Complete Diet with Rob Greenfield

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My guest today is the adventurer, activist, and humanitarian Rob Greenfield. Rob joins me to talk about the Food Freedom project he launched in Orlando, Florida, where he is growing and foraging for all of his nutritional needs.

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During the conversation Rob shares what brought him to the project, some of his choices along the way, just how strict he is when he says he grows or forages all his food, and the potential to accomplish these goals, of a 100% self-procured local diet, in other climates.

Find out more about Rob, his work and other projects, including those mentioned during his introduction, at RobGreenfield.TV

In this conversation, I mentioned one of my favorite authors for growing our own food, Steve Solomon, and his book Gardening When it Counts. Because of the influence of that book on my views over the years, I’m giving away a copy over at Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast. That giveaway starts on May 8th and runs through May 18th, 2019, so head over there and leave a comment today to enter.

As Rob also encourages us to forage, I’m also giving away a copy of Sam Thayer’s The Forager’s Harvest. Sam remains one of my favorite foraging authors and educators as his books stem from years of practice and refinement on the land and in the landscape. You’ll also find that giveaway at Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast starting on May 18th and open for at least 10 days.

Two things continue to resonate for me as I worked on editing this interview, and as I put the finishing touches on the show. The first is the project-based approach that Rob takes in these deep immersions, whether for this particular take on food, or when he wore all the trash he created as part of his bike journey, which you can see in the initial picture at his website RobGreenfield.TV.

This project focused exploration is something all of us can use as a model to dive into a subject we’re interested in, whatever that may be. We can pick one thing and see what we can learn about it, how far we can go, and the lessons we can pick up in a fixed amount of time. Maybe we want to spend the rainy season for our location learning to harvest water. Or to take a growing season to explore a particular plant from seed to harvest in different conditions in our garden. Or to take a year and see how little electricity or fossil fuels we can use.

By creating conditions that test ourselves, we can learn more about our wants, needs, and limits, safely and productively that will, hopefully, lead us to better ways to honor the ethics of permaculture when our time with a given experiment comes to an end.

The other side that sticks with me is from near the end where we talked about replicating this project in different climates. Given that humans populated the globe long before the prevalence of agriculture and subsisted through hunting, foraging, and, to borrow the language from M. Kat Anderson, tending the wild, why can’t we procure all of our food from our local environment?

Yes, if this were a full-time endeavor, as Rob is going through, it may mean we spend a lot more time on growing, gathering and preparing food, but what if we use that as an end goal and work our way back to where we are in the moment? To start by buying from our farmer’s markets and co-ops while learning what we can about wild and forageable foods. To take the suggestions of Sara Bir and look for the abandoned fruit trees in our neighborhoods, or ask our neighbors if we can harvest from what they have. Each step brings us closer to a local, nutritious diet.

If we find we cannot gain much of our food in this way, why not? What are the legal, environmental, or social factors keeping us from doing so? What can we do to change these limitations, personally and within our community?

What are your thoughts on seeking 100% of your own food? Can you imagine doing this in your local environment? What skills or resources would you need to obtain to make these choices?

Let me know by leaving a comment in the show notes or dropping a letter in the mail.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next episode is my interview with spoon carver and Christmas Tree coppice farmer, Emmet Van Dreische, about his work and new book Carving out a Living on the land.

Resources
Rob Greenfield
Growing and Foraging 100% of My Food – Day 111 Update (YouTube)
National Farmers Market Directory (USA)
Trash Me
Green Riders
Free Ride
Orlando Permaculture Meetup Group
Shad Qudsi / Atitlan Organics

May 10 2019

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Rank #14: Earth Skills, Permaculture and Wild Abundance

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My guest is Natalie Bogwalker, the visionary behind Wild Abundance, a permaculture skills center and homestead near Asheville, North Carolina. As a primary instructor at Wild Abundance, she teaches a variety of classes, including tiny house building workshops, women’s carpentry, and permaculture design courses. She likes to share her passion with others to help them live in an empowered and Earth-centered way.

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As a founder of Firefly Gathering, one of the most significant primitive skills events in the United States, Natalie brings years of Earth-focused skills and living to each of her classes. This focus forms the center of what she joins me to talk about today, as we discuss including hands-on primitive skills to create a more in-depth, grounded permaculture education. We also touch on how an extended experience, as her Earth-skills Permaculture Design Course takes 27 days spread over nine months, changes the nature of the PDC. We wrap up by talking about what students can bring to their course, and how permaculture instructors can improve Permaculture education.

Find out more about Natalie and her classes, including the upcoming Earth Skills class, at WildAbundance.net. You’ll find a link to that, as well as my interview with Eric Toensmeier and Ben Falk, and more, in the show notes.

I’m thankful for what Natalie shared with us about extending and expanding on Permaculture education, both for the amount of time spent in courses, the skills we develop while there, and on mentoring and advanced classes after we start down this road.

Her question, “How many hours did you spend in the fifth grade?” raises a point I’ve considered many times, though based more around college classes. A 72 hours PDC is about the equivalent of 6 college credits. So you can think of the Permaculture Design Course, as an introductory course, as about the same as Biology 101 and 102. It’s a great place to start, but there’s so much more to do. 

Extended courses, such as Natalie’s and others, add to the time between teachers and students. This extra time allows us to add to our hard and soft skills, from fire starting and shelter building to carpentry, nutritional knowledge, and social justice. With a student-focused approach, this can include not only the core knowledge necessary to complete a PDC, but also create the shared lexicon required to discuss design, ethics, and principles, and apply these ideas to more than the landscape. 

Through these, and advanced classes that focus on specific subjects such as water catchment, home building, foraging, conflict transformation, and personal change, we can gain the skills necessary for the creation of the permanent culture inherent in the work of permaculture. 

If you’re still looking to find your area of focus, your calling, whatever your stage in life, teachers like Natalie, myself, and others, are here to help you find the way. If you’d like to learn more, get in touch with the folks at Wild Abundance, at WildAbundance.net, and, of course, you can write to me:

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Oh, and how long do we spend in the fifth grade? Over 1,000 hours in the United States.

Until the next time, eat something wild every day while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Related Interviews

Drawing Down Carbon: Eric Toensmeier on Agroforestry and Climate Change
Financial Permaculture with Eric Toensmeier
Eric Toensmeier on Perennials, Broadscale Permaculture, & Food Forests
Whole System Design & the Resilient Farm with Ben Falk

Resources
Wild Abundance
Wild Abundance Instructors
Firefly Gathering

(Photo Credit: Jenny Tenney Photography)

Mar 14 2020

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Rank #15: 1831 – A Finer Future with Hunter Lovins

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Today guest host David Bilbrey sits down with Hunter Lovins to talk about Natural Capitalism Solutions and Hunter’s new book,  A Finer Future – Creating an Economy in Service to Life.

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During their conversation David and Hunter talk about the problems facing humanity, from climate change to economic policies, and how we got into this mess. She then shares solutions we can take, right now, to make a difference. Those ideas range from new habits, to ongoing education and direct action.

Learn more about Hunter Lovins and her current work at NatCapSolutions.org and her book, from New Society Publishers, at NewSociety.com.

What did you think of this conversation with Hunter Lovins? Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch with David and I:

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Recommended Reading (and watching)
George Monbiot – Neoliberalism: The Ideology at the Root of All our Problems.
Powell Memorandum: Attack on American Free Enterprise System
Dana’s Writing – The Donella Meadow Projects
Tony Seba: Clean Disruption – Energy & Transportation (Video)
Gabe Brown: Keys to Building a Healthy Soil (Video)
John Fullerton – Regenerative Capitalism
Buckminster Fuller – Operating Instructions for Spaceship Earth (PDF)
Kate Rayworth – Donut Economics
Freya Williams – Green Giants
Andrew Winston – Big Pivot
E.F Schumacher – Small is Beautiful (Full Text)
E.F. Schumacher – A Guide for the Perplexed (Wiki)
Lester Brown – The Twenty Ninth Day (Thrift Books)
Lester Brown – Full Planet, Empty Plate (Thrift Books)
Lester Brown – Plan B 4.0 (Thrift Books)
Jonah Sachs – Winning the Story Wars

Resources
Hunter Lovins
A Finer Future (New Society Publishers)
Natural Capitalism Solutions
Bard MBA in Sustainability

Robinhood – Invest for Free
Rocky Mountain Institute
The Mont Pelerin Society
Neoliberalism (Wiki)
The Dark Mountain Project
Well Being Economy
Club of Rome
Transition Network
Savory Institute
Regen18
Ecological Outcome Verification
Change Finance (CHGX) ETF

John L. Lewis (Wiki)
Cesar Chavez (Wiki)
Amory Lovins

Sep 30 2018

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Rank #16: Restoration Agriculture with Mark Shepard (Part III)

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My guest for this episode, which originally aired in 2014, is Mark Shepard, owner of New Forest Farm and author of Restoration Agriculture. This is the final piece in a series of three interviews Mark and I recorded to talk about Restoration Agriculture practices and to answer listener questions.

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In this episode we discuss four topics based around listener questions.

  1. What is Mark’s “Oil Cartel?”
  2. What place does keyline design have on a small scale site?
  3. What techniques does Mark suggest for water retention on a flat area?
  4. What tips does Mark have for starting seedlings where you are unable to water daily or weekly?

I enjoyed these conversations because of the different voice and perspective that Mark brought to the table. These really expanded my thoughts on how we can practice permaculture in many different ways underneath the same umbrella. Mark focuses on large scale agricultural restoration. My focus is on communication and outreach. We each have a role to fill.

Where do you see your niche in the permaculture community? Where do you fit into this big puzzle of creating a better world? Is there any way I can help you find your fit? I’d love to hear from you.

Visit our Partners
VerdEnergia Pacifica
Food Forest Card Game
The Fifth World

Support
If you value this show and the work of the podcast in spreading the word of permaculture to the world, lend your assistance in supporting these projects. Share links to your favorite episode with your friends. Leave reviews on iTunes or your favorite podcast sites.

The show can also use your financial support, either as a one-time or ongoing monthly contribution. Find out how to do that at: www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/support.

Get In Touch
E-mail: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Phone: 717-827-6266

The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Resources
Restoration Agriculture with Mark Shepard (Part I)
Restoration Agriculture with Mark Shepard (Part II)

Feb 08 2020

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Rank #17: 1908 – Trees of Power with Akiva Silver

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My guest today is Akiva Silver of Twisted Tree Farm in Spencer, New York. He joins me to talk about his life and the experiences that lead to his new book Trees of Power from Chelsea Green Publishing.

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Starting with his beginning as a tracker and forager, we move into his work on getting his farm started, and some of his favorite trees. Among those, we dig in deep about chestnuts and hickories. We also touch on what we mean by the word farm. Creating his families on-farm income on three-quarters of an acre. How foraging and tending the land extends the space we might consider our farm. How we can harvest more food than we can imagine by going to those places and spaces where others might not consider looking for food.

Akiva also shares the joy of propagation and the many ways we can do this from cuttings to grafting to layering, and how we can significantly diversify our plant genetics by growing out our selection from seeds.

Whether you are growing, planting, or just enjoy trees, there is a lot to learn from this interview.

Trees of Power Giveaway

You can find Akiva, his farm, and work at twisted-tree.net and you can find his book, Trees of Power, at chelseagreen.com. You’ll find links to those and many of the resources Akiva mentioned, such as Empire Chestnut Company, in the Resources section of the show notes.

Though Akiva runs a farm that propagates thousands and thousands of trees each year, what stands out for me is the passion that comes through in his voice from his connection to Earth that he developed that through foraging and tracking. His experience shows that we can use these skills as a way to foster and deepen that connection.

I feel that doing this is essential because we need to love something to care for it. If we can have that experience at a younger age, it can lead to a lifetime of meaningful action on our part to take responsibility for our choice and the impact on Earth, other people, and our ability to return the surplus.

Foraging is one of the best skills for this that we can learn, and also share with others, especially children. Time and time again I see this in my own kids, as my daughter seeks out violets and my son the brambles, to harvest flower and berries from the yard or when we go for a hike. It instilled a curiosity to wonder what this mushroom is, and can they eat it? To borrow my camera to take a picture so we can find out more about that little bush we’ve never seen before. This started when they were pre-school age and continues now as they prepare for their pre-teen years.

Anyone can benefit from learning to forage. As a hobby, it is simple and low-cost that can reap incredible rewards and is worth taking your time to, even if it’s only for a few hours on a couple of weekends a year.

If you’d like to learn more about foraging, though I know some great foragers locally, the best person working in our broader region of the United States and writing about their experiences is Sam Thayer. As Akiva mentioned, Sam wrote the forward to Trees of Power and has appeared on The Permaculture Podcast in the past. His books are just incredible and take you through many of the different ways you can make use of a wide selection of plants, beyond only the edible parts. Even if you don’t live in areas where the particular plants he details grow, his thoughts on foraging ethics and what to consider while walking the land make each book worth much more than the cover price.

Sam Thayer is at foragersharvest.com, and you can find a link to our interview below.

Donate online to the Winter to Spring Fundraiser

Along the way on this or any of your journeys, if I can ever help, please let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next interview is a conversation with Tim Krahn about the essentials of Rammed Earth construction.

Until then, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by foraging, propagating trees, and taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Twisted Tree Farm
Trees of Power (Chelsea Green)

Tom Brown Jr. Tracking School
The Graves Tree – Arthur Graves Chestnuts
Empire Chestnut Company (Route 9 Cooperative)

Interview: Foraging with Sam Thayer

Mar 20 2019

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Rank #18: Interview: David Holmgren – RetroSuburbia (Part 2)

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This episode looks at what brought David Holmgren to the present moment and writing RetroSuburbia. From David Bilbrey’s questions, David Holmgren shares the past and ongoing influences that guided the development of permaculture from those first days in the 1970s through to how this work continues to grow to the current day.

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You can find him, his work, and his books at holmgren.com.au and RetroSuburbia at Retrosuburbia.com. There you can also buy the book to have shipped wherever you live in the world.

Visit Our Partner: Harvesting Rainwater for Drylands and Beyond

I find that self-reflection, assessment, and awareness can lead to new insights and breakthroughs. These allow us to take our practices further. At the end of the last episode, I started this process by asking you to consider a series of questions about the context of your current on-the-ground situation. From that space of the structures that surround us, let’s take this consideration a bit more personal.

Given the questions David Holmgren answered today, how could you use the influences of your past, and what you’ve learned about permaculture, to create and integrate new solutions into your life? What kind of novel personal social-system can you create? What kind of synergies exists between what you already know and where you want to take your practice? Who inspires you that you could seek out to learn more? What related fields are pushing the edge of current knowledge that you could draw ideas of inspiration?

How can you, with time, radically transform your use of permaculture into a more personal, embodied, everyday practice?

If there’s any way I can connect you with what you need to take your practice further—by interviewing someone in an upcoming episode, connecting you with a particular resource, or anything else that comes to mind—feel free to contact me. Together we can see where the conversation leads.

From here, the next episode is a guest post from Michael Commons, read by me. After that is an episode looking at the current state of the podcast and where, after nine years, I’d like to take things from here and how I’d like you to join me on that journey.

Until then, spend each day retrofitting suburbia, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Fall Fundraiser
If you enjoy this show, you can help it to grow and continue to explore the edges of ecological design and what it means to practice permaculture in the landscape, our lives, and our communities by donating today.

Give online: paypal.me/permaculturepodcast
Become an ongoing supporter: Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast

Or send something in the mail:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018


Resources

Holmgren Design
RetroSuburbia
Aussie Street (YouTube)

Jeremy Lent : The Patterning Instinct
Making Permaculture Stronger
Novel Ecosystems
Imaging a World Without Growth
Michel Bauwens : Peer 2 Peer Foundation
Patrick Jones – Permapoesis
The Commons with David Bollier (Permaculture Podcast Interview)

Su Dennett
Bill Mollison
Howard T. Odum
Haikai Tane

Oct 29 2019

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Rank #19: Being Present for Ourselves and Others | Rhonda Baird

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My guest for today is Rhonda Baird, editor of Permaculture Design Magazine, and designer and educator at Sheltering Hills Design, LLC.

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We talk about the social side of permaculture and what we can do, as individuals and a community, to create boundaries that lead to deeper respect for ourselves and each other. To fight for something — rather than against — through small and slow solutions. The power we have as minority voices to create social change. The impact that being face-to-face with others can have in engaging with and resolving the issues facing our community and the broader world.

This is a conversation about sitting with things that are often uncomfortable, but necessary for transforming the world we have into the one we want to see.

Find out more about Rhonda and her work at permaculturedesignmagazine.com and shelteringhills.net.

Get in Touch
Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Resources
Permaculture Design Magazine
Sheltering Hills Design, LLC
Small and Slow-Solutions: IPC India 2017
Safer Spaces Agreement
Great Rivers and Lake Permaculture Institute
How to Conduct a Community Inventory (Transition US)
Sociocracy aka Dynamic Governance (Wikipedia)
Dynamic Governance: A New System for Better Decisions (Triple Pundit)
Restorative Justice
Restorative Circles
Permaculture and The Commons. Permaculture Design Magazine #103 (February 2017)
Radical Faeries
Why Mobile Technology Matters for the World’s Nomadic Peoples

May 02 2020

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Rank #20: Caring for Bees

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2018 was terrible for beekeepers, with up to 40 percent of hives across the United States dying off, one of the worst losses since we started tracking honey bee health. Recently, the USDA suspending the Honey Bee Tracking Survey indefinitely. Earlier this year, the bee-harming pesticide sulfoxaflor, sold under the trade names Closer and Transform, which has been banned since 2015, was approved for emergency use across 14 million acres in the United States.

With these multiple threats for honey bees, and indeed all our insect pollinators, what can we do?

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Searching for answers and to understand colony collapse disorder and what was killing our bees, in 2013 I reached out to Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp a research scientist with the University of Maryland and former Chief apiarist for Pennsylvania.

In this re-mastered release of that conversation, Dennis shares what he’s learned investigated bee dies off ever since Dave Hackenberg, a beekeeper with hives in Pennsylvania, first reported large colony losses and coined the term colony collapse disorder in 2006. Dennis shares more about the ongoing loss of bee colonies in the United States and elsewhere, which continues even now, years after this conversation, as well as the role of bees as pollinators in our food supply, and what we can do to support honeybees and native pollinators.

Find out more about Dr. vanEnglesdorp’s work by watching the TED Talk “A Plea for Bees“.

Stepping away from this conversation, years later, I still enjoy how precise and technical the conversation became regarding the research and issues surrounding bees, while still remaining accessible. For all of his work and research, I never felt like Dennis spoke over our heads. Part of that, I imagine, come from his love and passion for bees. Listening to him describe the co-evolution of flowers and pollinators reminded me of the beauty of nature, why I love this work, and why each of us should care for a little space of our own so we can build a better world that includes habitat for pollinators and the other species that also call this world home.

If you have any thoughts on this episode, please leave a comment, or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day making the world a better place while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources:
Dennis vanEnglesdorp, PhD
Dennis vanEnglesdorp: A Plea for Bees (TED Talk Video)
Bee Informed Partnership
Crop Pollination Exposes Honey Bees to Pesticides Which Alters Their Susceptibility to the Gut Pathogen Nosema ceranae (Research Article)

Jul 13 2019

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Empowering Permaculture | Delvin Solkinson

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Over the last two decades, my guest Delvin Solkinson studied permaculture education all over the world by taking numerous permaculture design courses and teacher trainings, as well as completing multiple diplomas, with various teachers. Some of his mentors include Bill Mollison, April Sampson-Kelly, and Rosemary Morrow. From those years of experience, he works to make this knowledge more accessible for students, easier to teach for instructors, and empowering for everyone, by sharing his notes in an open-source approach to permaculture.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/DelvinSolkinson.mp3

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Find out more about Delvin and his work, including his Permaculture Design Notes Book and the Permaculture Design Deck, at visionarypermaculture.com.

Become a Patreon patreon of The Permaculture Podcast
Buy the show a cup of coffee
Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter.

I’m a long-standing advocate of open-sourced ideas and technology, using them wherever possible. I produced the podcast on a Linux laptop for years, and continue to do most of the audio editing in Audacity, so enjoy Delvin’s approach to making as much of what he can readily available, while also acting as a curator to assemble the best of what he’s discovered. You can find all of those essentials, distilled down from his years of work, for free in various forms on his website. You can download the PDFs to read on your digital device. Print copies of the cards and games to play with and use as your own design oracles. And, if you prefer, you can also purchase physical copies from Delvin to further support the ongoing production of these ever valuable tools.

Do you use any open-source tools or know someone else who curates knowledge to this level? Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes. Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day deepening your understanding of permaculture, while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Delvin & Grace Solkinson website
Free downloads of books, cards, and games
www.visionarypermaculture

Training Permaculture Teachers book by Rosemary Morrow 
Free download or on-demand printer edition
www.visionarypermaculture.com/trainingpermacultureteachers

Robin Clayfield teaching books, games and cards
www.dynamicgroups.com.au

Rosemary Morrow
www.bluemountainspermacultureinstitute.com.au

More games and tools at Kym Chi and Delvin’s site
www.permaculturedesign.ca

Recent video and podcast with Geoff Lawton
www.youtu.be/rRcqdF7YcD4

Delvin Doctoral Slideshow 
www.youtu.be/3SAlzIlQPl0

Permaculture Institute : The Peoples Diploma 
www.permaculture.org/diploma

Permaculture Association Diploma
https://www.permaculture.org.uk/diploma

Permaculture Institute North America Diploma
https://pina.in/diplomas/

Australian TAFE Diploma
www.tafensw.edu.au/course/-/c/c/AHC52116-01/Diploma-of-Permaculture

Jul 04 2020

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The Next Economy | Erin Axelrod

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My guest today is Erin Axelrod, partner and worker/owner at LIFT Economy. She joins me to discuss how LIFT Economy is working to repatriate land, resolve housing issues, and create socially responsible businesses by investing in and providing support to women, indigenous, and people of color lead organizations. Using her years of experience as a framework, Erin provides multiple specific examples of what this work looks like in practice, what we can do to steer our economy towards regenerative businesses, and to heal our relationship with money.

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Find more about Erin and her work at LIFTeconomy.com

21 Choice Perennial Vegetables for 4-Season Climates

Schedule with Scott
UTOPIA: a permaculture vision

This conversation with Erin touches on something I’ve been working on and speaking to other folks in the community, including Karryn Olsen and Dan Palmer, about over the last few months: how can we break through the limitations we find ourselves in as a result of, to borrow from Erin, business as usual. Particularly, how do we get the education, resources, and support to implement permaculture ethics and principles at a broad scale, both in and beyond the landscape, given the dire need to do so right now and for years to come. From climate change, to oppressive policing, to improving the land where we grow food, the problems we face are numerous, with much deeper issues underlying what we see at the surface. Each of us can make a meaningful difference whether we do so through individual action or collaborating with others to dismantle harmful systems.

But, as I’ve heard in your dozens of replies to my recent inquiries into The Permaculture Pit, doing so can be difficult given the forces we find in our own life that resist change. That includes the concern about debt through university schooling, the lack of land access, or finding a quality PDC program and after PDC mentoring.

What Erin shared with us, however, opens up many different doors. There are alternative paths to the experience and education we need to become a lawyer if we so desire. I looked into that one in particular and found four states in the U.S.—California, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington—which allow you to do so with no law school required, but by completing a Law Office Study Program. Three other states, New York, Maine, and Wyoming, also offer apprentice programs, but do require some law school.

Beyond the legal realm, there are also trade apprenticeships, if you want to go that route with your work. I’m also interested in exploring and speaking to others about the one-on-one permaculture mentor programs that are both less and more than a traditional Permaculture Design Course.

If you don’t have land or are not interested in land-based permaculture, but want to assist those who are, there are programs like Agrarian Trust. We can also, if life provides us a bountiful income, invest in those programs and others like them.. We can donate scholarship funds to Permaculture Design Courses. If you’ve taken a PDC, reach out to your old teachers and see if there is something you can do to support what they are currently doing.

Or send a student to LIFT Economy’s Next Economy MBA program.

Seek out and spend money are the stores owned and operated by women, indigenous, and people of color.

There’s also room for us to work on policy change in our local communities. Lobbying, I know that sounds like such a dirty word, to repeal and replace laws that limit agriculture. Fight for food justice and cottage food industries. Support farmers markets in communities lacking fresh foods. 

And, for those of us who are already teachers in the community, do you have the room and space in your life to mentor students beyond the class and classroom?

If you took a route outside business as usual to arrive where you are, let me know, so I can share these options with others via the podcast newsletter or in a future episode.

Leave a comment in the show notes, email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com, or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day creating the new economy, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
LIFT Economy
People of Color Sustainable Housing Network
Daily Acts
Agrarian Trust
Agrarian Commons Little Jubba in Maine
The Sustainable Economies Law Center
Cottage Food Law (California)
The Next Egg
The East Bay Permanent Real Estate Cooperative
Defund the Policy – Imagining a world without prisons and police
Map link for traditional homelands (Erin recommends including a land acknowledgement in your email signature)
Winona’s Hemp & Heritage Farm
Greenwave
Native Conservancy
Jonas Philanthropies launches a 10M Tree Campaign

Jun 27 2020

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Peace, Permaculture, and The Gift | Kai Sawyer

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Image: Kai Sawyer at the Peace and Permaculture Dojo.
(Source:YouTube: Peace and Permaculture Dojo Tour)

“The more generous we are, the more relaxed we’ll be, the more wealthy we’ll feel, and the more gifts these will cycle.” – Kai Sawyer

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/KaiSawyer.mp3

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As we embody our values and live ever differently, how do we change the communities we are a part of as we become ever more apart from them?

This is one of many thoughts I have as we enter this conversation with Kai Sawyer, as we look at his life as a practitioner embracing peace, permaculture, and the gift economy to bring about social and cultural change in Japan.

Find out more about Kai Sawyer and his work at:

Tokyo Urban Permaculture
Living Permaculture

Something Kai wanted me to mention, that didn’t make it into our conversation is the ongoing impact and questions as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi power plant meltdown.

Something I didn’t know, that Kai shared in his follow-up email, is that Fukushima prefecture was one of the leading organic food growing regions in Japan.

What happens then, to the organic or natural farmer who carefully and with a lot of love, grew beautiful soil for decades that is now contaminated with cesium 134 and 137? Who will buy their produce? Who will help them rebuild their entire life?

Also in Fukushima prefecture was an innovative permaculture project at Iitate village that sought to redesign the community using permaculture to reverse the process of rural depopulation, to keep residents in this rural location rather than heading to the cities.

To Kai’s knowledge, it is the only initiative of the kind in Japan, one where an entire village was a permaculture design site. As you might imagine, the proximity to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and the ways the wind blew, high levels of radiation fell on the village, and their entire village was evacuated by the government.

A project to preserve the community, destroyed by a single disaster, responded to with modern practices now so ingrained they seem traditional and the only path forward.

How could this situation have been different if more communities in Japan were transformed by the whole systems design of permaculture and a chance to the cultural and social structures and consciousness?

As we grow as practitioners, how can we change these ways of thinking and organizing in our own communities and, in turn, change the way they are governed and inhabited?

If you have thoughts on this or anything else Kai and I spoke about, I’d love to hear from you.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and your community.

Resources
Tokyo Urban PermacultureLiving Permaculture
Peace and Permaculture Dojo Tour (Spring 2017) (YouTube)

The Center for Nonviolent Communication
Nonviolent Communication (Wiki)
Moved By Love, the Memoirs of Vinoba Bhave (Read Online at MKGhandi.org)
Bullock’s Permaculture Homestead
Humanure Handbook / Joe Jenkins

Iitate, Fukushima, a village scale permaculture project in Japan, evacuated due to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plants.
Living On The Edge of Fukushima

Jun 20 2020

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Plants as People Care |Nathan Carlos Rupley

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My guest today is Nathan Carlos Rupley. A member of my local permaculture community, he spends his time as a stay at home dad, self employed-artist, and aspiring hunter-gatherer.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/NathanRupley.mp3

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When not hanging out with his family or walking in the woods, you can find him reading about a wide range of subjects including simple living, foraging, native agriculture, natural building, “primitive” technology, philosophy, applied ecology, theology, and much more. He brings this knowledge to the table today as we discuss what he’s learning from the native plants of his ancestors.

The exploration of these plants and the related cultures provide insights into his place in the world and where he comes from. This leads to a conversation that ranges around a variety of thoughts including how we can learn more about plants and their uses by studying folk and Latin binomial names. What understanding ancestral plants can teach us about our identity. The impacts of colonization, on the colonized and colonizer. And being good mentors and ancestors now and for the future.

You can email Nate at nathanrupley@yahoo.com, with any comments, questions, if you want to rewild your yard, or, if you’re ever in Central Pennsylvania, would like to join him for a foraging class or plant walk.

Nate Rupley

Nate reminds me that wherever we come from before studying permaculture, whether doctor, tech nerd, stay at home parent, or an artist in a copy shop, there’s more to learn than any of us can accumulate, even if we had lifetimes to study, and what we learn along the way can take us to unexpected places. Even though we start in the landscape, discussing plants, animals, ecology, and design, we only begin there. If we’re interested, our exploration can take us to a myriad of different places, as we seek to practice not only where we are, but as who we are.  Whatever you are called to do, there is a place within the permaculture community for you.

What are you doing right now, that makes the world a more bountiful place? If you’re finding something difficult, or feel stuck, what would help to get you take your next step?

Until the next time, spend each day learning more about plants and your ancestors, while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Related Interviews
Wilson Alvarez on Biomimicry, Landcare and The Reintegration Project
Foraging with Sam Thayer
Beginning Foraging with Violet and Wildman Steve Brill

Resources
Nathan Carlos Rupley (Website)
Nathan Carlos Rupley (Patreon)
Nathan_Carlos_Rupley (Instagram)\
Gathering on YouTube

Samuel Thayer / The Forager’s Harvest
Steve Brill

Backyard Medicine by Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal
Wild Urban Plants of the Northeast by Peter Del Tradici
Fandabi Dozi (YouTube)
Ron Eglash – The fractals at the heart of African designs (TED Talk)

Jun 13 2020

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The Transition Town Movement |Rob Hopkins

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My guest for this episode is Rob Hopkins the creator of the idea of Transition Towns, a way for us to move from oil dependency to local resilience. That lead to his writing The Transition Handbook, something every permaculture practitioner should have in their library and which serves as a good introduction, along with Toby Hemenway’s The Permaculture City, to look at how we can move from the landscape to the people space.

Find out more about Rob and his work at TransitionNetwork.org and the other resources below.

If you are interested in starting your own transition town or want more information on the movement, let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266. Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com, or if you like, drop something in the mail.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day eating wild and creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Transition Network
Rob Hopkin’s Blog
Reconomy Project
Atmos Totnes
Making Permaculture Stronger
LAND (Learning and Network Demonstration) Evidence based Permaculture
Green City Acres – Home of Curtis Stone, author of The Urban Farmer

Jun 13 2020

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Planning for Future Generations

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In today’s episode, David Bilbrey returns to the host seat with Fred Kirschenmann. Fred joins us again to share more about his work at the Aldo Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University and Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture and how those two places are working to allow us to plan not only for the world we have now but also for our descendants. The solutions come in multiple forms, from the ways we can use plants in our fields to increase yields while regenerating soil, and the cultural changes that are coming as the children and grandchildren of the Baby Boomer generation reject consumerism and focus on a more community-centered life.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/Planning.mp3

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What do you think of what Fred shared with David today? Are there places where you can favor biology over technology in your design? Do you make lifestyle decisions that have an impact on your use of resources and consumption?

I’d love to hear from you.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Connect with the Podcast
Patreon
Instagram
Twitter

Resources:
Aldo Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University
Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer
Sir Albert Howard
Dave Brown & Brown’s Ranch

Books
How to Thrive in the Next Economy by John Thackara
Growing a Revolution: Bringing our Soil Back to Life by David R. Montgomery
Building the Agricultural City – A Handbook for Rural Renewal by Robert Wolf
Collapse by Jared Diamond

Jun 06 2020

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Returning to Permaculture Full-Time

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After spending more than a year and a half balancing family; a day job; and the work of permaculture education, I’m returning to teaching and producing The Permaculture Podcast full-time as of the release of this episode. With this announcement comes a number of updates on what’s happening with the show and behind the scenes.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/ReturningToPermaculture.mp3

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First, there are a bevy of new interviews to look forward to. Some of those include a conversation with Nathan Carlos Rupley on the role of plants in understanding and healing our past trauma, both personal and systemic. Laura Oldanie of Rich and Resilient Living shares her expertise in creating a regenerative lifestyle, and Erin Axelrod of LIFT Economy focuses on the intersection of permaculture and economics. I’ll release the interviews as they come together in the weeks ahead while continuing to intermix episodes from the archives along the way.

I’m planning to release an additional 20 or so new interviews in the months ahead. Though I have a long list of potential guests, due to scheduling issues, we can’t always work something out. If you have any suggestions for someone to appear on the show, leave a comment or send an email to show@thepermaculturepodcast.com.

Intermixed with the singular episodes featuring particular guests, I’m also looking at series that examine a particular topic in-depth across multiple episodes. Some currently in development include Biodynamic Agriculture and Decolonizing Permaculture. If you have any thoughts on something to cover, let me know.

Additionally, as you know, I love helping people share their stories as guests on the show. I am now taking this a step further by offering two courses in the months ahead.

The first is Storytelling for Personal Transformation. We’ll spend a year in this mentored program, starting on the upcoming Summer Solstice, to explore your values, goals, and desires, as well as who you are, who you were, and the story you tell yourself. In the end, you’ll emerge with the personal knowledge and skills to master your inner and outer worlds, empowered to tell a new story.

Registration for this course is open, but closes soon, on June 17th. If you are interested, check out the complete details at thepermaculturepodcast.com/storytelling and register today.

The second is a class on podcasting that starts on September 1st and will take you from developing the idea for your own show to releasing your first complete episode within 8 weeks. Using my more-than-a-decade in radio and podcasting, I’ll show you how to inexpensively record, edit, produce, and release your ideas to the world, even if you don’t have a website or background in broadcasting.

Registration for this class is open, but spaces are limited. Find out more at thepermaculturepodcast.com/podcasting and enroll now.

I’ve also been receiving a number of calls from listeners lately. To make communicating with each other easier, I’ve set up an account with Calendly where you can choose the best day and time for us to talk.

You’ll find that at calendly.com/scott-mann.

For those of you interested in advertising with the podcast, I’ve updated the information at thepermaculturepodcast.com/advertise that lowers the cost and simplifies the process of partnering with the show.

Even with amazing partners, listener support remains important for this show to thrive and grow. You can become an ongoing member of the Patreon community at patreon.com/permaculturepodcast, make a one-time donation at paypal.me/permaculturepodcast or by sending a letter in the mail to:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018


Finally, thank you for the many years we’ve spent together, exploring the edges of what it means to practice permaculture. This October marks 10 years since graduating from my Permaculture Design Course and starting this show. It’s been a pleasure and an honor to share so many voices with you as each of us works in our own ways to take care of Earth, ourselves, and each other.

Jun 02 2020

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The Art of Frugal Hedonism | Annie Raser-Rowland

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Can you live an enjoyable, self-indulgent life while remaining thrifty and at the same time not overtaxing Earth’s resources? To have all of that sounds too good to be true.

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If you follow what Annie Raser-Rowland suggested in her book The Art of Frugal Hedonism, however, the answer rings out as a resounding Yes! There is a process to all of this, but we can achieve this goal by making choices that lead to more of what we desire, as we discover what holds us in rapt attention: the true pleasures of our lives.

During our conversation, Annie uses her own life, as a artist, long-distance hiker, and forager, to model what we can expect by embracing frugal hedonism. The results lead to a life rich in time with those we care about and full of opportunities, for concerts, education, and the occasional luxurious restaurant meal. You might say this is minimalism, with a permaculture twist.

After listening to this conversation, can you see making the changes to live this way? Would you want to? Leave a comment below.

Get in Touch
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Resources
The Art of Frugal Hedonism  – Annie’s site.
The Art of Frugal Hedonism  – Chelsea Green Publishing

May 30 2020

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Have you found yourself in The Permaculture Pit?

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This weekend I was talking with a friend in the permaculture community when we realized we’d had the same experience.

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When we completed our Permaculture Design Course we were excited and enthusiastic but weren’t sure what to do next. We had a certificate, but the only paths presented were to design or teach. We were full of possibilities, but few practical next steps. We found ourselves in The Permaculture Pit.

I’m trying to understand how many others felt this during their permaculture education.

Is this something you experienced? If so, what was missing for you?

Let me know:
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266

Until the next time, spend each day practicing permaculture while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

May 27 2020

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Principles in Practice | Eloisa Lewis

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My guest today is Eloisa Lewis. Eloisa is an American permaculture consultant, community building artist, activist and healer. With her work as a project manager and educator she helps guide communities of individuals into holistically regenerative paradigms, and specializes in communal practices of decolonization.

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Eloisa joins me today to talk about her experiences in radical spaces, particularly Rainbow Gatherings but also in intentional community and activist camps, to put the principles of social permaculture into action. Throughout the conversation she shares the ways those manifest in the acts of nonviolence, communication, and community justice. She also shares how she began down this road, where she studied permaculture, and some of her mentors for others who would like to journey down this path.

Find out more about Eloisa at newlcimateculture.com and on social media @nomadsoulful and @newclimateculture.

Throughout this conversation with Eloisa I was thinking back to the experimental practices I’ve engaged in in-order to live into social permaculture, from launching permaculture convergences to visiting or living in intentional communities. These places served as vital opportunities to try non-violent communication, conflict transformation, restorative circles, and the other ways we can work together as human beings seeking to build permanent cultures that care for all life. The work is important to our long-term goals, but we need to see and experience them now before they’re necessary.

If we can attend radical gatherings or convergences, once they re-emerge from the pandemic, that’s amazing. I know, however, that that isn’t possible for everyone. In the meantime, or while we remain indoors, what are our options? The first place I would recommend starting is with Marshall Rosenberg’s Nonviolent Communication. Though Dr. Rosenberg has since passed on, his work continues to live and breathe through his book and the ongoing efforts of The Center for Nonviolent Communication.

I also linked to two other interviews below, one with Karl Stayeart and another with Ethan Hughes, that explore nonviolent communication and conflict transformation, so you can hear other voices engaged in this work. I also encourage you to reach out to Eloisa to see if she is currently hosting any workshops on these subjects you could attend virtually.

This conversation with Eloisa was also just the first to begin looking at radical spaces and how we can begin the ongoing processes of rewilding ourselves and working to decolonize our practices. If you know of anyone else working on these tasks who should appear in an upcoming episode, please let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, put your principles into practice while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Related Interviews
Nonviolent Communication
Conflict Transformation

Resources
newclimateculture.com
@nomadsoulful
@newclimateculture 

Find a Rainbow Gathering
Women’s Permaculture Guild
Heather Jo Flores
Urban Permaculture Institute of San Francisco

May 23 2020

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Organizing and Supporting Our Communities | Rhonda Baird

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Rhonda Baird, the editor of Permaculture Design Magazine and teacher and designer at Sheltering Hills Design, LLC., joins me to continue our conversation about creating change. In our first interview, we spoke about the way that we can work on ourselves as individuals. Today we move from the inside to the out with how we can organize and support others and our community.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/CommunityAndPermaculture.mp3

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Visit Our Partner: Food Forest Card Game

In that frame, we look at the tools you can add to your toolkit to do this work and build your, and other’s, competencies. Some of those include Theory Unonviolent communication, and dynamic governance (sociocracy). We also look at facilitation and what it means to step into a role of leadership.

Find Rhonda at https://www.shelteringhills.net/ and Permaculture Design Magazine, which she edits, at https://www.permaculturedesignmagazine.com/

What I keep coming back to from this conversation is that everything we talked about, from nonviolent communication to facilitation, and even leadership, are all skills you can learn. Though I’ve met a number of people who through charisma and their presence come across as natural leaders you can be taught how to lead others in the moment or on a project. This doesn’t require talent or exceptional abilities, just a desire to learn to lead.

A resource that can help you with this is the book, The Leadership Challenge. Based on copious research of businesses large and small, this has gone through multiple editions and printings and is one of the best I’ve ever encountered on organizational leadership and development. This has influenced countless leaders over the years and was required reading during graduate school.

This is well worth picking up, and I’m going to give away a copy of this and Giraffe Juice here on Patreon. Look for those in your feed on January 9 and January 8, respectively.

2019 marks a new year, and I’d like to bring you new knowledge, skills, and resources. If there is anything you would like to learn more about, let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, call: 717-827-6266, send an email to show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or send me a letter.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until we meet again, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Additional Resources
On Feedback – The School of Life
The Four Agreements (Wiki)
Regenpreneurs

May 16 2020

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Creatively Responding to a Crisis | Rob Avis

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Rob Avis – (C) 2016 Gavin Young Photography

My guest today is Rob Avis, a permaculture practitioner from Calgary, Canada, and one of the founders of Verge Permaculture. He joined me during the Covid-19 pandemic to discuss what we can do to creatively respond to this and other crises. 

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This includes our role as teachers and leaders while others are struggling for security, and how we can build resilience in our homes and our communities. He shares how together we can soften the blow to ourselves and others by preparing for the economic changes possible in the scenarios of hyperinflation, deflationary contraction, and hyper-stagflation, the latter of which he sees as the most likely outcome of those three at this time. 

A past guest of the show we get rolling with his thoughts on how to handle what we’re currently facing, so I’ve linked to Rob’s earlier interviews in the show notes below if you’d like to learn more about his background, his work on harvesting rainwater, and the framework he and his business partner Takota Coen have developed to simplify the application of permaculture to agriculture.

Find out more about Rob and his work at VergePermaculture.ca, and more through the links below.

I agree with Rob that now is a vital time for us to continue our education, take a role in creating resilience in our communities, and shift the narrative of what is possible. For ourselves, we can turn to our books, the University of YouTube, or the online classrooms like Coursera to work on expanding our knowledge. Now would be a great time to take that online Permaculture Design Course if you’re still looking for one.

If you have skills to share, we can contact our friends and family and see what they want to learn more about. Can we help them with their garden design? Help them repair something around the home?

If you’re a permaculture teacher, now is a good time to work on those online classes you wanted to put together. Begin sharing your knowledge through one-on-one consulting or webinars.

For our communities, we can coordinate seed swaps by mail, and eventually in person. We can make those phone calls to the city council or the mayor’s office to begin the conversation about chickens or other micro-livestock, or about expanding community garden efforts so people have access to land, or grow their own food.

To help with these, I’ve included links in the show notes to resources for each including some places offering online classes; software to connect remotely or run webinars of your own; and to organizations working on policy change. If you have any resources that come to mind others should know about, leave a comment in the show notes.

And of course, I’m always here to help you move your projects forward.

Get in touch.
Call: 717-827-6266

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, creatively respond to these uncertain times, while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Previous Interviews with Rob Avis
Rob Avis on the Essentials of Rainwater Harvesting
The Adaptive Habitat Program

Related Interviews
Emergency Management and Disaster Preparedness
Edenspore

Resources
Verge Permaculture
Spanish Flu Waves (CDC)
The Great Influenza, a great book on the 1918 pandemic by John Barry.
Economist Mark Blyth

Online Classes (General Education)
EdX
Harvard University Free Online Classes
Coursera Free Classes

Online Meeting and Webinar Software
Cisco WebEx
GoToMeeting
Zoom

Micro-Livestock
Backyard Chicken Project
How to get your city to allow backyard chickens (Grist)
Raising Chickens in the City (Mother Earth Living)

May 09 2020

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Being Present for Ourselves and Others | Rhonda Baird

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My guest for today is Rhonda Baird, editor of Permaculture Design Magazine, and designer and educator at Sheltering Hills Design, LLC.

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We talk about the social side of permaculture and what we can do, as individuals and a community, to create boundaries that lead to deeper respect for ourselves and each other. To fight for something — rather than against — through small and slow solutions. The power we have as minority voices to create social change. The impact that being face-to-face with others can have in engaging with and resolving the issues facing our community and the broader world.

This is a conversation about sitting with things that are often uncomfortable, but necessary for transforming the world we have into the one we want to see.

Find out more about Rhonda and her work at permaculturedesignmagazine.com and shelteringhills.net.

Get in Touch
Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Resources
Permaculture Design Magazine
Sheltering Hills Design, LLC
Small and Slow-Solutions: IPC India 2017
Safer Spaces Agreement
Great Rivers and Lake Permaculture Institute
How to Conduct a Community Inventory (Transition US)
Sociocracy aka Dynamic Governance (Wikipedia)
Dynamic Governance: A New System for Better Decisions (Triple Pundit)
Restorative Justice
Restorative Circles
Permaculture and The Commons. Permaculture Design Magazine #103 (February 2017)
Radical Faeries
Why Mobile Technology Matters for the World’s Nomadic Peoples

May 02 2020

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Indian Canyon, Decolonizing, and Indigenous Value Systems with Kanyon Coyote Woman

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In this episode co-host David Bilbrey sits down with the teacher, activist, and permaculture practitioner Kanyon Sayers-Roods, also known as Coyote Woman, to talk about her work on the land at Indian Canyon, California to educate and inspire others in their understanding of the natural world, the connections between individuals and communities, and what we can do to approach our interactions with humility.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/KanyonSayers-Roods.mp3

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Support the Podcast on Patreon

During their conversation Kanyon and David also touch on the history of Indian Canyon and the role this location had for native peoples of California, being thoughtful with our words and actions, and to consider the impacts our choices have on ourselves, our descendants, and the land.

Find out more about Kanyon’s work at indiancanyonlife.org.

There is a lot to unpack from this conversation, with more emerging with each additional listen. I realized that my thoughts on what was expressed could easily take an hour or more to explore all the threads and thoughts that Kanyon raised, so I’ll try to keep this shorter than that.

A piece that continues to resonate is what we can do to ask better questions and seek deeper understanding. I hear this in Kanyon’s words when talking about the role of cultural recognition and identity and asking from a place of humility. To know the history of the land beyond the physical impacts of industry or previous development, but also of those who called that land home and how they got there. To recognize the distinction of being native to a place versus being indigenous to it.

One of the reasons I found permaculture appealing decades ago was that as Bill wrote about the foundational ideas in the Designers’ manual, something that stood out was that what we are doing in our thought and design processes to look for what we can give and then receive in return. We build relationships in reciprocity.

Let’s take that a step further and deepen our work to honor and respect those people who came before us and how they knew and worked the land. We have a lot to learn and a lot to share.

What are your thoughts after hearing this interview with Kanyon?

Leave a comment in the show notes or reach out to directly:

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

With only 4 regular episode left in the year, I’m not sure which will be out in a few weeks, as David and I are shuffling around the scheduled so that we can explore some topics in more depth through a series of related interviews in 2019.

Whatever may come, until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Indian Canyon Life
Kanyon Sayers-Roods
Kanyon Konsulting

Dawes Act of 1887

Apr 24 2020

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Mycology and Citizen Science | William Padilla-Brown

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My guest today is William Padilla-Brown, a mycologist, teacher, and social permaculture practitioner. I’ve known William for a long time and as you’ll hear us mention, we’ve wanted to do this interview for years. I’m thankful that we finally had the opportunity. He has a unique background as a citizen scientist and educator working to propagate mushrooms, study them using molecular biology, and to share what he learns with the world through classes and an annual mushroom and arts festival, Mycofest.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/WilliamPadillaBrown.mp3

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Visit our Partner: Food Forest Card Game

During the conversation today, William shares how we can get involved as citizen scientists to explore the genetic makeup of mushrooms, as well as plants and insects, with readily available supplies and skills we can learn with less study than you might expect. We also dig into his work on breeding mushrooms and the role that molecular biology plays in understanding mating types to create viable strains with the characteristics we are looking for, rather than having to breed out to random chance. We end with how you can get started, reflection on how we hope the explosion of mycology might extend to other disciplines, and some of his work on growing algae for food.

Where to find William Padilla-Brown
Mycosymbiotics
Mycofest
Facebook
Instagram
YouTube
Cognitive Function
Cognitive Function Instagram

Giveaway: Cordyceps Cultivation Handbook Vol. 1

I’m always impressed by William continuing to push the edges of his work with mushrooms, mycology, and food systems, and make this knowledge accessible to everyone around him. From setting up the right environment for growing fungi to how to identify different types to how to propagate and now how to create gene sequences, he develops his knowledge and skills and then shares what he’s learned. His interest, built on books and workshops, allowed him to become an expert in mycology in his own right in five years. Now he’s conquering microbiology and gene sequencing to get even better at what he already does. Imagine where he’ll be in another five years. Or ten. Or twenty.

I reflect on this because I’ve re-created myself every decade or so of my life. I studied computer science and worked in Information Technology through my late teens and twenties. Leveraging those skills, a few years in college radio as a DJ, and finally taking a permaculture design course, became a podcaster. I took all that and went back to school to learn about resource management to better understand permaculture while honing my interview skills to get better at drawing out people’s personal narratives. Now I go back to my years as a storyteller as a teenager and in my 20s and consider how we can tell better stories and integrate them into our lives, change ourselves, and transform the world.

I believe that each of us has the ability to become experts in multiple areas. We can do this in non-traditional ways, through personal reading and study, the University of YouTube, mentorships, immersive internships. The hard part is deciding what we truly care about.

Once we know what gives our life meaning, we can climb onto the shoulders of the giants that came before us and see horizons they’ve only dreamed about.

What do you love so much that you’ll take the first step towards the edge of human knowledge and use your passion to add to our collective understanding?

Let me know:

show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day learning more about what you love while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Additional Resources
Ryan Paul Gates (Instagram)
Fungi for the People

Mushroom Mountain – Tradd Cotter
Mycelial Connection – Willoughby Arevalo
Fungi Perfecti – Paul Stamets
Radical Mycology – Peter McCoy

Oxford Nanopore

National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)
MiniPCR
New York Genome Center
GenBank
Genewiz
Organic Grower’s School

Apr 17 2020

Play

Emergency Management and Disaster Preparedness

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My guest today is Chris Gilmour. A permaculture practitioner and emergency manager, Chris works with individuals and organizations to map their community assets and help prepare for uncertain events

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We recorded this conversation during the emerging COVID-19 pandemic to discuss practical solutions we can apply right now to make sense of the situation and prepare a response appropriate for our individual lives. We begin introducing the four pillars of emergency management and a six-question approach. Chris finds this method useful when creating our assessments. We then move into a conversation about personal actions for each of us to take in the moment and as part of our long-term planning, using examples from Chris’s life to show the theory in practice. Throughout, we repeatedly return to what we can do to lighten the emotional load through activities that ground us in the moment and plan for days ahead as we focus on our values and what is bigger than ourselves.

Find out more about Chris at ChangingWorldProject.com. He also put together a resource page at ChangingWorldProject.com/permaculturepodcast where you’ll find more information from this interview. You can also check out the ecovillage he is working with on disaster preparedness, Our Eco Village, at ourecovillage.org.

As we returned to the Our Purpose Beyond Self several times during the interview, I want to come back to this in my closing remarks with two books to recommend.

The first is Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning. Of all the books I’ve read in my life, this one slim volume, something most of us can read in a few hours, has had the most impact on my inner life and understanding how meaning can protect us and help us through the hardest moments of life.

The second is Robert Wright’s Why Buddhism is True, which looks at the modern research that shows how we can see ourselves and the world more clearly through mindfulness practices that lead to greater truth and happiness. I find the insights of this book and the different ways to be mindful, beyond just meditation, relate well to the discussion today, and in the interviews with Robyn Mello and Natalie Bogwalker, about finding our grounding activities.

Finally, as I said at the end of the recent interview with Robyn Mello, I don’t know what the future holds or how hard it will be, but we will get through this.

If I can help in any way, get in touch:

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, observe and interact, plan, and take small and slow solutions, while you care for Earth, yourself, and each other.

Related Interviews
Edenspore – Robyn Mello
People & Permaculture: Trauma-Informed and Radical Self Care with Jessi Bloom

Resources
Changing World Project
Changing World Project Resource Page

Sprouting Seeds (Johnny’s Selected Seeds)
Sprouting Seeds (Sprout People)

Indoor Mushroom Grow Kit (Field and Forest Products)

Mar 28 2020

Play

Edenspore

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I’m joined by Robyn Mello, a permaculture teacher and designer, as well as the singer, songwriter, and herbalist, behind Edenspore.

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She spoke with me while I am currently self-isolating and wanting to record new interviews.

I’ve known Robyn for many years. As a past guest of the show, we started the conversation before I had a chance to start recording. This episode then begins with us talking about how we’re handling and thinking about the state of the world during the spreading COVID-19 pandemic. We then turn to building resilience and community and her work as a long-time permaculture practitioner working on lifestyle design. She shares how early motherhood has changed her perspective on future care and what we need to do to move away from a place of fear, as we trust ourselves and one another. We wrap up with a message of our role as permaculture practitioners to create more resilience in our local communities.

You can find Robyn at Edenspore.com, and on her Facebook page, Instagram, Bandcamp, and new blog site. Also, check out her Etsy page where you can find Robyn’s herbal remedies and more.

Today, I’m going to forgo the usual lessons learned recap for the episode and say this: I don’t know what the future holds, I don’t know how hard it will be, but we’re going to make it through this.

Whatever you are going through, leave a comment in the show notes to share with the podcast community so we can help you. You can also let me know what you are experiencing, and I’ll do what I can.

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Whatever we face in the world, we can find strength together, while taking care of Earth, ourselves, and each other.

Related Interviews
Permaculture Multi-Culture with Robyn Mello
An Introduction to Philadelphia Orchard Project
Philly Round Table
Philly Round Table Q&A
Horn Farm Center Q&A

Resources
Email Robyn: edensporedesign@gmail.com
Edenspore
Edenspore (Facebook)

Edenspore (Instagram)
Edenspore (Bandcamp)
Edenspore (Etsy)
Slow and Steady Resilience

Permaculture Women’s Guild
Permaculture Women’s Guild (Facebook)

Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari
Reflective Listening (PDF)
The Basics of Nonviolent Communication
The Permaculture Handbook by Peter Bane
Reducing Wasted Food at Home

Spotted Lanternfly

Mar 24 2020

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Island Creek Farm with Holly Brown

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My guest for this episode is Holly Brown of Island Creek Farm, a small permaculture farm located in Huddleston, Virginia.

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Holly and I sat down at her home on a mild day in October to talk about her origins as a farmer and what it is like to run a permaculture-based farm on imperfect farmland in western Virginia complete with heat and humidity during the summer and the occasional hard freeze in the winter. On less than one acre farmed organically the farm supported herself and two interns financially, while keeping three restaurants stocked with vegetables, provided fifteen CSA shares, and also fed herself, those interns, and her extended family. She even had enough left over to give to local food pantries. She accomplishes all of this while married with two children, and without the use of insecticides, herbicides, or any tilling. I learned all of this in our time together recording the interview and while we ate lunch and spent several hours walking around her farm. That time together was incredibly inspirational to me and gave me a better understanding of what we can accomplish with the right systems and support.

My time with Holly really stuck with me, even now several months later, because this was the first time I saw a farm that was integrated and operating in a way that I would want to run a farm when consider creating my own permaculture demonstration site. Her farm showed the possibilities I read about in books like Peter Bane’s The Permaculture Handbook, while remaining true to her own ideals.

Holly invited me into the home she shares with her husband and two children, a modest place compared to most of the houses I’ve seen in America, more reminiscent of the ideas you’ll find in the books by Lloyd Kahn or Patricia Foreman, though not quite that small. In the time after the interview she and I shared lunch together, a curry consisting of on-farm vegetables with yogurt she made from local raw milk and a salad containing something like 12 different kinds of lettuces. We then walked around and she showed me her successes and failures, including two different gothic arch greenhouse frames, one of which was strong and supportive that Holly demonstrated by doing a pull-up on, and another that wavered in the wind a bit.

If anything, visiting Holly gave me hope that we can build productive permaculture farms that feed people. That we can use little urban, suburban, and rural spaces to grow the food necessary, in an ecologically responsible manner, that can make a real difference. 

Are there any farms like Island Creek I should visit to bring back more working examples of permaculture in the world? If you know of any, leave a comment below.

As long as I am able I will be here to assist you on your permaculture path so please reach out to me if there is anything I can do for you.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Or Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, tend to a little piece of land, grow some of your own food, and take care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Mar 21 2020

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Earth Skills, Permaculture and Wild Abundance

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My guest is Natalie Bogwalker, the visionary behind Wild Abundance, a permaculture skills center and homestead near Asheville, North Carolina. As a primary instructor at Wild Abundance, she teaches a variety of classes, including tiny house building workshops, women’s carpentry, and permaculture design courses. She likes to share her passion with others to help them live in an empowered and Earth-centered way.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/WildAbundance.mp3

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As a founder of Firefly Gathering, one of the most significant primitive skills events in the United States, Natalie brings years of Earth-focused skills and living to each of her classes. This focus forms the center of what she joins me to talk about today, as we discuss including hands-on primitive skills to create a more in-depth, grounded permaculture education. We also touch on how an extended experience, as her Earth-skills Permaculture Design Course takes 27 days spread over nine months, changes the nature of the PDC. We wrap up by talking about what students can bring to their course, and how permaculture instructors can improve Permaculture education.

Find out more about Natalie and her classes, including the upcoming Earth Skills class, at WildAbundance.net. You’ll find a link to that, as well as my interview with Eric Toensmeier and Ben Falk, and more, in the show notes.

I’m thankful for what Natalie shared with us about extending and expanding on Permaculture education, both for the amount of time spent in courses, the skills we develop while there, and on mentoring and advanced classes after we start down this road.

Her question, “How many hours did you spend in the fifth grade?” raises a point I’ve considered many times, though based more around college classes. A 72 hours PDC is about the equivalent of 6 college credits. So you can think of the Permaculture Design Course, as an introductory course, as about the same as Biology 101 and 102. It’s a great place to start, but there’s so much more to do. 

Extended courses, such as Natalie’s and others, add to the time between teachers and students. This extra time allows us to add to our hard and soft skills, from fire starting and shelter building to carpentry, nutritional knowledge, and social justice. With a student-focused approach, this can include not only the core knowledge necessary to complete a PDC, but also create the shared lexicon required to discuss design, ethics, and principles, and apply these ideas to more than the landscape. 

Through these, and advanced classes that focus on specific subjects such as water catchment, home building, foraging, conflict transformation, and personal change, we can gain the skills necessary for the creation of the permanent culture inherent in the work of permaculture. 

If you’re still looking to find your area of focus, your calling, whatever your stage in life, teachers like Natalie, myself, and others, are here to help you find the way. If you’d like to learn more, get in touch with the folks at Wild Abundance, at WildAbundance.net, and, of course, you can write to me:

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Oh, and how long do we spend in the fifth grade? Over 1,000 hours in the United States.

Until the next time, eat something wild every day while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Related Interviews

Drawing Down Carbon: Eric Toensmeier on Agroforestry and Climate Change
Financial Permaculture with Eric Toensmeier
Eric Toensmeier on Perennials, Broadscale Permaculture, & Food Forests
Whole System Design & the Resilient Farm with Ben Falk

Resources
Wild Abundance
Wild Abundance Instructors
Firefly Gathering

(Photo Credit: Jenny Tenney Photography)

Mar 14 2020

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The Wildcrafting Brewer

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To honor the release of Pascal Baudar’s new book, Wildcrafted Fermentation, I’ve re-mastered and re-released our conversations about his earlier works. Today, you can listen to our interview about The Wildcrafting Brewer. The episode posted last week covered his first book, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine.

Thanks to the great folks at Chelsea Green Publishing, who publish Pascal’s three amazing books, I am giving away a copy of Wildcrafted Fermentation through Saturday, March 21st.

Giveaway: Wildcrafted Fermentation



Author, teacher, and forager Pascal Baudar joins me to discuss his exploration of primitive brews and fermentation, the basis for his book The Wildcrafting Brewer.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/TheWildcraftingBrewer.mp3

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He shares with us the way we can combine local ingredients as flavor,  with water, sugar, and yeast to create sodas, beer, wine, and mead with local flavor and sense of place. If you are familiar with his first book, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine,  then you know his thoughts push the limits of what we might think of when considering what to toss into our brew pot. Taking these methods,  he again takes us in an unexpected direction that goes from the social drinks we might expect, to discuss how we might consider making culinary, healing, or even psychotropic beverages.

Find out more about Pascal and his work as a forager and teacher at urbanoutdoorskills.com and his books, including The Wildcrafting Brewer at ChelseaGreen.com.

Stepping away from this conversation, though he and I spoke about brewing and making wild-flavored beverages, I’m thinking more generally about how easy it is to complicate and over-analyze our journey and arrive at a place where the results we wish to accomplish gets lost in a  messy process requiring more work than needed.

Pascal shows us that with his primitive, or as he also says archaic, brews and how the modern steps, and commercial flavors, limit the range of experiences we create as we scrub and sanitize our pots and fermentation vessels, or leave our brews alone; watched but untouched as the liquid transforms from sugary concoction into alcoholic elixir.

How often do we do seek this same sterile approach in our other work, only to find the effort falls flat because of a singular direction and only considering one way?

What if we tried more simplicity and creativity in our work as permaculture designers, and in our relationships and initiatives for community building? Can we strip away the unnecessary and arrive and something more concise, clear, whole, productive, and enjoyable?

I think so, and the skills of creating wild foods and beverages provide a place where we can safely explore these patterns, before searching for similar details in our other work.

What do you think of this conversation with Pascal? Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch with me if you would like to discuss this further.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until then, explore the wild and the uncivilized, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Pascal Baudar (Author’s Page at Chelsea Green)
Outdoor Urban Skills
The Wildcrafting Brewer
The New Wildcrafted Cuisine
Chelsea Green Publishing

Mar 07 2020

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iTunes Ratings

175 Ratings
Average Ratings
141
13
16
2
3

Great pod

By A nerd among the birds - Nov 15 2019
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One of my favorite podcasts, inspiring to hear all the great work folks are doing.

Fair and Enlightening

By MidshipmenVoyage - Mar 08 2016
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Very good dialogue and reviews.