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So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

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So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast takes an uncensored look at the world of free expression through personal stories and candid conversations.New episodes post every other Thursday.

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So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast takes an uncensored look at the world of free expression through personal stories and candid conversations.New episodes post every other Thursday.

iTunes Ratings

79 Ratings
Average Ratings
74
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0
0
2

👍🏻

By IPhone 6+ User Houston - Jul 29 2018
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Amazing - such important issues and very thoughtfully explored

Fantastic podcast

By Vino821 - Jan 04 2018
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Fasinating guests and topics.

iTunes Ratings

79 Ratings
Average Ratings
74
3
0
0
2

👍🏻

By IPhone 6+ User Houston - Jul 29 2018
Read more
Amazing - such important issues and very thoughtfully explored

Fantastic podcast

By Vino821 - Jan 04 2018
Read more
Fasinating guests and topics.
Cover image of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

Latest release on May 21, 2020

Read more

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast takes an uncensored look at the world of free expression through personal stories and candid conversations.New episodes post every other Thursday.

Rank #1: Ep. 15 Denying the Holocaust

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In 1996, Emory University Professor Deborah Lipstadt found herself in a peculiar situation: she and a team of lawyers would have to defend the truth about the Holocaust against British historian and famed Holocaust denier David Irving.

It was a quirk of the English legal system that allowed the battle to play out in court. In England, the burden of proof in libel cases rests on the defendant, not the plaintiff. So, when David Irving filed a libel lawsuit against Professor Lipstadt and her British publisher for critical statements Professor Lipstadt wrote about him in her 1993 book “Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory,” it was up to Professor Lipstadt to justify her criticism.

Sixteen years after Professor Lipstadt won her legal battle, the story of her encounter with Irving is now the subject of the recently released movie “Denial.”

Deborah Lipstadt is our guest on today’s episode of “So to Speak.” During our conversation, Professor Lipstadt revisits the Irving trial, explains its implications for free speech and academic freedom, and elaborates on the unique phenomenon of seeing one’s life acted out on the big screen.

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Nov 17 2016

38mins

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Rank #2: Ep. 18 Campus Free Speech Round Table: Fall 2016 Semester in Review

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A precipitous decline in the percentage of schools maintaining severely restrictive speech codes. A proliferation of bias response teams. “Security fee” or “speech tax?” Donald Trump. Milo Yiannopoulos. Penis drawings. These topics and more are covered in our recap of the fall 2016 semester, featuring Foundation for Individual Rights in Education vice presidents Samantha Harris and Will Creeley. Also, we take a listener question.

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Call in a question: 215-315-0100

Dec 29 2016

58mins

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Rank #3: Ep. 53 Bret Weinstein, professor in exile

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Former Evergreen State College Professor Bret Weinstein describes himself as a “professor in exile.” The evolutionary biologist left Evergreen last September in the fallout from the controversy surrounding the school’s planned Day of Absence programming.

Weinstein’s objection to the programming led fifty students to disrupt his class and demand his resignation. The backlash became so intense that Evergreen’s chief of police told him she could not protect him from protesters. As a result, he had to hold his biology course in a public park.

On this episode of So to Speak, we speak with Weinstein about his experience and the state of free speech and inquiry in higher education and beyond.

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Mar 08 2018

1hr 25mins

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Rank #4: Ep. 97 There’s no such thing as free speech, argues Stanley Fish

Oct 31 2019

1hr 11mins

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Rank #5: Ep. 45 Harvard professor Steven Pinker

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Harvard University professor and FIRE Advisory Council member Steven Pinker is a rockstar academic. He has written 10 books, many of which are bestsellers, including most recently “The Better Angels of our Nature” and “The Sense of Style.”

On this episode of So to Speak, we chat with professor Pinker about free speech, free inquiry, taboo, dangerous ideas, and, of course, his forthcoming book on the Enlightenment: “Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.” Here is the recommended reading list provided by professor Pinker during the podcast:

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Nov 15 2017

40mins

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Rank #6: Ep. 24 How Daryl Davis, a black man, defeats the KKK w/ dialogue

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Daryl Davis, a 58-year-old black man, has a question: “How can you hate me if you don’t even know me?”

For nearly three decades, Davis has been interviewing members of the Ku Klux Klan to find an answer to that question. However, in the course of his research, he found something he didn’t expect to find: friendship.

You see, while Davis was actively learning about the Klan members, they were passively learning about him, seeing that their prejudices were unfounded and becoming his friend. Today, Davis has dozens of Klan robes at his home that were given to him by former Klan members who shed their racist beliefs after meeting him.

On today’s episode of “So To Speak,” we travel to Maryland to meet Davis and explore how open dialogue and debate have shown him a path toward a tolerant, multicultural future.

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Mar 09 2017

39mins

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Rank #7: Ep. 67 ‘The Coddling of the American Mind’

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Tribalism and group polarization are on the rise. So too are rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide. On campuses, professors and students are afraid to speak out. And on social media, outrage mobs rule the day.

How did we get here?

On today’s episode of So to Speak, we are joined by FIRE President and CEO Greg Lukianoff to discuss his new co-authored book with New York University professor Jonathan Haidt, “The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure.”

It’s a social science detective story that seeks to explain “the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines” — and in this discussion, Greg points us toward all the clues.

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Sep 04 2018

54mins

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Rank #8: Ep. 27 The ‘heckler’s veto’ strikes Heather Mac Donald

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On April 6, Manhattan Institute Fellow Heather Mac Donald was standing in Claremont McKenna College’s Athenaeum preparing to give a lecture to an empty room.

An empty room was not what Mac Donald expected when she traveled to California from her New York City home to deliver a lecture on her new book, “The War On Cops.” But outside the auditorium, close to 300 people had surrounded the Athenaeum, preventing prospective audience members from entering. They were protesting Mac Donald’s defense of law enforcement policing tactics and her criticism of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Ultimately, the college livestreamed Mac Donald’s talk to those who could not attend in person. But the talk was cut short during the question and answer period after police and administrators determined that it was unsafe for her to remain in the building. The crowd was allegedly out of control, and Mac Donald could hear banging on the windows. Her exit through the kitchen of the Athenaeum into an unmarked Claremont Police Department van was coordinated by walkie-talkie.

Heather Mac Donald is our guest on today’s “extra” edition of “So to Speak.” Mac Donald is the latest speaker on campus to fall victim to the “heckler’s veto.” During our conversation, I ask Mac Donald what she was thinking as she heard the crowd outside banging on the Athenaeum’s windows. I also asked her what it says about the environment for free inquiry on campus that a scholar must escape under police protection through the kitchen of a campus building for presenting nothing more than an argument?

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Apr 17 2017

35mins

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Rank #9: Ep. 59 Debating ‘Is there a campus free speech crisis?’ with Sullivan, Haidt, Nossel, Sachs, & Foster

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Is there a campus free speech crisis?

In March, FIRE staff discussed the question. On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we put the question to others and feature audio from a live debate that occurred on May 8 in New York City.

New York magazine’s Andrew Sullivan and New York University’s Jonathan Haidt argue, yes, there is a campus free speech crisis.

PEN America’s Suzanne Nossel and Acadia University’s Jeffrey Sachs argue, no, there is not.

Freethink’s Kmele Foster moderates.

The debate took place at The Village Underground and was sponsored by FIRE and the Comedy Cellar as a part of “The Underground Debate Series.”

Who do you think won the debate? Share your thoughts on social media and tag the podcast using @freespeechtalk on Twitter.

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May 16 2018

1hr 49mins

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Rank #10: The 100th episode: The state of free speech in America

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On today’s edition of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we celebrate 100 episodes by bringing back on the show popular past guests for a wide-ranging discussion on the state of free speech in America.

Joining us are:

  • Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow, Brookings Institution
  • Nadine Strossen, professor, New York Law School, past president of the ACLU (1991-2008)
  • Bob Corn-Revere, partner, Davis Wright Tremaine
  • Greg Lukianoff, president & CEO, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education

Show notes: 

Dec 12 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #11: Ep. 91 ‘The Grievance Studies Affair’

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Last fall, three writers and scholars announced they had submitted 20 fake papers to academic journals to test whether  — as they suspected — certain fields of study lacked scientific and academic rigor.

Of the 20 papers they submitted before revealing their hoax, seven were accepted, four published, seven were “still in play,” and six were retired. The result is what’s become known as the “Grievance Studies Affair.” 

But what does their experiment prove, exactly?

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we put this question directly to Jim Lindsay, Helen Pluckrose, and Peter Boghossian, who authored the controversial papers.

Show notes:

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Aug 08 2019

1hr 23mins

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Rank #12: Ep. 29 Former ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser

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Ira Glasser is one of the most consequential civil liberties figures in American history.

He ran the ACLU as its executive director from 1978 until his retirement in 2001. In the process, he transformed the organization from a small, $4 million nonprofit with offices in a few cities into a household name with an annual budget of $45 million, a $30 million endowment, and staffed offices in every state, Washington D.C., and Puerto Rico.

This week is the 50th anniversary of when Glasser started with the ACLU on May 1, 1967. In this exclusive, wide-ranging interview, he shares how he went from a part-time math teacher with no law degree to the leader of one of America’s most prominent legal organizations.

His story takes us to Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, where in 1947, Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball and inspired a generation of civil rights activists, to the offices of Robert Kennedy, where the junior U.S. senator spoke with a young Glasser and convinced him to take a job with the ACLU — a job he initially didn’t want.

In explaining how he got from “here to there,” Glasser puts on a master class in principled free speech advocacy, effective management strategies, and how following your passions can lead you to delightfully unexpected places.

www.sotospeakpodcast.com

Interview transcript: thefire.org/so-to-speak-podcast-transcript-ira-glasser-aclu/

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May 04 2017

2hr 13mins

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Rank #13: Ep. 39 Judge Richard Posner on the First Amendment

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Last week, Judge Richard Posner suddenly retired from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after nearly 36 years on the bench. The 1981 President Reagan appointee authored over 3,300 judicial opinions during his tenure and is widely considered one of the most vocal, provocative, and influential appellate court judges of all time.

On today’s episode of So to Speak, we hear Judge Posner’s candid thoughts on the First Amendment as we play for you a conversation he had with Professor Geoffrey Stone on May 16, 2016, at the University of Chicago Law School.

In this wide-ranging and candid dialogue, Judge Posner discusses his views on executive power in wartime, including why he believes President Franklin Roosevelt was justified in interning Japanese-Americans during World War II and why President Abraham Lincoln was right to ignore the Supreme Court’s decision in Ex Parte Merryman. He also addresses Citizens United v. FEC (“terrible”), the Supreme Court in general (“a mediocre institution”), McCullen v. Coakley, the Pentagon Papers, flag burning, and much, much more.

This podcast is presented as part of So to Speak’s exclusive partnership with the First Amendment Salon. The First Amendment Salon is a quarterly gathering of members of the First Amendment community for a 90-minute discussion with leading thinkers concerning a timely topic related to freedom of expression.

VIDEO: youtu.be/bhLJliXX848

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Sep 05 2017

1hr 4mins

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Rank #14: Ep. 99 John Stuart Mill’s ‘On Liberty’

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we are joined by professor Dale E. Miller to discuss the life and philosophy of the English philosopher John Stuart Mill, whose 1859 essay “On Liberty” is a classic text — maybe the classic text — defending the principles of free expression.

Miller is a professor and associate dean for research and graduate studies at Old Dominion University. He is the author of J.S. Mill: Moral, Social, and Political Thought.

Show notes: 

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Nov 26 2019

1hr 27mins

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Rank #15: Ep. 28 ‘Sex and the Constitution’ with professor Geoffrey R. Stone

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Sex and the Constitution are not two topics often thought of together.

But University of Chicago Law School professor Geoffrey R. Stone seeks to change that with the publication of “Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America’s Origins to the Twenty-First Century.”

The newly released, 700-page book is 10 years in the making. Stone’s comprehensive review extends all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Romans to explain how sex came to be legislated in America.

Professor Stone is the guest on today’s episode of So to Speak. Fittingly, we met in New York City to discuss the portions of “Sex and the Constitution” dealing with the regulation of sexual expression. It was, after all, in New York City where the YMCA and Anthony Comstock began their campaigns in the 1800s to root out what they deemed obscene, sexually explicit material.

During our conversation, Stone explains how “obscenity” came to be regulated in America and why its legal definition constantly shifts. We also explore other First Amendment issues surrounding sexual expression, including nude dancing and the public funding of art with sexual themes.

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Apr 20 2017

51mins

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Rank #16: Ep. 38 “After Charlottesville” w/ former ACLU President Nadine Strossen

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Nadine Strossen knows the dangers of Nazism. Her father was liberated from the Buchenwald concentration camp one day before he was scheduled to be sterilized. If American soldiers arrived a day later, Strossen would never become the first female president of the ACLU. She wouldn’t even be alive.

After Charlottesville, there has been vigorous debate about the so-called limits of free speech. Should white supremacist and neo-Nazi ideologies enjoy full First Amendment rights? And if so, should civil liberties groups, like the ACLU, defend them?

On today’s episode of So to Speak, Strossen discusses the fallout from Charlottesville and argues forcefully that, yes, even neo-Nazis deserve free speech and assembly rights ― and yes, the ACLU should defend those rights. She believes the best way to preserve a free society is to not compromise the rights guaranteed by a free society. She is authoring a book on this very topic due out next year titled, “HATE: Why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship.”

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Aug 22 2017

1hr 8mins

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Rank #17: Ep. 78 LGBT equality and the First Amendment

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we speak with Rutgers Law School Professor Carlos Ball about his book, “The First Amendment and LGBT Equality: A Contentious History.”

During this conversation, we explore the history of how LGBT activists utilized the First Amendment to secure their rights, why Professor Ball considers that history “contentious,” and how debates surrounding liberty and equality have roiled America for over a century and continue to drive conversations about LGBT rights today.

Show notes:

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Feb 07 2019

1hr 5mins

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Rank #18: Ep. 23 Rob Corry, ‘speech code slayer’

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In 1994, law student Rob Corry joined with eight other students to file a legal challenge to a Stanford University speech code. It was the first-ever lawsuit filed under California’s recently-enacted “Leonard Law,” which applies First Amendment protections to private, non-sectarian colleges in the state of California (like Stanford), and which the students argued made Stanford’s restrictions on free speech unlawful.

Winning wasn’t going to be easy: Corry would be representing himself and his co-plaintiffs against one of America’s richest and most powerful research universities.

On Feb. 27, 1995—22 years ago this month—a California state court judge sided with Corry and struck down Stanford’s speech code as an impermissible content-based restriction on expression. The victory earned Corry the title of “speech code slayer" in a campus newspaper.

Today, on “So to Speak,” we talk with Corry of Corry v. Stanford about the seminal lawsuit, how he overcame the challenges of representing himself in court, and why other students should feel emboldened by his victory to challenge their colleges’ speech codes.

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Feb 23 2017

51mins

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Rank #19: Ep. 37 Fredrik deBoer on the growing distrust of higher ed

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Fredrik deBoer has been in and around academia his entire life. He’s a fourth generation Ph.D. who has blogged about education issues since 2008. Writing from a socialist perspective, he regularly tackles campus free speech debates.

Last month, deBoer wrote a piece for The Los Angeles Times arguing that recent efforts to shut down conservative speakers on campus have contributed to an environment where 58 percent of Republicans say colleges have a negative effect on the country.

On today’s episode of So to Speak, we ask deBoer how this distrust threatens the future of higher education, and why he believes his colleagues on “the left” contribute to it. We also review common arguments against free speech, and deBoer explains how anti-communist purges targeting his grandfather sparked his early appreciation for academic freedom.

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Aug 10 2017

1hr

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Rank #20: Ep. 89 Prof. Samuel Abrams wrote an op-ed encouraging viewpoint diversity. Then came the fallout.

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His office door was vandalized. He was accused of causing “harm” to his “college community.” There was even a demand — supported by dozens of his faculty peers — to review his tenure.Why? Because he wrote an op-ed in The New York Times arguing for more viewpoint diversity at his campus.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, Sarah Lawrence College professor Samuel Abrams joins us to discuss the response to his op-ed and the future of academic freedom, viewpoint diversity, and the role of faculty in college life.Also joining us is FIRE President & CEO Greg Lukianoff, author of The New York Times bestseller “The Coddling of the American Mind,” due out in paperback edition on Aug. 20.

Show notes:

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Jul 11 2019

52mins

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Ep. 112 College social media censorship

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A new FIRE report finds that 77% of public colleges and universities use a blacklist of secret words to censor comments on their Facebook pages. What’s more, 87% of them block particular users on Facebook or Twitter.

How do these blacklists work? How were they discovered? And do they violate the First Amendment? 

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by the director of FIRE’s Individual Rights Defense Program, Adam Steinbaugh. He is the author of “No Comment: Public Universities’ Social Media Use and the First Amendment.

Show notes:

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May 21 2020

36mins

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Ep. 111 'Dear Colleague,' due process now required. Title IX rules analysis.

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On Wednesday, the Department of Education published its long-awaited new Title IX regulations.

Over the years — and with the federal government’s prodding — Title IX has been twisted and used to justify censorship and the denial of core due process rights for those accused of sexual misconduct on America’s college campus. The new regulations will better protect certain free speech and due process rights long denied to students.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by FIRE Executive Director Robert Shibley and FIRE Senior Fellow Samantha Harris for a deep-dive analysis of the new regulations and the history of Title IX abuse on campus.

Show notes:

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May 08 2020

1hr

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Ep. 110 The Constitution in the age of coronavirus w/ Prof. Josh Blackman

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With much of the country under stay-at-home orders due to COVID-19, what do these orders mean for the five freedoms of the First Amendment?

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino and constitutional law expert Josh Blackman will break it all down. Blackman is a professor of law at the South Texas College of Law in Houston and the author of three books, including his recently co-authored book with Professor Randy E. Barnett, “An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know.”

Show notes:

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Apr 28 2020

36mins

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Ep. 109 Censorship pandemic

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For authoritarian leaders across the globe, the coronavirus emergency presents an opportunity to silence critics and consolidate power.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by international free expression experts Jacob Mchangama and Sarah McLaughlin to discuss how countries like Turkey, Hungary, Egypt, and Thailand are banning “fake news” amidst the pandemic — but, in doing so, are making the crisis worse. 

Mchangama is the executive director of Justitia, a Copenhagen-based think tank focused on human rights and the rule of law. He is also the host and producer of the podcast Clear and Present Danger: A History of Free Speech. McLaughlin is the director of Targeted Advocacy at FIRE. 

Show notes:

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Apr 16 2020

49mins

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Ep. 108 A history of (dis)information wars in the Soviet Union and beyond

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How and why do authoritarian regimes seek to control information? On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by University of Maryland Associate Professor Cynthia L. Martin to explore how one country, the former Soviet Union, restricted access to information and stifled dissent — and what changed when that regime collapsed in 1991.

Show notes:

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Apr 02 2020

1hr 2mins

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Ep. 107.1 "Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’"

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"Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’" by Foundation for Individual Rights in Education President & CEO Greg Lukianoff, as read by Susan Kruth.

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Mar 20 2020

16mins

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Ep. 107 FIRE, the coronavirus, and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino sits down with FIRE President & CEO Greg Lukianoff to discuss how FIRE is adapting to the coronavirus outbreak. We also explore the ideas behind Greg’s new, widely discussed article, “Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’.”

Show notes:

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Mar 20 2020

51mins

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Ep. 106 ‘Free speech and justified true belief’ w/ prof. Joseph Blocher

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Why is it important that we protect freedom of speech?

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino speaks with Duke University School of Law professor Joseph Blocher, who argues that one of the most common justifications for free speech — creating a “marketplace of ideas” in our search for truth — rests on unstable ground in our “post-truth” era. In his article, “Free Speech and Justified True Belief,” Blocher argues for a reframing of this epistemic theory of free speech around knowledge, rather than truth.

Nico and Blocher are joined in their discussion by frequent guest and First Amendment News Editor Ronald K.L. Collins.

Show notes:

Video of conversation

Podcast transcript

“Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’” by Greg Lukianoff

“Bans” by Joseph Blocher

National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Bacerra (2018)

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Mar 19 2020

1hr 13mins

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Ep. 105 ‘Rap on Trial’

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At a time when artistic expression has never enjoyed greater First Amendment protection, rap music has seemingly been left behind. Rap lyrics are routinely used as evidence by police and prosecutors to justify arresting and charging suspects for all manner of alleged crimes.

In their new book, “Rap on Trial: Race, Lyrics, and Guilt in America,” authors Erik Nielson and Andrea L. Dennis identify approximately 500 cases where the violent and aggressive themes within rap lyrics were used against defendants in court.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino speaks with Nielson and Dennis about their book, in which they argue that no other form of creative expression — or genre of music — is treated the same way as rap by the law. “That’s why we call this book ‘Rap on Trial.’ It’s not art on trial. It’s not music on trial. It’s rap on trial.”

Read the podcast transcript.

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Mar 05 2020

55mins

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Ep. 104 Violent video games with Villanova Professor Patrick M. Markey

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Do violent video games make people more violent?

Amid calls to censor or restrict access to violent video games because of their perceived contributions to violent events (such as school shootings), the question is as important as ever.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino explores this question. He is joined by FIRE’s resident video game expert (and FIRE staffer) Ryne Weiss and Villanova University professor Patrick M. Markey. Markey is the co-author with Christopher J. Ferguson of Moral Combat: Why the War on Violent Video Games is Wrong.

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Feb 20 2020

54mins

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Ep. 103 Guns, addiction, and the press

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Is carrying a weapon during a political demonstration protected by the First Amendment?

What about intentionally creating an addictive video game? 

Does the First Amendment’s press clause require the existence of news outlets?

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we explore these three topics and more with First Amendment scholar Luke Morgan, who has written three fascinating articles that examine the scope of the First Amendment’s protections:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Feb 06 2020

1hr 32mins

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Ep. 102 Cultural sites, slurs, antisemitism, and Title IX

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by his FIRE colleagues Robert Shibley, Samantha Harris, and Will Creeley to discuss:

Recorded on Jan. 15.

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Jan 22 2020

57mins

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Ep. 101 McCarthyism and The Red Scare

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“Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?”On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we explore how America’s fear of communism in the early- to mid-20th century led to firings and blacklists in Hollywood, government, and higher education — and how these actions compromised America’s treasured principles of free speech, free conscience, free association, and due process of law.We are joined by Ellen Schrecker, a former professor at Yeshiva University and the author of Many Are the Crimes: McCarthyism in America and No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities.

Click here for podcast transcript. 

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Jan 02 2020

1hr 8mins

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The 100th episode: The state of free speech in America

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On today’s edition of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we celebrate 100 episodes by bringing back on the show popular past guests for a wide-ranging discussion on the state of free speech in America.

Joining us are:

  • Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow, Brookings Institution
  • Nadine Strossen, professor, New York Law School, past president of the ACLU (1991-2008)
  • Bob Corn-Revere, partner, Davis Wright Tremaine
  • Greg Lukianoff, president & CEO, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education

Show notes: 

Dec 12 2019

1hr 31mins

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Ep. 99 John Stuart Mill’s ‘On Liberty’

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we are joined by professor Dale E. Miller to discuss the life and philosophy of the English philosopher John Stuart Mill, whose 1859 essay “On Liberty” is a classic text — maybe the classic text — defending the principles of free expression.

Miller is a professor and associate dean for research and graduate studies at Old Dominion University. He is the author of J.S. Mill: Moral, Social, and Political Thought.

Show notes: 

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Nov 26 2019

1hr 27mins

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Ep. 98 ‘The First Amendment in the Trump Era’ w/ Professor Timothy Zick

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we are joined by William & Mary Law School Professor Timothy Zick to discuss his new book, “The First Amendment in the Trump Era.”

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Nov 14 2019

1hr

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Ep. 97 There’s no such thing as free speech, argues Stanley Fish

Oct 31 2019

1hr 11mins

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Ep. 96 Who was Hayden C. Covington?

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He brought 45 First Amendment cases to the United States Supreme Court between 1939 and 1955. His success rate before the court was second only to future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. He handled as many as 50 major cases a year and is responsible for much of the First Amendment doctrine we take for granted today. Who was this man — and why have most free speech scholars and activists never heard of him?

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we discuss the life and legacy of Hayden C. Covington, who for many years was legal counsel for the Jehovah’s Witnesses. We are joined by distinguished First Amendment scholar and recurring So to Speak guest Ronald K.L. Collins. Collins is the author of the Florida International University Law Review article “Thoughts on Hayden C. Covington and the Paucity of Litigation Scholarship.”

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Oct 17 2019

47mins

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Ep. 95 Twenty years of FIRE with co-founder Harvey Silverglate

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In 1999, criminal defense attorney Harvey Silverglate joined with University of Pennsylvania Professor Alan Charles Kors to found the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we connect with Silverglate at his office in Cambridge, Mass. to discuss FIRE’s founding, the origins of his interest in campus civil liberties, and what he sees for his creation’s future.

Join FIRE in celebrating our 20th anniversary in New York City on Oct. 24. The event will feature a keynote address from author Salman Rushdie. Tickets and sponsorships are available at thefire.org/anniversary.

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Oct 03 2019

45mins

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Ep. 94 Kevin Williamson’s ‘The Smallest Minority’

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On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, journalist Kevin Williamson joins us to discuss his new book, “The Smallest Minority: Independent Thinking in the Age of Mob Politics.”

Williamson is the roving correspondent for National Review and co-host of the podcast Mad Dogs & Englishmen.

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Sep 16 2019

49mins

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iTunes Ratings

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👍🏻

By IPhone 6+ User Houston - Jul 29 2018
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Amazing - such important issues and very thoughtfully explored

Fantastic podcast

By Vino821 - Jan 04 2018
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Fasinating guests and topics.