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Rank #28 in News Commentary category

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News Commentary

We the People

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #28 in News Commentary category

News
History
News Commentary
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A weekly show of constitutional debate hosted by National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen where listeners can hear the best arguments on all sides of the constitutional issues at the center of American life.

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A weekly show of constitutional debate hosted by National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen where listeners can hear the best arguments on all sides of the constitutional issues at the center of American life.

iTunes Ratings

597 Ratings
Average Ratings
463
99
16
9
10

Great

By MarkE8 - Feb 04 2019
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Very good podcast, has helped me to learn about the constitution and understand current issues.

Free Speech & Press

By JIGGS LIKED THIS - Nov 24 2018
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Loved this episode - thoughtful AND civil. Glad I found this show.

iTunes Ratings

597 Ratings
Average Ratings
463
99
16
9
10

Great

By MarkE8 - Feb 04 2019
Read more
Very good podcast, has helped me to learn about the constitution and understand current issues.

Free Speech & Press

By JIGGS LIKED THIS - Nov 24 2018
Read more
Loved this episode - thoughtful AND civil. Glad I found this show.

Listen to:

Cover image of We the People

We the People

Updated 4 days ago

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A weekly show of constitutional debate hosted by National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen where listeners can hear the best arguments on all sides of the constitutional issues at the center of American life.

The Fourth Amendment and civil liberties

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Tracey Meares of Yale University and John Stinneford of the University of Florida explore how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump approach policing and privacy.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for hosting this week.

Oct 27 2016

1hr

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The Supreme Court’s next term

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Michael Dorf and Ilya Shapiro join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to preview a potentially blockbuster Supreme Court term starting in early October.

Sep 21 2017

1hr 5mins

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How our federal judicial system was born

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Jeffrey P. Minear, the Counselor to the Chief Justice of the United States, joins our Jeffrey Rosen to discuss the 225th anniversary of the Act that established our federal judicial system.

Sep 24 2014

37mins

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Justice Breyer on the First Amendment

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Our president and CEO, Jeffrey Rosen sits down with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute in Boston. They discuss the First Amendment, hate speech, the Citizens United decision, and other free speech cases.

Stephen G. Breyer  is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Jeffrey Rosen is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, the only institution in America chartered by Congress “to disseminate information about the United States Constitution on a nonpartisan basis.” 

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE

Apr 12 2018

52mins

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What Does the Constitution Say About Impeachment?

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How should impeachment be carried out, according to the Constitution? This episode explores the constitutional process of impeachment, from investigation and passage of articles of impeachment by the House of Representatives, to the Senate trial, and the aftermath. Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman, who served on the House Judiciary Committee during the Nixon impeachment, and Gene Healy, author of Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power detail the constitutional framework under which impeachment has been carried out in the past, how those precedents compare to what’s happening today, and what might happen next. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 24 2019

1hr 5mins

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Texas H.B. 2 and the right to an abortion

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The National Constitution Center's Jeffrey Rosen welcomes Stephanie Roti from the Center for Reproductive Rights and Emily Kebodeaux from Texas Right to Life to discuss a constitutional challenge to a Texas law regulating abortion providers.

Aug 27 2015

37mins

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Eric Holder on the 14th Amendment today

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This year marks the 150th anniversary of the 14th Amendment, which was ratified on July 9, 1868. Last week, the National Constitution Center and the Thurgood Marshall Institute at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund co-hosted a daylong symposium commemorating this important anniversary.

In this We the People episode, former Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., discusses the importance of the 14th Amendment today during the symposium’s keynote conversation. He is joined by Sherilynn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of LDF, and We the People host Jeffrey Rosen.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you. Contact the We the People team at podcast@constitutioncenter.org

The Constitution Center is offering CLE credits for select America’s Town Hall programs! Get more information at constitutioncenter.org/CLE.

May 03 2018

1hr 4mins

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The state of campus free speech

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Scholars and activists explore the future of free expression at U.S. universities. The speakers are PEN America Executive Director Suzanne Nossel, First Amendment expert Floyd Abrams, University of Missouri student activist Storm Ervin, civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson, and University of Chicago scholar Geoffrey Stone. This live program was presented in partnership with PEN America on November 17, 2016.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Go to bit.ly/wethepeoplepodcast to share your feedback. The survey closes November 30.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Nov 24 2016

1hr 29mins

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Should the 17th Amendment be repealed?

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David Schleicher of Yale University and Todd Zywicki of George Mason University discuss the text, history, and future of this contested amendment.

New essays are now available on the Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution. Read about the 17th Amendment, the 20th Amendment, the 24th Amendment, and the 25th Amendment.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Jul 13 2017

51mins

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A conversation with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joins National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen for a wide-ranging conversation in celebration of the 25th anniversary of her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In the 75-minute interview, Justice Ginsburg talks about the #MeToo movement, confessed her affection for Millennials, discussed the Supreme Court cases she’d like to see overturned, and told some personal stories about the progress women’s rights have made—while reminding the audience of just how recently gender discrimination in American law seemed not only normal but entrenched.

The event took place in Philadelphia on February 12, 2018, in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania Law School as the Owen J. Roberts Memorial Lecture in Constitutional Law.

Feb 15 2018

1hr 19mins

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A 'deep dive' on the Supreme Court

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Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, is joined by leading Supreme Court watchers to review the recent term and look ahead to the future.

The participants are Neal Katyal of Georgetown University and Hogan Lovells; Judge Nancy Gertner of Harvard University; Nina Totenberg of NPR; Geoffrey Stone of the University of Chicago; and Lawrence Lessig of Harvard University.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the People on iTunes. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review; it helps other people discover what we do.

Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was edited by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh WaimbergLana Ulrich, and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Jul 07 2016

1hr 3mins

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Does the Second Amendment protect the right to own and carry a gun?

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Michael O’Shea of the Oklahoma City University School of Law and Carl Bogus of the Roger Williams University School of Law debate the history and meaning of the Second Amendment at the Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, Illinois.

Nov 24 2015

1hr 34mins

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Article II and the powers of the President

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Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego and Christopher Schroeder of Duke University discuss how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump understand the powers and duties of the nation's chief executive.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Sep 15 2016

58mins

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Everything You Need to Know About The Constitution in Two Amendments

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Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center, leads an interactive discussion about the myriad issues, history, and opinions related to the First and Fourth Amendments.

Jul 16 2015

53mins

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The Fourth Amendment and police dog searches

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The National Constitution Center’s Jeffrey Rosen is joined by Orin Kerr and Christopher Slobogin to discuss another big Supreme Court decision about the Fourth Amendment and police dogs.

Apr 23 2015

39mins

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Jeff Rosen answers your constitutional questions

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In the latest installment of our popular podcast series, National Constitution Center president Jeffrey Rosen answers your questions about constitutional conventions, creating new states and the rights of immigrants.

Jan 29 2015

47mins

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America's biggest constitutional crises

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Annette Gordon-Reed of Harvard University, Sean Wilentz of Princeton University, and political journalist Sidney Blumenthal explore how Presidents have confronted the nation's gravest constitutional crises.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Sep 01 2016

1hr

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The history and meaning of the Establishment Clause

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In honor of the holiday season, Michael McConnell of Stanford Law School and Marci Hamilton of the Cardozo School of Law debate the history and contemporary application of the First Amendment's Establishment Clause.

Dec 16 2015

48mins

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A constitutional history of the Republican Party

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David French of the National Review and Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina explore the history of the GOP through a constitutional lens.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the People and Live at America’s Town Hall on iTunes or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Jul 21 2016

49mins

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A new look at America's founding

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Michael Klarman of Harvard Law School and Patrick Spero of the American Philosophical Society reassess the debates that defined the Founding era.

This program was presented live at the Constitution Center on November 14, 2016. You can watch the program on Constitution Daily or at constitutioncenter.org.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on Facebook and Twitter.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast,Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and David Stotz, and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Jan 05 2017

1hr 3mins

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Is There a Constitutional Right to Transport a Gun?

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On Monday, the Supreme Court heard the case New York Rifle and Pistol Association v. the City of New York which centers around a New York City gun regulation prohibiting residents from taking their guns to second homes and shooting ranges outside the city. After New York’s NRA affiliate and some gun-owning residents challenged the regulation, New York changed it – raising the question of whether this case is now “moot.” Explaining the “mootness” issue and diving into the legal and practical implications of the case – Second Amendment experts Darrell Miller of the Duke Center for Firearms Law and Clark Neily of Cato join host Jeffrey Rosen. They discuss the history, text, and tradition of the Second Amendment, what the right to “bear arms” really means, and how the Court should decide its first major Second Amendment case in almost a decade.

Here’s some vocabulary that may be helpful to know this week: 

  • Mootness: A case becomes moot if the controversy that was present at the start of litigation no longer exists. 
  • Judicial review doctrines: A judicial review test is what courts use to determine the constitutionality of a statute or ordinance. There are three main levels in constitutional law: 
  • Strict scrutiny: For a law to survive a court’s review under strict scrutiny, it must be narrowly tailored to achieve a compelling government interest.
  • Intermediate Scrutiny: A level down from strict scrutiny. The law must be substantially related to an important government interest.
  • Rational basis: The most deferential kind of review. The law must be rationally related to a legitimate government interest.


Special thanks to the Duke Center for Firearms Law.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Dec 05 2019

57mins

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What Would Madison Think of the Presidency Today?

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The National Constitution Center’s initiative, ‘A Madisonian Constitution for All,’ is launching an essay series where leading scholars explore what James Madison, the “father of the Constitution”, might think about the presidency, Congress, courts, and the media today. This week, two of the authors celebrate the launch of the series by diving into all things presidential – how the office was conceived of at the Founding, evolved throughout history, was impacted by the rise of political parties and partisanship, and increasingly expanded its power. They also give their takes on the current impeachment investigation. Scholars Sai Prakash and Sean Wilentz, authors of the ‘Madisonian Constitution for All’ essays on the presidency, join host Jeffrey Rosen. 

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Nov 28 2019

1hr 1min

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Dueling Platform Policies and Free Speech Online

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Twitter recently announced that it will stop paid political advertising, with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey asserting that interest in political messaging should be earned, not bought. Meanwhile, Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook would not stop hosting political ads, saying that the platform should not be responsible for policing speech online. Will Twitter’s efforts to regulate political ads work? Might Facebook’s more “hands-off” approach lead to unintended consequences for our democracy? Which approach to regulating speech might foster free expression the most? And how do policies of private institutions shape our free speech landscape, given that the First Amendment doesn’t bind Twitter or Facebook? This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision Abrams v. United States, so we also consider: Are the landmark First Amendment cases, many of which were decided decades before social media existed, still relevant in a world of ever-changing digital platforms, bots, and disinformation campaigns? Digital speech experts Ellen Goodman of Rutgers University Law School and Eugene Volokh of UCLA Law join host Jeffrey Rosen.

Some terms you should know for this week:

  • Microtargetting: a marketing strategy that uses people’s data — about what they like, their demographics, and more — to segment them into small groups for content targeting on online platforms.
  • Interoperability: the ability of computer systems or software to exchange and make use of information. In this context, that means that if platforms like Facebook were required to share data with other developers, those developers could create new platforms and there would be more competition in the market.


Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Nov 21 2019

1hr 4mins

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Can the Trump Administration End DACA?

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Two years ago, the Trump administration decided to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) — a policy enacted under President Obama that deferred the deportation of undocumented people brought to the United States as children. Earlier this week, the Supreme Court heard challenges to that decision and was faced with the questions: can the Court even review the decision to end DACA, since it was an action taken by the Department of Homeland Security, an executive branch agency? If it can, was the decision to rescind DACA legal? And is DACA itself legal and constitutional? Brianne Gorod of the Constitutional Accountability Center and Josh Blackman of the South Texas College of Law Houston join host Jeffrey Rosen to dive into the questions.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Nov 14 2019

49mins

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Conversations with RBG

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This week, we’re celebrating the launch of host Jeffrey Rosen’s newest book, Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law—an informal portrait of the justice through an extraordinary series of conversations, starting in the 1990s and continuing to today. Jeff has collected Justice Ginsburg’s wisdom from their many conversations on the future of the Supreme Court and Roe v. Wade, which Supreme Court decisions she would like to see overturned, the #MeToo movement, and how to lead a productive, compassionate life – illuminating the determination, self-mastery, and wit of the “Notorious RBG.” Dahlia Lithwick, veteran Supreme Court reporter and host of the Slate podcast Amicus, moderates.

Check out Conversations with RBG on Amazon and listen to the audiobook on Audible. The audiobook also has its very own Alexa skill – Ask RBG. You can ask your Amazon echo things like, “Alexa, ask RBG about the #MeToo movement” and you’ll hear clips from the real-life interviews with Justice Ginsburg featured in the audiobook.

This episode is a crossover with our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall – live constitutional conversations held here at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and across America – which is available wherever you get your podcasts. 

Nov 07 2019

1hr 8mins

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Is Brexit a British Constitutional Crisis?

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Brexit, the UK’s campaign to leave the European Union, has sparked ongoing political and constitutional controversy. However, the UK doesn’t have a written constitution — it is governed by a set of laws, norms, conventions, judicial decisions, and treaties — and Brexit has led some to think that needs to change. This episode dives into that debate over the UK’s unwritten constitution as well as other key Brexit-related issues including Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s attempts to “prorogue” Parliament and the ensuing UK Supreme Court decision, parliamentary sovereignty, and the role of referenda. Two leading experts on those topics –Meg Russell, Director of the Constitution Unit at University College London, and Kim Lane Scheppele, Professor of International Affairs at Princeton University phone in from London for a conversation with host Jeffrey Rosen. 

A term that is helpful to know for this week:

  • Prorogation - brings the current session of Parliament to an end. While Parliament is prorogued, neither House can meet, debate or pass legislation, or debate government policy. In general, bills which have not yet been passed are lost and will have to start again from scratch in the next session. The Crown decides when Parliament can be prorogued, but, typically, the Prime Minister advises the Crown to prorogue and that request is accepted.


Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 31 2019

59mins

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What Does the Constitution Say About Impeachment?

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How should impeachment be carried out, according to the Constitution? This episode explores the constitutional process of impeachment, from investigation and passage of articles of impeachment by the House of Representatives, to the Senate trial, and the aftermath. Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman, who served on the House Judiciary Committee during the Nixon impeachment, and Gene Healy, author of Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power detail the constitutional framework under which impeachment has been carried out in the past, how those precedents compare to what’s happening today, and what might happen next. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 24 2019

1hr 5mins

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Can Employees Be Fired for Being LGTBQ?

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Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination “because of… sex.” Last week, a trio of cases that raise the question of whether Title VII also prohibits discrimination because of sexual orientation and/or gender identity were argued before the Supreme Court. Two of these cases – Bostock v. Clayton County Georgia and Zarda v. Altitude Express, Inc. – are lawsuits brought by employees who claim they were fired for being gay, and are suing their employers. The third case – R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. v. EEOC – centers around Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman who says she was fired from her job at a funeral home because of her gender identity. On this episode, Karen Loewy, Senior Counsel for LGBTQ legal advocacy organization Lambda Legal, and Professor David Upham of the University of Dallas – who both wrote briefs in these cases – explain the arguments on both sides, analyze the Justices’ reactions at oral argument, and predict the potential social and legal consequences of these cases.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 17 2019

54mins

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Two Federal Judges on How They Interpret the Constitution

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Last week, the National Constitution Center travelled to Washington, DC to host Clerks at 100 – a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the federal statute instituting Supreme Court clerkships that brought together hundreds of former clerks. Supreme Court clerks assist the justices with researching and drafting opinions and other work critical to the function of the Court. The day before the reunion, the NCC hosted a symposium in partnership with the George Washington Law Review at GW Law School featuring former clerks to discuss that special experience. This episode features NCC President Jeffrey Rosen’s conversation with Judges Diane Wood and Jeff Sutton, who shared how their clerkship experience affected them personally and professionally and shaped their methods of interpreting the Constitution. Judge Wood clerked for Justice Harry Blackmun and serves as Chief Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit and Judge Sutton, who sits on the 6th Circuit, clerked for retired Justice Lewis Powell and Justice Antonin Scalia.  

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 10 2019

55mins

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We the People Live: Supreme Court 2019 Term Preview

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This week, We the People partnered with SCOTUSblog's podcast SCOTUStalk for a live preview of the Supreme Court's 2019 term – recording our show in front of a live National Constitution Center audience for the first time! Host Jeffrey Rosen was joined by SCOTUSblog's Amy Howe and John Elwood to preview the blockbuster cases of the upcoming term, on topics including LGBTQ rights under Title VII, immigration policies like DACA, the Second Amendment, school choice and the free exercise of religion, and more.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Oct 03 2019

59mins

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The Battle for the Constitution: Live at The Atlantic Festival

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This week, the National Constitution Center in partnership with The Atlantic launched a new web project: “The Battle for the Constitution”— a year-long exploration of the major issues and controversies surrounding the Constitution today from all sides of the debate. At the Atlantic Ideas Festival yesterday, the NCC and the Atlantic celebrated the project launch with a series of panels featuring scholars, journalists and legislators. They discussed the breaking news of the House’s impeachment inquiry into President Trump, as well as what separation of powers means in U.S. government today. Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO of the NCC, kicked off the discussion in conversation with Martha Jones, professor of history at John Hopkins University, John Malcolm, Vice President for Constitution Government at the Heritage Foundation, and Quinta Jurecic, managing editor at Lawfare. Later, Representatives Lance Gooden (R-TX) and Adam Schiff (D-CA) spoke about their views on the impeachment question and the proper exercise of congressional power. 

Sep 26 2019

1hr 37mins

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Justice Neil Gorsuch, Live at America’s Town Hall

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Justice Neil Gorsuch visited the National Constitution Center to celebrate Constitution Day and discuss his new book A Republic, If You Can Keep It. Justice Gorsuch, the Honorary Chair of the National Constitution Center’s Board of Trustees, sat down with President Jeffrey Rosen to discuss his passion for civics and civility, the importance of separation of powers, what originalism means to him, and why he is optimistic about the future of America.

This episode is a crossover with our companion podcast Live at America’s Town Hall — live  constitutional conversations held here at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and around the country — which is available wherever you get your podcasts.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Sep 19 2019

1hr 2mins

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Madison vs. Mason

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James Madison and George Mason, both Virginian Founding Fathers, diverged on some of the biggest debates of the Constitutional Convention—including the proper distribution of power between national and local government, the future of the slave trade, and whether or not the Constitution should have a Bill of Rights. Exploring these debates and their impact on the Constitution – scholars Colleen Sheehan and Jeff Broadwater join host Jeffrey Rosen. They dive into the core of the constitutional visions and ideas of Madison and Mason. 

Next Tuesday, September 17th, is Constitution Day – the anniversary of the signing of our constitution back in 1787. To learn more about the National Constitution Center’s Constitution Day programming, including the launch of our upgraded Interactive Constitution, visit constitutioncenter.org/learn

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Sep 12 2019

1hr

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When Should Judges Issue Nationwide Injunctions?

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What are “nationwide injunctions”? When and why are they issued by federal courts? Have they been invoked more frequently in recent years, and, if so, how is that affecting how laws or executive orders are implemented nationwide? And is the term “nationwide injunctions” itself actually a misnomer? Two experts on these broad kinds of injunctions, Amanda Frost of American University’s Washington College of Law and Howard Wasserman of Florida International University, answer those questions. They also detail how nationwide injunctions have been used to block policies of both President Obama and President Trump – including immigration policies like DAPA and DACA under President Obama, and the so-called “travel ban” and third country asylum rule under President Trump – as well as civil rights policies like President Obama’s protections for transgender students using bathrooms that match their identities and President Trump’s ban on people with gender dysphoria serving in the military. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.

Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Sep 05 2019

49mins

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The Next Big Second Amendment Case?

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The upcoming Supreme Court case New York Rifle and Pistol Association v. the City of New York could be the first major Second Amendment case in almost a decade. It centers around a New York City regulation prohibiting residents from taking their guns to second homes and shooting ranges outside the city, even when the guns are unloaded and separated from ammunition. New York’s NRA affiliate and some gun-owning residents challenged the regulation, but, in the midst of litigation, New York City changed it – raising the question of whether the case was now “moot”. And, Senate Democrats filed a controversial brief addressed to the Supreme Court warning that they might pursue structural reform of the Court if they don’t like the outcome in this case. Detailing the twists and turns of the case and its potential impact on the Second Amendment – Adam Winkler of UCLA Law School and Ilya Shapiro of the CATO Institute join host Jeffrey Rosen.  

Here’s some vocabulary that may be helpful to know this week:  

Mootness: A case becomes moot if the conflict, or the law at issue, that was present at the start of litigation no longer exists.  

Judicial review doctrines: A judicial review test is what courts use to determine the constitutionality of a statute or ordinance. There are three main levels in constitutional law:  

Strict scrutiny: For a law to survive a court’s review under strict scrutiny, it must be narrowly tailored to achieve a compelling government interest

Intermediate Scrutiny: A level down from strict scrutiny. The law must be substantially related to an important government interest.

Rational basis review: The most deferential kind of review to the legislature. A law only has to be “rationally related” to a “legitimate” government interest. 

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Aug 29 2019

46mins

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The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

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The Lincoln-Douglas debates — the historic series of seven debates which pitted Abraham Lincoln against Stephen Douglas as they vied for an Illinois Senate seat — began on August 21, 1858. In honor of that anniversary, this episode explores the clash of constitutional visions that characterized the debates between Lincoln and Douglas. Each man argued that he was the heir to the Founders’ legacy as enshrined by the Constitution, as they battled over slavery, popular sovereignty, the nature of rights, and the future of the union. Historians Sidney Blumenthal and Lucas Morel trace the constitutional visions and political rivalries of Lincoln and Douglas from the Kansas Nebraska Act to the Dred Scott decision, through the Civil War and the passage of the Constitution’s Reconstruction amendments. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.  

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Aug 22 2019

1hr 1min

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Live at America's Town Hall: George F. Will

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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist George F. Will returned to the National Constitution Center earlier this summer to discuss his new book, 'The Conservative Sensibility', a reflection on American conservatism. He sat down with National Constitution Center President Jeffrey Rosen for a wide-ranging conversation, sharing his thoughts on everything from natural rights and the Declaration of Independence through the Woodrow Wilson presidency and up to the Roberts Court. 

This episode originally aired on our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall.  

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Aug 15 2019

1hr 3mins

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The Federalists vs. the Anti-Federalists

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In early August 1787, the Constitutional Convention’s Committee of Detail had just presented its preliminary draft of the Constitution to the rest of the delegates, and the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists were beginning to parse some of the biggest foundational debates over what American government should look like. On this episode, we explore the questions: How did the unique constitutional visions of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists influence the drafting and ratification of the Constitution? And how should we interpret the Constitution in light of those debates today? Two leading scholars of constitutional history–Jack Rakove of Stanford University and Michael Rappaport of the University of San Diego School of Law – join host Jeffrey Rosen. 

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org. 

Aug 08 2019

56mins

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When does Twitter-blocking violate the First Amendment?

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President Trump can no longer block people on Twitter, following a ruling by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. The court held that because President Trump controls access to his @realdonaldtrump Twitter account and uses it for official government purposes, it is a public forum and, under the First Amendment, he cannot block people solely based on their viewpoints. Katie Fallow – one of the lead attorneys who represented the blocked Twitter users in the case – and David French, senior writer at National Review and former First Amendment litigator, debate the merits of the decision as well as its potential impact on future cases. They also explore a similar lawsuit recently filed against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez by people claiming that she unconstitutionally blocked them on Twitter. And, they explain how the Second Circuit’s decision may impact government attempts to regulate social media. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Aug 01 2019

48mins

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The Constitutional Legacy of Seneca Falls

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July 19 was the anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention, the nation’s first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. This episode explores what happened at the historic convention, and how its legacy shaped the Constitution through the fight for women’s suffrage and the 19th Amendment and, later, landmark gender equality and reproductive rights cases, including Roe v. Wade. Gender law and women's rights scholars Erika Bachiochi of the Ethics & Public Policy Center and Tracy A. Thomas of the University of Akron School of Law join host Jeffrey Rosen.

Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Jul 25 2019

1hr 3mins

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