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Connected Social Media

Connected Social Media works with the world's most innovative companies to tell the stories behind their press releases and their products. Whether you're a blogger, a journalist, an investor or an engaged consumer, you'll get valuable insights and information from the people behind the people behind the projects that drive modern life - everything from microchips to microfinance, from wifi to disaster recovery. Brilliant, hard-working and dedicated executives, engineers, analysts and entrepreneurs are telling their stories using an ever-increasing toolbox. One of the most exciting developments in recent years is the ability to participate in the dialogue with the companies that are constantly revolutionizing our reality. Join the conversation at ConnectedSocialMedia.com.

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Connected Social Media works with the world's most innovative companies to tell the stories behind their press releases and their products. Whether you're a blogger, a journalist, an investor or an engaged consumer, you'll get valuable insights and information from the people behind the people behind the projects that drive modern life - everything from microchips to microfinance, from wifi to disaster recovery. Brilliant, hard-working and dedicated executives, engineers, analysts and entrepreneurs are telling their stories using an ever-increasing toolbox. One of the most exciting developments in recent years is the ability to participate in the dialogue with the companies that are constantly revolutionizing our reality. Join the conversation at ConnectedSocialMedia.com.

How to Fall in Love with Backup: Get Hit by Ransomware

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Rick Vanover handles product strategy at VEEAM, a backup and replication services firm. In this segment, learn about the service most companies hope they’ll never need. But Vanover says a good backup service is the best thing ever after a data breach or failed IT system. He shares a story about an emergency flight he took to South America to save digital data. And he tells how he found the woman of his dreams. Vanover — aka Rickatron, who is active on Twitter @rickvanover –– sees backup as a safety net every enterprise cannot live without.

Related article:
Meet Rick Vanover, the Batman of Backup

Find more enterprise cloud news, features stories and profiles at The Forecast.

Transcript:

Rick Vanover:
I got this call, literally they told me go to the airport. This was 15 years ago. I literally flew to Venezuela to get an INI file off of a system that was on its last leg, going to die and this parcel freight operator in that country would have lost everything if I didn’t do this.

I’m Rick Vanover senior director of product strategy at Veeam. I joined Veeam because I fell in love with this thing called backup. We want backup to be easy and just work, but then have flexibility when something goes wrong or is not going as planned. Why would I have to fly to Venezuela to get an INI file?

“Well, why don’t I just dial in?”
“Well, they sold the modem.”
I’m like, “What? Why would they sell the modem?”
“They sold the spare server.”
“Oh, we lost that too.”
“Right.”
So it’s like compound failure after compound failure. “Oh, where’s the tape drive?” “We don’t know.”

They had a driver picked me up and we went straight in because of the dire situation. Right. It’s like it just like, it’s crazy. And now granted the customers was great, total pleasure to work with. But here I am this squirty kid with a lot of hair coming in there trying to fix their problem. Saved the day, you know, made them happy. Right. But the data is what they cared about.

Born and raised in the Midwest of the United States. I’ve lived in Ohio for most of my life. It was my wife that made me get into technology. Whatever year college it was, my junior year, it’s like, I fell in love with this wonderful woman. Because we go on a date and she’s like making me pay. And so, okay, let’s go get a job. So I wouldn’t say I was born a geek. I find myself inspired by technology. I mean, heck even right there, my nickname is Rickatron.

I sent an email to the editor of a website. I said, man, this, this blog is crap. He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

The editor came back and said, “Can you write?”

And I’m like, okay, it’s like that. That was my moment. That was the Dawn of Rickatron. And then from there, the blogs, the Twitters, social, the webinaring and the white paper. And I love what I do.

When I get customers who have beat ransomware with backup they’re happy when it saves their job, they love it. When it saves their business, they love it. When it gets them out of a jam, they love it. Otherwise, you’re looking at basically an end of day situation. So I talked to our tech support team about this often and I sent one of the managers a text I’m like, hey, do you have any latest ransomware advice? Cause I love getting their advice because they deal with it every day.

He said, just education, just know about these threats and what not to do and things like that. He went on to say, I recommend going so far as to have mortal fear installed in both IT administrators and end users.

I’m like, whoa, that’s deep. We’re never going to be done with it but ransomware is that overarching threat that could end at all.

We call it the three, two, one rule: three different copies of your data on two different media with one of them being offsite. And the beautiful thing about that is that it doesn’t prescribe any specific technology. Doesn’t prescribe any specific transport method. And it can really address nearly any failure scenario.

People were focused on tape. Well, and then they want a cloud. And then they were focused on new hypervisor platforms and they were focused on cloud platforms. And then they were focused on form factors and consumption models. What I call a solution stack. It’s basically a summer fashion show. You know, we’re going into the spring and it’s like every season, we’re going to have some things that are in season and you know, there’s kind of dujour things that the market wants. But the other thing I can say is that what we’ve seen also varies a bit by region, by segment, by customer type and beams getting to be a big backup player.

No, no. I don’t think people are flying down to Latin America to get an INI file anymore or other exaggerated stories. But the reality is the data drives everything we do and you got to have control over it. And you don’t want to get it out of control because you’re going to be at an end of day situation otherwise. Avoiding that, that’s enough to make you fall in love with backup.

Jason Lopez:
Rick van over is the senior director of product strategy at Veeam, spelled V E E A M, the company which provides backup and replication services as well as cloud data management. This is the Tech Barometer podcast. Tech Barometer is produced by the forecast and you can find more tech podcasts and written stories at theforecastbynutanix.com.

Jan 24 2022

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This Moment Matters: Lowering CO2 Emissions Is a Daunting Task and the Finance Sector Must Lead the Way

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There are many parts of the solution to climate change from scientific research to each person’s daily lifestyle choices. Perhaps the most critical piece is getting the world’s industries to make carbon neutral or negative products, and to cut emissions in the manufacturing process. Some companies will do this voluntarily, but widespread compliance must come from the demands of investors requiring companies to lower emissions in order to secure capital.

“If I’m the steel industry… very high emissions, I recognize that that’s under pressure,” said Simon Cooper, who leads climate and sustainability initiatives at Oliver Wyman, “Things will need to change, and I’m going to need investment to either buy new arc furnaces or to invest in negative emissions technologies. And that money has to come from somewhere. That comes from finance.”

In this podcast, a moving interview with Cooper who lays out a clear and compelling vision for an aggressive action to meet the UN’s sustainability goals to lower C02 output and mitigate the worst effects of climate change.

Jan 18 2022

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This Moment Matters: Cyber Threats Are Becoming More Sophisticated, So Should You

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Cybercrime has become a sophisticated enterprise. Hacking tools built on the latest technologies such as AI or hybrid cloud are available on the black market, where stolen data is also bought and sold. And digital tools used in cinema have become cheap and available. This kind of software is also in the hands of hackers who deploy them to fool users into clicking on unsecure links. “They’re able to manipulate, of course, letters and signatures and other corporate data, as well as now voices and of course images,” says Stephen Viña, senior vice president of Marsh’s Cyber Practice. “They’re really able to fabricate a whole story out of thin air, just to get you to click on a link, to authorize a payment, to move money around.”

There was a time in the early days of the internet that users assumed technologists would simply develop cyber security software that relieved the user from having to think about it. Today, we are further than ever from that notion. All it takes to bring a company to its knees is one person in the organization clicking on an unsecure link. On this podcast, a conversation with Stephen Viña about the ever-changing risks of digital crime, from hacking to ransomware.

Jan 18 2022

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This Moment Matters: How to Think About the Nursing Shortage for Patients and Policymakers

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There was a shortage of health care workers before COVID. Now that the dwindling labor pool is a top news headline, the realization has set in – which medical professionals were trying to communicate from the beginning of the pandemic – that one of COVID’s worst effects is that it overwhelms medical systems and challenges short-staffed hospitals to provide care for other diseases and ailments.

“Even if Omicron is mild, it will create a large denominator of cases, some number of which will need to be hospitalized,” says Gigi Norris, Managing Director at Marsh where she leads the US healthcare practice. “That’s happening at the same time as other COVID cases and influenza, which always creates an uptick in hospitals in the wintertime. There is a potential deluge of patients.”

In the podcast Norris brings her expertise in public health and pandemics to describe the unfolding of events of a disease with many unknowns, the issues around information and communication, and the effects on the critical labor force needed to treat millions of patients.

Jan 18 2022

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Getting a Grip on Supply Chains with AI

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As the pandemic exposes the weakness in the global supply chain, companies are building a new one with cloud and AI.

The effects of the COVID pandemic have slowed supply chains in many verticals from agriculture to musical instrument makers. But technologies such as the cloud, AI, video and drones are helping manufacturers, distributors and sellers better understand the locations of billions of parts and products in the global supply chain, whether in a factory, warehouse or store. Computer vision systems are an example in which drones capture physical movements of items from shelves using artificial intelligence to keep inventory. In this podcast we talk to Jerome Pedreno, head of business development, and Damien Pasquinelli, technology builder, both of the Hardis Group, maker of warehouse management systems in Europe, about how cloud and AI are making supply chains highly efficient, leading to better performance and lower costs.

See related articles:
A Compelling Case for the Cognitive Supply Chain

Digital Twins Poised to Shake Up Supply Chain Logistics

Find more enterprise cloud news, features stories and profiles at The Forecast.

Transcript:

Jason Lopez:
The jazz guitarist Pat Metheny once said that his music reflects the details of existence… where life is actually lived but which we hardly notice. And while this is a tech story about how information technology is making supply chains more efficient and enabling the places we shop to understand what and how to stock products, the people we interviewed see this IT realm with a similar feeling about the details. You’ll hear it later in the story.

Jerome Pedreno:
Do you know why Jeff Bezos called Amazon, “Amazon?” Because there is a region in Brazil where if you want to stay alive, you need to use the Amazon.

Jason Lopez:
Jerome Pedreno is in charge of business development for the Hardis Group, a major player in the warehouse management systems market in Europe.

Jerome Pedreno:
Amazon is not only a way to get some goods, but all the kinds of services you need to survive. It’s not a way of transporting things. It’s the market itself.

Jason Lopez:
Pedreno points out the online market is open 24 hours a day, going deep into the world’s inventory, connecting the best offers and finding the best pricing.

Jerome Pedreno:
Supply chain is just some things that was traditional slow. And now it is absolutely changing your business model. If you want to create what they call omni channel, which means my client can buy anything on my website, from the mobile to store, wherever he wants and can be delivered very fast, wherever he wants, then you need to have a real time global supply chain drop shipping from your suppliers in your stores, in your warehouses, everywhere.

Jason Lopez:
The next frontier he says is the transformation from operating the supply chain in specific places at specific hours, to having a global network which operates in real time. In order to achieve it product stocks need to be available everywhere to fulfill the promise of an omni- channel market.

Jerome Pedreno:
Since it’s arriving in the store with our system, we are tracking everything. So we know where everything is. We have planograms of those stores, so we can really know as much as possible.

Damien Pasquinelli:
We need to be focused on business problems.

Jason Lopez:
If the discussion of omni channel markets, always on supply chains, and such sounds like back- of-the-napkin, Jerome’s colleague, Damien Pasquinelli, who builds applications for Hardis, connects it to the supply chain in action… and explains what Hardis does.

Damien Pasquinelli:
Problem is more to be able to say, okay, my product is in a good place in my store or not. It’s very simple. It’s binary.

Jason Lopez:
Pasquinelli says the technology uses deep learning in analyzing a video on the floor to detect when there’s contact between a customer and a product, to understand the actual movement of products picked up off shelves.

Damien Pasquinelli:
We say, okay, there is a contact, there was a movement. So the product is not in the initial place, and so we will decrease the inventory of that, and we will notify that we have one product less. And just to analyze the contact between people and products, we need to use edge computing in the store to be able to process every data, every image locally, because if we push every image to the cloud it will be very expensive.

Jason Lopez:
This is one reason, he says, they base their technology on a distributed architecture and why Hardis works with Nutanix.

Damien Pasquinelli: We continue on the edge computing, where I want to deploy the visual recognition model in the store. So we would process 99% of data local, and we will push to the cloud just information to say, okay, we have one product less in the store.

Jerome Pedreno:
To make sure in real time that you don’t have shortage, we have been working with robots. We are also working with electronic labels and we are now exploring a lot of video solutions to make sure that in real time we avoid shortage.

Jason Lopez:
Pedreno says the system can use a variety of inputs… cameras, video, 5g, beacons, smartphones. And it accounts for places with bad or no wifi. The purpose is to have as much data as possible in real time to increase efficiency.

Jerome Pedreno:
What we do is provide tools to execute this supply chain, wherever it is, in factories, in warehouses, in stores. Okay? And on top of that, we are about to release big platform that will create software that will help you to manage the network itself. So we have created tools to manage any type of nodes of your supply chain networks. And now we are about to release offers in the next two years to manage the link between these nodes and the global network in real time.

Jason Lopez:
This is the kind of granular snapshot of details that are simply not humanly possible to comprehend. If you think about the billions of products on shelves in warehouses and stores, improving the efficiency of the market just slightly, scales in a big way, leading to better services and lower costs. So, in discussions with technologists about the advances of these apps and systems, sometimes it’s good to do a check in and to discover that technologists are not tone deaf to the big picture. Pedreno says that we always need to stop and think about ramifications. We rely on algorithms to know where to get the best deals, where to eat, what road to take, what movies are available. But he says it’s important that technologies don’t take away our freedom.

Jerome Pedreno:
Of course, we will be able to track everything. Let us think about a lot of things, potentially very interesting and a source of a productivity. Potentially very dangerous and a source of controlling people. What they do, what they buy, where to stock it, where to store it. And so on what I believe is that personal assistant or that kind of stuff, or listening to us then understand more and more what we desire. And in the near future, if you read people like Yuval Harari, you see that a lot of people are trained to experience personalized movies, songs, tailored made. So probably if it’s true, we will have people that we live in, let’s say Amazon or Google universe, whereas they will have a lot of services. Their assistant will know them so much that they will provide them with the right holidays, with the right financial advice. If they need to go somewhere it is computer powered. So I know exactly when I will arrive, there is no more traffic jam. And I live in this universe and this is the service I pay every month for all these. Just one thing. Now, if I want to get out from there, how do I do it? Once everything is there, all my pictures or my life or my desire, everything I am. If this environment decide to influence me, decide that I need to think this and not that, decide that I need to love this and not that. That can be politically motivated, financially, motivated something you don’t desire directly. You have given so much power to such an environment that are you still free? And that is the true question. If you want to become more productive, if you want to become more efficient, yes. You can use Google map instead of searching for the right street. But you are losing your ability to find the right street by yourself. There is a price to pay, and that is why when people say, “Oh, Google is using my data,” Hey ho. Hoo, hoo. It’s not free. It’s very costly to have all the servers and so on. There’s always a price to pay. So we become more efficient, but if we become more efficient, the risk is to be less free. And we must be conscious about this trade and then people would choose democracy.

Jason Lopez:
Jerome Pedreno heads up business development for the Hardis Group. Damien Pasquinelli is a technologist who designs warehouse management systems for the company. This is the Tech Barometer podcast, I’m Jason Lopez. Tech Barometer is produced by The Forecast. Find us at theforecastbynutanix..com

Jan 11 2022

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AI Automation in the Restaurant Industry – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 269

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Atif Kureishy, founder and CEO of Vistry, joins host Jake Smith to talk about deploying restaurant automation technology improve quality of service. Atif goes into detail about Vistry’s Discrn platform, why the company extended Intel’s edge insight for industrial software architecture to optimize workloads, and how his team uses the Intel Distribution of OpenVINO for faster insights and increased performance.

For more information visit:
vistry.ai

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Jan 07 2022

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Reducing Compute Resources in Neural Networks – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 266

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Helen Kim from MaxLinear (previously NanoSemi, Inc.) joins host Jake Smith to talk about reducing compute resources to achieve target accuracies in deep neural networks. Helen goes into detail about MaxLinear’s Augmented Neuron technology, which mathematically augments neural networks to reduce memory usage and latency. Jake and Helen discuss how Intel’s oneDNN and other tools are making AI advancements easier for partners and how the future of 5G will impact the larger industry.

For more information, visit:
nanosemitech.com/benchmarks-show-maxlinears-augmented-neuron-reduces-resnet50-cost-by-2x

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Jan 05 2022

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Integrating Virtual Health into the Broader Care Continuum

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In-person care, telehealth, and apps, oh my! With so many care delivery choices available to patients, when does it make sense to engage virtually and when is it best to leave the screen behind? In our conversation with Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, hospitalist and associate professor in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School, we explore the explosion of virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic and the opportunities and challenges that it presents. Dr. Mehrotra shares his thoughts on issues related to virtual care coordination, integration and access, as well as care quality, outcomes and experience.

Guest: Ateev Mehrotra, MD, Associate Professor in the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Jan 05 2022

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Building Tailored AI Solutions – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 268

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Nico Holmberg from Silo AI joins host Jake Smith to talk about building tailored AI solutions for a variety of industries. Nico goes into detail about how Intel and Silo AI are working together on real-time computer vision for quality control in industrial manufacturing. Nico also talks about why Silo AI uses a broad number of Intel software and hardware components in order to achieve the performance and flexibility their AI lab needs to build a variety of solutions for their customers. Jake and Nico end the episode talking about the future of AI research and development.

For more information, visit:
silo.ai

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 16 2021

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Using AI for Specialized Video Analytics – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 267

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Erik Landolsi, CTO of Irisity, joins host Jake Smith to talk about using AI for video analytics. Erik talks about the challenges of connecting and processing immense amounts of video data, why Irisity anonymizes certain details based on where cameras are installed, and what the recent acquisition of AgentVi means for the future of specialized video analytics.

For more information, visit:
irisity.com

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 14 2021

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Customer Service in the Era of Digital Transformation – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 265

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: S. Venkat from MindTree joins host Jake Smith to talk about digital customer service, specifically the company’s MindTree Cognitive Contact Center, which combines existing call center infrastructure with new technology. The two discuss how MindTree worked with the Intel Distribution of Python along with SigOpt (a recent Intel acquisition) for hyperparameter tuning to reach necessary accuracy and performance benchmarks.

For more information, visit:
mindtree.com

Follow S. Venkat on LinkedIn at:
linkedin.com/in/venkateswaran-sundareswaran-69a6363

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 07 2021

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How Open Source Transformers Are Accelerating AI – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 261

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Jeff Boudier from Hugging Face joins host Jake Smith to talk about the company’s open source machine learning transformers (also known as “pytorch-pretrained-bert”) library. Jeff talks about how transformers have accelerated the proliferation of natural language process (NLP) models and their future use in objection detection and other machine learning tasks. He goes into detail about Optimum—an open source library to train and run models on specific hardware, like Intel Xeon CPUs, and the benefits of the Intel Neural Compressor, which is designed to help deploy low-precision inference solutions. Jeff also announces Hugging Face’s new Infinity solution that integrates the inference pipeline to achieve results in milliseconds wherever Docker containers can be deployed.

For more information, visit:
hf.co

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 06 2021

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Using AI for Digital Risk Protection – Conversation in the Cloud – Episode 262

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: James Carnall from ZeroFOX joins host Jake Smith to talk about AI-powered digital risk protection across the internet, including text, images and video, to identify threats ranging from deep fakes and fraud to potential cyberattacks. James explains why the ZeroFOX team worked directly with Intel for over a year to optimize their processes, such as improving inference performance with OpenVINO. James and Jake talk about how the rising volume of disinformation can have a negative financial impact on companies of all kinds and explain the limitations of relying on biometrics to thwart theft.

For more information, visit: builders.intel.com/docs/aibuilders/zerofox-uses-intel-ai-technologies-to-protect-businesses-against-targeted-social-and-digital-attacks.pdf

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 06 2021

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The Future of Serverless AI – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 264

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Arijit Sengupta, founder and CEO of Aible, joins host Jake Smith to talk about the difference between the promise of AI and actual results. Arijit talks about helping develop BeyondCore, which was acquired by Salesforce, his book AI is a Waste of Money, the current unsustainable costs of creating complex models, and why Aible takes a “serverless-first” approach to AI. He also goes into detail about working with Intel on optimizations and benchmarking for necessary lower energy costs. Jake and Arijit close the episode discussing algorithm fairness, data privacy, and the personalized AI of the future.

Follow Arijit on Twitter at:
twitter.com/arijit_sg

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 06 2021

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Leveraging Conversational AI to improve Customer Experience – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 263

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In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Nitin Somalaraju from Tech Mahindra joins host Jake Smith to talk about the company’s Speech Analytics platform named Sayint, which uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and natural language processing (NLP) to uncover meaningful insights from customer conversations. Nitin talks about why regional localization and privacy issues are still challenging to overcome when deploying voicebots and how Intel technology has helped the Tech Mahindra team.

For more information, visit:
sayint.ai

Follow Jake on Twitter at:
twitter.com/jakesmithintel

Dec 06 2021

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Tech’s Slow, Intertwining Disruption of Healthcare

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Medicine has eluded the tech disruptions which seemingly overnight rewrote business models in media, telecommunications, transportation and other industries. That doesn’t mean healthcare is untouched by technology. Hospitals are keen on innovations for diagnosis and medical procedures such as AI doing predictive analysis of patients with COVID-19 or natural language processing algorithms reviewing consumer claims of unexpected bills. Shifting the model to prevention promises to improve people’s health and lower costs. But that shift won’t be fostered by an app like AirBnB or Uber, which empower users with more information. What’s needed is empowering doctors with more patient information. In this podcast segment, explore this topic with Dr. Arik Eisencraft, Chief Medical Officer of the Israeli company Biobeat Technologies and a medical researcher at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Lisa Suennen, a venture capitalist at the San Francisco-based Manatt Venture Fund and Saligrama Agnihothri, a professor of supply chain and business analytics at Binghamton State University in New York.

Find more enterprise cloud news, features stories and profiles at The Forecast.

Transcript:
Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: I actually think this is the right path forward. I think that as we have more accurate, sophisticated and advanced tools, this may actually help all of us as healthcare providers to provide better health.

Jason Lopez: This is the tech barometer podcast. I’m Jason Lopez, the internet brought with it, profound disruptions, social media, disrupting newspapers, for example, but one that many have been waiting on is a disruption of healthcare where in the U S the per capita expense is more than $11,000 annually, double the amount in most European countries. One of the core reasons for high costs is that the model focuses on treating the results of bad health, especially heart disease, cancer, diabetes, rather than on prevention data. Your access to information is the magic behind Airbnb, Uber, and other disruptive apps who has a room you can sleep in or a car. You can get a ride in, in health care to achieve a prevention model. The magic would sort of be the other way around as it is now. Your data from an annual checkup and blood draw is hardly anything. Imagine if your doctor could have your vital information on an ongoing basis. So how did doctors get access to your data? And even if they could, how can doctors deal with the data of hundreds of millions of people to get in front of disease.

Lisa Suennen: You go to the doctor and you’ve got some condition that’s readily measured by some ongoing wearable sensor. How does the doctor know that? How do they prescribe it to you? Because it’s not in their formulary, you know, and that’s loaded into their epic system. How do they get paid for monitoring you?

Jason Lopez: Lisa Suennen is a venture capitalist at Manatt, Phelps, and Phillips. She’s spent her career investigating business models, listening to startup pitches. And greenlighting the funding of various new technologies in healthcare.

Lisa Suennen: The medical system is not really set up to take this data, analyze it, and do things with it because they don’t generally get paid for doing that. The medical system doesn’t get paid to keep you healthy. It’s paid to treat you, right. And so if you have a condition, like a heart attack, and there’s a way to measure that you might have another heart attack, you know, they’d be looking for that. They’d be monitoring for that.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: Physicians and nurses are in many cases, more conservative when thinking about health issues than the public, it’s not always like that, but we see that a lot.

Jason Lopez: Dr. Eric Eisenkraft is chief medical officer of the Israeli company, Biobeat technologies, and a medical researcher at Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Eisenkraft has been involved in testing remote technologies, such as augmented reality to conduct a medical procedure,

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: A small study we’ve completed not long ago in which medical students were in an operating room. I was, some of my colleagues were standing in another room and the students were wearing these glasses. We could see through their glasses, what they’re seeing. And they had a swine model of hemorrhagic shock and lung contusion there. We guided them in real time, how to perform an insertion of a chest tube. And we were drawing on the screen and they saw it on their glasses, how to perform the cuts and how to introduce the chest tube inside the animal. And it worked perfectly.

Jason Lopez: This is just an example of the many kinds of advances brought on by the it revolution, technologies such as the cloud, AI, robotics, AR and VR inspiring many new developments in medical therapies. But perhaps the low hanging fruit of immediately impactful technologies are wearables. A recent study found that a mobile health app, when used as part of a doctor’s care, significantly improved patient outcomes. But one of the insights of the paper is the next hurdle, actually getting the healthcare system to adopt it. Suennen says this piece is beginning to open up.

Lisa Suennen: Already starting to see movement towards payment for.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: There still a lot of way to move forward, but it’s not in a preliminary phase anymore. And you don’t have to stand beside the patient in order to get this information. The patient now can be thousands of miles away from you, and you can still understand what is happening, what is going through and provide either help from afar or at least give them the guidance, what to do now.

Jason Lopez: The technology to enable remote medicine and how it gets paid for is one discussion. Getting doctors and patients to start using it is another. But because of the COVID lockdown, remote medicine went from an alternative way to connect to an expected way.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: I must’ve made the COVID-19 for us was a huge leap forward because it enabled us to show the strengths of such a system. We are talking about remote patient monitoring. We are talking about reducing direct contact between healthcare providers and patients.

Jason Lopez: Eisenkraft’s company, Biobeat makes a medical grade wearable device, which measures 12 different parameters, such as oxygen levels, heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiac index to name a few.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: Because now physicians started to think, “well, maybe I don’t really want this patient to arrive to the hospital. Maybe he can stay at home and we can help him and provide medical care when he or she is still at home.” So this is one thing. Another thing is pre- symptomatic detection of changes. So I don’t want to wait until the patient will feel that something is happening. I want to be aware of that even before he feels that, and we have no more and more evidence that is possible. And we can do that.
Jason Lopez: What Eisenkraft just said is essentially the whole ball game. With enough data, it’s possible to get in front of disease before it happens. So it’s not just really about the wearable, but what that wearable is attached to: the algorithms that enable making sense of the data.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: We have huge data sets of thousands of patients, and by using machine learning tools and algorithms that perform better than us and keep on analyzing the data that was collected and refining that. And with every patient that is being added, we get more insights and more information. We see how our algorithms become stronger and better with better prediction capabilities. And on the other hand, we are a cloud-based company. So basically there is no limits to how many patients can now be monitored in currently different places. And physicians now can perform their own analysis or get our help in analyzing the data.

Jason Lopez: In other verticals, such as media, transportation, hospitality, such tech innovations in cloud and AI have meant disruption, transparency, lower prices, better services, but there’s been more of a challenge for these platforms to become established in healthcare.

Lisa Suennen: You’re seeing, you know, newer doctors are being trained in a digital world. Some of the medical schools are better at this than others, but they’re starting to work, you know, in that realm or at least they’re young enough to have engaged digitally in every other facet of their life so they’re accustomed to that technology engagement. And, you know, as those replace older doctors, you know, that’ll help, right? I do think all of these things are converging to make things different. 10 years is perhaps the right number of years when it will be fundamentally different for this. Not one year, but we’re already starting to see some of that. It’s not unheard of for these things to start being used now. Especially clinical trials, that’s happening a lot.

Dr. Arik Eisenkraft: I think that we’re really witnessing what we probably will be defined a few years from now kind of a revolution because there are multiple novel technologies that are now being implemented more and more. And it has to do with imaging and with using artificial intelligence and robotics and merging everything together. And it’s quite different from how it was, let’s say a decade ago.

Jason Lopez: Dr. Eric Eisenkraft is the chief medical officer of Biobeat Technologies. Lisa Suennen is a VC at Manatt, Phelps and Phillips. You might want to check out her blog, a must read in the industry called Venture Valkyrie. It’s at venturevalkyrie.com. I’m Jason Lopez. This is the tech barometer podcast produced by the forecast. Find us at theforecastbynutanix.com.

Dec 06 2021

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What We Know About Long Covid

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For people recovering from COVID-19, the journey back to health and well-being can be a long and winding road. Some suffer from crippling fatigue; others experience brain fog; and still others can’t seem to catch their breath. How do we treat the lingering symptoms known as long COVID and what is the outlook for patients experiencing them? To answer these questions and more, we speak with Dr. Lekshmi Santhosh, the founder and Medical Director of the multidisciplinary post-COVID/post-ICU OPTIMAL Clinic at UCSF Health. She explains what we know about long Covid to date and how we can best support patients suffering from it and shares her best advice for minimizing our chances of experiencing long Covid in the first place.

Guest: Lekshmi Santhosh, MD, Assistant Professor, Founder and Medical Director of the multidisciplinary post-COVID/post-ICU OPTIMAL Clinic at UCSF Health

Resources from Spring Health:
Burnout Guide
springhealth.com

Dec 03 2021

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Building Secure Apps for Government Defense

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BAE Systems contracts with the U.S. Department of Defense. It’s in the difficult business of handling military and intelligence secrets. And while there is a lot the company can’t talk about, there are plenty of useful insights they can share, which will help leaders across different industries. In this podcast segment with Dr. Nandish Mattikalli, the chief engineer for the intelligence solutions business within the security sector at BAE talks about staying committed to security, the kinds of threats it sees, and how hybrid multicloud technologies help meet government defense needs.

Related podcast: Defense Contractor Turns to Flexibility of Hybrid Multicloud IT

Related article: BAE Systems Moves Government Defense to Hybrid Multicloud

Related article: National Security Mindset for Building Defense Apps in the Cloud

Find more enterprise cloud news, features stories and profiles at The Forecast.

Transcript:
Jason Lopez:
This is the Tech Barometer podcast from the forecast, I’m Jason Lopez. About 15 years ago, working on an NPR story, I talked with security analyst Bruce Schneier. It was after the dot com bubble had burst. And for many users a seemingly new thing was happening: malware. It was escalating, but my assumption was the IT community would figure this out, to which Schneier said, “No, it’s only going to get worse.” And today we’re in the middle of a ransomware epidemic. We’ve seen utilities attacked and it raises the question: what about some of the most sensitive data out there, like military intelligence and defense? I talked with Nandish Mattikalli, chief engineer for the intelligence solutions business within the security sector at BAE, a company that has the U.S. department of defense as a client, and started by asking about his special sense of responsibility when it comes to it and cloud security.

Nandish Mattikall:
Yeah, it is not just a sense of responsibility. It is a significant responsibility, especially when it comes to cloud computing and that responsibility is related to the type of mission, the type of customer, the type of programs that we support. The responsibility, not only to continue the mission, but also make sure that they’re all secure. Cyber security is a major risk element to make sure that both the internal, as well as the external threats are addressed, litigated, controlled and continuously monitored. Definitely a significant part of our emphasis. And especially with the cloud, that is one of the major concerns for adoption of cloud computing. Whereas the sense of security our customers would have when they have on-prem data centers or infrastructure, that sense of urgency for cyber comes down a little bit, but it gets enhanced in a cloud environment. And rightfully so.

Jason Lopez:
What’s an example of the kind of threats that you see at the level of national.

Nandish Mattikalli:
Yeah. I will just take the example that colonial pipeline hacking. The implication of hacking those kinds of networks, it can bring our infrastructure of our country to bare minimum, and it will have significant impact for not only operations of our, you know, financial networks or defense networks, but from the security perspective, it could be any applications that if you’re, let’s say, for example, you are in a hurricane zone, right? Hurricane Ida is hitting our coastline and somebody is trying to hack FEMA’s application. And if that application are secure, we are putting our people in danger.

Jason Lopez:
Right. You know, national security, I guess when you step back is more than just military, but it’s things like disaster response. But I want to back up and ask you a question about you for a moment. And you grew up in India where, you know, there’s been a national focus on information technology, education. How did you get interested in IT?

Nandish Mattikalli:
Yeah. So, uh, I was always interested in building and we used to play on the side of where you are in the sand and we always build sandcastles. The idea was how tall can I build before it breaks? So as I was going to school in India, India was sending satellites into space. So that really piqued my interest. And as I was working towards my masters at IIT Bombay in India, we were in the very early stages of an information system to handle satellite data that we’re getting from multiple sensors in space. So building things and see how they work and make things that are impossible using math and science, I think is a significant driver. Even today when a plane flies in sky, I look at it and say, wow, it’s just amazing. I’m fascinated by the engineering. And I want to build new capabilities.

Jason Lopez:
Well, that’s really interesting. You know, here at the forecast, when we interview people, we like to, you know, focus on them as more than just an expert with a title, but kind of get to know what’s sort of under the hood in terms of what they think, but let’s go back to that. Let’s go back to the question of it. Where does BAE show up in the stack?

Nandish Mattikalli:
Yeah, absolutely. That’s a very good question. So the traditional cloud computing model, there is a platform as a service, software as a service and then application as a service and then data as a service. And now we are into the AIML as a service. And where BA was before cloud computing, we were in almost all the layers. I Mean infrastructure and the platform and applications. But with the cloud computing and, um, infrastructure becoming commodities and platforms are becoming commodities. So we are moving away from the infrastructure layer, definitely. And we are slowly away public platform layer, but mostly focus on the applications, the data and mission outcomes and AIML layer of that stack. At the same time, focusing on security across all the layers, right? And in some cases there are examples where the customer wants us to build out infrastructure. We do do the infrastructure layer for the customers as well, whether it is a data center or a facility build-out. And we work with partners such as Nutanixs and Dell and VMware and other partners to help with those as a lead system integrator for our customers. But, the emphasis has been to move up the stack and not to be in the infrastructure layer where those are becoming more of a commodity.

Jason Lopez:
So when you step back and you, and you look at IT, has security always been a part of what you do?

Nandish Mattikalli:
Yup. So the answer, your question is, yes. The reason I say that is because the security mindset and the business that we are in the customers that we support and the missions that we engage in are the national security intelligence and defense customers I mentioned to you. But what we are seeing is attacks are evolving, right? There are several incidents including that of Snowden. The insider threats are much more prevalent and more dangerous with the multi-cloud our attack surface has increased. And there’s a interest from the nation states to disrupt our operations. So as our adversities that change the game, we are rapidly evolving as well.

Jason Lopez:
Well, what would happen if a defense project was compromised, what would occur there?

Nandish Mattikalli:
So a defense project can be at various security level and any defense project that is compromised, it can have grave and significant consequences to our national security. So that’s one of the reasons why we process and handle data properly at various security levels. And BA systems has several solutions in place, and we work with other partners as well for cross domain solutions.

Jason Lopez:
The day, you know, many people in your field, keep coming back to the social piece of this.

Nandish Mattikalli:
Yup. And then, and that is very true. And, uh, we have seen, you know, these various fishing activities, right through social behavior and social engineering. It will just take clicking on one link that comes in my inbox. And next thing you know, that propagates to the network internally, what is more important for us is what we call APT the advanced persistent threat, that’s significant interest to us. And how do we identify monitor, contain and react to those.

Jason Lopez:
So in, you know, designing and building apps for your clients, what are you looking at in terms of mounting a defense?

Nandish Mattikalli:
So, as I said earlier, talking about the apps, there is an implied reliance on the structure of the platform that it is secure, but at the same time, it takes a collaborative effort to communicate the needs of the security between various teams so that the security is built into the apps and the data at the applications layer and the data layer security features are built in not trying to add security on top. And then the dev ops concept we include application security, data security, and even security of some of these newer architecture, such as containers and hardening of the containers is a significant emphasis. And within the DOD, there are pre-approved containers and a use of pre-approved containers will help us get to the faster ATOs or even achieve continuous ATO. And BAE systems is investing. And we are working with various partners, including Nutanix and Dell, Microsoft, I believe with red hat as well. We are developing capabilities related to the security, especially in the cloud and the multi-cloud. And those are linked to zero trust automation of security implementation, and even continuous monitoring.

Jason Lopez:
Nandish Mattikalli is the chief engineer for the intelligence solutions business at BAE. This is the tech barometer podcast, I’m Jason Lopez. It comes to you from The Forecast and you can find us at theforecastbynutanix.com.

Dec 01 2021

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Centering our Conversation about Quality Through a Health Equity Lens

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Over 20 years ago the Institute of Medicine included “equitable” as one of six domains of quality, but when we talk about equity and quality today, we don’t often discuss them in tandem. To reach health improvement goals, that must change. In this episode of the Business Group on Health Podcast, we speak with Dr. Mark Smith, professor of clinical medicine at the University of California at San Francisco and founding president and CEO of the California Healthcare Foundation. Mark shares why it’s critical to view quality through an equity lens and the importance of setting specific and time-driven targets; his thoughts on the rapidly changing dynamics of health care delivery and if virtual care can bridge the equity gap; and why he’s hopeful for the future.

Guest: Mark Smith, MD Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of California San Francisco

Nov 25 2021

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The Catch-22 Cost of Rushing to Public Cloud

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In the widely circulated article “The Cost of Cloud: A Trillion-Dollar Paradox,” venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz showed how the rush to public cloud IT services can eat away business valuation over time. In this Tech Barometer podcast segment, explore the real cost of running a business on public cloud with Martin Casado, general partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, and Nutanix CEO and President Rajiv Ramaswami.

Related links:
The Cost of Cloud, a Trillion-Dollar Paradox
Cloud Computing’s Catch-22

Find more enterprise cloud news, features stories and profiles at The Forecast.

Transcript:
Rajiv Ramaswami:
The cloud has become the top operating model for most companies, especially during the pandemic. What does cloud mean for a company’s bottom line and are there new nuances driving these cloud decisions.

Jason Lopez:
That’s the CEO of Nutanix, Rajiv Ramaswami. On this podcast, a conversation between Rajiv and his friend Martin Casado, a general partner at the venture capital firm of Andreessen Horowitz. Martin has worked at Lawrence Livermore Labs, for intelligence agencies working on networking and cybersecurity, and while at Stanford in the PhD program – when Rajiv knew him – developed software defined networking. Later they also worked together at VMWare. Their conversation starts with the trends in cloud computing.

Martin Casado:
I think it’s important for everyone to remember that we’re still actually in the early days of cloud. Depending on who you ask the cloud market is what $300 billion a year right now. Most estimates suggest that’s growing 20% a year on year, and that will go for the next almost decade. Right? So if you compare that to the $3 trillion it industry, it’s a very large market, but it’s still early. And with that is we’re still just starting to understand the implications of cloud. Like we know the benefits, we know like agility, we know, you know, we know the benefits, but we’re just starting to understand the actually the economic implications. And it turns out for some companies, actually, this is fairly significant. And so we’re entering an era now and I would view this as almost like cloud V2, understanding where there’s a lot of discussion around like, what is the right architecture for cloud? What is the right cost for cloud? How should I use cloud in the correct ways? And so I think this is kind of where we are with the cloud adoption cycle.

Rajiv Ramaswami:
I agree, Martin. So to your point, I mean, I’ve been seeing lots of companies taking on public cloud initiatives and when we talk to it leaders, they talk about scale agility and the speed of development and being able to bring out new applications quickly. All that is not a surprise. I think that’s perhaps a little bit less of an understanding of the true cost of cloud. Now you had a front seat position here. As you sit on the boards and you invested in a number of these bond in the cloud companies, uh, software companies and SAS companies that really started doing everything in the public cloud. You published a fairly controversial paper here around the true cost of cloud here. and also talked about it as a bit of a paradox. I think you call it a trillion dollar paradox if I’m not mistaken. And, so what were the key findings?

Martin Casado:
Yeah, sure. So, so like, like you said, I sit on a board of these companies I’ve seen, you sit there on these board meetings and you’re like, wow. You know, like 50 of our cogs, 70% of our cogs, 80% of our cogs are cloud, what’s going on. So to understand this, we looked at 50 public companies, the majority of which the vast majority, which IPO in the last six years, and, and we Spelunk through S ones. And we asked the question, what percentage of cogs is cloud? These are software companies, right? Uh, and it turned out that it was 50%, which is just an number, right? And then we asked the question, listen if 50% of the cogs is cloud, if you reduce that by a factor of two, which is totally doable in many cases, how will that impact the share price of these companies? And across the 50 companies that we talked to, we estimate between a hundred to $200 billion is being suppressed, which is like, this is like, this is $200 billion across 50 companies. And by the way, the trillion dollar paradox is that, you know, if you extend this, we were just looking at 50 companies. If you extend this industry wide, it’s very easy to come up with 500 billion to a trillion dollars. And so, listen, we’re just starting to have companies that IPO that are heavily reliant on the cloud. We’re just starting to understand the economics. And the result is, is that it makes up a large portion of cogs and that greatly greatly suppresses the the share price unless you’re able to drop it.

Rajiv Ramaswami:
So are you suggesting Martine that these bond in the cloud company is actually repatriate workloads on-prem.

Martin Casado:
So, it’s interesting is when we started the work for the paper, the research for the paper, the goal was just to do a cost analysis. We didn’t even want to come up with suggestions about you, listen, how much, you know, how much of a company’s economics are driven by the cloud? In these conversations and we really talked to dozens, many companies we spoke to says that they’ve either repatriated or do repatriation. And so, you know, we don’t take a position, however it is being done today, and it is being considered today. And clearly there are cost advantages if you do it right. And so in the large continuum of solutions, whether it’s optimize better or buy a third party tool for visibility or push it so your engineers think about costs or repatriation. We think it is something that customers should have in the conversation. It should be part of the conversation.

Rajiv Ramaswami:
So we’ve got about 20,000 plus enterprise customers who are starting to donate in a different way, right. They all started with on-prem data centers and almost everybody there is looking to use the public cloud. What advice would you have for these companies as they go to the cloud and what should they be looking out and learn from the lessons of all your SAS companies?

Martin Casado:
So this is fairly obvious, but it just, it’s so important. It bears repeating, which is optionality is critically important. Um, and the right way to do that is upfront is multi-cloud. And it just seems to be already a reality. I mean, HashiCorp just did a survey, which shows that 76% of companies are already multi-cloud. Bank of America had a CIO report that basically said the same thing recently. And so it’s just important to realize that, just like all companies are becoming software companies, it feels like all software companies are becoming SAS companies. And if you’re building a SAS service, which is really the primary mechanism of distributing software, the cloud becomes part of your Cogs and the primary way to reign that in is by having optionality on the backend and listen, this is why I think Nutanix is so trend aligned. The world is coming your way, which is cloud is not a location. It’s not a company. Cloud is an operating model. And that operating model is something that you can consume is on-prem equipment, and you can consume it in a colo, or you consume it as a service over the public internet. The important thing is that you have optionality and how you consume it.

Rajiv Ramaswami:
Martin, I think what you just said, outlines exactly our vision, right? I agree with you. A hundred percent cloud is an operating model. Our customers are going to operate in this multicloud world, and I think there’s an opportunity for them to do cloud right, as they move forward and learn from the lessons of all these companies that have been in the cloud. So wonderful having you with us, Martin, thank you so much and all the best.

Martin Casado:
Awesome. Thank you.

Jason Lopez:
Martin Casado is a general partner at Andreessen Horowitz. Rajiv Ramaswami is the CEO of Nutanix. This is the Tech Barometer podcast, produced by The Forecast. Find more tech podcasts and stories at theforecastbynutanix.com.

Nov 18 2021

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