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Talks with Teachers

Inspiring Interviews with America’s Great Educators

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Teaching the Whole Child with Kristin Ziemke (Apple Distinguished Educator)

 Apple Distinguished Educator, Chicago’s Tech Innovator of the Year  Elementary Teacherwww.kristinziemke.com @KristinZiemke Segment I – Background and Inspiration   Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – This is her 14th year in education. She is currently a first-grade teacher and Technology Integrationist. She has fallen in love with urban education as is passionate about helping all students reach their potential.  Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Both of her parents are teachers. SHe comes from a teaching family, thus her first courses in education came at the dinner table. She also is thankful for the help that Stephanie Harvey and Smokey Daniels provided over the years. It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – Many lessons fell flat, but as she evolved as an educator, Kristin saw those experiences as opportunities. Once she was trying to get her first-grade students to use Edmodo, the wi-fi went down at school. She remembers sweating in that moment, trying to give support to as many students as she could. Instead, she transitioned to annotations on sticky notes.   What is the challenge in teaching on the elementary level?  – The biggest challenge is that you are teaching the whole child at that moment. It is not about teaching the subject, it is nurturing their academic, social, emotional needs. It is also setting the tone for all future learning. So much time is spent developing a vision of who students are as readers, writers, and thinker.  What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – Kristin loves the struggle of meeting the many needs of students. That makes it so rewarding. She also loves developing a community of learners, shifting their mindset, making them realize that there is not just one teacher in the room, there are 34. Segment II — What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop?   What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Make connections that really matter. Her best advice to any educator is to build a network -- develop a personal PLN. Conferences are also a great place to meet people. Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- The internet can be like drinking from a fire hose. There are a number of different blogs that she reads like: Chris Lehman's blog Teaching Like its 2999 She also likes #1stchat on Twitter As well as the Heinemann digital campus. Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – Give them consistent, sustain opportunities to write. Find the chunks of time to make writing meaningful.  Update the cannon. What books belongs in the 1st grade classroom?   The post Teaching the Whole Child with Kristin Ziemke (Apple Distinguished Educator) appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

29mins

9 Jun 2014

Rank #1

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Creativity and Imagination: A New Way to View Student Ability

Scott Barry Kaufman www.scottbarrykaufman.com @sbkaufman Scott is Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Kaufman investigates the development and measurement of intelligence, creativity, and personality (see scientific papers). He has six books, including Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined and The Philosophy of Creativity (with Elliot Samuel Paul). Kaufman is also co-founder of The Creativity Post, and he writes the column Beautiful Minds for Scientific American (seepopular posts).  In this episode you will learn: The purpose of the Imagination Institute  What the elements of postive psychology are and how they can help teachers understand students Why we are misguided in measuring intelligence How to think broadly about intelligence to develop the learning outcomes that you really care about Why active learning skills out-predict learning outcomes better than IQ exams Why we shouldn't categorize one master list of intelligence A new definition of intelligence: the dynamic interplay of engagement and ability in the pursuit of personal goals How to move past the negativity of labeling students based on their mind bends How to look for hidden gifts in your students The Future Project's role in school with its Dream Director Why creative expression is self expression. Scott will explain why he is not a big fan of creative exercises, but how he prefers to foster autonomy Scott's books: The post Creativity and Imagination: A New Way to View Student Ability appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

28mins

28 Sep 2014

Rank #2

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What the Standards Leave Out

Should interest and engagement be measured? Download on iTunes for Your Morning Commute  Click here to read a transcript of this episode The post What the Standards Leave Out appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

6mins

1 Oct 2014

Rank #3

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#19 Building Better Writers with Troy Hicks

Troy Hicks Associate Professor of English Education, Former Middle School Teacher (Central Michigan University)   Segment I – Background and Inspiration Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?  – Troy teaches at Central Michigan University. He is also involved in the National Writing Project in his area in Michigan.  To backtrack, he graduated from MSU and taught middle school at a rural school in Concord, Michigan. He eventually went back to MSU to earn his graduate degree and eventually made his way into higher education.   Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – He had a mentor from Day 1 at his middle school in Concord. Chris Miller was the 7th grade science teacher and Troy was the 7th grade Language Arts teacher.  Chris was focused on the students. He would joke that he was so student-focused that he didn't begin teaching science until mid-September. When Troy was deciding to stay in the classroom or going to graduate school to pursue Education, Chris gave him the most timely and sympathetic encouragement to pursue goals beyond the four walls of the school.   It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – He felt he had read all the right books during his undergraduate experience about reading and writing workshops. When he got into teaching, like many first and second year teachers, suddenly the book became his curriculum. He eventually learned to let go and give students more choice. Ultimately he learned to strike a balance between what he had to do that was mandated by the curriculum and what he felt the students needed or wanted to do. Why is literacy important? – Troy believes that if we don't frame literacy as a thinking process, then it is really difficult to make the case for literacy with math, science and social studies. We want students to be critical thinker and have substantive conversations.  What is one thing that you love about the classroom?  – The thing that he talks about with his pre-service students and what he took away from his middle school years is the moment of discovery. To sit with a student, conference with him or her, and see the lightbulb go off, is a small moment that he really values. Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies While there are a number of classics, Troy tends to recommend the book that he is reading at the moment.Thrive: 5 Ways to (Re)Invigorate Your Teaching is a book that he reviewed. It is written by Meenoo Rami, a young, energetic teacher that is doing great things in the classroom. He found it refreshing, clear and concise.  What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Troy believes that you have to take time for yourself. Put it on your calendar because you might not do it. make time to read. Watch the show you've been meaning to watch. Go for walks. You have to invest in yourself .  Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? – www.digitalis.nwp.org has layer upon layer of resources. The NWP Digital Is website is an emerging and open knowledge base created and curated by its community of members. We gather resources, collections, reflections, inquiries, and stories about what it means to learn and teach writing in our increasingly digital and interconnected world.  Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – One minute of conferencing is worth 15 minutes of comments on the paper.

28mins

24 Mar 2014

Rank #4

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#89 Jim Burke of the English Companion

Jim Burke is the author of numerous bestselling books, including the English Teacher’s Companion and What’s the Big Idea? The question he’s always tried to answer is “How can we teach our students better?” He seeks these answers daily through his work in his own classroom at Burlingame High School in California where he still teaches after twenty years. Jim has received numerous awards, including the NCTE Intellectual Freedom Award, the NCTE Conference on English Leadership Award, and the California Reading Association Hall of Fame Award. He served on the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Committee on Adolescence and Young Adulthood English Language Arts Standards. He founded the English Companion Ning, described by Education Week as “the world’s largest English department” and winner of several Edublog Awards for Best Social Network for Education. In addition to the EC Ning, Jim offers a steady stream of recommended resources through his website (www.englishcompanion.com) and Twitter (@englishcomp) where he is ranked in the top 100 educators to follow at the top within the online English teacher community. The post #89 Jim Burke of the English Companion appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

56mins

18 Oct 2017

Rank #5

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#25 The Together Teacher — Maia Heyck-Merlin

TWT #25 Subscribe to Talks with Teachers in iTunes www.thetogetherteacher.com -- Free teacher time management materials, please head to the resource page  Maia Heyck-Merlin has over a decade of experience juggling high-volume roles in results-oriented organizations. She most recently served as Chief Talent Officer and Chief Operating Officer for Achievement First, a charter school management organization running 20 schools in Brooklyn and Connecticut. During this time, she oversaw teams that led recruitment, human capital, operations, and development and evaluation of school leaders and teachers at Achievement First. She currently continues to work with Achievement First in a part-time capacity. Prior to joining Achievement First, she worked at Teach For America in a variety of capacities. Maia began as a corps member in South Louisiana where she taught fourth grade for two years and was named Teacher of the Year for her school and selected as a Fulbright Memorial Fund recipient. She then shifted to teach fifth grade at Children’s Charter School and directed Teach Baton Rouge’s first summer training institute for The New Teacher Project. In 2002, Maia returned to Teach For America as the Executive Director in South Louisiana, overseeing programmatic efforts for a corps that had doubled in size. She then served for three years as the Houston Institute Director, leading training and development for the incoming corps. In her last role at Teach For America, Maia founded and led the National Institute Operations team, which managed national operations for all five summer training institutes. In the podcast Maia offers advice on: How to manage your time and all the stuff that goes along with it. Ways talented teachers can avoid drowning and burnout  What the Together Teacher does to maximizing your time Why the old-school inbox and outbox doesn’t work How to ruthlessly clean as you go The way in which students can be an asset in a well-organized classroom 3 Things that Together Teachers do religiously The post #25 The Together Teacher — Maia Heyck-Merlin appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

25mins

12 May 2014

Rank #6

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Alex Kajitani: Episode #90

Fifteen years ago, Alex Kajitani was a struggling new teacher in one of California’s poorest neighborhoods. He’d left a potentially lucrative career in restaurant management to pursue his teaching dream, and now his inner-city middle school students were unmotivated, unengaged and uninterested in the math he was teaching. Demoralized and desperate, he set out on a journey to turn his class, and his life, around. Today, Alex holds the title of California Teacher of the Year and a Top-4 Finalist for National Teacher of the Year, 2009, and is lauded for his innovation and “real talk” as a teaching and leadership speaker and trainer nationwide. Follow Alex on Twitter: @AlexKajitani website: www.alexkajitani.com The post Alex Kajitani: Episode #90 appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

35mins

11 May 2018

Rank #7

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ASCD Emerging Leader — Nicole Lemme

ELA Curriculum Master TeacherASCD 2014 Emerging Leader Download on iTunes Segment I – Background and Inspiration   Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Nicole is a Curriculum Master Teacher for K-12 English Language Arts for the school district of Lee County in Florida. She has taught all levels of ELA which helps in her current role, forming vertical alignment for her district. Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Her career as a teacher started as a child. Her father was a state teacher of the year in New Jersey. She enjoyed watching him engage with his students and she wanted to be a part of that magic.  It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – In her first year, Nicole was asked to do a pre-reading lesson on The Grapes of Wrath. She planned this amazing lesson and had students listen to Woody Guthrie's "This Land is My Land." It was an ESOL course and there were 11 students that represented 11 different countries. Hence, this land was NOT their land.  Yet, it turned into a discussion about the songs of their native lands.  What is the challenge in teaching?  – There is a huge challenge giving relevant and timely feedback. Nicole is looking at digital tools to help solve this problem. What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The absolute love for the profession comes from the proverbial student who asks, "how did you get that from one paragraph?" learn to think for himself or herself and do that level of analysis on their own.  Segment II — What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop?  What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Nicole takes the time to read for pleasure. Certainly we need to read our curriculum, but we must re-engage with pleasure reading because the more teachers do that the more they can stay excited about books and have great conversations with students. Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? --  Nicole recommends that new teachers join organizations like NCTE, ASCD. They give you such great exposure to a wide array of professional reading.  Also, she recommends free professional development opportunities like Twitter, Talks with Teachers Book Club, or MOOCs. Provide a writing practice that is effective?  –  She encourages other teachers to have students frame conversations in class with claim, evidence, connection. It improves the quality of discourse in class, which then results in better writing later on.  Update the cannon. What books belongs in the classroom?  The post ASCD Emerging Leader — Nicole Lemme appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

33mins

30 Jun 2014

Rank #8

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Inspiring Students to Read with Joshua Parker

Josh Parker English teacher -- Baltimore, Maryland 2012 Maryland Teacher of the Year  Segment I – Background and Inspiration Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?  – Joshua initially wanted to be a professional basketball player despite coming from a family of teachers. He worked in sports but did not find it fulfilling. He ended up substitute teaching and then decided to go back to school to obtain his teaching certification. He has been teaching in various capacities in Baltimore since and was named the 2012 Maryland Teacher of the Year.  Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – 3 people 1. His department chair -- Mandy Shanks 2. his principal  3. Dr Alfred Tatum who writes a lot of books about teaching African-American males how to read.  It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – He taught Accelerated English and it was for students that failed the test and needed remediation. It was a class that had a scripted program. He went against his instincts and trusted the book and the script. Along the way he learned to not to trust the script so much as to trust his knowledge of students.  He also learned how to match real-time data with real-time metrics.  How do we develop a love of reading? – 6 things: 1. relevancy -- don't throw out Shakespeare but add Walter Dean Myers Langston Hughes 2. We need to understand the differences in boys and teach that way. Sometimes boys don't have great attention spans so we have to chunk the reading. 3. Make the case -- sometimes students don't know how important reading is until they hear the statistics of illiterate or disfunctional readers 4. Allow time for expression --the students have to be able to speak what they read, speak their ideas, speak their stories. 5. Embrace their out of school reading styles -- some students will read comic books or sports stories. Celebrate that and share it in your classroom. 6. Model reading yourself -- Carry books wherever you go. What is one thing that you love about the classroom?   – The energy, the synergy, the anything-can-possible-happen. Having the rapt attention of 25 adolescents is one of the best feelings that you can have. Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies What book do you recommend to a teacher striving to improve his or her craft? -- Two books: The English Teacher's Companion by Jim Burke and Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males by Dr. Alfred Tatum. What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- A teacher has to discover themselves and pouring that energy into that and then bring it into the classroom. Joshua loves to play basketball and enjoys bringing that passion into the classroom.  What sites are valuable on the internet? -- Teaching Channel and the English Companion are the tried and true sources for Joshua. Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – Shorten and simplify the rubric.  Update the cannon. What book, written in the last 10-15 years, belongs in the classroom? -- The Other Wes Moore. Fist, Stick. Knife. Gun. by Geoffery Canada. is another.  The post Inspiring Students to Read with Joshua Parker appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

34mins

19 May 2014

Rank #9

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Shanna Peeples: 2015 National Teacher of the Year

Shanna Peeples, is now a graduate student at the Harvard School of Education. She was a high school English teacher from Amarillo, Texas, and was named the 2015 National Teacher of the Year.  Peeples taught AP English at Palo Duro High School, where she served as the English department chair as well as an instructional coach for other teachers. In this Talks with Teachers episode you will learn: How Shanna took a circuitous route to the classroom. She worked as a disc jockey, medical assistant, pet sitter and journalist before teaching Shanna's education background. How she earned an Associate’s degree from Amarillo College, a Bachelor of Arts from West Texas A&M University and a Master of Education from the University of Texas at Arlington. The way in which Shanna connected literature to her students' lives. While at Palo Duro High School, Peeples' students came from many different backgrounds. Amarillo is one of several cities in the United States that helps refugees find new paths in life and gain access to critical resources. As a result, Peeples worked with many students who speak English as a second language or recently entered the United States from another country. How Jim Carey influenced Shanna's career trajectory and how she incorporated this lesson into the classroom The way in which Shanna incorporate reading into her daily life. How she planned her units and developed her lesson plans. The influence Sherman Alexie had on her teaching. The book she recommends to teachers: The post Shanna Peeples: 2015 National Teacher of the Year appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

28mins

30 Sep 2017

Rank #10

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#21 The Impact of Teaching with Renee Moore

Renee Moore English teacher -- Cleveland, Mississippi  2001 Mississippi Teacher of the Year  Resource of the Week: Brian's Post on Edutopia                            Rate Talks with Teachers on iTunes Talks with Teachers 4-Week   Talks with Teachers has developed a new way to help you. Sure we’ve got this podcast that’s great to listen to. Sure there are valuable lessons on our website for all levels that can help your teaching. But the one thing that has been lacking is COMMUNITY. We have a loyal following of listeners, Tweeters, and contributing teachers that have all interacted with us. Yet, we have not allowed you to interact with each other.  That’s where the Talks with Teachers 4-Week Challenge comes in. We want you to do something small each day to grow as a teacher. We’ve got readings, videos, fun, little projects lined up to foster your love of teaching. And best of all, there will be a community forum for you to share your success and encourage others to find purpose and joy in teaching.  Segment I – Background and Inspiration Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?  – Renee teacher English full time at Mississippi Delta Community College. She initially was a journalist in her hometown of Detroit but when she moved to Mississippi to return to her husband's home state she switched careers and began teaching English. She taught English and journalism for over 26 years before she switched to the community college setting.   Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Mrs. Dorothy Grennell was a veteran English teacher, who taught for 46 years. Renee took over her position when she retired. Mrs. Grennell took her under her wing because her house was across the street from the school. Renee would visit her after school and could cry.  Dorothy gave her the materials that she accumulated over 46 years of teaching. Renee has also been a part of many teaching networks of her career such as the National Writing Project, the Bread Loaf Teaching Network, and the Center for Teaching Quality.  It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – She taught at a small school and had students that would often loop -- she would have them in 9th grade and later on in 11th or 12th grade. She had a grammar lesson that she had taught to students when they were in her class previously and now that they were being asked to recall that content, it went incredibly bad, so bad that she felt compelled to write about it in her teaching journal. That lesson turned in to an action-research project that lasted 10 years all because she questioned why students struggled with grammar. It became a major paper, a website, one of the most fantastic learning experiences she's ever done and chapters in books that she would eventually write. Sometimes the things that pose the greatest problems become the greatest learning experiences for teachers.    Why are the language arts and literacy important? –Even though the label on our content is English, she considers herself a teacher of communication. To be able to communicate is the most fundamental human skill of all. What is one thing that you love about the classroom?   – Renee averaged 100-150 kids a day and if you multiply that by 25 years you see the impact she had on student lives'. Most of all, she loved learning new things. It happened even the day this interview was recorded.   Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies What book do you recommend to a teacher striving to improve his or her craft? Renee likes The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of ...

24mins

6 Apr 2014

Rank #11

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Dave Stuart Jr. — Episode #91

Dave Stuart Jr. is a husband and dad who teaches high schoolers in a small town. He is animated by a simple belief: all students and teachers should flourish. Every article he write, every lesson he teaches, and book he reads is driven by the certainty that that can, and must, happen. He is the author of These 6 Things: How to Focus Your Teaching on What Matters Most (Corwin Literacy), he shares his work on his blog, www.davestuartjr.com, and reaches teachers through his newsletter. In this episode you will learn about: his teaching mentors his fundamental beliefs about reading how he creates genuine connections with students how he develops teacher credibility how he creates great classroom discussion how he creates his pop-up debates why he writes books and what his goals are with his blog  the people that have influenced his teaching the common habits of master teachers how to create an Everest statement The post Dave Stuart Jr. — Episode #91 appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

36mins

6 Aug 2018

Rank #12

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Building a Better Teacher with Elizabeth Green

Background Elizabeth Green is co-founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief of Chalkbeat. Elizabeth previously co-founded GothamSchools, now Chalkbeat New York, and covered education for The New York Sun and U.S. News & World Report. She has also written about education issues for The New York Times Magazine. Elizabeth serves on the board of the Education Writers Association. In 2009-2010, she was a Spencer Fellow in education journalism at Columbia University, and in 2011, she was an Abe Journalism Fellow studying education in Japan. Her book, Building a Better Teacher, will be published in August 2014 by W. W. Norton. About Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone) What happens in the classroom of a great teacher? Opening with a moment-by-moment portrait of an everyday math lesson—a drama of urgent decisions and artful maneuvers—Building a Better Teacher demonstrates the unexpected complexity of teaching. Green focuses on the questions that really matter: How do we prepare teachers and what should they know before they enter the classroom? How does one get young minds to reason, conjecture, prove, and understand? What are the keys to good discipline? Incorporating new research from cognitive psychologists and education specialists as well as intrepid classroom entrepreneurs, Green provides a new way for parents to judge what their children need in the classroom and considers how to scale good ideas. Ultimately, Green discovers that good teaching is a skill. A skill that can be taught. Get the book In this episode you will learn: the research Elizabeth did for Building a Better Teacher the common habits of successful teachers how developing teachers can improve themselves ways in which schools can develop their teachers on a large scale how technology can help and hinder teachers how little good teaching has changed over the years Connect with Elizabeth Green at: @elizwgreen Follow Chalk Beat -- the news site covering educational change The post Building a Better Teacher with Elizabeth Green appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

29mins

1 Sep 2014

Rank #13

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#60 2014 National Teacher of the Year — Sean McComb

Sean McComb -- 2014 National Teacher of the Year Sean McComb, an English teacher at Patapsco High School & Center for the Arts  in Baltimore County, was named 2014 National Teacher of the Year. In addition to teaching, McComb supports his Patapsco colleagues through coaching and training as the school's Staff Development Teacher. He also served as a curriculum writer for the school system and an adjunct instructor in Education and Writing at Towson University. In this episode you will learn:  Sean's journey into teaching Patapsco's A.V.I.D. program The emotional toll of being a teacher A lesson that failed for Sean How to ignite passion in the classroom How to ask the right essential questions When to hold back and let students control the class Why intellectual curiosity is important What you can do to build better connections with your students Why the Teaching Channel is a great resource a tip to improve student writing What he is most proud of as a teacher The post #60 2014 National Teacher of the Year — Sean McComb appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

26mins

15 Dec 2014

Rank #14

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#70 Angela Watson: Advocating for Teachers and Students

Using backwards design, share your teaching story. Tell the Talks with Teachers audience where you are now and how you arrived at this place in your career. -- Her role is as an educational consultant and and instructional coach. Angela considers herself an advocate for students and teachers. She had 11 years of experience in Washington D.C. and Florida. She started writing books for teachers and curriculum for teachers.  Identify a mentor that guided you in your journey to become a master teacher and share what you gained from that relationship. -- As a teacher, she never had a mentor. That is why she is so passionate about coaching and mentoring teachers now. Angela did have someone that she shared a classroom with and co-taught with. She was able to see what she did day in and day out. She laughed with her kids but was also able to get her student to work really hard. The experience was valuable because she worked side-by-side for a whole year with another passionate teacher. What did you learn from a lesson that did not go as planned? -- Angela said that many lessons did not go as planned. Every lesson has that point where it can make that left turn and go off track. It is an important point for teachers to realize that they need to be super-responsive to kids' needs and be able to turn on a dime and support them in that moment. What is a teacher need at the moment? -- Angela believe that a great teacher need right now is more autonomy. She believes that teachers feel that they don't have the freedom to meet their students' needs They are in this really hard place where they feel like a cog in a broken system. She believes that we have to empower teachers to make choices and make decisions rather than follow scripted lessons. How does she empower teachers to be autonomous? -- Teachers must focus on what they can control and realize what they can't control. Often teachers have more freedom than they realize and they have to focus on the small things that can drive them to greater freedoms. What is motivating Angela in education? -- She's excited by the trend in which the ways classrooms are being managed. It is no longer about tracking student behavior, it is about connecting with kids and building student relationships. A book recommendation for teachers? Pernille Ripp's Passionate Learners. She talks so honestly about missteps and failures. How can teachers exist outside the box while still providing benefits for their students? Teachers need to purposefully and consciously manage their energy. What are small things that a teacher can do that can lead to student success? Angela believes that having predictable routines can set students up for success. When student do not know the routines and expectations, it can stress them and take away the energy they need to devote to their own learning. What are the habits of  successful teachers? They know how to prioritize. The problem with teaching is that everything feels like an emergency. It can become overwhelming and that can create burnout. Teachers have to figure out for themselves what is most important because they can not give 110% to everything everyday. What is Angela most proud of from her career in education? She is proud of the fact that she has earned the trust of teachers and she has kept that trust since she began blogging in 2003. The post #70 Angela Watson: Advocating for Teachers and Students appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

24mins

24 Mar 2015

Rank #15

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#54 Scaffolding for Strength with David Grossman

David Grossman David is a 7th grade science teacher at TK Stone Middle School in Elizabethtown, Kentucky.  His  goal is to inspire wonder in his students as they explore science, gaining the science literacy that they need to be successful members of society. Find David on Twitter @tkSciGuy Check David's website dedicated to the Next Generation Science Standards In this episode you will learn: David's journey as a teacher that includes teaching in an alternative school, being a librarian, and working as a middle school science teacher. How to recognize the emotional needs of each grade level. Why students need love and support at all ages How to rescue a failing lesson Ways to build academic muscles through scaffolding Why schools can not follow a business model The unpredictable nature of teaching middle school and why that is a great thing How to be with each student in the moment and take it one step further by supporting them outside the classroom Ways in which students can read like scientist and write like reporters How Voxer can improve your teaching A book every teacher should read Empowered Schools, Empowered Students: Creating Connected and Invested Learners The post #54 Scaffolding for Strength with David Grossman appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

20mins

2 Nov 2014

Rank #16

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#65 Tech as a Tool to Differentiate Instruction

Cheryl Costello Academic Tech Coordinator at Cheshire Academy,an independent school in Cheshire, CT. Member of #CAIS Commission on Technology Subscribe on iTunes In this episode you will learn: How she began using technology as a tool to differentiate instruction How she managed to go from a stay-at home mom to a successful teacher What she learned about flexibility in lesson panning and how she learned it The time and planning that goes into successful teaching Why everyone should readMindset by Carol Dweck How you can create a personal learning community on Twitter Why you should read education blogs like Edutopia and Ed Tech Teacher How her passion for her content showed through her students' work The post #65 Tech as a Tool to Differentiate Instruction appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

15mins

5 Feb 2015

Rank #17

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#28: ESL on Fire with Dorina Sackman — 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year

2014 Florida Teacher of the Year ESOL  Orlando, Fl  Segment I – Background and Inspiration   Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Dorina is an ESOL teacher as well as the 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year and a finalist for the National Teacher of the Year. She is the daughter of a business teacher and began her career in Massachusetts.  Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?    – Her mother, a business teacher at a Title I school on Long Island, the head of the Applied Linguistics department at the University of Massachusetts, and her assistant principal at Westridge Middle School, Cynthia Haupt.   It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.   – In trying to infuse every culture her students possessed into a lesson, it ended up being a miss-mosh. The assignment was a persuasive essay and in that moment she realized that sometimes less is more. Her students noticed that she was trying too hard. What is the difficult of teaching ESOL? – The biggest challenge is having students from 17 different countries, 11 different languages in one classroom. It is also the cultural differences and differing backgrounds in one room -- one student did not know how to hold a pen.  What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The kids. She gets emotional because she has got 160 of them every year. She loves them so much.  Segment II — What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop?   What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Most of Dorina's classroom exists outside the classroom.  Dorina believes that community service should be an essential part of her students' education.  Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? teachertube edmodo Smithsonian Education  Teaching Channel (Dorina's lesson) Dave's ESL Cafe  Elite Daily Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – Formulaic writing. It provides structure for students that need it. is a process, not a product. ne minute of conferencing is worth 15 minutes of comments on the paper.  Update the cannon. What book, written in the last 10-15 years, belongs in the classroom? -- Dorina allows her students to read books from their native countries.   The post #28: ESL on Fire with Dorina Sackman — 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

35mins

1 Jun 2014

Rank #18

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Re-Writing the Rest of Your Career

3 Things to Consider for the Next 10 Years Subscribe to Talks with Teachers on iTunes Comment on this episode and read a transcript The post Re-Writing the Rest of Your Career appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

5mins

3 Sep 2014

Rank #19

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#66 Connecting with Students: James Sturtevant on the Art of Relationships

James Sturtevant Jim Sturtevant first stepped in front of high school students in the late summer of 1985. Jim predicted he would teach a year or two, before pursuing something grown up: go to law school, get a PhD, or enter the private sector and earn a fortune.  But, a funny thing happened on the way to the forum.  Jim fell in love with his students.  Could one really get paid for bonding with young people?  The answer was…ABSOLUTELY!  And still is, some thirty years and thousands of students later.  “Your students seem so relaxed and happy.  How’d you create this atmosphere?” Caught off guard, he gave a meager and vague response.  After much reflection and research, Jim finally answered the question in You've Gotta Connect. Subscribe on iTunes In this episode you will learn: How James develops relationships with his students Why relationship develop is just as important, if not more important, than content knowledge How to connect with those students that seem disengaged and reluctant to learn Ways in which you can take strong relationships and turn them in passionate learners What administrators should know about student connections and why they are so important in the learning process The post #66 Connecting with Students: James Sturtevant on the Art of Relationships appeared first on Talks with Teachers.

23mins

16 Feb 2015

Rank #20