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ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #114 in Government category

Business
Non-Profit
Government
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Listen to the ABA Journal Podcasts for analysis and discussion of the latest legal issues and trends. Podcasts include ABA Modern Law Library and ABA Asked and Answered, brought to you by Legal Talk Network.

Read more

Listen to the ABA Journal Podcasts for analysis and discussion of the latest legal issues and trends. Podcasts include ABA Modern Law Library and ABA Asked and Answered, brought to you by Legal Talk Network.

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
11
5
1
0
1

5 stars

By K_Outlaw - Mar 07 2018
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Great Podcast. I’d love more frequent episodes.

Mr.

By Addison Barnhardt - Jun 01 2015
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Great podcast but should be weekly or more frequent!

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
11
5
1
0
1

5 stars

By K_Outlaw - Mar 07 2018
Read more
Great Podcast. I’d love more frequent episodes.

Mr.

By Addison Barnhardt - Jun 01 2015
Read more
Great podcast but should be weekly or more frequent!
Cover image of ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network

ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network

Latest release on May 26, 2020

Read more

Listen to the ABA Journal Podcasts for analysis and discussion of the latest legal issues and trends. Podcasts include ABA Modern Law Library and ABA Asked and Answered, brought to you by Legal Talk Network.

Rank #1: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How to be your own advocate without stepping on toes

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Even trained advocators don’t get everything they want at work. But what are some good strategies for knowing when to accept a manager’s decision, or continue to press for what you want? In this episode of the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with Dr. Artika Tyner, vice president for diversity and inclusion at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Tyner discusses how lawyers can advocate for themselves in the workplace, without getting in their own way.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Jun 26 2017

33mins

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Rank #2: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How can lawyers fight implicit bias?

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Many of us don’t think of ourselves as biased, and we don’t want to be prejudiced towards others. But we’re also reluctant to acknowledge the ways bias can creep in, according to academics who study implicit bias. In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with Jeffrey Rachlinski, a Cornell Law School professor who has done various studies about implicit bias, including one that focused on trial judges.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Jan 23 2017

34mins

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Rank #3: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How to practice law remotely and efficiently during the COVID-19 crisis

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As people across the country are coping with countless changes in light of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast is taking a break from its regularly scheduled programing to share information with lawyers about how they can adjust to the world’s current situation—such as having to work from home, whether they want to or not.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Mar 30 2020

25mins

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Rank #4: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Loving life as a lawyer: How to maintain joy in your work

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Do you dread going to work? If so, maybe it's time to look at the other ways you can flex your legal skills, says Nancy Levit, co-author of The Happy Lawyer: Making a Good Life in the Law.

There are many types of jobs for lawyers, and sometimes what you thought you wanted to do doesn’t work out, Levit tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered. She shares tips on how to find the work you want to do, and how to find joy in the work you're already doing.law lawyer legal podcast attorney practice

Jan 29 2018

22mins

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Rank #5: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Should I stay or should I go? When partners should make a lateral move

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Switching law firms doesn’t only cause partner anxiety, it’s hard on clients too. Lawyers need to really evaluate whether a move will best serve the people and businesses they represent. In this month’s Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with Karen Kaplowitz, a former BigLaw rainmaker who now leads a business-development consulting firm. Much of her work centers on working with partners after a firm merger, and in this podcast, she shares tips about how they can best serve clients after a move or figure out ways to make a place for themselves at a new firm if their book of business is small.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Oct 23 2017

30mins

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Rank #6: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Barbie v. Bratz: What happened when toy titans took each other to court

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In this month’s Modern Law Library, we read a thrilling tale of dueling toymakers, corporate espionage and a group of brats taking on the queen of the DreamHouse. Prof. Orly Lobel, author of “You Don’t Own Me: How Mattel v. MGA Entertainment Exposed Barbie’s Dark Side,” speaks to the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles about how an intellectual property dispute between the maker of Barbie and the creator of Bratz spun into a legal battle that would last more than a decade.

Dec 20 2017

23mins

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Rank #7: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Seeking equal pay? Here are some strategies

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Studies have shown that salary and compensation at firms can still be markedly higher for white males than attorneys with a different ethnicity or gender. But if you feel you aren't being paid commensurate with your colleagues and with the value you bring to your firm, how should you proceed? In this episode of Asked & Answered, the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward talks with Jeffrey Lowe of the legal talent management company Major, Lindsey & Africa. Lowe wrote the report on the agency's “2016 Partner Compensation Survey,” and offers insights gleaned from that survey's findings.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Aug 28 2017

23mins

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Rank #8: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Can you become a better lawyer in 5 minutes a day? This author thinks so

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Many people promote a daily practice of meditation, spiritual contemplation and mindfulness as a way to improve your personal life and wellbeing. Attorney Jeremy Richter argues that creating a similar daily ritual to focus on developing your professional skills can be just as helpful to your clients, career and your law practice. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles speaks with Richter, author of the new book “Building a Better Law Practice: Become a Better Lawyer in Five Minutes a Day.” The book is structured to provide a daily reading on personal and professional development over a seven-week time period. Richter discusses why he decided to channel energy into blogging during the early years of his practice as an insurance litigator, and shares some lessons from that time that became inspirations for the book.

Aug 22 2018

16mins

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Rank #9: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : John Lennon's lawyer explains how the musician's deportation case changed immigration law

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When immigration attorney Leon Wildes got a call from an old law school classmate in January 1972 about representing a musician and his wife who were facing deportation, their names didn’t ring a bell. Even after meeting with them privately at their New York City apartment, Wildes wasn’t entirely clear about who his potential clients were. He told his wife that he’d met with a Jack Lemon and Yoko Moto.

“Wait a minute, Leon,” his wife Ruth said to him. “Do you mean John Lennon and Yoko Ono?”

What Wildes didn’t know when accepting the Lennons’ case was that he and his clients were facing a five-year legal battle which would eventually expose corruption at the highest levels of the Nixon administration and change the U.S. immigration process forever. His account of that legal battle is told in John Lennon vs. the USA: The Inside Story of the Most Bitterly Contested and Influential Deportation Case in United States History.

Leon Wildes and his son Michael (now a managing partner at the firm his father founded, Wildes & Weinberg) joined the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles to discuss the legacy of the case and the effect it’s had on the entire family.

Oct 19 2016

11mins

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Rank #10: ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : Bruce MacEwen diagnoses and prescribes for law practice ills

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Bruce MacEwen is both a doctor and an epidemiologist in the world of BigLaw firms. A Legal Rebels Trailblazer, the Adam Smith, Esq. founder can diagnose structural illnesses, including aspects of the partner-as-owner model, and he can point to unhealthy customs and practices, such as when aversion to failure becomes its cause. He also can give advice and guidance for getting better and surviving or, in some instances, provide a dispassionately detailed autopsy.

Oct 11 2017

33mins

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Rank #11: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Creating Order: Lifestyle tips for disorganized lawyers

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Do you have a New Year's resolution to finally get your home and office in order? In this episode, professional organizer Janet Taylor speaks with the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward to share tips and tricks for finally conquering mounds of paperwork and constantly losing house keys.

Jan 03 2019

25mins

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Rank #12: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Was this lawyer-turned-WWII-spy the basis for James Bond?

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In a different time, Dusko Popov might have enjoyed the life of a Serbian playboy without the interruption of espionage, subterfuge and violence. But from the early days of World War II, Popov risked his life as a double agent to aid the Allies in the fight against the Nazis.

Florida attorney Larry Loftis had been intending to write a fictional spy novel, he tells the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles in this episode of the Modern Law Library. But in researching the lives of spies in World War II, he discovered Popov's story and decided that this was a truth no fiction could touch. Loftis combed U.S., British, Portuguese and German archives and Popov's own memoirs—and interviewed surviving members of Popov's own family—to produce "Into the Lion's Mouth: The True Story of Dusko Popov: World War II Spy, Patriot, and the Real-Life Inspiration for James Bond."

In this podcast, Loftis discusses how he came to learn of Popov; how the paths of Bond creator Ian Fleming and Popov may have crossed; and why Popov was convinced that if a piece of intelligence he'd uncovered had been passed on to the U.S. Navy, the devastating Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor 75 years ago may have been prevented.

Dec 21 2016

19mins

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Rank #13: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Public-Speaking Skills Every Lawyer Should Master

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For every lawyer that thinks they have oral presentations down pat, there’s another that has anxiety about talking in front of a crowd. And they both need help. As an attorney and a formal federal law clerk, Faith Pincus gives lawyers the tools they need to succeed at public speaking. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, ABA Publishing’s Ashley Alfirevic speaks with Pincus about how to ditch the notecards, engage the audience and ask the right type of rhetorical questions.

May 22 2019

29mins

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Rank #14: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : How broken windows policing changed the legal landscape in ‘Misdemeanorland’How broken windows policing changed the legal landscape in ‘Misdemeanorland’

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As violent crime in New York City peaked from 1988-1991, policy makers were desperate for ways to combat and prevent it. In 1994, a new theory was embraced by the NYPD: that by controlling low-level “quality-of-life” violations like vandalism, noise complaints, traffic violations and aggressive panhandling, the police would ward off violent crime and more serious property crimes. Violent crime numbers had already begun to dip, but now misdemeanor arrests shot up, pulling in tens of thousands of people with no prior criminal record. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Prof. Issa Kohler-Hausmann explains to the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles the impact this change in tactics had for New York City police, courts and residents, and discusses her new book, “Misdemeanorland: Criminal Courts and Social Control in an Age of Broken Windows Policing.”

Apr 25 2018

36mins

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Rank #15: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : David Grann uncovers the deadly conspiracy behind murders of oil-rich Osage tribe members

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Although the Osage tribe had been forced from their ancestral lands by the U.S. government, through shrewd and careful bargaining they retained the mineral rights to one of the richest oil fields in the world: Osage County, Oklahoma. But instead of insuring the prosperity and safety of the tribe, the wealth of the Osage made them targets for what was later known as the Reign of Terror. The task of solving dozens of murders fell in the 1920s to the newly formed FBI and its young director, J. Edgar Hoover. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, author David Grann tells the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles how he first learned of this series of murders and decided to write Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. He also discusses the brave Osage woman at the heart of his story, Mollie Burkhart, who defied the local white-dominated power structure to discover who was responsible for the deaths of her family members.

Jun 07 2017

19mins

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Rank #16: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How to prepare for another try at the bar exam

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It's not terribly unusual for a law grad to need to take the bar exam more than once to pass. But the experience of failing the bar can be crushing to one's confidence–and concentration. After failing the bar exam, many students have a hard time studying for a retake. This is not necessarily because they can't do the work, but because anxiety and fear of failure get in the way, Jamie Kleppetsch of John Marshall Law School tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this month's Asked and Answered.

Kleppetsch, who is president of the Association of Academic Support Educators as well as being an associate director of John Marshall's Academic Achievement Program, shares with listeners some tips for reapproaching the bar exam with a fresh mindset and more preparation.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Jan 04 2017

28mins

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Rank #17: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Finding the Right Fit: Creating a career you love

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Samorn Selim had a difficult childhood. Her family fled Laos when she was young, and settled in a rough section of Stockton, California. There was violence in her neighborhood, and sometimes the family did not have enough food. So after graduating from Berkeley Law and getting a job at a big law firm in San Francisco, she thought she should be happy, she tells the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward. But she wasn’t. Despite the large salary, private office and trial assignments, she hated her job. Finally she left the practice to do career services work at Berkeley Law. The change took $100,000 from her annual salary, and added 30 minutes to her work commute. But it taught her that getting the jobs we think we want may not actually be what’s best for us, and being honest about what sort of work fulfills you can help in choosing the right spot. In this episode of Asked and Answered, Selim shares what she learned about finding the right career fit.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Jan 28 2019

31mins

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Rank #18: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How to land government contracts as a minority- or women-owned firm

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Government entities at all levels often set aside a portion of work for minority and women-owned businesses, including law firms. But many people are unsure about how to land these contracts or receive certification. In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward gets tips for program participation from Emery Harlan. Harlan is a Milwaukee employment attorney and a cofounder of the National Association of Minority-Owned Law Firms.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

May 29 2017

28mins

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Rank #19: ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Bullying from the Bench: How to cope in court

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When attorney Roula Allouch got involved with Bullyproof, an anti-bullying initiative with the ABA Young Lawyers Division, she quickly saw that many members' complaints were about judges. Complaining about judges is hard, Allouch tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward, and for the most part it's a bad idea to raise it in court while the behavior is occurring. But how should you respond? Listen to this episode for advice and information about tactics you can use to protect yourself without hurting your client's case.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Feb 25 2019

28mins

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Rank #20: ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Are prisoners’ civil rights being needlessly violated by long-term solitary confinement?

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In the 1960s and 1970s, a series of deadly prison riots convinced corrections officials that long-term solitary confinement was the only solution to control the “worst of the worst.” Supermax prisons, such as the Pelican Bay State Prison in California, were constructed to fulfill this perceived need. But with the abundance of evidence showing how psychologically harmful solitary confinement is, can its use be justified? And with the lack of transparency surrounding the number and type of prisoners being held in long-term solitary confinement, how can we really judge its necessity or effectiveness?

In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles speaks with Keramet Reiter, a University of California Irvine professor and the author of the new book 23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Reiter discusses the years of research she conducted into Pelican Bay Prison, including interviews with the prison’s main designer; the judge who condemned horrific abuses which occurred in the prison’s early years; and former prisoners who have emerged from long-term solitary confinement and dealt with its after-effects. She also shares what kind of reforms she thinks would be necessary for the judicial system and legislators to be able to assess the need for long-term solitary confinement.

Apr 19 2017

31mins

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ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Can cyborg lawyers convince their clients to listen?

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Do you really need a human for the so-called human touch in lawyering, particularly when a big part of the job is convincing the client to be reasonable? Maybe not, according to some people who created apps that they claim help people accomplish tasks traditionally carried about by lawyers. The ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward talks with legal technologists about how their apps are working to do things such as detect and block sarcasm in texts between parents at odds with each other and quickly find middle ground between people battling over small amounts of money.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

May 26 2020

23mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Meet 9 American women shortlisted for the U.S. Supreme Court before Sandra Day O'Connor

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As early as the 1930s, presidents were considering putting the first woman on the U.S. Supreme Court. So who were these other candidates on the shortlist, and why did it take until 1981 for Sandra Day O'Connor to become the first female justice? In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles talks with Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson about their decade-long research project into the careers and personal lives of nine other women who could have been elevated to the Supreme Court. In Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court, Jefferson and Johnson also look at the factors that helped those nine succeed as women in the law, the institutional powers that stood in the way of their nominations, and the forces that eventually broke down the court's gender barrier.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

May 20 2020

31mins

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ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : How hosting a national pandemic summit aided Nebraska courts with its COVID-19 response

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When the novel coronavirus began sweeping across the U.S. earlier this year, Nebraska’s courts system was better prepared to rapidly adjust its operations than some of its counterparts in other states. Michael G. Heavican, the chief justice of the Nebraska Supreme Court, attributes this to the National Pandemic Summit that he hosted in May 2019 for court leaders across the country. In this new Legal Rebels Podcast episode, Heavican talks to ABA Journal Legal Affairs Writer Lyle Moran.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Nexa.

May 13 2020

23mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Insider's guide to succeeding in law school

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Andrew Guthrie Ferguson says that near the end of every school year, he has law students come into his office, "usually in tears." They tell the professor that if they'd only known at the start of the year what they'd figured out by the end of the year, they'd be so much father ahead. During his time as a non-traditional law student, Jonathan Yusef Newton found himself coaching and consoling many of his peers, trying to share with them what he'd learned about the law school system. Both Ferguson and Newton independently thought that there should be a guide to law school to explain these unwritten rules–and after a discussion in Ferguson's office, they realized they could collaborate on just such a project, combining the wisdom of the law professor and the recent law grad. The Law of Law School: The Essential Guide for First-Year Law Students was the result.

In this episode, they discuss the book with the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles, and share their thoughts on how distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic will impact the experience of law school. Ferguson, an expert on the use of data and electronic surveillance by law enforcement, and Newton, a former police officer, also share their thoughts and concerns about the use of surveillance technology to enforce public health.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

May 06 2020

36mins

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ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Trials and tiaras: How do pageant winners fare as lawyers?

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In this new episode of the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast, Senior Writer Stephanie Francis Ward talks about the similarities between the pageant circuit, law school and the practice of law with pageant winners—some of whom have no school debt thanks to contest scholarships—and a litigator who also works as a pageant coach.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Apr 27 2020

18mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Journalist investigating wrongful convictions turns lens on white-collar criminal case

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When Michael Segal first approached longtime Chicago journalist Maurice Possley about writing about his case, Possley was not interested. Segal's 2002 arrest and subsequent federal trial had been big news in the city, and Segal had been accused of the looting about $30 million from his Chicago company, Near North Insurance Brokerage. Possley had won the Pulitzer Prize for previous stories about wrongful convictions, but never about someone of Segal's profile: a wealthy, powerful and educated owner of the fifth largest insurance brokerage in the country. But the more Possley looked into the case, the more convinced he became that prosecutorial misconduct and vengeful former employees had unjustly cost the Segal family their company, some 1,000 employees their jobs, and Segal himself eight years in prison–for a crime that Possley doesn't believe was ever a crime in the first place.

In Conviction at Any Cost: Prosecutorial Misconduct and the Pursuit of Michael Segal, Possely delves into the motives of the various players in the case, and lays out irregularities in the way Segal was investigated and prosecuted. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Possley speaks with the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles about his investigation, his writing partnership with Segal, some of the more surprising turns his research took, and how Chicago city politics impacted the case.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Apr 22 2020

29mins

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ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : Online estate planning sees surge during coronavirus crisis

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The online estate-planning platform Trust & Will saw at least a 100% increase in business in March amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Cody Barbo, the company’s CEO and co-founder. “I think that everybody has a family member who is elderly or has been affected by this or works in health care, so it definitely hits close to home,” says Barbo in this new episode of the Legal Rebels Podcast with ABA Journal Legal Affairs Writer Lyle Moran.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Nexa.

Apr 15 2020

28mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Develop your horse sense with equine law

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Julie Fershtman has developed a niche practice helping people who love horses deal with the particular joys and challenges that come with equine businesses. She is one of the nation's best-known lawyers serving many facets of the horse industry. Fershtman is the author of Equine Law and Horse Sense, produced with ABA Publishing. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Fershtman introduces ABA Publishing’s Ashley Alfirevic to the world of horse sense, the dark underbelly of the Kentucky Derby and the liabilities of pony rides.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Apr 08 2020

22mins

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ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : How to practice law remotely and efficiently during the COVID-19 crisis

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As people across the country are coping with countless changes in light of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast is taking a break from its regularly scheduled programing to share information with lawyers about how they can adjust to the world’s current situation—such as having to work from home, whether they want to or not.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Mar 30 2020

25mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist

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With a barrage of information and misinformation about COVID-19 coming our way, it can be hard to evaluate what sources are trustworthy, and where to go for reliable medical news. So for this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles called her friend Mary Lancaster, an epidemiologist for the federal government. They discuss how to evaluate social media claims, the best books and podcasts for people who want to know more about infectious diseases–and their recommendations on good fiction reads for people who need to take a break from the coronavirus news.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Mar 25 2020

25mins

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ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : President of the Legal Services Corp. reflects on his tenure

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Asked to reflect on his nine-year tenure as president of the Legal Services Corp., Jim Sandman says he is proud of many things that he and his team accomplished. Under Sandman’s leadership, the LSC produced its seminal work, which found that 86% of civil legal needs reported by low-income Americans in the past year were either inadequately addressed or not met at all.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Nexa.

Mar 18 2020

21mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom

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Public speaking is a crucial part of working as an attorney. It is especially important for female attorneys who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, ABA Publishing’s Olivia Aguilar speaks with Rena Cook, co-author of Her Voice in Law: Vocal Power and Situational Command for the Female Attorney, about various aspects of voice and presentation; power-stealing vocal traits; and why understanding your voice is an important first step to building confidence and strengthening your success.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Mar 11 2020

36mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : Two families connected by LA riots collide in 'Your House Will Pay

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The riots in South Los Angeles in 1992 may be nearly three decades old, but in the present day, two families in the novel Your House Will Pay will find that the events from that time are far from over.

Shawn Matthews is a former gang member and ex-prisoner in his forties, trying to raise a family and help his cousin acclimate after a decade in prison. Grace Park is a 28-year-old pharmacist who lives at home with her Korean-immigrant parents, trying to understand the reasons behind her older sister's estrangement with the family. These two main characters have never met, but over the course of the book the reader comes to understand the web of connections between them.

In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles speaks with Steph Cha, author of Your House Will Pay, about the real-life incidents that provided the inspiration for her novel. They also discuss why Cha decided to go to law school–and why she decided to be a writer instead of a practicing attorney.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Feb 26 2020

33mins

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ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Why did a Georgia city prohibit tattoos on Sundays?

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These days, people from all walks of life get tattoos. But in Columbus, Georgia, it was illegal to give them on Sundays, until recently. No one knows for sure what led to the law, but some suspect that it was what’s known as a “blue law,” a term for state and municipal regulations that prohibits commerce on Sundays, when lawmakers thought people should be in church. In this new episode of Asked and Answered, Stephanie Francis Ward explores people’s changing views of laws inspired by Christian outlooks and whether it’s worth changing those laws, even if they are rarely if ever enforced.

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Feb 24 2020

21mins

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ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : How 2 Texas lawyers are marketing their practice through song

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Thanks to social media and the internet, it’s never been easier—or more affordable—for lawyers to advertise. On the other hand, having so many avenues available to lawyers makes it more difficult for anyone to stand out from the crowd. So when Waco, Texas, lawyers Will Hutson and Chris Harris got more than 500,000 views on YouTube for a clip showing them playing guitars and singing about the legal consequences of swallowing, destroying or concealing marijuana in front of police officers, it was almost like winning the lottery. In this new episode of the Legal Rebels Podcast, Hutson and Harris speak with ABA Journal Assistant Managing Editor Victor Li.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Nexa.

Feb 12 2020

17mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : How safe is your right to vote?

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The story of voting rights in the United States is not just one of expansion; there have been periods (such as after Reconstruction) where voting rights that had once been exercised were blocked off, extinguished and suppressed. Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels speaks with the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Feb 05 2020

37mins

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ABA Journal: Asked and Answered : Getting real: What happens when clients go on reality TV

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Imagine you are meeting a client for the first time, and they show up with a TV camera crew that wants to film your meeting. This month, the Asked and Answered podcast series is exploring the unique curiosities of the law, starting with what it’s like when your client shows up with a camera crew and wants to tell their story on film. In this new episode, Stephanie Francis Ward, host of Asked and Answered, speaks with three lawyers involved in the world of reality television.

Music featured in this episode:
“On the Line” by Bright Seed
“Seriously” by Adrian Walther
“Sun And The Moon” by Moments
“California Cruisin” by Mikey Geiger
“Keys And Thank You” by Fairlight

Special thanks to our sponsor, LawPay.

Jan 27 2020

28mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : The court of public opinion: Why litigation PR is a critical component of a case

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A lawyer’s duties do not begin and end at the courtroom door. They extend beyond to the proverbial court of public opinion. As both an attorney and a public relations consultant, author James F. Haggerty has shared how to properly handle the media aspects of litigation in the third edition of his book, In the Court of Public Opinion: Winning Strategies for Litigation Communications. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Haggerty speaks with Olivia Aguilar of ABA Publishing.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Jan 22 2020

29mins

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ABA Journal: Legal Rebels : Reinventing the staid field of legal academic writing

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Legal academic publishing isn't synonymous with innovation. The mere mention of it can, for some, bring up repressed memories of the most banal and stuffy aspects of law school. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wants to change that. In spring 2019, MIT announced the MIT Computational Law Report. In this new episode of the Legal Rebels Podcast, technology writer Jason Tashea talks to Bryan Wilson, editor-in-chief of the online publication.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Nexa.

Jan 15 2020

27mins

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ABA Journal: Modern Law Library : How to kick off 2020 with more productive business meetings

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When considering our New Year’s resolutions, we all want to be more resourceful with our time, especially with our workdays. We don’t realize how much time meetings can take up if they are conducted in an inefficient manner. Author and lawyer Donald Tortorice has offered a solution with his new book, The Modern Rules of Order. The fifth edition shares a modern and streamlined approach to business meetings that promotes efficiency, decorum and fairness in all settings.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Headnote.

Jan 08 2020

23mins

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iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
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5 stars

By K_Outlaw - Mar 07 2018
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Great Podcast. I’d love more frequent episodes.

Mr.

By Addison Barnhardt - Jun 01 2015
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Great podcast but should be weekly or more frequent!