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Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

Updated about 1 month ago

Arts
Food
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On Louisiana Eats! NOLA food icon Poppy Tooker takes us into Louisiana's wide open fields, deep waters, bustling markets, and busy kitchens. Poppy's people are carrying on the traditions of Louisiana's wholly local but universally celebrated food, from farm to table, and sometimes barroom! Poppy roams the State to find the folks whose inspiration and innovation are taking the abundant wealth of Louisiana's food culture into the future. Let's eat!

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On Louisiana Eats! NOLA food icon Poppy Tooker takes us into Louisiana's wide open fields, deep waters, bustling markets, and busy kitchens. Poppy's people are carrying on the traditions of Louisiana's wholly local but universally celebrated food, from farm to table, and sometimes barroom! Poppy roams the State to find the folks whose inspiration and innovation are taking the abundant wealth of Louisiana's food culture into the future. Let's eat!

iTunes Ratings

33 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
1
0
1

Do Listen!

By MSKTX - Mar 09 2019
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This is a very informative and entertaining podcast. Many insightful journeys and curious discoveries about the Crescent City. Highly recommend.

We LOVE Ms. Poppy & her adventures in her hometown!🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰

By The 🐿 - Dec 31 2018
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Happy New Years Poppy!

iTunes Ratings

33 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
1
0
1

Do Listen!

By MSKTX - Mar 09 2019
Read more
This is a very informative and entertaining podcast. Many insightful journeys and curious discoveries about the Crescent City. Highly recommend.

We LOVE Ms. Poppy & her adventures in her hometown!🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰

By The 🐿 - Dec 31 2018
Read more
Happy New Years Poppy!
Cover image of Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

Latest release on Jul 04, 2020

All 351 episodes from oldest to newest

America Eats

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On this week's show, we're celebrating the 4th of July holiday by savoring the remarkable diversity that shapes America's food culture.


We begin with Gabrielle Langholtz, author of "America: The Cookbook." Gabrielle’s encyclopedic tome explores our nation’s identity through the immigrant stories and recipes that created American food as we know it.

Then, James Beard award-winning author Adrian Miller discusses the African-American men and women who fed our nation's first families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas.

Next, spirits expert Noah Rothbaum joins us. His book, "The Art of American Whiskey" uncovers our country’s history through old whiskey labels. He takes us back to the era of Prohibition and its clandestine speakeasies, as well as the state of the liquor industry immediately following its repeal.

And finally, we become "as American as apple pie" with Kate McDermott, also known as "the Piechiatrist." Kate has hosted workshops and written books on the craft of pie-making, including the James Beard Award-nominated title, The Art of the Pie.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

Jul 04 2020

50mins

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Food and Race Through the Lens of History

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As in cities worldwide, the streets of New Orleans have come alive this spring with protests, marches, and rallies for racial justice. The Crescent City has long been a hotbed for activism and played an important role in civil rights era organizing that helped put an end to Jim Crow. This week, we take a look at the legacy of the segregated South through stories about the intersections of food, race, and labor over the past century.

The late Michael Mizell-Nelson spent his career studying the experience of working class New Orleans. We revisit our streetcar ride with Michael, as he shares the history of public transportation during the era of Jim Crow.

Then, we hear from the late Dr. Rudy Lombard, whose mother was a housekeeper at an opulent Uptown home in New Orleans. Rudy’s childhood experiences played a part in leading him to the 1960 McCrory’s lunch counter sit-in on Canal Street which eventually brought about Lombard vs. Louisiana – the 1963 Supreme Court decision ending segregation in dining establishments.

We continue our look at the lunch counter with historian Jill Cooley. Her book To Live and Dine in Dixie traces the story of race and gender politics within dining spaces during the age of Jim Crow.

Finally, we hear from John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, and author of The Potlikker Papers. John T. tracks the history of Southern food, delving into issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity from the civil rights era through today.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

Jun 27 2020

50mins

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Tammany Taste Quick Bite: Hoodoo Ice Cream

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It’s officially summertime here in South Louisiana, and that means long days of sunshine and humidity. What better way to beat the heat than with some ice cream? On North Columbia Street in Covington’s historic St. John District, Hoodoo Ice Cream has been offering a variety of locally sourced homemade flavors since 2018.

Co-owners Billy Sussky and George Schenck sell everything from Vanilla and Chocolate to wilder creations like Almond Pistachio, Blueberry Buttermilk, and Bananas Foster. Each flavor of ice cream is made from grass-fed, Jersey cows’ milk of Mauthé Progress Milk Barn in Mississippi.

We sat down with Billy and George at their shop to learn how these two friends became the unlikely owners of Hoodoo Ice Cream.

Jun 25 2020

12mins

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Iconic Culinary Legends

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What does it take to make a name for yourself in the restaurant business? You need nerves of steel, the heart of a hero, and maybe you have to be a little bit crazy. This week we’re visiting with chefs and restauranteurs who are legends in the business.

We begin with Northshore legend, Pat Gallagher. Pat has been a major player in the industry there since 1978. At a time when other restaurateurs are shrinking their business,
Pat's growing his. We discuss his journey to culinary success, driven by his
passion for food and his love of home.

Chef Tom Douglas is a culinary legend in the Pacific Northwest. Since opening his first restaurant in 1989, the Dahlia Lounge, Tom has become a fixture in the contemporary dining scene in Seattle, Washington. In March, he closed 12 of his 13 restaurants, laying off 850 employees. Yet, the visionary chef is undaunted. He shares with us the ups and downs of his career and his vision for the future.

Finally, the unabashed, unapologetic chef Donald Link tells us the story of how he became a culinary celebrity in his home state of Louisiana. You can listen to the uncut, uncensored version of our 2014 interview with him here.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

Jun 20 2020

50mins

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Breaking The Bonds Of Silence: Touring The Whitney Slavery Museum

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This week, Louisiana Eats celebrates Juneteenth—the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

We revisit our 2016 trip to the Whitney Plantation, the only plantation museum in Louisiana that focuses entirely on the lives of enslaved people. The vision for the museum originated with attorney and developer John Cummings, who invested millions of dollars to help educate the public about the truths of slavery in Louisiana.

The Whitney Plantation is one of three surviving Civil War-era sugar plantations located in St. John the Baptist Parish along the Mississippi River. There, we join Director of Research at Whitney Dr. Ibrahima Seck, who gives us a personal tour of the property.

We make our first stop at a restored nineteenth century Baptist church, where we learn about slavery as viewed through the eyes of children. Not far from the church, Dr. Seck brings us to a large monument engraved with names and information about the enslaved individuals who lived at Whitney. We also step into one of the site's 22 cabins and tour the oldest detached kitchen in Louisiana, making our final stop at the big house where the Haydel family lived.

Following our visit to the plantation, we speak with Sybil Haydel Morial—educator, activist and former First Lady of New Orleans—who learned later in life of her family’s connection to the Whitney Plantation. Sybil chronicled her breadth of experience during the civil rights era and the years that followed in her memoir, Witness to Change.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

Jun 13 2020

50mins

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Tammany Taste Quick Bite: Pat Gallagher

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In this time of coronavirus it might be hard to believe that any restauranteur could be expanding their business instead of contracting it. But that is precisely what Chef Pat Gallagher is doing.

Gallagher’s 527 Restaurant & Bar in Mandeville, Gallagher’s Grill in Covington and Gallagher’s on Front Street have been Northshore favorites for years. Plans for Rest Awhile on Mandeville’s Lakeshore Drive are ongoing—pandemic or not—and Pat and his crew are now working on opening Band’s Grocery, a brand new Mandeville lunch spot.

We sat down with Pat Gallagher to learn how hospitality, family, and home are at the center of his business plan.

Jun 09 2020

22mins

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10 Years of Louisiana Eats

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On this week's show, we’re celebrating the 10th anniversary of our show's debut!

We've dug through our archives for some of our favorite moments over the past decade, with an emphasis on Louisiana culture and cuisine. The first episode of Louisiana Eats broadcast on June 9, 2010. That year also marked the 125th anniversary of New Orleans’ streetcar line. We look back at our very first field piece, when we took a streetcar ride with the late, great historian Michael Mizell-Nelson.

Then, we revisit our conversation with Priestess Miriam Chamani, who presides over North Rampart Street's Voodoo Spiritual Temple.

Next, we take a mule-drawn ride with the Roman Candy man. On many an afternoon in New Orleans, you'll find Ronnie Kotteman on his 105-year-old cart on the streets of Uptown New Orleans.

Wild man Joey Fonseca then takes us on a virtual alligator hunt before we visit Mahaffey Farms in Princeton, Louisiana, where Evan McCommon was just beginning to convert his family's timber ranch into a biodiverse farm.


For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

Jun 06 2020

50mins

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See You In Food Court

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On this week's show, Louisiana Eats looks at the place where the law intersects with food and drink. The topic's not as dry as you might expect—especially when it comes to liquor and law!

We begin with attorney Philip Greene. By day, he serves as Trademark and Internet Counsel for the U.S. Marine Corps, based in the Pentagon. Philip's probably better known, however, as a cocktail enthusiast and historian. He’s a founding member of the Museum of the American Cocktail and has written several books on the the high-proof drink. We discuss intellectual property with Philip, and the different forms that businesses have used to protect their brands.

Dylan Lintern, President and COO of NOLA Brewing, joins us next. He tells us a harrowing tale of legal troubles so big that Godzilla himself played a major role. The litigious experience was the inspiration behind the name of the brewery's award-winning Hoppyright Infringement IIPA.

Then, we hear from our resident food lawyer, founder of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, Liz Williams. Liz demystifies just what life as a food lawyer might entail and discusses her personal experience with this growing legal specialty.

Finally, we speak with environmental chemist turned absinthe distiller from New Orleans, Ted Breaux, who explains his pivotal role in the legalization of absinthe in the United States by challenging misconceptions with scientific evidence and a dogged perseverance.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

May 31 2020

50mins

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Listening To The Flip Side Of History.

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To tell a truly engaging story, you have to dig deep beneath the surface. When it comes to radio storytelling, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as the Kitchen Sisters, are masters. Through projects like Lost and Found Sound and Hidden World of Girls, the independent producers tell stories for NPR and online “from the flip side of history.”

On this week’s show, we take a journey in sound with these two radio luminaries, discuss their amazing trajectory on NPR, and learn how they came to uncover Hidden Kitchens, their duPont-Columbia and James Beard Award-winning radio series.

As we hear the Kitchen Sisters’ stories, we also delve into a sampling of their soundscape, from their early days at KUSP, Santa Cruz’s community radio station, to some of their favorite Hidden Kitchen visions.

With their help, we’ll even hear from heavyweight champion George Foreman about his famous grill — a tool used in many marginalized communities.

Then, we speak with an emerging kitchen sister in her own right, historic gastronomist Sarah Lohman. Her new book Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine offers an in-depth look at influential
ingredients Americans use every day. Hunting through historical documents, Sarah uncovered the unique individuals behind each flavor, and shares tales of how these unsung heroes forever changed the American culinary landscape.

And finally, we’ll meet one of New Orleans’ most distinctive TV commercial personalities, Al Scramuzza of Seafood City. Al’s comical and campy TV ads dominated the airwaves for decades. But even before he was a household name, Al was combining his acumen for business and marketing to turn a profit and to help catalyze the crawfish craze in the second half of the twentieth century.

We’re meeting fascinating characters and those who tell their stories on this week’s Louisiana Eats! For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

May 23 2020

50mins

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What's The Buzz?

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The humble little honey bee is one of the most important players in our ecosystem. In one of our favorite episodes from last year, we circle the globe in pursuit of a honey of a tale. We begin right here in our own backyard at the Audubon Zoo. While more exotic creatures may be what draw the crowds, both native and European honey bees can be found bumbling around the zoo's grounds. Curator Dominique Fleitas gives us a tour of the Pollinator Garden and shows us the hives she helps maintain in the Louisiana Swamp Exhibit.

Next, we speak with David Noll, founder of Pacific Resources International, a company that sells manuka honey products. Known for its antibacterial properties, manuku honey is made by bees pollinating the flowers of the manuka bush, a plant native to New Zealand and Australia.

We then talk all things apian with Chicago superstar chef Rick Bayless, whose passion for bees led him to start his own urban colony. And back home, we discover hidden hives in Mid-City with Poppy's beekeeping neighbor Bridget Breaux.

For more of all things Louisiana Eats, be sure to visit us at PoppyTooker.com.

May 19 2020

50mins

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