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Speak Out with Tim Wise

Updated 6 days ago

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Speak Out with Tim Wise is an informative and entertaining podcast aimed at promoting multiracial democracy and justice in dangerous times. The show features the biting, factual, and humorous commentary of its host, alongside dialogue with some of the nation's leading scholars, artists and activists, as well as grassroots community leaders whose voices are often ignored in the dominant media.

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Speak Out with Tim Wise is an informative and entertaining podcast aimed at promoting multiracial democracy and justice in dangerous times. The show features the biting, factual, and humorous commentary of its host, alongside dialogue with some of the nation's leading scholars, artists and activists, as well as grassroots community leaders whose voices are often ignored in the dominant media.

iTunes Ratings

267 Ratings
Average Ratings
242
8
6
4
7

iTunes Ratings

267 Ratings
Average Ratings
242
8
6
4
7
Cover image of Speak Out with Tim Wise

Speak Out with Tim Wise

Latest release on May 07, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 6 days ago

Rank #1: Episode 20: Dr. Chris Emdin - For White Folks Who Teach in the 'Hood (and the Rest of Y'all Too)

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This week on Speak Out with Tim Wise, Tim speaks with Dr. Christopher Emdin, author of the award-winning and best-selling books, "Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation," and "For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education." Emdin, who is a professor of Math, Science and Technology at Teacher’s College (Columbia University), is a leading expert on ways to engage and inspire young students of color in school by connecting their daily lived experiences, styles of communication and natural genius to academic learning. On this episode, Tim and Chris discuss this “reality pedagogy,” and how teachers so often resist its use, settling instead for stale and failed approaches to educating such students. They also discuss the myth that money alone will solve the issues facing urban education, the problem of white savior syndrome manifested by many white teachers in black and brown communities, and the way that oftentimes even educators of color adopt habits and mentalities that further marginalize children of color. A must-listen-to episode on a critical topic for all educators, parents, and persons concerned about the future of schooling in America.

Jan 30 2018

54mins

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Rank #2: Episode 6 - Teaching Black Students in the Crosshairs of Injustice: A Conversation with St. Louis Teacher Erika Whitfield

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In this episode, I talk with Erika Whitfield, a 7th grade teacher in St Louis, whose recent Washington Post article about her students’ reaction to police misconduct (and the acquittal of yet another white officer in the killing of yet another black man), speaks to the way even 12 year old black kids have come to expect disappointment from the justice system. We discuss what this means, and how she as a teacher helps inspire their learning and optimism despite a system that they already understand is stacked against them.

Oct 24 2017

57mins

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Rank #3: Episode 55 - Antifa: Myths and Realities with Daryle Lamont Jenkins

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In this episode, Tim speaks with Daryle Lamont Jenkins, founder of One People's Project and a leading figure in the American antifa (anti-fascist) movement. With so much misinformation about antifa in mainstream corporate media, Tim and Daryle take the opportunity to discuss what antifa is and what it isn't; to discuss various tactics of antifa, from releasing the personal information of white supremacists to confronting Nazis in the streets. Do these tactics help or hurt the cause? Are there limits to the tactics? And what is the goal of antifa? Additionally Wise and Jenkins discuss why ignoring fascists doesn't work, the overlap between extreme and mainstream right-wing figures and movements, and why there are even people of color and Jews in neo-fascist and white supremacist movements nowadays. An important and enlightening discussion in the age of Trumpism

Jun 25 2019

1hr 9mins

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Rank #4: Episode 53 - Dying of Whiteness: A Conversation with Scholar Jonathan Metzl

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In this episode, Tim speaks with Dr. Jonathan Metzl, a professor of sociology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University, and the author of the new book, Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America’s Heartland. In his groundbreaking volume, Metzl sets out to explore and answer the question: why do working class and struggling white Americans so often seem to vote against their own interests? Electing politicians who vote against public health care initiatives (like Obamacare) from which they themselves would benefit? Or politicians who vote for fewer restrictions on gun availability even as white gun suicide rates skyrocket? Or politicians who vote to cut funding from education budgets upon which they themselves depend? Wise and Metzl discuss the latter’s explosive findings from months of research in Tennessee, Kansas and Missouri—findings that illuminate how white fear (of black criminals, of “wasting” tax dollars on people of color, and of squandered resources in “urban” school districts) lead many whites to support right-wing policies that only make their own lives less livable. As one white man in Metzl’s study, who was dying of an untreated illness but couldn’t afford health care, put it: he would rather die than go on Obamacare, because he doesn’t support tax dollars going to welfare recipients and “illegals.” That man, who indeed has since died, is perhaps the best (but hardly the only) example of how white racial resentment harms not only its intended targets, but ultimately can destroy whites as well. A powerful and illuminating conversation about a critical topic, this episode of Speak Out With Tim Wise will force us to ask the critical question: can we build a movement for justice in a nation where whites are so blinded by racial resentments and anxieties as to not even care for their own well-being, to say nothing of the well being of others? And if we are to build such a movement, what will it take to overcome the politics of resentment so aptly chronicled in Metzl’s research?

Apr 02 2019

55mins

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Rank #5: Episode 39: Movement Building for Justice: Black Self-Determination, White Allyship & Intersectionality

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Today’s episode features a conversation on social justice movement building between Tim and three of the nation’s most engaging thinkers and activists: Tia Oso, Dayvon Love and Chris Crass. The dialogue took place in front of a live audience at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education (NCORE) in New Orleans on May 31. Among the topics discussed by the panel: What things get in the way of effective movement building? What are the lessons we can take away from past and present movements about how to push through those obstacles? Are there common mistakes we make in this work, and if so, how can we learn from them as we move forward? What is the role of white people in social justice work? How important is Black self-determination to the cause of liberation and how has it been often overlooked within both historical and contemporary accounts of movement organizing? We’ll discuss all this and more on today’s episode of Speak Out With Tim Wise.

Jun 19 2018

1hr 18mins

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Rank #6: Episode 49 - Talking About Race in a Time of Turmoil: Dr. David Campt on the White Ally Toolkit for Constructive Dialogue

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On today’s episode, I speak with Dr. David Campt, racial dialogue facilitator, educator, and creator of the new White Ally Toolkit Workbook, which aims to provide white folks with the rhetorical and practical tools they need to engage other whites around issues of racial equity. At a time of increasing political and racial division, the importance of white progressives and so-called “woke” folks knowing how to speak to (and with) those whose awareness of race issues is limited—or who steadfastly repel from the idea that racism is really an issue of importance at all—has never been greater. In their conversation, David and Tim explore why it’s so hard for some white progressives to speak to conservatives about these issues, why its important to figure out a way to do so, and what rhetorical and narrative tools are most effective for the purpose of ratcheting down partisan and ideological hostility, while possibly building bridges across philosophical divides. So whether you’re interested in facilitating large scale group dialogues at your school, your place of worship or in your community, or just looking for practical advice about how to speak to that difficult family member at Thanksgiving, this is an episode you don’t want to miss.

Oct 09 2018

1hr 4mins

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Rank #7: Episode 47: The Psychological Effects of Police Violence, Racism & Inequality in America

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This week’s episode features Tim’s plenary presentation at the 2018 American Psychological Association’s National Conference in San Francisco, this August. In this speech, Wise addresses the way that inequities in the justice system — especially police violence, racial profiling and disproportionate incarceration—impact the psychological health of peoples of color in America, and what those impacts mean for professionals seeking to offer trauma-informed care. He also examines the way that racial disparities in the justice system and elsewhere affect the psychological well-being of whites. From internalized notions of superiority to a mentality of entitlement and unrealistic expectations, racial inequity can generate unhealthy states of mind even for those who typically benefit from a system of inequity. When entitlement and expectations are then frustrated (as with a global economy or as a result of changing demographics) whites then either lash out at others in ways that fail to make their own lives better, or internalize shame for their failures, contributing to things like the current opioid epidemic. Bottom line: solidarity across racial lines and a society of greater equity are necessary to a psychologically healthy nation.

Sep 04 2018

47mins

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Rank #8: Episode 16 - Writer/Poet Michael Harriot: On Racism, Whiteness and Honesty in America

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Words are just letters on a page, or sounds traveling through the air when spoken, except when they’re more than that. For Birmingham-based writer and poet Michael Harriot — whose essays are featured at The Root and whose spoken word performances have lit up audiences across the United States — words are much more. They are tools at the very least, and weapons at the most, for crafting truth in a society built on lies. On this episode, Tim speaks with Michael about some of his recent essays about race in America: about the trouble with white liberals and colorblindness; white deflection techniques to avoid hard conversations about racism; the difference between institutional racism and personal bias, and the racial meaning of the recent Alabama Senate election among other things. The episode also features Michael’s spoken word performance of his poem “My Mama So Black,” performed at the 2017 International World Poetry Slam Finals, and Tim’s commentary about the quixotic search for those elusive Obama-to-Trump voters folks like to talk about so as to "prove" that Trump's appeal isn't due to racism.

Jan 02 2018

1hr

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Rank #9: Episode 8 - Spare the Kids: Dr. Stacey Patton on Race, Corporal Punishment and Why Whuppins Won't Save Black America

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Perhaps you’ve heard it said before: “I got spanked as a kid and I turned out alright!,” or “If I don’t whoop you, the police will do far worse” as rationales for corporal punishment, in general, and especially within the black community (and white working class communities). But while the people who say these things may mean well, what damage does spanking children actually do? My guest this week is professor, author, and scholar Dr. Stacey Patton of Morgan State University. Her work (and her personal story) attest to the damage done by corporal punishment and the way violence done to black children for generations under enslavement and white supremacy ultimately became embedded in the thinking of even those victimized by it. As Patton — an unapologetic critic of racism and white supremacy — makes clear, historically speaking, spanking or “whuppin” black children is “literally the whitest thing you can do.” Until we begin to see such practices as antiquated and destructive forms of abuse, generations of young people will continue to be hit in the name of love, embedding deeply destructive mixed messages about the care they deserve, both as children and later as adults.

Nov 07 2017

1hr 2mins

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Rank #10: Equity, Justice and the White Church (Rob W. Lee and John Pavlovitz)

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What does one do when their church no longer wants them as a pastor? When speaking out against white supremacy, on behalf of black lives, and in solidarity with LGBTQ liberation, ultimately costs them their jobs? Does one abandon the church altogether or try and fight for a progressive Christianity instead? My guests this week have answered the questions clearly, and in favor of the latter option. Rob W. Lee -- a descendant of Robert E. Lee -- faced pushback from parishioners in his church after condemning white supremacy in the wake of Charlottesville, ultimately convincing him to resign his position. Meanwhile, John Pavolovitz was fired from his position after challenging some of the more reactionary church positions on sexuality among other topics. Both are adamant however that those reactionary ideologies should not and do not define what Christianity can be, even in a white church community that has often taken a pass on justice struggles. Regardless of your own faith beliefs -- or even if you reject religion altogether -- this conversation is a necessary one for progressives to engage.

Oct 17 2017

58mins

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Rank #11: Episode 44: Why Identity Politics is Necessary (But Whiteness is a Fraud): Race & Class Inequity in America

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While I take a break from guest interviews for the summer, enjoy these three commentaries: one new and two previously available in my 2017 Patreon archives. In the first (and new) piece, I respond to common critiques of “identity politics,” and explain why those criticisms are wrongheaded on multiple levels. First, they are selective: only condemning a political focus on marginalized groups (people of color, women and LGBTQ folks, for instance) while ignoring the way that a focus on the “white working class,” conservative Christians, or bringing back manufacturing jobs mostly for men, are also about prioritizing certain identities. Second, to the extent most of us have not only dominant identities from which we benefit, but also identities that confer disadvantages—for instance, white folks who are poor—a politics that examines how identity impacts us is of benefit to all. Ultimately the problem is not identity-based politics, but identity-based oppression. In the second piece, I examine the difference between a critique of whiteness (as a social force) and white people as individuals. Too often a critique of the first is seen as an attack on the second. But whiteness was created as a way to sucker most so-called white people into casting our lot with the wealthy, rather than recognizing the interests we share with working class people of color. To the extent whiteness has served as a trick to divide and conquer working folks, criticizing whiteness is not only something we should do for the sake of people of color, but also something we should do for the benefit of most so-called whites. In the third and final piece, I explore how our tendency to venerate the wealthy—and give them credit for all good things that flow to the rest of us, like jobs—not only rests on a faulty understanding of economics, but also relies upon two important American forces, which make a politics of class solidarity harder here that in many other societies. The first of these is the myth of meritocracy, which leads even those who are struggling to believe they’ll be rich someday if they just work hard enough, and the second is the role of white supremacy, and specifically what W.E.B. DuBois called the “psychological wage of whiteness.” By providing relative advantage for white workers over people of color, America’s racialized version of capitalism keeps many working class whites in line, loyal to the wealthy, even as they would be better off joining with people of color to fight for a more just system.

Jul 24 2018

55mins

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Rank #12: Episode 3: Activist and Educator Tia Oso

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There’s an old saying: “You gotta dance with the one that brought ya.” But as my guest Tia Oso explains in this week’s episode, too often Democrats and white liberals fail to acknowledge the centrality of folks of color – and especially black women – to any truly progressive political coalition. Only by amplifying and listening to the voices, agendas and ideas of the most marginalized, can progressives hope to build lasting and effective movements for social change.

Sep 30 2017

57mins

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Rank #13: Episode 43: It’s Not About Bigotry: Institutional Racism, Gentrification and the Perpetuation of Inequality

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While I take a break from guest interviews for the summer, enjoy this compilation of two previous (but still highly relevant) commentaries from my 2017 Patreon archives. In the first, I explore the way that racism operates institutionally, even in the absence of deliberate racist and bigoted intent. When we presume that racism requires overt prejudice we often overlook the subtle but destructive ways in which racial inequity is perpetuated in labor markets, education and the justice system, simply by way of the normal, seemingly race-neutral operation of those systems. In so doing, we miss some of the most persistent and destructive manifestations of racial injustice. In the second piece, I explore the issue of gentrification and the way that “economic revitalization” often serves to displace and further marginalize already marginalized persons of color, and the poor (of all colors), while disproportionately benefitting affluent whites. Although perhaps preferable to white flight and the abandonment of urban areas, the question remains: why do lawmakers only commit to economic development when certain people move back to an area? Why don’t urban planners and elected officials have the same interest in creating opportunities for working class folks of color as they do for upper income white hipsters, tech-bros and “creative class” artists? And how might cities balance the need for economic development with the need for affordable housing, cultural preservation and respect, and opportunities for all?

Jul 17 2018

51mins

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Rank #14: Episode 48: Educational Inequity is a Feature not a Glitch: Racism and Schooling in America

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On this episode — the last before returning to the regular interview format of the program — please enjoy Tim's presentation to the teachers, staff and administrators of the Cahokia Illinois School district on August 31 of this year. In this presentation, he discusses the ways that racial and ecnomic inequities in education, far from indicating failures in the system, actually suggest that inequality is a desired and deliberate outcome of schooling, and has been for many years. Herein, Wise explores the role techers can play in challenging that system of inequity, the importance of adopting a paradigm of schooling that focuses on collective liberation rather than individual accomplishment, and discuss the problems with colorblindness as a method for eduating children of color.

Sep 19 2018

1hr 4mins

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Rank #15: Episode 56 - When Hate Comes to Campus: Responding to the New White Nationalism in the Age of Trump

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In this episode, taped live at the 2019 National Conference on Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education (NCORE), Tim and his panel discuss the rise of overt racist and white nationalist organizing in America, and especially on college campuses. With groups like Identity Europa actively recruiting college students, and with young people especially susceptible to right-wing radicalization via internet-based hate forums, it will be important for colleges—as places of learning and as spaces ostensibly committed to pluralism and equity—to devise strategies for responding to the upsurge of racist, Islamophobic, xenophobic and anti-Semitic activity. Panelists will explore the causes for resurgent white nationalism, controversies regarding free speech/hate speech as they pertain to this new threat, and various institutional responses that colleges and universities will need to explore in order to meet the challenge. Panelists include: Scot Nakagawa, Lindsey Schubiner, Rahuldeep Gill and Tim Wise

Jul 31 2019

1hr 24mins

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Rank #16: Episode 9 - Meghan Linsey on Taking a Knee for Justice, Anti-Racist Solidarity and Progressive Country Music

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This September, singer/songwriter Meghan Linsey, the 2015 runner-up on "The Voice" took a knee as she sang the final note of the national anthem before the Tennessee Titans and Seattle Seahawks game in Nashville. Meghan and her boyfriend and guitar player, Tyler Cain, joined players across the NFL that day in this form of protest, in response to Donald Trump criticizing football players for speaking out against police brutality and racial injustice. On this episode, I'll speak with Meghan about the responsibility of artists to speak out in these dangerous times, the importance of white allyship to people of color, and how her experiences growing up around racism heightened her awareness to the need to resist.

Nov 14 2017

1hr 2mins

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Rank #17: Episode 13: Fake News, Post-Truth Politics and the Future of American Democracy

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Tired of living in a “post-truth” political world where lies become “alternative facts” and social media facilitates the spreading of nonsense faster than ever before? Worried about the way we often find ourselves, and others, in walled-off political and cultural silos, only hearing things that reinforce our pre-existing assumptions? Concerned about the way our brains seem almost wired for irrationality? You’re not alone. And luckily, things are not hopeless! On today's episode, I'll speak with Dr. Gleb Tsipursky, a professor at Ohio State University who specializes in the science of irrational decision making, and is committed to fostering fact-based inquiry and rationality in our daily and political lives. As co-founder of the “Pro-Truth Pledge,” Tsipursky is pushing for a renewed commitment to accuracy, fact-checking and honesty in our daily discourse, whether on social media or in politics. And as Tsipursky explains, there are strategies we can employ to foster the search for truth, short-circuit our own tendencies to irrational thinking, and encourage the same in others. This episode also features my commentary on the “post-truth” claims of conservatives and Republicans, to the effect that “they are the party of civil rights and anti-racism,” in which I explain the historical deception behind such a claim.

Dec 12 2017

58mins

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Rank #18: Episode 11 - Activist/Actor Matt McGorry (How to Get Away With Murder) on Fighting Racism and Misogyny in Hollywood and America

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Although Matt McGorry is best known for his role as Asher Millstone on ABC's How to Get Away With Murder, he is also increasingly known for speaking out on issues of sexism, racism and white male allyship in the struggles against both. With reports of widespread male sexual predation emerging from Hollywood (and the world of politics), Matt's take on these subjects, both in and outside the entertainment industry, is especially timely. On this episode we discuss misogyny and structural white supremacy, the problematic concepts of "good men" or "good white people" (and why our intentions aren't the point where oppression is involved), and navigating these subjects while in the public eye as a celebrity.

Nov 28 2017

1hr 3mins

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Rank #19: Episode 10 - Frances Lee on Social Justice Activism, Call-Out Culture and the Pitfalls of Progressive Proselytizing

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Fighting for a better world in a society beset by multiple injustices can be incredibly exciting and rewarding — and it’s obviously necessary. But can it also sometimes bring out the worst in people? Like a toxic quest for ideological purity? Or an overly judgmental tendency to call people out in divisive and dogmatic ways over even relatively small errors in judgment? In recent essays, “Excommunicate Me from the Church of Social Justice,” and “Why I’m Starting to Fear My Fellow Social Justice Activists,” writer and activist Frances Lee explains why the answers to these questions are often yes, and why it matters. If we wish to build a strong and effective progressive left, we’ll need to find ways to support one another without striking a more-radical-than-thou pose; and we’ll need to re-focus our attention on structures and systems that maintain oppression, rather than attacking individuals when they make mistakes, inadvertently say the wrong thing, or fail to live up to the standards of some on the left.

Nov 21 2017

57mins

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Rank #20: Episode 42: White Nationalism and the Absurdity of Neo-Nazi Rhetoric (A Best of Tim Wise Episode)

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While I take a break from guest interviews for the summer, enjoy this compilation of two previous (but still highly relevant) commentaries from my 2017 Patreon archives, in which I discuss, dissect and dismantle the logic and argumentation of white nationalists and Neo-Nazis. First, I explore the inherent moral and practical absurdity of white nationalism and white racial identity politics itself, and why organizing for “white interests” is inherently different than when people of color organize on the basis of theirs. Then, I examine the particularly illogical and flawed reasoning behind the anti-Jewish bigotry so central to these movements. From claims that Jews enjoy “Jewish privilege” to claims that Jews control the media and financial sectors, the stupid is seriously strong with these arguments, as I explain in the second half of the show.

Jul 10 2018

50mins

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