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Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #128 in News Commentary category

Business
Non-Profit
News
News Commentary
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Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

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Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
9
4
2
1

Shorter titles s.v.p.!

By Profleibo - Jan 17 2011
Read more
Great materials but one needs to be able to read the titles in a list on an Ipod. Steven Leibo

A great resource

By Duke1977 - Dec 12 2007
Read more
This is the most interesting podcast in the directory.

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
9
4
2
1

Shorter titles s.v.p.!

By Profleibo - Jan 17 2011
Read more
Great materials but one needs to be able to read the titles in a list on an Ipod. Steven Leibo

A great resource

By Duke1977 - Dec 12 2007
Read more
This is the most interesting podcast in the directory.
Cover image of Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Latest release on Feb 13, 2020

Read more

Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Rank #1: Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, with Francis Fukuyama

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The rise of global populism is the greatest threat to global democracy, and it's mainly driven not by economics, but by people's demand for public recognition of their identities, says political scientist Francis Fukuyama. "We want other people to affirm our worth, and that has to be a political act." How is this playing out in the U.S., Europe, and Asia? What practical steps can we take to counteract it?

Sep 17 2018

1hr

Play

Rank #2: Global Ethics Weekly: Orbán's Hungary, the EU, & a "Values-Free Alliance"

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As Viktor Orbán continues to enact illiberal policies in Hungary, some, including Harvard's Yascha Mounk, have called for the state to be expelled from the European Union. Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev puts this idea in a geopolitical and historical context and discusses what it could mean for the future of the EU. Is it possible to have an alliance of nations without shared values?

Jun 28 2018

26mins

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Rank #3: Fight for Liberty, with Max Boot, Philip Bobbitt, Garry Kasparov, & Bret Stephens

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We live in a time when liberal democracy is on the defensive, not only in the U.S. but around the world. Yet these speakers, whose roots reflect the political spectrum, are optimistic that having a fresh discussion on moral values and basic principles such as freedom of speech, a free press, and the rule of law can help bring democracy back to health. Don't miss this valuable discussion.

Oct 19 2018

59mins

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Rank #4: China's Spies in California with Zach Dorfman

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"There is a significant counterintelligence threat on the West Coast of the U.S., and it differs in meaningful ways from what is commonly perceived of as counterintelligence work and targets on the East Coast," says Senior Fellow Zach Dorfman. He discusses shocking examples of Chinese espionage in particular, such as technology theft and spying on local politicians. The Chinese also exert pressure on diaspora communities to become more pro-PRC.

Sep 11 2018

33mins

Play

Rank #5: Ian Bremmer & Tom Nichols on Globalization, Populism, & American Politics

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If populism is a reaction to a globalism that is viewed as unresponsive to the needs of citizens, can populism sustain any version of globalization? Eurasia Group's Ian Bremmer and Tom Nichols of the U. S. Naval War College discuss and debate this important question and much more.

Jan 16 2019

57mins

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Rank #6: Gandhi's Satyagraha & Social Change, with Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox

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Satyagraha, one of Gandhi's most influential teachings, stresses "passive resistance" in the face of injustice. Qunnipiac's Gadkar-Wilcox saw a powerful example of this in regards to a debate in India over sanitary napkins and she also sees it as Florida high school students push legislators for stricter gun control. Why is this tactic or "disposition" so effective?

Feb 26 2018

29mins

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Rank #7: "Russian Roulette" & Influence, with Olga Oliker & Jeff Mankoff

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Jeffrey Mankoff and Olga Oliker of CSIS host a podcast called "Russian Roulette" on all things Russian (and Eurasian), from food and wine to politics. What is the Russian perspective on U.S.-Russia relations and what are the goals of Russia's covert influence operations in the U.S.? Do they all originate with Putin or are some of them bottom-up? Are the Russians happy with Trump's performance as president? Find out in this lively podcast.

Aug 22 2018

27mins

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Rank #8: Global Ethics Weekly: The Situation in Western Sahara, with Ambassador Sidi Omar

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Ambassador Sidi Omar, UN representative for Frente POLISARIO, a liberation movement aiming to secure the independence of Western Sahara, discusses the decades-long dispute in Northwest Africa. With negotiations ongoing between Frente POLISARIO and Morocco at the UN, could there be a resolution? How do Europe and the Trump administration fit in?

Feb 07 2019

21mins

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Rank #9: Gene Editing, Slow Science, & Public Empowerment, with Françoise Baylis

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In the fourth podcast in Carnegie Council's gene editing podcast series, Dalhousie University's Professor Françoise Baylis, author of "Altered Inheritance," explains what "slow science" and "broad societal consensus" mean when it comes to this technology. She also details why public empowerment is vital for ethical gene editing and wonders if some of these procedures will stay in the realm of science fiction.

Dec 18 2019

36mins

Play

Rank #10: Banned in China, with Andrew J. Nathan

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What's the "anaconda in the chandelier" in China that looms over foreign scholars, journalists, and Chinese citizens expressing their opinions? Find out in this podcast with political scientist and China scholar Andrew Nathan of Columbia University.

Aug 15 2018

38mins

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Rank #11: Japan-China Battles for Hearts & Minds, with Giulio Pugliese

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Japan and China, while in a "tactical détente," are engaged in an information battle for foreign hearts and minds over the South China Sea and also Japan's past, says Pugliese of King's College, London. The "China dream" is the doppelganger of the "China nightmare"--the brutal Japanese invasion of China. "To a certain extent, Xi Jinping will need to cater to the China nightmare for foreign and internal consumption as he pushes for the China dream."

Aug 07 2018

23mins

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Rank #12: George Friedman: The End of the International Order and the Future of Asia

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Tired of conventional wisdom? Check out geopolitical forecaster George Friedman. The period that began at the end of World War II was a freak, he says. "We're returning to a more normal structure in which the nation-state is dominant, international trade is intense but managed by states for their own benefit, and where this idea that the nation-state is obsolete goes away." And find out why he's bullish on Japan and thinks we overestimate China.

Aug 01 2017

25mins

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Rank #13: The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate

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"Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.

Mar 19 2019

1hr 2mins

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Rank #14: China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman

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In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.

Nov 02 2018

31mins

Play

Rank #15: Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam, with Robert K. Brigham

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Henry Kissinger is smart, charming, and a great writer, says historian Robert Brigham. But when it came to Vietnam, his arrogance and deceit made a bad situation worse. Kissinger altered the logbooks for military bombings and misled the president on the content of the secret talks in Paris. "He was a theorist who stuck to theorist dreams, and it cost the country dearly." What are the lessons for today's administration?

Oct 26 2018

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #16: Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial Intelligence's potential for doing good and creating benefits is almost boundless, but equally there is a potential for doing great harm. This panel discusses the findings of a comprehensive three-year project at The Hastings Center, which encompassed safety procedures, engineering approaches, and legal and ethical oversight.

Dec 07 2018

1hr 34mins

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Rank #17: Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond

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Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.

Jun 20 2019

1hr 5mins

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Rank #18: Vanishing Frontiers: The Forces Driving Mexico and the U.S. Together, with Andrew Selee

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"Mexico is very present in our daily lives, sometimes even in ways we don't realize," says Andrew Selee. Did you know, for example, that some of America's most famous baked goods, such as Sara Lee, are owned by a Mexican company and made in Pennsylvania? From manufacturing and trade to film, food, and sports, plus the large number of Americans with Mexican heritage, the economies and cultures of Mexico and the U.S. are woven tightly together.

Jun 01 2018

21mins

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Rank #19: Shades of Red and Blue: The Problem of Strangers

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The hardening of America's borders is an essential part of Trump's agenda. But will this make the United States a safer and more prosperous nation? Hear from Jamil Dakwar, Sana Mustafa, Yael Eiesenstat, Oz Sultan, and Chadwick Moore. This program is part of the Shades of Red and Blue series, presented by The Ethics Centre, and co-sponsored by the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and Bard Globalization and International Affairs program. This program was recorded on April 1, 2017.

May 25 2017

59mins

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Rank #20: Stratfor's Rodger Baker on the Rebalancing of World Politics and Asia

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"I think the biggest impact of Donald Trump's presidency, particularly in Asia-Pacific, has been the concept of uncertainty," says Baker, citing the lack of a clear and concise policy from the administration. "Uncertainty, if the United States were just a small peripheral country, is manageable; uncertainty when the United States is such a large and impactful country becomes very difficult to manage."

Aug 10 2017

14mins

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Who Controls the Global Thermostat? with C2G's Janos Pasztor

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With record-breaking winter warmth in Europe, catastrophic fires in Australia, and deadly flooding in Indonesia, we are deep into a climate crisis. In this wide-ranging talk, Janos Paztor, executive director of the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative (C2G), talks about his organization's work on the governance of emerging technologies that intentionally seek to change the Earth's climate system, including carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation modification.

Feb 13 2020

1hr 4mins

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Killer Robots, Ethics, & Governance, with Peter Asaro

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Peter Asaro, co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, has a simple solution for stopping the future proliferation of killer robots, or lethal autonomous weapons: "Ban them." What are the ethical and logistical risks of this technology? How would it change the nature of warfare? And with the U.S. and other nations currently developing killer robots, what is the state of governance?

Feb 11 2020

42mins

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Democratic Candidates & Foreign Policy after Iowa, with Nikolas Gvosdev

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With the (incomplete) results of the Iowa Caucus putting the spotlight on Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders, what do we know about their foreign policy platforms? How do they differentiate themselves from Joe Biden? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev shares his thoughts and touches on voters' possible perception of Sanders as a "socialist" and how climate change could become an issue in this election.

Feb 05 2020

23mins

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Do Morals Matter? Presidents & Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump, with Joseph Nye

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How much do morals matter for U.S. presidents when it comes to international affairs? What are the ethics of "America First" or the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Joseph Nye, former dean of the Harvard Kennedy School, works through each presidency from FDR to Trump and scores their foreign policy on three ethical dimensions of their intentions, the means they used, and the consequences of their decisions.

Feb 04 2020

1hr 7mins

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The Crack-Up: The Birth of the Modern Middle East, with Ted Widmer

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At the end of World War I, colonial powers carved up the Ottoman Empire and the reverberations are still being felt today. Historian Ted Widmer discusses the circumstances that led to this fateful episode and why Woodrow Wilson wasn't able to extend his principle of "self-determination" to the Middle East. How should we think about the Trump-Netanyahu peace plan in the context of what happened in Palestine in 1919?

Jan 31 2020

30mins

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Just War, Unjust Soldiers, & American Public Opinion, with Scott D. Sagan

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Do soldiers fighting for a "just cause" have more rights than soldiers fighting on the other side? In this interview following up on an "Ethics & International Affairs" article, Stanford's Professor Scott D. Sagan discusses the results of a study he conducted with Dartmouth's Professor Benjamin A. Valentino on how Americans think about this profound question.

Jan 27 2020

34mins

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Behind AI Decision-Making, with Francesca Rossi

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With artificial intelligence embedded into social media, credit card transactions, GPS, and much more, how can we train it to act in an ethical, fair, and unbiased manner? What are the theories and philosophies behind AI systems? IBM Research's Francesca Rossi discusses her work helping to ensure that the technology is "as beneficial as possible for the widest part of the population."

Jan 23 2020

32mins

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Privacy, Surveillance, & the Terrorist Trap, with Tom Parker

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How can investigators utilize new technology like facial recognition software while respecting the rights of suspects and the general public? What are the consequences of government overreaction to terrorist threats? Tom Parker, author of "Avoiding the Terrorist Trap," discusses privacy, surveillance, and more in the context of counterterrorism.

Jan 14 2020

36mins

Play

Gene Editing, Slow Science, & Public Empowerment, with Françoise Baylis

Podcast cover
Read more

In the fourth podcast in Carnegie Council's gene editing podcast series, Dalhousie University's Professor Françoise Baylis, author of "Altered Inheritance," explains what "slow science" and "broad societal consensus" mean when it comes to this technology. She also details why public empowerment is vital for ethical gene editing and wonders if some of these procedures will stay in the realm of science fiction.

Dec 18 2019

36mins

Play

The Ethics of Gene Editing & Human Enhancement, with Julian Savulescu

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What does "good ethics" means when it comes to gene editing? What types of conversations should we be having about this technology? Julian Savulescu, director of the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, shares his thoughts on these topics and more, including moral and human enhancement, and why he called Dr. He Jiankui's experiment "monstrous."

Dec 11 2019

34mins

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Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: Designing an Ethical Algorithm, with Michael Kearns

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How can algorithms be made more "ethical"? How can we design AI to protect against racial and gender biases when it comes to loan applications or policing? UPenn's Professor Michael Kearns, co-author of "The Ethical Algorithm," and Geoff Shaefer, who works on AI issues at Booz Allen Hamilton, discuss these issues and much more.

Dec 04 2019

48mins

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Gene Editing Governance & Dr. He Jiankui, with Jeffrey Kahn

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Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, discusses the many governance issues connected to gene editing. Plus, he gives a first-hand account of an historic conference in Hong Kong last year in which Dr. He Jiankui shared his research on the birth of the world's first germline genetically engineered babies. What's the future of the governance of this emerging technology?

Dec 02 2019

33mins

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Gene Editing: Overview, Ethics, & the Near Future, with Robert Klitzman

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In the first in a series of podcasts on gene editing, Columbia's Dr. Robert Klitzman provides an overview of the technology, ethical and governance issues, and where it could all go in the near future. Plus he explains why the birth of genetically engineered twins in China last year was a "seismic" event. How could gene editing lead to more inequality? What could be some of unintended consequences?

Nov 20 2019

38mins

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The Crack-Up: Dwight Eisenhower & the Road Trip that Changed America, with Brian C. Black

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In 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower, along with a "Mad Max"-style military convoy, set out on a cross-country road trip to examine the nascent state of America's roads. Penn State Altoona's Professor Brian C. Black explains how this trip influenced Eisenhower's decisions decades later, both as general and president, and laid the groundwork for the rise of petroleum-based engines and the interstate highway system.

Nov 18 2019

22mins

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AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff

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How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.

Nov 13 2019

25mins

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Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez

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National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?

Nov 08 2019

21mins

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Carnegie New Leaders Podcast: The Future of Space Acquisition & Threats, with Maj. Gen. Nina M. Armagno

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In conversation with intelligence analyst Amelia M. Wolf, Major General Nina M. Armagno of the U.S. Air Force discusses her role as director of Space Programs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition at the Department of Defense. How has space acquisition shifted as threats have evolved? What would a future U.S. Space Force look like?

Nov 06 2019

29mins

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The Crack-Up: How General Motors Shaped America, with Anna Clark

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From financing mechanisms to labor policy to the rise of the suburbs, General Motors had a huge effect on the development of the United States in the 20th century. In this wide-ranging talk with historian Ted Widmer, Detroit-based journalist Anna Clark explains how 1919 was a turning point for the automobile manufacturer and why 2019 could be another pivotal year.

Nov 04 2019

22mins

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Migration in the Americas, Empathy, & Politics, with Daniela Segovia

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Political scientist Daniela Segovia, currently an Eisenhower Fellow, discusses the importance of empathy when working on and thinking about migration policy in Latin America. She also touches on her own story as a Venezuelan migrant living in Mexico. What should governments and international organizations be doing? How can concerned citizens help?

Oct 29 2019

26mins

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The Crack-Up: The 1919 Elaine Massacre & the Struggle to Remember, with Nan Woodruff

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The massacre in rural Elaine, Arkansas was one of the most violent episodes of 1919's Red Summer of racist confrontations, but it also remains one of the least-known. In this talk with historian Ted Widmer, Penn State's Professor Nan Woodruff explains the causes and how it fits in to the post-World War I context. Why are people still reluctant to speak about this massacre? How should we remember this dark chapter in American history?

Oct 23 2019

23mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
9
4
2
1

Shorter titles s.v.p.!

By Profleibo - Jan 17 2011
Read more
Great materials but one needs to be able to read the titles in a list on an Ipod. Steven Leibo

A great resource

By Duke1977 - Dec 12 2007
Read more
This is the most interesting podcast in the directory.