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EMJ podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
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Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) is an international peer review journal covering pre-hospital and hospital emergency medicine, and critical care. The journal publishes original research, reviews and evidence based articles on resuscitation, major trauma, minor injuries, acute cardiology, acute paediatrics, toxicology, toxinology, disasters, medical imaging, audit, teaching and reflections on clinical practice. The journal is aimed at doctors, nurses, paramedics and ambulance staff.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

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Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) is an international peer review journal covering pre-hospital and hospital emergency medicine, and critical care. The journal publishes original research, reviews and evidence based articles on resuscitation, major trauma, minor injuries, acute cardiology, acute paediatrics, toxicology, toxinology, disasters, medical imaging, audit, teaching and reflections on clinical practice. The journal is aimed at doctors, nurses, paramedics and ambulance staff.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

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Cover image of EMJ podcast

EMJ podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) is an international peer review journal covering pre-hospital and hospital emergency medicine, and critical care. The journal publishes original research, reviews and evidence based articles on resuscitation, major trauma, minor injuries, acute cardiology, acute paediatrics, toxicology, toxinology, disasters, medical imaging, audit, teaching and reflections on clinical practice. The journal is aimed at doctors, nurses, paramedics and ambulance staff.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Rank #1: Primary Survey: the highlights of December 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the December 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, chosen by Associate Editor Mary Dawood.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/719

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Evaluation of the provision of helicopter emergency medical services in Europe - emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/720

Heart failure and palliative care in the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/726

Performing sit down medicine in a stand-up place: is it time for palliative care in the emergency department? - emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/730

Predrawn prehospital medications are microbiologically safe for up to 48 hours - emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/743

Systematic review and meta-analysis of pre-hospital diagnostic accuracy studies - emj.bmj.com/content/35/12/757

Read the full December 2018 issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/12

Dec 11 2018

9mins

Play

Rank #2: Primary Survey: the highlights of July 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the July 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, chosen by Deputy Editor, Ian K Maconochie.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/403

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Do EPs change their clinical behaviour in the hallway or when a companion is present? A cross-sectional survey - emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/406

Effects of hallway/corridor and companions on clinical encounters: a possible explanation - emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/404

Essential medicines for emergency care in Africa - emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/412

End-tidal carbon dioxide output in manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus active compression-decompression device during prehospital quality controlled resuscitation: a case series study - emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/428

Risk stratifying chest pain patients in the emergency department using HEART, GRACE and TIMI scores, with a single contemporary troponin result, to predict major adverse cardiac events - emj.bmj.com/content/35/7/420

Read the full July issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/7

Jul 20 2018

10mins

Play

Rank #3: Primary Survey: the highlights of August 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the August 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal.
Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/461
Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Fluid therapy in the emergency department: an expert practice review - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/511

Intravenous cefazolin plus oral probenecid versus oral cephalexin for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections: a double-blind, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/492

Efficacy of scheduled return visits for emergency department patients with non-specific abdominal pain - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/499

Application of outpatient cardiac testing among emergency department patients with syncope - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/486

Diagnostic yield of an ambulatory patch monitor in patients with unexplained syncope after initial evaluation in the emergency department: the PATCH-ED study - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/477

Prehospital neurological deterioration in stroke - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/507

Development and validation of an admission prediction tool for emergency departments in the Netherlands - emj.bmj.com/content/35/8/464

Read the full August 2018 issue of EMJ here: https://emj.bmj.com/content/35/8

Jul 30 2018

11mins

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Rank #4: Primary Survey: the highlights of June 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the June 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, chosen by Associate Editor, Edward Carlton.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/341

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Editor's choice: Comparison of qSOFA with current emergency department tools for screening of patients with sepsis for critical illness - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/350

Editor's choice: qSOFA, SIRS and NEWS for predicting inhospital mortality and ICU admission in emergency admissions treated as sepsis - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/345

Editor's choice: Sepsis-3 and simple rules - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/343

MRSA nares swab is a more accurate predictor of MRSA wound infection compared with clinical risk factors in emergency department patients with skin and soft tissue infections - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/357

Outpatient management of children at low risk for bacterial meningitis - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/361

Gender and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a New Zealand registry study - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/367

Inter-rater and intrarater reliability of the South African Triage Scale in low-resource settings of Haiti and Afghanistan - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/379

Validity of the Japan Acuity and Triage Scale in adults: a cohort study - emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/384

Marauding terrorist attack (MTA): prehospital considerations -emj.bmj.com/content/35/6/389

Read the full June issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/6

Jul 17 2018

9mins

Play

Rank #5: Primary Survey: the highlights of February 2019

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through his highlights of the February 2019 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Read the primary survey here - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/63

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

A simple clinical assessment is superior to systematic triage in prediction of mortality in the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/66

A systematic review examining the impact of redirecting low-acuity patients seeking emergency department care: is the juice worth the squeeze? - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/97

From ED overcrowding to jail overcrowding: a cautionary tale of a Serial Inebriate Programme (SIP) - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/92

UK’s initial operational response and specialist operational response to CBRN and HazMat incidents: a primer on decontamination protocols for healthcare professionals - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/117

Implementation of tranexamic acid for bleeding trauma patients: a longitudinal and cross-sectional study - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/78

Emergency medical services oxygen equipment: a fomite for transmission of MRSA? - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/89

Factors influencing variation in investigations after a negative CT brain scan in suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a qualitative study- emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/72

Prolonged length of stay in the emergency department and increased risk of hospital mortality in patients with sepsis requiring ICU admission - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/82

Approach to syncope in the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2/108

Read the full February issue here - emj.bmj.com/content/36/2.

Jan 29 2019

12mins

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Rank #6: Primary Survey: the highlights of May 2019

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through his highlights of the May 2019 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Read the primary survey here - emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/257

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Could this be Measles? - https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/310

Randomised controlled trial of simulation-based education for mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation training - https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/266

Preferred learning modalities and practice for critical skills: a global survey of paediatric emergency medicine clinicians - emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/273

Immune checkpoint blockade toxicity among patients with cancer presenting to the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/306

Major incident triage and the evaluation of the Triage Sort as a secondary triage method - https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/281

Distributions of the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) across a healthcare system following a large-scale roll-out - https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/287

A mixed methods study of the impact of consultant overnight working in an English Emergency Department - https://emj.bmj.com/content/36/5/298

Read the full May issue here - emj.bmj.com/content/36/5.

May 03 2019

10mins

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Rank #7: Primary Survey: the highlights of November 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the November 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month chosen by Associate Editor Professor Rick Body.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/651

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Managing accidental hypothermia: a UK-wide survey of prehospital and search and rescue providers - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/652

Managing accidental hypothermia: progress but still some way to go - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/657

Characteristics and outcomes of accidental hypothermia in Japan: the J-Point registry - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/659

Indoor accidental hypothermia in the elderly: an emerging lethal entity in the 21st century - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/667

Paediatric traumatic cardiac arrest: the development of an algorithm to guide recognition, management and decisions to terminate resuscitation - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/669

Defining significant childhood illness and injury in the Emergency Department: a consensus of UK and Ireland expert opinion - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/685

Understanding better how emergency doctors work. Analysis of distribution of time and activities of emergency doctors: a systematic review and critical appraisal of time and motion studies - emj.bmj.com/content/35/11/692

Read the full November 2018 issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/11

Dec 04 2018

9mins

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Rank #8: More evidence needed to divert patients from emergency departments

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The systematic review discussed in this podcast outlines inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of diversion strategies on emergency department use and healthcare utilisation.
Dr Brian Rowe, from the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada, tells Editor-in-Chief of EMJ Professor Ellen Weber other strategies are needed to address ED overcrowding.
Read the paper at http://emj.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/emermed-2017-207045.
Related articles:
The patient’s dilemma: attending the emergency department with a minor illness (https://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j1941);

Low-acuity presentations to the emergency department in Canada: exploring the alternative attempts to avoid presentation (https://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/249).

Nov 15 2018

12mins

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Rank #9: Taking the stage: a development programme for women speakers in emergency medicine

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The Speaker Development Programme (SDP) is a prize-winning year-long curriculum aimed at developing women speakers as a step on the journey towards academic recognition. Editor-in-Chief of the Emergency Medicine Journal Professor Ellen Weber talks to Dr Dara Kass, the founder of this program. They also discuss the project FemInEm, an organisation dedicated to gender equity in emergency medicine.
Read the related article on the EMJ website: (https://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2019/01/10/emermed-2018-207818). The commentary mentioned in the podcast will be published with the April issue of the journal.
More papers mentioned in the podcast:
- Are there too few women presenting at emergency medicine conferences? (https://emj.bmj.com/content/33/10/681)

- When will we have enough women speakers in emergency medicine? (https://emj.bmj.com/content/33/10/680)

Feb 28 2019

17mins

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Rank #10: Primary Survey: the highlights of January 2019

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the January 2019 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, chosen by Editor-in-Chief Ellen Weber.
Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/1.
Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:
The view from here: on the other side of the curtain - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/52
Accuracy of NEXUS II head injury decision rule in children: a prospective PREDICT cohort study - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/4
Side effects of decision rules, or the law of unintended consequences - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/2
Analgesia in the emergency department: why is it not administered? - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/12
Urgent care axis for the older adult: where is best to target interventions? - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/22
Exploring parents’ reasons for attending the emergency department for children with minor illnesses: a mixed methods systematic review - emj.bmj.com/content/36/1/39

Read the full January issue here: emj.bmj.com/content/36/1

Jan 10 2019

10mins

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Rank #11: Primary Survey: the highlights of May 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the May 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, chosen by our Associate Editor, Caroline Leech.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/279

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Editor's choice: Lack of efficacy in a randomised trial of a brief intervention to reduce drug use and increase drug treatment services utilisation among adult emergency department patients over a 12-month period - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/282

Absence of a quick fix does not mean ‘do nothing:’ time to address drug use in the ED - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/280

New decision formulas for predicting endotracheal tube depth in children: analysis of neck CT images - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/303

What is positionality and should it be expressed in quantitative studies? - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/323

Modelling attending physician productivity in the emergency department: a multicentre study - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/317

Impact of emergency department surge and end of shift on patient workup and treatment prior to referral to internal medicine: a health records review - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/309

Comparison of epidemiology, treatments and outcomes of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction between young and elderly patients - emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/289

Image challenge: acute chest pain after tooth extraction
- emj.bmj.com/content/35/5/332

Read the full May issue of EMJ here: https://emj.bmj.com/content/35/5

Jun 29 2018

12mins

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Rank #12: March 2018: celebrating 50 years of Emergency Medicine in the UK

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Richard Body, EMJ Deputy Editor, and Simon Carley, EMJ Associate Editor, talk through the highlights of the March 2018 edition of the journal, celebrating 50 years of the UK's Emergency Medicine.
It is a special podcast presenting a collection of amazing articles that tell the story of where we have come from, where we are and where we are going. It's not all opinion though. We have some fantastic papers this month including an RCT on the use of ice to reduce the pain of laceration repair (Intravenous versus oral paracetamol for acute pain in adults in the emergency department setting: a prospective, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/179).

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/135

Details of the other papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Being a pioneer in emergency medicine - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/142

Emergency medicine research: how far have we come and where are we heading? - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/149

How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education? - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/156

Looking back and forward: emergency medicine in its 50th year - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/137

The feasibility of an interactive voice response system (IVRS) for monitoring patient safety after discharge from the ED - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/180

Understanding cardiac troponin part 2: early rule out of acute coronary syndrome - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/192

Ionised calcium levels in major trauma patients who received blood en route to a military medical treatment facility - emj.bmj.com/content/35/3/176

Read the full March issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/3.

Feb 16 2018

18mins

Play

Rank #13: Primary Survey: the highlights of February 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the February 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Simon himself.

Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/73

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Understanding cardiac troponin part 1: avoiding troponinitis - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/120

Calculating the proportion of avoidable attendances at UK emergency departments: analysis of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine’s Sentinel Site Survey data -
http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/114

Elevated mortality among weekend hospital admissions is not associated with adoption of seven day clinical standards - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/108

Pre-emptive ice cube cryotherapy for reducing pain from local anaesthetic injections for simple lacerations: a randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/103

Use of the low-frequency/high-frequency ratio of heart rate variability to predict short-term deterioration in emergency department patients with sepsis - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/96

Utility of prehospital electrocardiogram characteristics as prognostic markers in out-of-hospital pulseless electrical activity arrests - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/89

A traumatic tale of two cities: does EMS level of care and transportation model affect survival in patients with trauma at level 1 trauma centres in two neighbouring Canadian provinces? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/83

Managing alcohol-related attendances in emergency care: can diversion to bespoke services lessen the burden? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/79

Alcohol identification and intervention in English emergency departments - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/75

Taking control of alcohol-related emergency department visits - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/2/74

Read the full February issue of EMJ here: emj.bmj.com/content/35/2

Jan 30 2018

16mins

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Rank #14: Primary Survey: the highlights of January 2018

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the January 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Ellen Webber (Editor-in-Chief, University of California, San Francisco, USA).

Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/1.

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:

Impact of Physician Navigators on productivity indicators in the ED - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/5

Tackling the demand for emergency department services: there are no silver bullets - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/3

Emergency consultants value medical scribes and most prefer to work with them, a few would rather not: a qualitative Australian study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/12

Can an observational pain assessment tool improve time to analgesia for cognitively impaired older persons? A cluster randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/33

Failure of falls risk screening tools to predict outcome: a prospective cohort study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/28

PREDICT prioritisation study: establishing the research priorities of paediatric emergency medicine physicians in Australia and New Zealand - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/39

Profile and outcomes of critically ill children in a lower middle-income country - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/52

Characteristics of youth agreeing to electronic sexually transmitted infection risk assessment in the emergency department - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/46

Waveform capnography: an alternative to physician gestalt in determining optimal intubating conditions after administration of paralytic agents - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/62

Read the full January issue of EMJ here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1

Jan 11 2018

15mins

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Rank #15: Primary Survey: the highlights of the October 2017 issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the October 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Richard Body (Emergency Department, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK).
Read the primary survey: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/633.

Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below:
The use of whole-body computed tomography in major trauma: variations in practice in UK trauma hospitals - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/647

Non-traumatic incidental findings in patients undergoing whole-body computed tomography at initial emergency admission - emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/643

Whole body computed tomography for trauma: friend or foe? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/635

Extreme event medicine: considerations for the organisation of out-of-hospital care during obstacle, adventure and endurance competitions http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/680

Ibuprofen versus placebo effect on acute kidney injury in ultramarathons: a randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/637

Gender, race and the presentation of acute coronary syndrome and serious cardiopulmonary diagnoses in ED patients with chest pain - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/653

Primary care services co-located with Emergency Departments across a UK region: early views on their development - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/672

Read the full October issue of EMJ: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10.

Oct 24 2017

7mins

Play

Rank #16: August 2017's Primary Survey

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the August 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/491

Details of the papers mentioned on this podcast can be found below:

Clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention in an emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/495

Developing a decision rule to optimise clinical pharmacist resources for medication reconciliation in the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/502

Emergency medicine pharmacists on an international scale - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/492

‘Major trauma’: now two separate diseases? - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/494

Traumatic brain injuries in older adults—6 years of data for one UK trauma centre: retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/509

Validating the Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) and Troponin-only Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (T-MACS) rules for the prediction of acute myocardial infarction in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/517

A practical approach to Events Medicine provision - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/538

BET 1: Lidocaine with propofol to reduce pain on injection - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/551.2

BET 2: Poor evidence on whether teaching cognitive debiasing, or cognitive forcing strategies, lead to a reduction in errors attributable to cognition in emergency medicine students or doctors - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/553

Read the full August issue here: emj.bmj.com/content/34/8

Aug 10 2017

17mins

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Rank #17: July 2017's Primary Survey

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the July 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/427

Details of the papers mentioned on this podcast can be found below:

The key to resilient individuals is to build resilient and adaptive systems - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/428

Emergency medicine: what keeps me, what might lose me? A narrative study of consultant views in Wales - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/436

The psychological health and well-being of emergency medicine consultants in the UK - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/430

Satisfaction, burnout and intention to stay of emergency nurses in Shanghai - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/448

Occupational stress in the ED: a systematic literature review - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/441

Can a partnership between general practitioners and ambulance services reduce conveyance to emergency care? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/459

Relationship between oxygen concentration and temperature in an exothermic warming device - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/472

The barriers associated with emergency medical service use for acute coronary syndrome: the awareness and influence of an Australian public mass media campaign - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7/466

Read the full July issue here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/7?current-issue=y

Jul 13 2017

12mins

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Rank #18: June 2017's Primary Survey

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the June 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, starting with T-MACS, ROC curves, the demand for mental health care in emergency medicine, pain scales for children and more.

Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/347

Details of the papers mentioned on this podcast can be found below:

Troponin-only Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (T-MACS) decision aid: single biomarker re-derivation and external validation in three cohorts - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/349

What is an ROC curve? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/357

A systematic review of management strategies for children’s mental health care in the emergency department: update on evidence and recommendations for clinical practice and research - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/376

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine composite pain scale for children: level of inter-rater agreement - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/360

Emergency department syndromic surveillance to investigate the health impact and factors associated with alcohol intoxication in Reunion Island - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/386

Violence-related ambulance call-outs in the North West of England: a cross-sectional analysis of nature, extent and relationships to temporal, celebratory and sporting events - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6/364

Read the full June issue here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/6?current-issue=y

Jun 16 2017

10mins

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Rank #19: April 2017's Primary Survey

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Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the April edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, with a special focus on organ donation.

Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/201.

Details of the papers mentioned on this podcast can be found below.

Critical care in the Emergency Department: organ donation: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/256.

Withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy: the case for delay: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/203.

A randomised experiment comparing low-cost ultrasound gel alternative with commercial gel: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/227.

Validity of the Manchester Triage System in patients with sepsis presenting at the ED: a first assessment: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/212.

Mid-arm circumference can be used to estimate weight of adult and adolescent patients: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/4/231.

Mar 27 2017

11mins

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Rank #20: That old weekend effect!

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The truths and myths about the so-called "weekend effect" in the UK hospitals is discussed in this podcast.
Chris Moulton, Vice President of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and a senior consultant at the Royal Bolton Hospital, and Ellen Weber, Editor-in-Chief of the EMJ, compare two very different realities between the USA and the UK emergency medicines, in terms of resources, mind-sets and politics.

Why does data show there is a disparity in mortality rate for patients admitted to hospital at the weekend compared to those admitted on a weekday?

Both related article and commentary published by the Emergency Medicine Journal are available here:
http://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2016/10/27/emermed-2016-206049;

http://emj.bmj.com/content/early/2016/10/27/emermed-2016-206226.

Oct 24 2016

14mins

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