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Rank #93 in Politics category

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Politics

KQED's Forum

Updated 2 months ago

Rank #93 in Politics category

News
News Commentary
Politics
Read more

KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Read more

KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

iTunes Ratings

390 Ratings
Average Ratings
272
50
33
19
16

I’m #TeamGiggle

By Borat4Ever - May 13 2020
Read more
Idk what crawled up Larry’s posterior. Keep doing your thing and giggling, Mina

Mina giggle girl!

By X13 b45 8 - Apr 15 2020
Read more
Don’t listen to Larry mansplaining! Hey Larry it’s just your opinion, man!

iTunes Ratings

390 Ratings
Average Ratings
272
50
33
19
16

I’m #TeamGiggle

By Borat4Ever - May 13 2020
Read more
Idk what crawled up Larry’s posterior. Keep doing your thing and giggling, Mina

Mina giggle girl!

By X13 b45 8 - Apr 15 2020
Read more
Don’t listen to Larry mansplaining! Hey Larry it’s just your opinion, man!
Cover image of KQED's Forum

KQED's Forum

Latest release on Aug 07, 2020

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KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Rank #1: Psychologist Rick Hanson on Building Resilience in a Pandemic

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An overwhelming majority of Californians are worried about a family member getting sick, according to a recent survey by PPIC, or about taking a financial hit from the coronavirus. Add to that the day -to-day stresses of shutdowns and sheltering in place. And while talk of reopening the economy brings relief to some, it is provoking new fear and anxiety in others. In this hour, we’ll get tips from psychologist Rick Hanson about how to build resilience and better cope with uncertainty and fear.

May 06 2020

52mins

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Rank #2: Pandemic Pushes U.S. Postal Service Toward Collapse

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U.S. Postmaster General Megan Brennan told House Oversight Committee members Thursday that the postal service will "run out of cash" by September, unless the government provides $75 billion in aid to make up for devastating pandemic-related operating losses. The $2 trillion stimulus package signed by President Trump last month authorized a $10 billion loan -- but no direct grants -- to the USPS. We'll talk about what it will take to rescue the postal service, and why President Trump opposes emergency aid.

Apr 14 2020

24mins

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Rank #3: Dating in the Age of Coronavirus

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The "new normal" of social distancing is forcing many single Californians to redefine their dating lives. Dating apps have seen a spike in usage since coronavirus hit and they're responding with new features for audio and video messaging within their platforms. Messages from exes looking to reconnect are also on the rise as people seek companionship in this time of isolation. This hour, we talk about dating during the coronavirus pandemic. And we want to hear from you: if you're currently dating in quarantine -- or attempting to -- what's been your experience?

Apr 28 2020

53mins

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Rank #4: Reading Your Way Through a Pandemic

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Publishers are reporting booming sales of Albert Camus' "The Plague" and other examples of pestilence fiction during the pandemic. Other readers are using the shut-in to dive into long and weighty classics like "100 Years of Solitude" or "War and Peace. And still others, hoping to forget it all, are turning to escapist literature. But despite all the reading, bookstores, publishers and authors are being hit hard by the coronavirus shutdown. Forum will check in on independent bookstores who are battling for survival, and we want to hear from you.  What books are sustaining you during this time?

Apr 20 2020

53mins

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Rank #5: Michael Pollan On What the Pandemic Reveals About ‘The Sickness in Our Food Supply’

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As meatpacking plants become coronavirus hotspots and large producers dump milk and destroy crops, the nation's industrial food chain is buckling. That's according to journalist and author Michael Pollan, who says in a recent article that the pandemic is exposing glaring and longstanding deficiencies in the way the U.S. produces and distributes food. We'll talk to him about why he thinks it's time to de-industrialize our food system and re-imagine the American diet.

May 27 2020

28mins

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Rank #6: This Epidemiologist Who Warned of a Global Pandemic Says the Fight Against Coronavirus is Far From Over

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Fourteen years ago, Dr. Larry Brilliant delivered a TED Talk in which he gravely predicted a worldwide pandemic that could infect a billion people and cause trillions of dollars in economic damage. The Marin County resident worked on the World Health Organization team that eradicated smallpox in the 1970s, is the former head of Google.org and chairs the board of the non-profit Ending Pandemics that aims to improve how countries detect and respond to outbreaks. Brilliant says the coronavirus has a low death rate compared with smallpox and is optimistic that we will soon have antiviral drugs to treat patients. We’ll talk with Brilliant about what we can do now to combat coronavirus and what we can learn from this global crisis.

Apr 06 2020

53mins

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Rank #7: UCSF’s Bob Wachter on Newest Covid-19 Science, Bay Area Numbers

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At a Monday press conference, Governor Newsom said California is preparing for a mid-May peak of Covid-19 infections in the state. At the same time, there are early signs that the Bay Area is "flattening the curve".  UCSF department of medicine chair Bob Wachter joins us to discuss how Newsom's prognosis fits with what we're seeing in the Bay Area, the public health benefits and costs of sheltering in place, and when we can expect to return to a semblance of normal.

Apr 07 2020

48mins

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Rank #8: George Packer on Coronavirus and America as a ‘Failed State’

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Journalist George Packer’s 2013 bestseller  “The Unwinding” painted a picture of an America with institutions in decline, a frayed social fabric and inequality on the rise.  In his new piece in the Atlantic, Packer looks at what happens when a country with those pre-existing conditions meets a deadly pandemic.  “Every morning in the endless month of March, Americans woke up to find themselves citizens of a failed state,” he writes. Packer joins us to talk about his piece, and what can be done to strengthen our civic life.

Apr 24 2020

24mins

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Rank #9: California Teachers, Students Struggle with Distance Learning

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California's public schools were already facing daunting challenges. And now, an unprecedented closure has been added to the mix. We'll talk with educators and parents about how the impromptu experiment in distance learning is going, and what it all means for the state's six million K-12 public school students.

Apr 01 2020

53mins

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Rank #10: Examining the Fall of Elizabeth Warren’s Campaign

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On Thursday, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren ended her bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Warren's campaign was characterized by her call for broad economic reform, including breaking up big tech, canceling student loan debt and imposing a wealth tax. In farewell remarks to her staff, Warren said the campaign showed that "a woman can stand up, hold her ground, and stay true to herself -- no matter what." But campaign watchers wonder whether and to what extent her gender played a role in her downfall. We'll take up the issues.

Mar 06 2020

51mins

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Rank #11: How Prepared is the Bay Area’s Healthcare System to Deal With Coronavirus Spread?

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Hospitals are struggling to cope with new infections in Italy's Lombardy region, where coronavirus cases occupy more than 80% of the intensive care beds. On Tuesday, San Francisco confirmed its 14th case of COVID-19, bringing the Bay Area total to 99. So, how prepared are Bay Area hospitals for an influx of patients? As healthcare workers brace for further spread, what lessons can our regional healthcare system take from other countries?

Mar 11 2020

52mins

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Rank #12: Bush Administration’s David Frum Laments State of Conservatism

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In his new book "Trumpocalypse," erstwhile neoconservative David Frum explores what he sees as the failures of conservatism, from the Iraq war to the financial crisis to the Trump presidency.  A former speechwriter for President George W. Bush,  Frum joins us to talk about his book and how to reimagine a United States and a conservative party without Donald Trump.

May 27 2020

52mins

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Rank #13: Navigating Anxiety and Isolation During the Coronavirus Pandemic

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The impact of the novel coronavirus on our daily lives is far reaching and complex – which naturally leads to high levels of anxiety. In times of stress, we often turn to others for support and strength, but in this case, slowing the spread of COVID-19 means limiting social contact. In this hour of Forum, we talk with experts about how to deal with the double whammy of anxiety and isolation. And we want to hear from you: what are you experiencing and how are you coping?

Mar 13 2020

52mins

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Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh on the Power of Street Art as Protest

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Musician Nina Simone once said “an artist’s duty, as far as I’m concerned, is to reflect the times.” We’re now seeing a reflection of our times — the fight against racism and inequality — in works of art on city streets and storefronts across California, as artists paint murals or graffiti remembering George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and declaring “Black Lives Matter.” Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh knows the power street art can have in bolstering a social movement. Her international street art campaign “Stop Telling Women to Smile,” now a book of the same name, reflected her own experiences with street harassment and became a way to empower other women. We’ll talk to Fazlalizadeh about her work, which includes recent murals supporting the Black Lives Matter movement, and the role of street art in protests.

Aug 07 2020

16mins

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How to Chart a Path out of QAnon and Other Cult-like Communities

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QAnon, the online conspiracy group that traffics in baseless theories about a Satan-worshipping deep state, counts among its defenders Republican congressional candidates, far right media personalities and former and current Trump administration officials. It’s also stolen the minds of countless ordinary Americans who have come to believe in its apocalyptic, convoluted narratives. We’ll talk about what attracts people to QAnon and similar cult-like communities, and what friends and family members can do to help loved ones emerge from the rabbit hole.

Aug 07 2020

35mins

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Pandemic Brings a Rise in Hunger in the Bay Area

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For Bay Area food banks, securing funding and supplies is increasingly difficult during the pandemic.  The challenges come as the need for food assistance is rising.  Long lines have become common at food banks, and Second Harvest Food Bank in Silicon Valley is seeing a 100 percent increase in the number of people calling its food connection hotline, many for the first time. As the economic impact of the virus on families and individuals grows, we’ll hear how Bay Area food banks are coping.

Aug 07 2020

28mins

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Benjamin Jealous, President of People For the American Way, on Saving the U.S. Postal Service

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With less than 90 days to the November election, concerns are mounting that the Trump Administration is actively undermining the  U.S. Postal Service. Although the USPS is the country’s most popular government agency, President  Trump recently dismissed it as a “joke” and questioned its ability to deliver mail-in ballots on time. Trump’s newly appointed Postmaster General, who was also a major Trump campaign donor, has limited overtime work, and extra mail delivery, moves that postal workers say have created mail backlogs. In response,  Benjamin Jealous, the President of the People For the American Way, is spearheading a campaign to defend the Postal Service. We’ll talk to Jealous about what can be done to ensure that Americans can have confidence in the mail service.

Related Links:

Aug 07 2020

23mins

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Former Obama Campaign Manager David Plouffe on the Latest Political News

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Since former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe published “A Citizen’s Guide to Beating Donald Trump” back in early March, there have been major developments regarding the 2020 election. Former Vice President Joe Biden became the Democratic nominee, the coronavirus pandemic escalated and the economy fell into a deep recession. Most recent polls have Trump trailing in the general election, and one poll from Berkeley IGS this week has Biden leading by 39 percentage points among California voters. But many questions are still to be answered, including who Biden will pick as his running mate, what an election looks like in a pandemic and which strategies each party should take in order to win votes. Plouffe joins Forum to talk about the book, answer those questions and discuss the latest political news.

Aug 06 2020

52mins

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Ahead of School Year Start, Teachers Raise Concerns About Remote and In-Person Instruction Alike

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As school districts around the country issue pandemic education plans, there’s widespread concern among teachers about safety, equity and how to make the most of online learning. We’ll talk about a new NPR/Ipsos teacher survey, and we’ll hear how one local teachers’ union is handling its members’ concerns about education in the time of Covid.

Aug 06 2020

28mins

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Nurses Stage National Protests for More Protective Equipment and Safer Working Conditions

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On August 5, thousands of nurses across the country staged protests to highlight the lack of personal protective equipment and other challenges they continue to face as front line workers in this pandemic. According to media reports, in California, 100 health care workers have been killed by Covid-19 and medical workers account for 20% of all infections in some states. Nurses are demanding that more be done to protect them. We’ll hear about what how nurses are coping and what they need for a safer work environment.

Aug 06 2020

23mins

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Census Count to End a Month Early Stoking Fears of an Undercount

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The Census Bureau is ending its population count a month early, though nearly 40 percent of the country has yet to fill out the forms. Census Bureau director Steven Dillingham announced yesterday that all counting efforts will wrap up by Sept. 30, cutting short a four-month extension during the pandemic. We’ll talk about what ending the count early could mean for California’s historically undercounted communities and the redrawing of political districts.

Aug 05 2020

52mins

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Pandemic Takes Growing Toll on Mental Health

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The coronavirus pandemic has many people feeling isolated in their homes, detached from loved ones, and anxious about their livelihoods. All of that is taking a major toll on mental health. The U.S. suicide rate rose after the 2008 recession, and experts warn that vulnerable individuals are more at risk of suicide during periods of crisis.  We’ll talk about how to address anxiety and depression, when to seek help, and what services are available for individuals and families struggling to cope.

Resources:

Crisis Support Services of Alameda County

Mental Health Association San Francisco

CalHOPE

Aug 05 2020

52mins

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California Faces a Looming Eviction Crisis as Coronavirus Pandemic Continues

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Renters across California could be in danger of losing their homes in the coming weeks. Eviction moratoriums that have helped millions of renters are close to expiring even as the coronavirus pandemic is keeping many unemployed. State lawmakers are weighing proposals to prevent a mass wave of evictions, but face a budget deficit and other constraints.  Meanwhile, relief from the federal government appears unlikely. We discuss the state’s looming eviction crisis.

Aug 04 2020

28mins

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More California Counties on COVID Watch List as State Records Over 500,000 cases

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In the month of July, California experienced its worst surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths leading Gov. Newsom to impose a re-shutdown of businesses in more than 30 counties. As of today, California leads the nation with over 500,000 confirmed cases. But at his daily presser Monday, Newsom indicated that the state’s situation is improving with both new COVID-19 cases and coronavirus-related hospitalizations down in the last week. He also emphasized the virus’s disproportionate impact on the state’s Latino and Central Valley populations and reaffirmed his commitment to allocating state and federal resources to those communities where cases continue to grow. We'll talk about the steps California's taking to contain the pandemic, address testing backlogs and support communities disproportionately harmed by the virus.

Aug 04 2020

23mins

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The Untold Story of How Congress Won the Civil War

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While Abraham Lincoln tends to get most of the credit for winning the Civil War, historian Fergus Bordewich reminds us not to forget about the role Congress played in the Union’s victory. In his new book, “Congress at War,” Bordewich follows four influential members of Congress as they navigate one of the most dynamic and consequential times in American history. Bordewich joins Forum to discuss the challenge of governing a divided nation and how the 36th United States Congress helped hold the union together.

Aug 04 2020

51mins

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Inside the Infamous College Admissions Scandal

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In March 2019, news broke of a massive college admissions bribery scandal. Among the accused were prominent business people, well-known actors, sports coaches, and four of California’s top universities. At the heart of the conspiracy was con man Rick Singer, an author of self-help books and purported college counselor, who masterminded rigging SAT and ACT tests, faking athletic profiles and bribing coaches. Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz -- Wall Street Journal reporters who broke major developments in the story -- detail the rise and fall of Rick Singer’s elaborate operation in their new book, “UNACCEPTABLE: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal.” In this hour, we talk with Korn and Levitz about the book and take your questions about the college admissions scandal.

Aug 03 2020

51mins

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Politics Monday: Rep. Anna Eshoo, COVID-19 Relief, Biden’s VP Pick

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First, South Bay Congresswoman Anna Eshoo, chair of the House health subcommittee, joins us to discuss the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic. Then, we check in with KQED's Scott Shafer and Anita Kumar of Politico on the latest national political news.

Aug 03 2020

52mins

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After Strong Start in Battling Coronavirus, California Now Leads U.S. in Cases

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In mid-March, California became the first state to enact widespread shelter-in-place orders -- seen as a bold action to prevent the kind of spike in coronavirus cases New York was reporting at the time. Today, California has the most cases of COVID-19 in the country, surpassing New York with over 485,000 confirmed cases. Public health experts say California's early shelter-in-place orders effectively slowed the spread, but a combination of impatience with those orders, unreliable federal leadership and Gov. Newsom’s decision to re-open the economy has created a more challenging battle against the virus. We'll discuss the latest news on how California is handling the pandemic, including what's happening in the Central Valley, a new hot spot for coronavirus.

Jul 31 2020

28mins

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How Much Should We Worry about COVID When Gathering Outside?

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After more than four months of limited activity and isolation, Californians have been itching to socialize. Even as cases rise in the state, many have become emboldened to gather in the safest place they can -- outdoors. But how safe is it? Public health officials across the state have been warning against the large gatherings that are increasingly popping up at public parks and beaches. We’ll get the latest on what we know about outdoor transmission of COVID-19 and the safest ways to see friends and family.

Jul 31 2020

23mins

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Unemployment and Recession Woes Intensify as Pandemic Wears On

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The end of July spells the end of an additional $600 per week benefit for many unemployed Americans in the midst of a pandemic-induced recession. As Congress debates if and how to extend the supplemental cash, California lawmakers are drafting a plan to make up those funds if the federal money dries up. We discuss what’s in the works to help the close to 7 million unemployed Californians, where the recession is headed, and how lawmakers are responding.

Jul 31 2020

28mins

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Open Vallejo’s Geoffrey King on Badge-Bending by Vallejo Police

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An investigative report by Open Vallejo, a recently launched independent news site, has found that a secret clique in the Vallejo Police Department bends back points of their badges to commemorate each time they kill in the line of duty. These revelations came as a shock at a time when the nation is focused on issues of police brutality and less than two weeks after the California Department of Justice announced an investigation into Vallejo Police for destroying evidence in the killing of Sean Monterrosa. We talk with Geoffrey King, founder and editor of Open Vallejo, about the report.

Jul 31 2020

23mins

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Poet Cathy Park Hong on ‘Minor Feelings’ and Anti-Asian Racism in the Age of COVID

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In her new book of essays, "Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning," poet Cathy Park Hong weaves memoir with cultural criticism to explore topics of racial identity, shame, politics and capitalism. Hong describes “minor feelings” as "emotions built from the sediments of everyday racial experience and the irritant of having one’s perception of reality constantly questioned or dismissed.” It’s a feeling that’s particularly acute during the pandemic, which she says has “unmasked” a vicious anti-Asian racism. We'll talk to Hong about the book, Asian American identity and anti-Asian racism.

Jul 29 2020

52mins

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Employers and Workers Question What Is — And Isn’t Working — About Working From Home

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Tech giant Google said Monday it would delay bringing workers back to the office until summer 2021. The company’s decision reflects a massive change that started in March when millions of white collar employees shifted to working from home. Some employers were pleasantly surprised at how productive their workers could be without the office setting. Freedom from commutes and strict working schedules has been a boon to many workers who now have more time to cook, exercise, and sleep. Still, some workers may find it harder to thrive from behind a computer screen. We talk to experts about the shift to working from home and whether it’s a sustainable model for the long term.

Jul 29 2020

52mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

390 Ratings
Average Ratings
272
50
33
19
16

I’m #TeamGiggle

By Borat4Ever - May 13 2020
Read more
Idk what crawled up Larry’s posterior. Keep doing your thing and giggling, Mina

Mina giggle girl!

By X13 b45 8 - Apr 15 2020
Read more
Don’t listen to Larry mansplaining! Hey Larry it’s just your opinion, man!