Cover image of The Fluent Show
(87)

Rank #173 in Language Learning category

Education
How To
Language Learning

The Fluent Show

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #173 in Language Learning category

Education
How To
Language Learning
Read more

Learn a Language...Or Maybe Three!I'm Kerstin from Fluent Language, and together with my co-host Lindsay from Lindsay does Languages, I'm on a mission to help you get excited about language learning. We both learn languages every day in our lives, and we have learnt over 15 different languages between us.In this show, we share stories, news, tips, and ideas that will make you fluent...eventually. Subscribe to the show today to get your regular dose of Fluent love.🥰 Support The Fluent Show on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/fluentshow)

Read more

Learn a Language...Or Maybe Three!I'm Kerstin from Fluent Language, and together with my co-host Lindsay from Lindsay does Languages, I'm on a mission to help you get excited about language learning. We both learn languages every day in our lives, and we have learnt over 15 different languages between us.In this show, we share stories, news, tips, and ideas that will make you fluent...eventually. Subscribe to the show today to get your regular dose of Fluent love.🥰 Support The Fluent Show on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/fluentshow)

iTunes Ratings

87 Ratings
Average Ratings
79
3
2
0
3

Waste of time, full of advertisements

By C.OdeR.Ed123 - Nov 13 2019
Read more
These podcasts are great quality but sadly the podcaster does not structure her podcasts well at all. It takes her nearly 10 minutes to get to the topic on some of her episodes. She spends these first 10 minutes of her episodes by advertising herself and her sponsors. During her podcasts there is also a lot of fluff and not enough good information. I will be finding a new podcaster.

Sooooo Useful!!

By Deej2013 - Jan 09 2019
Read more
Great tips, keep up the good work!!

iTunes Ratings

87 Ratings
Average Ratings
79
3
2
0
3

Waste of time, full of advertisements

By C.OdeR.Ed123 - Nov 13 2019
Read more
These podcasts are great quality but sadly the podcaster does not structure her podcasts well at all. It takes her nearly 10 minutes to get to the topic on some of her episodes. She spends these first 10 minutes of her episodes by advertising herself and her sponsors. During her podcasts there is also a lot of fluff and not enough good information. I will be finding a new podcaster.

Sooooo Useful!!

By Deej2013 - Jan 09 2019
Read more
Great tips, keep up the good work!!
Cover image of The Fluent Show

The Fluent Show

Latest release on Jan 13, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

Rank #1: 5 Steps for Creating Your Language Habit

Podcast cover
Read more

Click or tap here to get the free guide to building your language learning habit

Thank you to Bonnie Z for this episode introduction.

Today’s question comes from Elizabeth - here's a summary of what she's asking:

I am attempting to learn Japanese. I’m trying out different methods in order to establish a routine that works best for me. This is starting to frustrate me because I feel like I am going in circles without making any real progress in the language.

I absolutely love Japan, and so I’m trying hard to stay motivated and keep going, but the lack of progress is starting to zap my enthusiasm.

Is this type of “wheel spinning” typical when you are a first time, self-directed language learner?

OMG ELIZABETH I LOVE THIS QUESTION!!!!!!

You’re taking your first baby steps into indie learning and choosing what is right for you, and that’s just super strong and amazing.

In today’s episode, I’ll take the opportunity to talk you through a few key steps as I teach them in the Language Habit Toolkit, my all-in-one package to help you create a great language learning routine.

The idea of this language HABIT is so important because of what a good habit signifies.

5 Steps To Establishing Your Language Learning Habit

Assess your resources - are they right?

You want a guiding resource, some input resources, and a few reference materials.
Learn more about this in my blog article "No More Hoarding!".

Aim for higher levels of COMFORT not skill

Work with the right goals

There are two types of goals you need for language learning:
Vision Goals and Path Goals

Track what you do

If your goal is the habit, progress is coming closer to the language being an absolutely irremovable part of your life. Progress isn’t always about knowing one more word of vocabulary, but instead about one tiny little degree of comfort.

My most basic check-in is the “daily contact”, keeping me feeling accomplished even on super busy days.

Review Regularly

This is where we find out what’s real and what’s not, and that means whether you are actually spinning your wheels. The key is to answer questions like

  • What went well, what didn’t go well
  • Was there any surprise
  • What do I want to do next
  • Where am I in relation to my goals

TRUST IN YOURSELF you’re doing an awesome job Elizabeth!!

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Apr 01 2019

32mins

Play

Rank #2: 9 Creative Ways To Power Up Your Language Learning

Podcast cover
Read more

Today’s episode is based on an Instagram question from Iye, who is learning Norwegian.

She asks

Do you have any tips for how I can go about creating my own language learning materials?

Listen in to discover how creating your own materials will help you learn faster and better.

And there's more: click or tap here to read the full show notes in my blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk.
Thank you to Evelina from Alaska for this episode introduction.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Jan 28 2019

25mins

Play

Rank #3: What Are the Easiest Languages in the World?

Podcast cover
Read more

“The merit of all things lies in their difficulty.”

  • Alexandre Dumas

In this podcast, Lindsay and I discuss what makes a language easy or hard to learn, and share our own Top 5 easiest languages. Listen to find out more.

Want to Join The Discussion?

We have a full blog article to go with this episode, where you can leave a comment to tell us your own thoughts:
Click or tap here to read the full blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk

Thank you to the Fluent Language Learners Facebook Group for their contributions. You can join this group if you also want to talk about languages over there and check in regularly with other learners.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Apr 22 2019

1hr 14mins

Play

Rank #4: 3 Useful Rules For Remembering Grammar

Podcast cover
Read more

In today's episode I discuss the question of how to have the best memory possible for learning a langauge. There are a bunch of rules of thumb to help you work out if memorizing can help you progress from where you are right now.

Speaking requires quick recall, agile thinking. Writing requires attention to detail.

Rule of Thumb: Understand the concept, learn details on a need-to-know basis.

Rule of Memorizing: Know the difference between cramming and acquiring.

Rule of Thumb for Learning a Language: Aim to make mistakes and be understood, not to be perfect and silent.

Press play and have a listen to the show for more detailed advice about memorizing, plus my personal declaration of love for post-it notes.

Thank you to Owain for this episode introduction.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Oct 15 2018

25mins

Play

Rank #5: How To Start An Amazing Language Journal (with Instagrammers Kathryn and Sam)

Podcast cover
Read more

Click or tap here to get inspired with a gallery of inspiring pages from the best instagram journalers

What if you had a language learning tool that costs you hardly anything, adapts to your own preferences, boosts your memory and helps concentration?

Turns out you do, and it's probably in your bag right now: Your notebook!

In this episode of the podcast, I'm joined by language lovers Kathryn and Sam who are passionate about taking creative language notes. Listen to discover their experiences, language learning tips and strategies for effective note taking and creating an amazing language journal for yourself.

Special Guests: Kathryn (365smallsteps) and Sam Grigg.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Oct 08 2018

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #6: How to Increase Your Vocabulary so You Can Talk about Anything

Podcast cover
Read more

Today’s theme: How to Learn Specialist Vocabulary

Thank you to Bonnie for this episode introduction.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Check out The Vocab Cookbook

In this short and straightforward guide, you'll learn:
* The Three Steps behind successful word memory: Acquire, Memorize, Revise
* Where to find the best system for remembering words forever
* How techniques can be adapted to suit your own learning styles
* Why remembering grammar is different from remembering vocabulary, and what you can do about it

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Aug 19 2019

35mins

Play

Rank #7: Top Tools for Language Learning: Autumn/Winter 2019

Podcast cover
Read more

Wrap up warm, it's the autumn/winter edition of Top Tools for language learning, bringing you ingenious solutions to common language learning problem.

This podcast has chapter support, so if your podcast player supports chapters, you can skip to relevant parts as your little linguist heart desires.

Click or tap here to read the full show notes and get all links <<

This time, we're covering 6 resources that can make your life easier when you're learning languages. You'll hear about:

  • FlipWord
  • Quizklip
  • The Indo-European Cognate Dictionary
  • Mini Vocab Notebooks (preferably with Gudetama on them)
  • LingoLog
  • Master Any Language

Thank you for listening to the Fluent Show! If you enjoyed this episode, please consider supporting the show by leaving a review in your podcast app or becoming a member of our Patreon community. And if you have a question or want to share your listener intro on the show, please email it to hello@fluentlanguage.co.uk

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Nov 25 2019

1hr 12mins

Play

Rank #8: How to Learn Several Languages At The Same Time

Podcast cover
Read more

In The News This Week

A deaf woman wanted to attend a pop concert with her young daughter, but had to fight and even sue the company until she was granted a sign language interpreter. Is this fair?

We discuss what 'disability' is, how sign language is very different from other languages in music, and how awesome it is to have interpreter companies in this world.

Make sure you watch the great video showing how signers interpret music.

How to Learn Several Languages at Once

Our show topic this week is all about learning more than one language at the same time. It’s the polyglot dream! Many people, especially polyglots, want to learn as many languages as possible.

But is there enough time?

How the heck do we fit it in?

We discuss advice from polyglots around the internet and compare it with our own life experiences to get to the ultimate tips for learning multiple languages.

Click or tap here to read the full list of tips and show notes

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Feb 12 2018

59mins

Play

Rank #10: Q&A: What's a Reasonable Weekly Schedule for Language Learning?

Podcast cover
Read more

Rebecca from New York asked

Can you talk about how to set up a reasonable weekly schedule for language learning?

In this show, I've got five simple steps for you that will help you plan a successful week in language learning. I'll talk about setting goals, managing your energy, analysing your calendar, and matching your activity to your strengths.

A reasonable schedule for learning languages is one that doesn’t make you groan, but isn’t empty either.

Here's what matters most:

  • prefer regular to all-in-one
  • Ensure you speak, read, listen, write
  • Have at least one big session, preferably more than one
  • Review after a few weeks

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Apr 02 2018

27mins

Play

Rank #11: Living And Speaking French Just Like In France

Podcast cover
Read more

Click or tap here to read the full show notes in my blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk

Bonjour les auditeurs, and welcome to a special édition française of the Fluent Show, with my native French speaking guest Géraldine Lepere.

Check out Géraldine's AWESOME site Comme Une Française

This show is a bilingual podcast, meaning you'll hear me do my best in French.

Bilingual? How does that work?

It's simple. Throughout this episode of the podcast, Géraldine and I will switch between speaking English and speaking French.

You will hear me make mistakes, forget words, and be right there in the truth of making mistakes. I am a French speaker and have studied French for 20+ years, but my French is NOT perfect.

If you are not an experienced French learner, there will be some parts of the podcast that you don’t understand. But like all language learners, you’re not alone in that feeling. I always remember what the lovely Ron Gullekson said about listening to a different language:

“I want to get used to feeling uncomfortable.”

So fear not, trust that we will come back to English again and again, and the interview will still be interesting for you.

Get A List Of Vocabulary I Learnt In This Episode + My Main Takeaways

Special Guest: Géraldine Lepere.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Jun 18 2018

1hr

Play

Rank #12: My Language Learning Secrets!!

Podcast cover
Read more

This week on the show, I answered a question from Twitter user @akalious:

I’m so curious how you learned English to IELTS 9* even before you went to UK... Could you talk abt that a little bit in future episodes?

In this episode you'll learn:

  • How Many Formal Study Hours Of English I Took in the first 8 years of studying English...and why that only half matters
  • What I Did Differently To Give Me Native-Like Fluency in English
  • How having No Native Speaker Contact actually helped me grow in English
  • The one way that polyglots can damage your language learning 😲
  • Why my dream job of "grumpy record store owner in London" helped me imagine my success even when I was 13
  • Why you must never doubt yourself and it's better to believe than compare

8 Language Mindset Tips You Can Start Using Today

  1. OBSESS
  2. CONTINUE
  3. LISTEN
  4. Be confident from day 1. Know that you can do this. Do not doubt yourself.
  5. Drill grammar, read books, use what you have.
  6. Think long term - I never wondered when I’d be fluent. Why? I had no one to talk to anyway.
  7. Sleep with a dictionary by your bed.
  8. Don’t overthink it. I didn’t worry about how I was learning or whether my vocab study method was the MOST effective. I just did what I did.

If there is an actual secret, it is this: Yes, you can simply decide that you're going to be awesome - you don't have to tell anyone or proclaim your amazingness online or with friends. But you can know it on the inside and carry the confidence into everything you do in language.

Oh, and grammar drills are effective. 😅

Thanks to Ashley Williams (husband of co-host Lindsay for this week's podcast intro.

  • IELTS 9 means roughly a C2 level, on the "International English Language Testing System" endorsed by most British universities and the British Council. You take this test for immigration or for going to university.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Jul 09 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #13: Ask A Linguist: Your Language Questions Answered By Linguists From Talk The Talk

Podcast cover
Read more

Linguist hour! Lindsay and I bring you an interview with one of our favourite podcasts, the linguistics show Talk the Talk from Australia.

Please take 5 minutes to take our Fluent Show survey!

We don't often have research scientists on the show, so this was a huge opportunity for the Fluent Show to go into science.

We posed your "Ask a Linguist" questions on these topics:

Is it a language? Is it a dialect?

Talk the Talk had a few insights that I had never heard before.

What determines the prestige of a dialect within a language?

We looked into how politics and social developments can directly influence how you speak, and how you feel about it.

Are there common language learning stages across all languages, for example grammar needed to communicate something?

In fact, there are two ways to approach language learning: analysis and pattern-spotting, and learning and copying useful chunks. Which one works? Talk the Talk gave us the science perspective. Plus: What is "glottochronology?"

Hedvig quoted this research paper.

If we come across a language in the same area that uses different words for the same concepts, does that language come from a different family of languages?

In essence, yes. For this one, you need a basic vocabulary list - but they're not all that straightforward. Hedvig and Kylie explain more on this episode.

Finally: Podcasting!

Also: We talk about what it's like to podcast about languages, and about podcasting in general. If you're not interested in the wider context of language and podcasting authentically...then skip it and you won't miss the linguistics. We do know that many listeners love podcasts and think about starting their own, so for you this discussion is going to be both useful and interesting.

Ultimately, we love and support community radio and podcasting. And in that sense...

Please Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Special Guests: Kylie Sturgess and Talk The Talk.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Jan 21 2019

59mins

Play

Rank #14: Frustrated! 🔥 What To Do When You Just Can't

Podcast cover
Read more

In this episode, I am answering a listener question from Leandro.

I'm going through a really hard time on learning languages. I'm a Portuguese native speaker and I'm learning English and French. Most of time I'm really motivated learning English, because I love British 19th century literature and I fancy reading all the books in English. My level is not that bad, I guess.
But, most of time I'm so unmotivated to learn French and keep with my daily studies. Sometimes I get so frutrated I want to burn all my materials of study out.

I have two questions: how to handle with frutration? And how to get better at pronunciation by myself?

Ready to hear my answers? Then tune in!

Leandro's good practices with English:

  1. You have a very clear thing that you love and enjoy in the target language - English 19th century literature
  2. You can picture a goal, a situation that feels possible to you - reading all the books in English
  3. You are feeling fairly confident and you don’t struggle with self doubt - like you say, your level is not so bad. You’re working within the realm of what’s possible, you’re not asking anything impossible from yourself, you are not obsessed with progress, just having a good time.

Before you set fire to your books and possibly other things, know this: IT IS OKAY TO FEEL UNMOTIVATED. IT IS NORMAL.

The most important question you haven’t answered is why do you feel so unmotivated

Teach & Thrive
Sign up here if you're interested in Lindsay & Kerstin's new workshop series for ambitious online language teachers and creators.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Thank you to listener Bonnie for this episode introduction.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

May 27 2019

22mins

Play

Rank #15: Learning and Speaking 20+ Languages in New York City

Podcast cover
Read more

This week, I talk to language and grammar fanatic Ellen Jovin. Ellen has spent the last (nearly) decade learning and forgetting over 20 languages, and reviewing hundreds of language learning materials.

In this interview, you will learn about

  • How to select the best materials for teaching yourself a language
  • How to grow as a person through using Facebook
  • Why it doesn't matter if a language is hard
  • Why Ellen stopped going to language classes
  • How even the best book can be one you don't enjoy, and what to do when that happens
  • How to use the city, even the building you live in, to learn more languages
  • Why Ellen has reviewed hundreds of materials, but won't tell me (or you!) which one is the best one
  • Why being true to yourself is a better way to learn languages

Quotes from Ellen Jovin

Ellen is a joy to talk to and to listen to. She has so much love for language and a great way with words, so this interview was packed full of great quotes.

"In 2009 I suddenly realised (..) that I can really learn a lot without ever going to class."

"I feel a kinship with Slavic languages. There's so much grammar and I love grammar so much that I'm sitting there with my eyes open in disbelief that they could possibly have this many forms."

"I feel as though it might really transform my life outlook if I took Latin."

"I feel like what I'm doing is true. It's honest. I'm not studying languages because I think I should study them. I'm studying them because it makes me feel happy."

"I don't really care about [forgetting languages I've studied]. I did it because I enjoyed the process. It opens up a world into another culture, it enables you to make new friends who are native speakers of other languages....and how is that not worthwhile?"

"In a teach yourself environment you really have to tap into the interesting capacity for play, for humour."

Special Guest: Ellen Jovin.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

May 07 2018

1hr 15mins

Play

Rank #16: What To Do When You Fail To Reach Your Goals

Podcast cover
Read more

After our live episode for number 100, we're rolling 'back to school' and reviewing summer motivation and new routines before cracking on with our topics this month.

In The News

We discussed this BBC news article about a pedantic (?) rule in French grammar...and who's trying to get rid of it. The language, ever changing, but who thought THIS untouchable rule would be questioned?

How To Refresh Your Language Learning Goals

In this episode we focused on the big topic of goals. Do you EVER get everything done that you aim to do in language learning?

Here's what we discussed

  • How we think about achieving or failing to achieve our own language goals
  • What the word for "failing to achieve" should be (call me maybe, Merriam-Webster)
  • The hidden information you only get from a failed language goal
  • The two sides of reviewing language goals on deadline day: data and motivation
  • 6 Strategies for refreshing your language learning goals and dealing with disappointment
  • What is a good tracking method to make sure you actually work on your goals?
  • Whether to re-set or abandon a goal if you didn't achieve it

A Song For When You Wonder If Your Progress Will Disappear Because You Didn't Reach A Goal

Everything stays
Right where you left it
Everything stays
But it still changes
Ever so slightly
Daily and nightly
In little ways
When everything stays

And here's a wonderfully helpful quote from Ira Glass

Ira Glass on Storytelling from David Shiyang Liu on Vimeo.

And finally, more life advice from "Adventure Time"

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Sep 10 2018

1hr 2mins

Play

Rank #17: Maintaining Old Languages While Learning New Ones

Podcast cover
Read more

How can you keep an older language fresh while starting on a new one?

Do you have to worry about forgetting everything you've learnt within weeks?

This week, head over to the blog for detailed notes and an article on this topic:
Click or tap here to read the blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk

Conclusions:

  1. You can’t just forget a language, but in order to keep it fresh you need to engage in maintenance activities and accept a learning curve when you immerse again
  2. Learning more languages, even at the same time, is awesome
  3. But don’t expect miracles, consider your goals and limitations
  4. Interference is a normal process of language acquisition

Thank you to Bonnie for this episode introduction.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Jul 22 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #18: Understanding TV and Film Dialogues Without Subtitles (with Cara from Leo Listening)

Podcast cover
Read more

This week, my guest on the podcast is Cara Leopold, an English teacher who focuses on helping her students enjoy TV and films in English by improving their listening skills.

Some of Cara's top tips:

  • Don’t mess around with TV and films initially. They're more challenging than many of us like to admit, and it can be disheartening even at B levels to miss big chunks of action because we insist on switching off the subtitles.
  • Instead, stick to curated materials for learners
  • Look for natural speech over scripted speech, actors with a naturalistic delivery who don't mumble in order to sound authentic
  • Try podcasts and interviews, because they deliver natural speech and structured content.
  • If a show comes out regularly and follows a strict formula with set segments, it’s going to be easier to understand

The biggest mistakes Cara sees language learners make is to treat tv and films like you would in your native language, expecting to kick back and relax for 2 hours. If it's passive consumption you are after, your listening skills will not improve - think quality over quantity.

And here is a piece of Cara's philosophy that stood out to me:

“Everything works in language learning."

Step By Step to Subtitle Freedom

Here are the steps Cara recommends so you can improve listening skills and hit that subtitle freedom:

  1. Get hold of a text, for example search youtube by subtitles
  2. Open the transcript below your YouTube video so you can read it as you move along
  3. Find trailers or selected clips of films and TV shows, or choose to watch a show or film in scenes
  4. Practice dictation
  5. Switch the subtitles on and off as required
  6. Repeat things as closely as possible to how the actor is saying them

“You have to be able to settle for some imperfection."

Special Guest: Cara Leopold.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Dec 10 2018

59mins

Play

Rank #19: Unusual Ways to Remember Vocabulary That Describes Ideas

Podcast cover
Read more

The German Retreat in Berlin

Today I answer a listener question from Hadassah about memorizing vocabulary that describes ideas, not objects

Here are a few handy tips in summary - listen to the show to hear my many examples and in-depth explanations.

  1. The post-it method. Write your words on post-its and stick them up around quirky places that do have a connection to the ideas you’re describing. The added creativity involved in connecting the abstract concept to the object will help you remember it as you spent more time contemplating the word and making it ’sticky'

  2. The Language Play Method In addition to associating the concept with an object, you can also use the linguistic characteristics of the word you’re trying to remember. This can be sound, spelling, etymology. Find what your word rhymes with, associate the sound of the word with its meaning, or research exactly where it comes from.

  3. Chunks of Language Instead of individual words, the idea is to study chunks of language, that could be short sentences or little phrases that you can use. So instead of “hungry” you’d learn “I’m so hungry, I want to eat” or instead of “where” you’d learn the whole phrase “where is the bathroom?”. For your question of abstracts, this can be helpful because you now have a full sentence to write down and something that you can sing to yourself.

  4. Find examples of the concept in music and art

The forgetting curve: humans tend to halve their memory of newly learned knowledge in a matter of days or weeks unless they consciously review the learned material.

Thank you to Wesley for this episode introduction in Persian.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Sep 09 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #20: When Is the Right Time to Start Learning Another Language?

Podcast cover
Read more

¡Hola Radioyentes!

This week I'm answering a listener question (asked in Spanish AND English!):

 When is it the right time to start learning another language?

The question came from Tomás, 45 years old and a native speaker of Spanish. Tomás has good English and regular exposure through books and TV, but he feels unsure about whether he's ready to add a new language like German or English.

This has happened to me a few times, and I’ve also studied up to 3 languages at the same time.

In this episode, I reflected on what matters most when you are facing this question and shared 3 core rules for you:

1. When you don’t practice a language, you’ll lose a bit of it

Not practicing a language doesn’t mean that you’ll never remember it again. In fact, you are unlikely to ever go all the way back to zero.

But it does mean that your progress will slow down and if you don’t do anything, it means that you will forget some of what you practiced in the language most recently. Remembering that memory is all about repetition and exposure, it seems likely that you’d lose what you were last exposed to.

So maybe as a rule of thumb expect that you’ll step down one level. But if you’re already a few years in, you won’t lose all those years.

If you stop actively studying after 3 months = it can feel like nothing sticks.
If you stop actively studying after 5 years = it will not all disappear.

2. Make sure you adjust your expectations for both languages

You could be learning five, ten languages at once and in fact there are ways in which this will absolutely propel you forward. But don’t expect the results of a sprint when you are in fact practicing a triathlon. Progress is not linear - it’s not always what you expect or predict, and often your destination changes

3. Declare your intentions

Once you have worked out your goals and you got in touch with what you really want, you get to decide and move forward. Your decision is not forever.

And as far as I can see, you are in an absolutely perfect position. Good luck!

Support This Podcast

Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Thank you to Maria for this episode introduction.

Sponsored By:

Support The Fluent Show

Links:

Mar 18 2019

28mins

Play