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Education
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EWA Radio

Updated 6 days ago

Education
Courses
Read more

EWA, the professional organization dedicated to improving the quality and quantity of education coverage in the media, hosts regular interviews and panel discussions with journalists and education professionals.

Read more

EWA, the professional organization dedicated to improving the quality and quantity of education coverage in the media, hosts regular interviews and panel discussions with journalists and education professionals.

iTunes Ratings

15 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
0
0
0
1

Outstanding discussions, invaluable!

By Steve_TheStrip - Jun 28 2018
Read more
Emily Richmond is extremely knowledgeable and her guests are among the nation's top journalists reporting about education issues. The length is just right, too -- about 13-15 minutes. Just enough to get a sense of the topics, many of which you wouldn't have heard about anywhere else. Check it out and get smarter.

Unique conversations with journalists

By LFWDP - Sep 29 2017
Read more
The EWA Radio podcast has carved out a unique niche interviewing journalists about stories on education, one of the issues that matters most to people. Host Emily Richmond is always well-prepared and gets the best from her guests. The topics they tackle range widely, everything from finding high-quality child care to coping with college costs. Definitely worth subscribing!

iTunes Ratings

15 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
0
0
0
1

Outstanding discussions, invaluable!

By Steve_TheStrip - Jun 28 2018
Read more
Emily Richmond is extremely knowledgeable and her guests are among the nation's top journalists reporting about education issues. The length is just right, too -- about 13-15 minutes. Just enough to get a sense of the topics, many of which you wouldn't have heard about anywhere else. Check it out and get smarter.

Unique conversations with journalists

By LFWDP - Sep 29 2017
Read more
The EWA Radio podcast has carved out a unique niche interviewing journalists about stories on education, one of the issues that matters most to people. Host Emily Richmond is always well-prepared and gets the best from her guests. The topics they tackle range widely, everything from finding high-quality child care to coping with college costs. Definitely worth subscribing!

Listen to:

Cover image of EWA Radio

EWA Radio

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

EWA, the professional organization dedicated to improving the quality and quantity of education coverage in the media, hosts regular interviews and panel discussions with journalists and education professionals.

The Fight to Fix Reading Instruction

Podcast cover
Read more

In a new documentary for APM Reports, Emily Hanford digs into the disconnect between the cognitive science on learning to read and the instructional methods being used to teach millions of U.S. students. Among her findings: a popular technique is based on a flawed idea that  researchers say may actually be holding back kids from becoming skilled readers. As with her past reporting on this topic, the story is sparking pushback, debate, and a lot of hard questions for parents and educators. What’s changed in the public discourse around literacy instruction and teacher preparation since her first documentary on the topic two years ago? How does Hanford use social media to keep her stories in the public eye, connect with new sources, and counter criticism? And what advice does she have for reporters who want to be more transparent about the research and sourcing that informs their stories? 

Oct 15 2019

23mins

Play

A Reality Check for Boston's Valedictorians

Podcast cover
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Ever wonder what happened to your high school’s valedictorian after graduation? So did The Boston Globe, which set off to track down the city’s top students from the classes of 2005-07. Globe reporters Malcolm Gay and Meghan Irons learned that a quarter of the nearly 100 valedictorians they located failed to complete college within six years. Some had experienced homelessness. Many have struggled in lower-skilled jobs than they had aspired to. What went wrong? To what extent did their high school education fail to prepare them? What should colleges do to better support students? Gay and Irons discuss their project, tell the stories of individual valedictorians, and share tips for journalists looking to undertake similar reporting in their own communities.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on January 29, 2019.

Oct 08 2019

19mins

Play

The Ugly Side of Beauty Schools

Podcast cover
Read more

In this replay of a recent episode of EWA Radio, Meredith Kolodner and Sarah Butrymowicz of The Hechinger Report discuss their investigation into private cosmetology schools in Iowa that are reaping big profits at the expense of their students.  Students are spending upward of $20,000 to earn a cosmetology certificate—comparable to the cost of two associates’ degrees at a community college. Additionally, Iowa’s requirement for 2,100 hours of training, significantly higher than many other states, means students have to wait longer to start their full-time careers. Additionally, they’re often required to work at their school’s salon while taking classes, and bring in revenue by selling services and products. How did Butrymowicz and Kolodner crunch the national and local numbers on outcomes for these for-profit colleges? Who’s holding such programs accountable? And what advice do they have for local reporters covering career certification programs in their own communities?

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on February 6, 2019.

Aug 20 2019

18mins

Play

Can a state help more residents finish college?

Podcast cover
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Like many states, Colorado has set an ambitious goal for boosting the number of citizens with advanced degrees and credentials, all with an eye toward filling high-need jobs in areas like health care and manufacturing. In a five-part series, EWA Reporting Fellow Stephanie Daniel of KUNC (Northern Colorado Community Radio) looks at how the Rocky Mountain state is trying to do that: including  encouraging Hispanic and low-income high school students to take advanced courses, adding mentoring  for young people in foster care, and creating a community college mobile learning program that brings certification classes to workers on the job. She finds important lessons for anyone concerned about diversity, demographics, and workforce development in their states.

Jul 30 2019

19mins

Play

The Strange Tale of the Fake AP Test

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In South Florida, a high school principal is under fire for tricking hundreds of studentsinto thinking they were taking a legitimate Advanced Placement exam that might lead to college course credit. As first reported by Cassidy Alexander of the Daytona Beach News-Journal, the principal determined that giving all eligible students the AP test would have been too expensive. Instead, the school paid for 78 students to take the real test. The principal created what she called a “placebo exam” for 336 unwitting students so she could gather information on how much they learned in the AP course. As Alexander explains, the incident, now under investigation by the school district and state, is more than just a PR nightmare for Mainland High School -- it has also damaged trust with students and families. Alexander, who just marked her first anniversary on the education beat, also discusses what she’s learned about mining open records, how she makes the most of social media as a reporting tool, and what it’s like to cover a school system where she was once a student.

Jul 09 2019

17mins

Play

The Underreporting of Student Restraint and Seclusion

Podcast cover
Read more

School districts have been vastly underreporting instances when some of their most vulnerable students are physically restrained or sent to seclusion rooms by campus staff -- that’s the conclusion of a new report from the Government Accountability Office, a federal watchdog agency. Two reporters on opposite sides of the country were already deep into the reporting on this issue: Jenny Abamu of WAMU in Washington, D.C., and Rob Manning of Oregon Public Broadcasting. They discuss how they teamed up for a joint NPR Ed story, how local reporters can follow their lead in looking at restraint and seclusion issues in their own districts, and ideas for verifying numbers on these trends when official data is in short supply.

Jun 25 2019

24mins

Play

Paul Tough on why College Years ‘Matter Most’

Podcast cover
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In his new book, “The Years That Matter Most: How College Makes Us or Breaks Us,” author Paul Tough looks at inequities in access to high-quality higher education, specifically, the opportunity to earn degrees that research says lead to high-paying jobs, social mobility, and according to some research, better health and a longer life. Tough spent six years  analyzing extensive  research and data, and interviewing the people whose lives are affected by these challenges. He brings the wonky educational research to life by showing how policies affect high-need students waiting anxiously for their acceptance letters and  the admissions officers struggling to push the gates open just a little bit wider. He casts light on some of the most important puzzles of the day, such as how college entrance exams like the SAT factor into the debate over equity and access. What does the research show is working -- or falling short -- in efforts by colleges to attract more low-income and first-generation students? And where can reporters find fresh angles and story ideas in covering not just elite institutions but the state schools and community colleges educating the vast majority of the nation’s postsecondary students?

Oct 01 2019

26mins

Play

Want to Know What Students Think of Your Reporting? Ask Them.

Podcast cover
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For many Los Angeles students, getting to and from class can be a risky proposition, as they navigate neighborhoods with high rates of homicides. In her report “Navigating a safe path to schools surrounded by homicide,” education reporter Sonali Kohli crunched the data and found surprising examples where the reality contradicted public perceptions of the “most dangerous” schools. To help identify and acknowledge perceptions of bias, The Los Angeles Times reporter asked students to line-edit news stories about campus violence and homicides near schools in high-crime areas. She also shadowed students in the Los Angeles Unified School District on their commutes, as they dodge gangs and other potential threats. Some of those young people have lost multiple loved ones to gun violence. Kohli also speaks candidly about her decision to briefly step away from the beat to address her emotional well-being after covering devastating wildfires and a mass shooting event, in addition to her work on the school commute project. And she offers advice to others looking for mental health resources and support for journalists.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired April 30, 2019.

Jul 23 2019

22mins

Play

Summer Story Ideas on the Education Beat

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School might be out, but that doesn’t mean education issues take a vacation: Two experienced education journalists offer compelling story ideas to beat the summertime blues. Delece Smith-Barrow of The Hechinger Report and Lauren Camera of U.S. News & World Report join this week’s podcast to discuss a wide range of national topics ripe for localized summer coverage. For starters, a looming U.S. Supreme Court decision on adding a citizenship question to the U.S. Census could have serious implications for federal funding of programs on which many districts and schools rely. Also, where do the Democratic presidential candidates stand on education issues, from “free college” to the rising pushback against charter schools? The journalists also discuss how to cover changes to federal policy on consumer protections for students attending for-profit colleges, and changes to how postsecondary institutions use college entrance exams, particularly in the wake of the “Varsity Blues” admissions scandal.

Jun 12 2019

22mins

Play

When Prisoners Go to College

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If you’re an inmate in Illinois, what educational programs are available to help you get your life back on track? That’s the question public radio reporter Lee Gaines set out to answer in an ongoing series. As part of an EWA Reporting Fellowship, Gaines looks at how severe budget cuts in Illinois, plus changes to eligibility for federal Pell Grant dollars, have reduced the number of prisoners earning postsecondary credentials and degrees. She also probed other issues: Where are incarcerated individuals still finding academic success that translates into opportunities once they’re released? What does the research show about the long-term benefits of prison education programs, both to the individual and society? How did Gaines work around prison officials who severely limited her access to prisons and prisoners? And what advice does she have for local reporters looking at similar issues in their own communities? (Gaines’ work was recognized with a First Place prize for audio storytelling in this year’s National Awards for Education Reporting.)

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired March 5, 2019.

Jun 18 2019

18mins

Play

A Thousand Days of Betsy DeVos

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When Betsy DeVos was confirmed as the U.S. secretary of education in early 2017, few observers would have bet she would stick around for long. Today, DeVos is one of the longest-serving members of President Trump’s cabinet. Rebecca Klein of The Huffington Post talked with dozens of people about the controversial education secretary’s tenure so far, crafting an in-depth analysis of what motivates her decisions and keeps her on the job. How does DeVos’ belief in the free market system influence her policy positions on everything from school choice to consumer protections for student loan borrowers? Where has she had the most success in reversing the Obama administration’s policies on things like Title IX and transgender students’ rights? Klein also discusses how  the education agendas of presidential candidates provide fertile ground for story ideas by local reporters.

Dec 03 2019

17mins

Play

Don’t Mess With Texas: Covering the Lone Star State's Schools

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Prior to joining The Texas Tribune in 2016 as its statewide public schools reporter, Aliyya Swaby covered education for the hyperlocal New Haven Independent in Connecticut. Now she’s responsible for a beat that stretches more than a quarter-million square miles. What has she learned from her in-depth project on school segregation? How is “white flight” impacting districts seeking to raise money for improvements through capital bond measures? Where has she found useful data to inform her reporting on a possible state takeover of Houston Public Schools, one of the nation’s largest districts? And what advice does she have for other reporters looking to put local reporting into statewide and national context? 

Nov 19 2019

17mins

Play

If DACA Ends, What Happens to Students and Schools?

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This week, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider a consolidation of cases challenging President Trump’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), which has temporarily protected some 800,000 immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children from being deported. While a key focus is college-age students who fear deportation, ending DACA has significant repercussions for the K-12 school community as well. In this 2017 episode of EWA Radio, soon after Trump announced his plans to unwind DACA, Corey Mitchell of Education Week and Katie Mangan of The Chronicle of Higher Education discussed the potential implications. What was the legal challenge that prompted Trump’s action to dismantle DACA? How might the move impact college students who rely on DACA’s protections to work and support themselves while still in school? And who are the DACA-eligible individuals working in the nation’s public schools?

This episode of EWA Radio first aired September 6, 2017.

Nov 12 2019

13mins

Play

Why Impeachment Is a Teachable Moment

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Unlike other classroom controversies like gun control or immigration policy, the process by which Congress considers presidential impeachment is spelled out in the Constitution. It’s also a rare occurrence, which means today’s civics teachers have a unique opportunity to help students connect historical and current events, explains Stephen Sawchuk of Education Week. Where can reporters find teachers willing to speak about their classroom experiences? What resources are they turning to for curriculum materials beyond the standard textbooks? And how can education reporters help amplify those classroom conversations with an eye toward helping the general public better understand the impeachment process? 

Nov 05 2019

18mins

Play

How To Cover a Teachers' Strike

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With Chicago teachers on the picket lines this fall -- and labor actions in recent months in smaller school districts in California, Colorado, and Washington -- hear how Ben Felder of The Oklahoman reported on a statewide walkout by educators in 2018. Like their counterparts in West Virginia and Kentucky, teachers in the Sooner State were seeking more than bigger paychecks; they also aimed to draw attention to funding shortfalls for public schools statewide. Felder shares his experiences as a local reporter covering what quickly swelled into a national story. Which questions yielded telling answers from striking teachers, as well as district leaders, parents, and students? How did Felder build a deep network of sources among union leaders and rank-and-file teachers? And what are story ideas for local reporters covering the teacher workforce, whether or not a strike looms?

Oct 29 2019

14mins

Play

What School Choice Means in Rural Mississippi

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In rural Clarksdale, Mississippi, the phrase “school choice” has a different meaning, as it brings to mind the segregation academies set up by white families opposed to federally mandated school integration. Writing for The Hechinger Report, Danielle Dreilinger spent time in Clarksdale -- known as the birthplace of the Blues -- which recently got its first charter school, serving an almost all-black student population. She looks at the pushback from local educators and policymakers, who say the charter is siphoning off badly needed funds from traditional public campuses, which also serve large populations of high-need black students. Dreilinger also  spent time with families and educators on both sides of the debate. How did she use historical documents to inform her current-day reporting? What steps did she take, especially as a white journalist visiting a diverse community, to build trust among her sources? And what are some story ideas for other reporters when it comes to covering charters and choice more broadly?

Oct 22 2019

24mins

Play

The Fight to Fix Reading Instruction

Podcast cover
Read more

In a new documentary for APM Reports, Emily Hanford digs into the disconnect between the cognitive science on learning to read and the instructional methods being used to teach millions of U.S. students. Among her findings: a popular technique is based on a flawed idea that  researchers say may actually be holding back kids from becoming skilled readers. As with her past reporting on this topic, the story is sparking pushback, debate, and a lot of hard questions for parents and educators. What’s changed in the public discourse around literacy instruction and teacher preparation since her first documentary on the topic two years ago? How does Hanford use social media to keep her stories in the public eye, connect with new sources, and counter criticism? And what advice does she have for reporters who want to be more transparent about the research and sourcing that informs their stories? 

Oct 15 2019

23mins

Play

A Reality Check for Boston's Valedictorians

Podcast cover
Read more

Ever wonder what happened to your high school’s valedictorian after graduation? So did The Boston Globe, which set off to track down the city’s top students from the classes of 2005-07. Globe reporters Malcolm Gay and Meghan Irons learned that a quarter of the nearly 100 valedictorians they located failed to complete college within six years. Some had experienced homelessness. Many have struggled in lower-skilled jobs than they had aspired to. What went wrong? To what extent did their high school education fail to prepare them? What should colleges do to better support students? Gay and Irons discuss their project, tell the stories of individual valedictorians, and share tips for journalists looking to undertake similar reporting in their own communities.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on January 29, 2019.

Oct 08 2019

19mins

Play

Paul Tough on why College Years ‘Matter Most’

Podcast cover
Read more

In his new book, “The Years That Matter Most: How College Makes Us or Breaks Us,” author Paul Tough looks at inequities in access to high-quality higher education, specifically, the opportunity to earn degrees that research says lead to high-paying jobs, social mobility, and according to some research, better health and a longer life. Tough spent six years  analyzing extensive  research and data, and interviewing the people whose lives are affected by these challenges. He brings the wonky educational research to life by showing how policies affect high-need students waiting anxiously for their acceptance letters and  the admissions officers struggling to push the gates open just a little bit wider. He casts light on some of the most important puzzles of the day, such as how college entrance exams like the SAT factor into the debate over equity and access. What does the research show is working -- or falling short -- in efforts by colleges to attract more low-income and first-generation students? And where can reporters find fresh angles and story ideas in covering not just elite institutions but the state schools and community colleges educating the vast majority of the nation’s postsecondary students?

Oct 01 2019

26mins

Play

No Forgiveness: Teachers Struggle With Unfair Student Loan Debt

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Two federal programs that were supposed to steer college students to public service jobs like teaching in high-poverty schools instead became mired in missteps, as the recipients unexpectedly found their grants wrongly converted into high-interest loans. Cory Turner of NPR’s education team spent 18 months looking at problems with the TEACH Grant program, and his findings helped spur the U.S. Department of Education to reverse course. He’s also been digging into Congress’ attempts to address problems with private servicers hired by the feds to administer the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Fund. How did open records factor into Turner’s reporting process? What techniques did he use to sort through the red tape and find the human stories underneath? And how can education reporters carve out time for investigative work, even on tight deadlines? 

Sep 24 2019

24mins

Play

The Missing Data on Student Restraint and Seclusion

Podcast cover
Read more

School districts have been vastly underreporting instances when some of their most vulnerable students are physically restrained or sent to seclusion rooms by campus staff — that’s the conclusion of a new report from the Government Accountability Office, a federal watchdog agency. Two reporters on opposite sides of the country were already deep into the reporting on this issue: Jenny Abamu of WAMU in Washington, D.C., and Rob Manning of Oregon Public Broadcasting. They discuss how they teamed up for a joint NPR Ed story, how local reporters can follow their lead in looking at restraint and seclusion issues in their own districts, and ideas for verifying numbers on these trends when official data is in short supply.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on June 25, 2019.

Sep 17 2019

24mins

Play

Can Puerto Rico’s Schools Be Saved?

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In Puerto Rico, the public education system is still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Maria two years ago. Now, another storm has hit, but this time it’s political. Education Secretary Julia Keleher, who pledged to reinvigorate the U.S. territory’s crumbling and low-performing schools, resigned in April. She was subsequently indicted on corruption charges and has pleaded not guilty. Reporter Mark Keierleber. of The 74 Million has covered the island’s education system for several years, including the closure of hundreds of campuses in the wake of Hurricane Maria, the exodus of Puerto Rican students to the mainland, and the scandal engulfing Keleher. Why should mainland education reporters pay closer attention to what’s happening in Puerto Rico, especially Keleher’s efforts to bring charter schools to the island? What are the familiar patterns that often follow as public school systems struggle to recover from natural disasters? And what lessons do Puerto Rico’s educational challenges hold for other school systems?

Sep 10 2019

19mins

Play

The Higher Ed Stories You Need to Know About

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Where can you find reliable data on how your colleges and universities are handling sexual-assault allegations on campus? How do you develop better sources among the faculty senate leadership? And why is now the time to focus on Greek life on campus -- and a growing number of students’ opposition to it? Sarah Brown, who covers the daily beat for the Chronicle of Higher Education, discusses the trend of “underground” fraternities operating beyond the reach of campus administrators, and efforts to build inclusive campus communities even as political divides widen for many student groups. she also offers tips for digging into the popularity and viability of Democratic presidential candidates’ proposals for addressing the student loan debt crisis. 

Sep 03 2019

25mins

Play

Back to School: Story Ideas, Tips and Trends to Watch

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With a new school year getting underway, how can education reporters find fresh angles on familiar ground? Kate Grossman, the education editor for WBEZ public media in Chicago, offers story ideas, big trends to watch for, and suggestions for networking with parents, teachers, and administrators. Plus, Grossman offers some smart dos and don’ts for the first day school. How “culturally competent” are your local teachers as student populations in many communities are becoming more diverse? What steps are school districts taking to help students and families amid an increase in federal immigration raids? And why are states with school voucher and tax credit scholarship programs keeping a close eye on a forthcoming U.S. Supreme Court case?

Aug 27 2019

21mins

Play

The Ugly Side of Beauty Schools

Podcast cover
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In this replay of a recent episode of EWA Radio, Meredith Kolodner and Sarah Butrymowicz of The Hechinger Report discuss their investigation into private cosmetology schools in Iowa that are reaping big profits at the expense of their students.  Students are spending upward of $20,000 to earn a cosmetology certificate—comparable to the cost of two associates’ degrees at a community college. Additionally, Iowa’s requirement for 2,100 hours of training, significantly higher than many other states, means students have to wait longer to start their full-time careers. Additionally, they’re often required to work at their school’s salon while taking classes, and bring in revenue by selling services and products. How did Butrymowicz and Kolodner crunch the national and local numbers on outcomes for these for-profit colleges? Who’s holding such programs accountable? And what advice do they have for local reporters covering career certification programs in their own communities?

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on February 6, 2019.

Aug 20 2019

18mins

Play

Lessons from Parkland: Covering the Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting

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Heartbreaking. Frightening. Infuriating. All those words apply to the remarkable coverage by the South Florida Sun Sentinel of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The newspaper’s reporting since the February 2018 killings earned journalism’s top award this year, the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. The newspaper pushed back on stonewalling by district leadership and public safety officials to uncover missed opportunities that might have mitigated — or even prevented — the school shooting that left 17 people dead and dozens more seriously injured. Longtime education reporter Scott Travis and data journalist Aric Chokey speak candidly about their memories of February 14, 2018, how the local newsroom rallied to take the lead on what became a national story, and what they learned in the past year when it comes to interviewing trauma survivors, mining public records, and why earning journalism’s top prize brought mixed emotions.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on April 24, 2019.

Aug 13 2019

21mins

Play

Why Is Reading Instruction So Controversial?

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Across the country, the way most students are being taught to read is out of step with more than 40 years of scientific research on how children learn this essential skill. That’s the case being made in a radio documentary from APM Reports’ Emily Hanford, winner of the Public Service category in this year’s EWA Awards. Hanford describes the devastating domino effect of inadequate literacy instruction on students’ academic progress and opportunities. She also seeks to dispel popular myths about the nation’s literacy challenges, including that it’s a problem rooted in poverty. In fact, a third of struggling readers come from college-educated families. What does the preponderance of research, including recent work by neuroscientists, show about how children learn to read? If the evidence is so strong in favor of a phonics-based approach, why are the vast majority of public schools disregarding this strategy? And why is preparing educators to teach reading typically a low instructional priority at many teacher colleges? Hanford offers story ideas for local reporters around literacy instruction, as well questions to ask teachers, parents, and policymakers.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired on September 18, 2018.

Aug 06 2019

21mins

Play

Can a state help more residents finish college?

Podcast cover
Read more

Like many states, Colorado has set an ambitious goal for boosting the number of citizens with advanced degrees and credentials, all with an eye toward filling high-need jobs in areas like health care and manufacturing. In a five-part series, EWA Reporting Fellow Stephanie Daniel of KUNC (Northern Colorado Community Radio) looks at how the Rocky Mountain state is trying to do that: including  encouraging Hispanic and low-income high school students to take advanced courses, adding mentoring  for young people in foster care, and creating a community college mobile learning program that brings certification classes to workers on the job. She finds important lessons for anyone concerned about diversity, demographics, and workforce development in their states.

Jul 30 2019

19mins

Play

Want to Know What Students Think of Your Reporting? Ask Them.

Podcast cover
Read more

For many Los Angeles students, getting to and from class can be a risky proposition, as they navigate neighborhoods with high rates of homicides. In her report “Navigating a safe path to schools surrounded by homicide,” education reporter Sonali Kohli crunched the data and found surprising examples where the reality contradicted public perceptions of the “most dangerous” schools. To help identify and acknowledge perceptions of bias, The Los Angeles Times reporter asked students to line-edit news stories about campus violence and homicides near schools in high-crime areas. She also shadowed students in the Los Angeles Unified School District on their commutes, as they dodge gangs and other potential threats. Some of those young people have lost multiple loved ones to gun violence. Kohli also speaks candidly about her decision to briefly step away from the beat to address her emotional well-being after covering devastating wildfires and a mass shooting event, in addition to her work on the school commute project. And she offers advice to others looking for mental health resources and support for journalists.

This episode of EWA Radio originally aired April 30, 2019.

Jul 23 2019

22mins

Play

When Schools Spy on Students

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Ever feel like somebody’s watching you? If you’re in a in a K-12 school these days, you’re probably right. Education Week’s Benjamin Herold took a close look at the surge in digital surveillance of students by districts -- sometimes using tools like facial recognition software, and scanning social media posts for worrisome language -- intended to identify students at risk of harming themselves or others. What does this mean for privacy rights, campus safety, and district budgets? How is information about students’ social media habits being tracked, reported, and stored? And who are some unexpected sources reporters can tap to better understand the legal and technological issues at play?

Jul 17 2019

19mins

Play