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Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

Updated 12 days ago

Technology
Government
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Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.

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Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.

iTunes Ratings

267 Ratings
Average Ratings
235
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3

Excellent, thought-provoking podcast

By Hommie alot - Jun 16 2016
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This is a must listen! Thank you guys for doing this podcast.

Podcast series

By Novotny Joe - Mar 12 2016
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Series fills a void regarding important land use planning and community development topics!

iTunes Ratings

267 Ratings
Average Ratings
235
24
3
2
3

Excellent, thought-provoking podcast

By Hommie alot - Jun 16 2016
Read more
This is a must listen! Thank you guys for doing this podcast.

Podcast series

By Novotny Joe - Mar 12 2016
Read more
Series fills a void regarding important land use planning and community development topics!
Cover image of Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

Latest release on May 17, 2019

Read more

Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.

Rank #1: Tiny Homes and Smart Infill Housing—Improving Housing Choices

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Topic:

Spurring Community Revitalization

In This Episode:

[01:36] Co-host Kate Meis is introduced.

[01:44] Guest Darin Dinsmore is introduced.

[01:53] Darin shares how he ended up working on affordable-housing and infill-housing issues.

[02:24] Darin explains what smart infill housing is.

[02:50] Darin describes what infill and smart growth look like in rural communities like Truckee, California.

[03:54] Darin provides information on his tiny-home project.

[06:04] Darin discusses the zoning ordinance for the tiny-home project in Arizona.

[06:50] Kate mentions that with the growing interest in tiny homes, local governments are having to figure out how to keep the zoning updated.

[07:23] Mike comments on the dynamic of minimal residential house size and people who are living in hotel rooms.

[08:11] Darin speaks about micro-units and single-room occupancy units.

[08:46] Darin tells about the infill score and revitalization roadmap tool.

[09:27] Darin states where people can go to take the infill-readiness test.

[09:48] Darin describes the Crowdbrite tool.

[11:25] Darin shares where people can go to access the Crowdbrite tool.

[11:39] Darin mentions where the Crowdbrite tool is being used.

[12:06] Darin supplies some of the things communities can do to be infill ready.

[13:01] Mike adds to the discussion that there’s a public-approval issue.

[13:24] Kate conveys that most Americans prefer smart growth.

[13:33] Darin provides some of the challenges cities face in becoming infill ready.

Co-Host:

Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma.

Guest:

Darin Dinsmore is an urban planner & landscape architect with over 25 years of experience in community-based planning and design. He launched Crowdbrite in 2010 to bring plans to life and find solutions to improve civic engagement. His award-winning interactive online tools (www.crowdbrite.net) has helped more than 500k people design their city while leveraging more than $2.5b of new investment. The Crowdbrite team helps build the natural, social and financial capital to strengthen neighborhoods and revitalize communities. We were awarded app of the year 2016 by the Lincoln Land Institute with projects featured in Fast Company Magazine.

To help create more sustainable and vibrant communities he launched a suite of SMART planning tools including www.infillscore.com and the Community Revitalization Program, used by more than 400 communities. In 2017 Darin is working to create new jobs and innovative housing solutions with a Tiny House demonstration project.

Organization:

Crowdbrite’s mission is to work with cities and developers to help build more affordable, vibrant and walkable communities. In the first 12 months since launch Crowdbite has 400+ cities engaged in 47 states and 7 countries, won a national planning award, and have started a movement toward cities taking a proactive approach to SMART infill.

You can help Crowdbrite reach their goal of 1,000 cities in the next 3 months, to support a data driven approach community revitalization. Your Challenge:

Step 1 – explore the 30 SMART Strategies here

Step 2 – Read About Infillscore & Watch the www.infillscore.com video

Step 3 – Take 7 minutes to complete www.infillscore.com for your community

To learn about Crowdbrite’s consulting services for community revitalization please contact Darin at darin@crowdbrite.com

Take Away Quotes:

“I’m originally a planner from Canada, came to the United States, came to California, back in 1999. As a nonprofit planning director, really got involved in working with communities, doing community-based planning, and one of the big issues is infill development and, today now more than ever, affordable housing.”

“Most cities, as you’re aware, including St. Louis, where we are now, have lots that are underutilized or could be utilized better or parking areas that could be used for housing and things. It’s just making better use of those lands where there are existing services—water, sewer, parks, schools—and how can we use those lands more efficiently and more effectively.”

“Truckee, for instance, was one of the last incorporated cities in California, and it really was and grew as a bunch of, sort of, scattered neighborhoods in Placer County. And since they’ve incorporated, they’ve been, basically, trying to knit that community fabric together with roads, parks, schools, and infrastructure to really become that community and that town that’s more walkable and friendly for its citizens. And so their type of infill isn’t large-scale projects; it’s small two- and three-story buildings, accessory dwelling units, even, maybe, tiny homes in your backyard.”

“About a year ago we launched this infill-score tool. It’s a tool for citizens, elected officials, and planners to kind of get a number in terms of their infill readiness, and it takes about 10 minutes online to calculate your score. And in the last year, without really any advertising, we’ve had 250 cities in seven countries and every state except Delaware use the tool. So we’re seeing that there’s a lot of interest and demand in tools and strategies for smart infill.”

Resources:

Crowdbrite

Infill Score

Infill Planning Tool – Community Revitalization Roadmap

Mar 09 2017

15mins

Play

Rank #2: Small Cities and the Transportation Revolution

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – emerging mobility trends

Guest & Organization:

Christopher Cabaldon was first elected Mayor of West Sacramento in 1998, and is serving his ninth term. He is the first mayor elected directly by the voters of the city, after serving three terms on the city council. The Sacramento Bee says that “under his leadership, the city has become one of the municipal stars of the region.”

At the United States Conference of Mayors, he is Chair of the Jobs, Education, and the Workforce Committee and one of the nation’s leading mayors on innovation, ports and exports, civil rights, and education. An appointee in the administrations of four California governors spanning both political parties, Mr. Cabaldon currently serves as California’s commissioner on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education, where he is chair of the issues analysis & research committee.

Mayor Cabaldon’s work on transportation, land use, water, air quality and climate change, housing, and economic development at the local, regional, and statewide scales has won numerous awards, and has become the model for effective regional collaborative action. Mr. Cabaldon earned his B.S. in environmental economics from UC Berkeley, and a Master of Public Policy & Administration degree from CSU Sacramento, where he received the Distinguished Alumni Award.

Resources:

City of West Sacramento’s Via On-Demand Rideshare – link to download the Via app, get information on the Pilot, and find links out to Via’s Support page and additional FAQs

City of West Sacramento’s JUMP Bike Share

Local Government Commission 

Jul 13 2018

25mins

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Rank #3: Resiliency Planning Success Stories

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – getting adaptation and resilience projects to move forward

Guest & Organization:

Ellory Monks is co-founder of The Atlas Marketplace, a free online community for public officials upgrading their systems to be stronger, smarter and more sustainable. The Atlas is a hassle-free space where cities come to learn, share, and connect about what’s working in their communities. As co-founder, Ellory works with 70+ partner cities to help them scale and replicate proven urban innovations – and the benefits they generate – in their own communities. Prior to co-founding The Atlas, Ellory was Partner at re:focus partners, a firm dedicated to the design & financing of resilient infrastructure, and before that, held a fellowship in Washington D.C., where she acted as the executive secretary of the Obama Administration’s Climate Data and Tools Initiative, and more broadly, provided analytical and technical support to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She has a B.A. in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Public Policy from Rice University.

Resources:

Atlas Marketplace – access is free!

Miami-Dade $13B CIP plan that prioritizes resilience

Upcoming workshop at Kresge Foundation: “Procuring Resilience” Workshop

Retain Your Rain, Norfolk VA

Citizen Science for King Tide Flooding, Broward County

California Adaptation Forum – the 3rd California Adaptation Forum will be held in Sacramento, CA from August 27-29, 2018

Local Government Commission 

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 45: Radical Innovation and Resilient Infrastructure—Climate Adaptation

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 117: Coastal Adaptation in Louisiana

Jul 13 2018

33mins

Play

Rank #4: Transportation Inequity in Baltimore

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Topic:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – transportation inequity

Guest & Organization:

Tracee Strum-Gilliam, AICP is the Director of Mid-Atlantic Client Solutions for PRR. For her, working at PRR is thrilling! The core part of her position at PRR is to grow the Baltimore office and PRR’s transportation and infrastructure practice on the East Coast. As a 20-year veteran of the transportation industry, it is most certainly a challenge that she welcomes, because she loves helping clients solve challenges and achieve their goals through strategic planning. She is a proud member of several Transportation Research Board committees, Women’s Transportation Seminar Baltimore Chapter, and the Waterfront Partnership Board of Baltimore. When she’s not working, she’s traveling with family. She always has a passport handy and a suitcase ready.

PRR specializes in advancing major public issues and sparking market transformation across a diverse range of segments that include environmenttransportationhealthcare, and land use.

Resources:

PRR

Local Government Commission 

New Partners for Smart Growth conference

Jul 13 2018

23mins

Play

Rank #5: Open Spaces Sacred Places

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Topic:

Urban Resilience – urban green spaces designed with a purpose

Guest & Organization:

Fred Smith is the Director of Stringfellow Health Fund Grants at the Community Foundation of Northeast Alabama. He has an Associate of Science degree from Southern Union Community College, Bachelor’s degree in marketing and a Master’s degree in Public Administration—both from Jacksonville State University. Fred is also a graduate of the Alabama Association of Not for Profit Executive Leadership certificate program. He is a recent appointee to the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama Roundtable, a group that gives young civic and business leaders the opportunity to study issues and government policy in Alabama in conjunction with the research conducted by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama. The group meets with public officials and other leaders to learn about and discuss issues currently affecting the state and local governments while also seeking solutions to the state’s problems.

Prior to joining the Community Foundation, he served as an Instructor for Gadsden State Community College and previously served as, the Director of Jacksonville State University’s Community Wellness program which received several local and state commendations for its contributions to community programming. He completed the Essential Skills & Strategies for New Grantmakers in 2016 and has also participated in Foundations on the Hill held in Washington D.C. both hosted by Southeastern Council of Foundations. Fred also has a previous connection to the Foundation. He has written grants to, received grants from, and successfully managed grants for the Foundation and has served as a volunteer grant reviewer. In addition to managing the Stringfellow Health Fund competitive grants program, Fred also conducts grantee site visits, manages the poverty project to align the foundation’s grant making with the Community Needs Assessment, and is coordinating the 100th anniversary celebration of Susie Parker Stringfellow’ s will in 2020.

Fred met his lovely wife Rochelle while they both attended Jacksonville State University. They have two daughters, Eden and Zion, and they reside in Jacksonville Al.

Resources:

A Southern Interpretation of Sacred

Nature Sacred

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press App! Learn more about the app here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Aug 09 2018

22mins

Play

Rank #6: Energy Democracy

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Topic:

The Connection Between Race and Energy

In This Episode:

[01:35] Guest Denise Fairchild is introduced.

[02:12] Denise explains what energy democracy is and why it’s important.

[05:31] How does energy shape our political system?

[08:11] Denise talks about the ownership and distribution of energy.

[11:03] Denise touches on how a community ownership of energy would work and gives examples of models.

[17:01] Denise tells why production decentralization matters and if distributive production meets all of our needs.

[21:22] What is the connection between race and energy?

[24:30] Denise describes how confronting racial issues will drive a new energy democracy.

[28:29] Denise mentions the parallels between fossil fuel interests and the struggle to end slavery.

[30:48] Denise shares where people can go to buy her book.

Guest and Organization:

Denise Fairchild is president and CEO of Emerald Cities Collaborative, a national nonprofit organization of business, labor, and community groups dedicated to climate resilience strategies that produce environmental, economic, and equity outcomes. She is co-editor of the new book “Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions”.

Take Away Quotes:

“It’s interesting that we are really seeing the reason for economic democracy when we look at what’s going on in Puerto Rico right now. It is the prime example about how the burning of fossil fuel is leading to climate crisis, that’s led to the loss of life and property, showing that the fossil fuel economy, the extractive economy, not only impacted our environment but our economy.”

“Our current economy, our dirty energy economy, is also impacting issues of equity. Dirty energy lifts up the racial inequality that exists in our current capitalist economy. Those that are most challenged by and vulnerable to the impacts of dirty energy are low-income people.”

“Energy democracy’s addressing the challenges of a centralized monopoly over energy where profit matters more than planet and people.”

“If you can put the source of energy on your rooftop or in a community, two or three miles from where energy’s going to be used, you’re going to save 20 or 30% more in terms of the cost of transmitting energy.”

Resources:

Emerald Cities Collaborative

“Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions”

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Oct 26 2017

31mins

Play

Rank #7: Community Benefits Agreements: A Vital Tool for Equitable Community Reinvestment

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TOPIC

Equalizing the Balance of Power


IN THIS EPISODE

[01:48] Introduction of Veronica Eady.

[02:14] Veronica explains when she realized being an environmental justice advocate would be her life’s work.

[03:59] What is a community benefits agreement?

[05:20] Do community benefits agreements work in equalizing developers and communities?

[07:50] Why are community benefits agreements important for equitable reinvestment or development?

[11:33] Are there other examples of a good environmental benefits agreement, and is an environmental benefits agreement the same as a community benefits agreement?

[13:40] Veronica describes the elements of obtaining a community benefits agreement.

[16:21] Where can we learn more or get advice about a community benefits agreement?

[18:17] Veronica explains about the Conservation Law Foundation and the work that is done there.

[19:27] Veronica shares how listeners can learn more about the Conservation Law Foundation and get in touch with her.

[19:55] Veronica shares one change that would lead to smarter, more sustainable, and more equitable communities.

[20:37] Veronica describes the action that listeners can take to help build a more equitable and sustainable future.

[21:27] Veronica explains what the New England region looks like 30 years from now.

GUEST

Veronica Eady is the Vice President and Massachusetts Director of the Conservation Law Foundation. She is a lawyer whose practice has been focused on issues of environmental justice. Veronica is a former chair of the U.S. EPA’s National Environmental Justice Advisory Council and the principal author of the State of Massachusetts’ environmental justice policy.

Check out Veronica’s recent posts on the Conservation Law Foundation website

Contact Veronica via email at veady@clf.org

ORGANIZATION

The Conservation Law Foundation protects New England’s environment for the benefit of all people. They use the law, science and the market to create solutions that preserve natural resources, build healthy communities, and sustain a vibrant economy. Their vision is for a healthy, thriving New England – for generations to come.

TAKEAWAY QUOTES

“Generally speaking, the interests on the community side in a community benefit agreement are wide-ranging. It can be community based organizations; it can be labor unions, faith organizations, or mainstream environmental groups, or any combination of those. But typically those are the types of groups that have an interest in community benefits agreements.”

“I’ve seen some community benefits agreements that have been very good, and I have seen some that have not been so good…Over the last 20 years, we’ve seen them change quite a bit, to the extent that in some states, community benefits agreements are mandated by law.

“…here in Massachusetts, where I live, our casino gaming law requires a community benefits agreement with the community, and the fact that these community benefits agreements are now more so embodied in a statute and required, that’s really changed what the playing field looks like. So no longer is it community organizations, the environmental groups and such coming together and insisting on their power and their place at the table, the dynamic is a little bit different now because you have the state government, in Massachusetts, for example, saying you have to do this community benefits agreement…it changes the lead of the agreement; it changes the tenor of the agreement…it really has shaken up the playing field and the balance of power.”

“[Community benefits agreements] continue to be an important tool because they are still a way for communities to be at the table and formally engage in this conversation, even if it is a conversation mandated by statute.”

RESOURCES

Conservation Law Foundation

Conservation Law Foundation – People & Communities

Conservation Law Foundation 2015 Year in Review

Take Action!

THANKS FOR LISTENING

Thanks so much for joining us. Have some feedback or an idea you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave an honest review for Infinite Earth Radio on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are super helpful and greatly appreciated as it helps us expose this show to a wider audience – plus, we read each and every one of them!

Apr 28 2016

23mins

Play

Rank #8: The Future of Transportation: Mobility as a Service

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TOPIC

Reducing Single-Occupancy-Vehicle (SOV) Commuting


IN THIS EPISODE

[01:13] Introduction of Steve Raney.

[01:59] What is Joint Venture Silicon Valley?

[02:45] Steve explains the goals of the Bay Area Mobility as a Service project.

[04:11] Why is it challenging to decrease single-occupancy-vehicle (SOV) miles traveled in areas that were designed and built for single-occupancy vehicles (SOV)?

[05:13] Steve describes what congestion pricing is and why it’s important to reducing carbon emissions.

[07:56] Steve shares what Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is and how it works.

[09:34] Steve explains how the software on your smartphone helps you connect with different commuting options.

[10:31] Where can people go to learn more about the Bay Area MaaS program, as well as the concept of Maas?

[12:10] Are there other industries working to combine compatible fields into one brand?

[13:02] Steve describes the Bay Area Maas project.

[15:47] How can MaaS be used to create more equitable commuting policies and conditions for low-wage workers?

[18:27] Steve shares how he became involved in this work.

[19:16] How can people learn more about Joint Venture Silicon Valley?

[19:30] Steve shares one change that would lead to smarter, more sustainable, and more equitable communities.

[20:10] Steve describes the action listeners can take to help build a more equitable and sustainable future.

[20:39] Steve explains what the San Francisco Bay Area looks like 30 years from now.

[21:22] Steve shares his thoughts about the rise of Uber and Lyft.

GUEST

Steve Raney leads Joint Venture Silicon Valley’s Mobility as a Service project. Previously, Steve led autonomous vehicle commercialization studies for Nissan and Google and he led the EPA’s “Transforming Office Parks into Transit Villages” Study. He is the parent of MTC’s Climate Innovations grant program. Steve has 5 university degrees.

Learn more about Steve here

ORGANIZATION

Established in 1993, Joint Venture Silicon Valley provides analysis and action on issues affecting our region’s economy and quality of life. The organization brings together established and emerging leaders—from business, government, academia, labor and the broader community—to spotlight issues and work toward innovative solutions.

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is Joint Venture Silicon Valley’s umbrella term for our Silicon Valley commute-focused project to improve options besides driving alone. MaaS dissolves the boundaries between different transport modes, providing a more customer-centered, seamless experience while improving the efficiency of the entire transport system. Bay Area employers provide a range of customized employee programs to facilitate commuting: transit passes, Wi-Fi motor coach service, last mile shuttle buses from transit, payroll subsidies and more.

TAKEAWAY QUOTES

“We focus on difficult challenges, in areas like economic development, transportation, energy, communications infrastructure, hunger, and climate change; and I think we’re a pretty compassionate organization.”

“[The drive-as-you-go insurance] is one of the one’s that’s relatively viable politically. It’s not at all a tap-in putt in golf, but it’s something that is more worthwhile to pursue to get something enacted.”

“We’re trying to internalize the negative externalities of pollution and carbon and congestion and create a more efficiently functioning mobility market with better choices.”

“We know that higher-income workers are more likely to drive alone, so that kind of a policy is a progressive transfer of wealth from high-income folks to low-income folks. So that kind of policy scores relatively high for a congestion-pricing policy, whereas a big increase in a gas tax—because low-income folks, so much of their budget is taken up by transportation costs—that really hits them hard. So there are more compassionate pricing policies within the mix of congestion pricing.”

RESOURCES

Joint Venture Silicon Valley – Mobility as a Service (MaaS)

EPA’s Final Report: Transforming Office Parks into Transit Villages

THANKS FOR LISTENING

Thanks so much for joining us. Have some feedback or an idea you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave an honest review for Infinite Earth Radio on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are super helpful and greatly appreciated as it helps us expose this show to a wider audience – plus, we read each and every one of them!

May 05 2016

32mins

Play

Rank #9: The Sustainable City with Dr. Steven Cohen

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – importance of cities as the center of industry and life

Guest & Organization:

The Research Program is led by Dr. Steven Cohen, Professor in the Practice of Public Affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is also Director of the Master of Public Administration Program in Environmental Science and Policy at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and the Director of the Masters of Science in Sustainability Management at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies. He is a consultant, former policy analyst, and former member of the Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology for the U.S. EPA. Cohen is the author of several books, including The Sustainable City (2017), Understanding Environmental Policy (2006, 2014), Sustainability Management (2011), The Effective Public Manager (1988, now co-authored in its fifth edition), and the co-author of Sustainability Policy: Hastening the Transition to a Cleaner Economy (2015), and is a regular contributor for the Huffington Post on issues sustainability management and environmental policy. He is a graduate of Franklin College of Indiana (1974) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (MA, 1977; PhD, 1979). Dr. Cohen views the forthcoming research as a necessary next step in moving the needle towards more rigorous sustainability initiatives.

Resources:

Learn more about Dr. Steven Cohen

The Sustainable City

Local Government Commission 

Aug 16 2018

24mins

Play

Rank #10: Three Revolutions – The Future of Cars

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Topic:

Autonomous vehicles, shared vehicle services and electric vehicles

Guest & Organization:

Dr. Daniel Sperling is the Blue Planet Prize Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy and founding director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis, which oversees the 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program.

He has held the transportation seat on the California Air Resources Board since 2007 (appointed by Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown) and served as Chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies in 2015-16. Among his many prizes are the 2013 Blue Planet Prize from the Asahi Glass Foundation for being “a pioneer in opening up new fields of study to create more efficient, low-carbon, and environmentally beneficial transportation systems.”

He served twice as lead author for the IPCC (sharing the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), has testified 7 times to the U.S. Congress, and provided 40 keynote presentations in the past five years. He has authored or coauthored over 250 technical papers and 12 books; is widely cited in leading newspapers; has been interviewed many times on NPR, including Science Friday, Talk of the Nation, and Fresh Air; and in 2009 was featured on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

In Three Revolutions, transportation expert Dan Sperling, along with seven other leaders in the field, share research–based insights on potential public benefits and impacts of the three transportation revolutions. They describe innovative ideas and partnerships, and explore the role government policy can play in steering the new transportation paradigm toward the public interest—toward our dream scenario of social equity, environmental sustainability, and urban livability.

Resources:

Three Revolutions – Steering Automated, Shared, and Electric Vehicles to a Better Future by Daniel Sperling

3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program at the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Yosemite Policymakers Conference – building livable communities

Local Government Commission 

Mar 15 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #11: Design & Dignity

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Topic:

The dignifying power of design

Guest & Organization:

An architect by training, John Cary has devoted his career to expanding the practice of design for the public good. John’s first book was The Power of Pro Bono and his writing on design, philanthropy, and fatherhood has appeared in The New York Times, CNN, and numerous other publications. John works as an advisor to an array of foundations and nonprofits around the world and frequently curates and hosts events for TED, The Aspen Institute, and other entities. Deeply committed to diversifying the public stage, he is a founding partner in FRESH, a next-generation speaker’s bureau that represents young women and people of color. For seven years, John served as executive director of nonprofit Public Architecture, building the largest pro bono design program in the world, pledging tens of millions of dollars in donated services annually.

Resources:

Design for Good: A New Era of Architecture for Everyone by John Cary

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Dec 28 2017

33mins

Play

Rank #12: A Holistic Approach to Drinking-Water Infrastructure [U.S. Water Crisis Part Three]

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TOPIC

Water Sustainability in Urban Areas


IN THIS EPISODE

[02:09] Introduction of Dr. Tamim Younos.

[02:44] Tamim describes the scope of the problem of the water crisis and the number of Americans who lack access to safe drinking water.

[05:37] Tamim shares about water testing.

[08:04] Are certain geographic areas or populations more likely to be impacted by the lack of proper water infrastructure?

[09:30] What kind of implications does the lack of access to clean water and wastewater facilities have on families and communities?

[10:54] What are some common health issues related to lower-quality drinking water?

[12:40] Tamim explains what the Green Water-Infrastructure Academy is doing about the problem of unsafe drinking water.

[17:38] Tamim describes the obstacles of getting a broader knowledge of the policies that are needed.

[20:11] How can people learn more and support the Green Water-Infrastructure Academy’s work?

[20:54] Tamim shares what motivates him to do this work and why this work is important to him.

[21:45] Tamim discusses the frequency of the issues of poor and lacking water infrastructure in the U.S.

[23:19] Tamim shares one change that would lead to smarter, more sustainable, and more equitable communities.

[24:40] Tamim explains the action that listeners can take to help build a more equitable and sustainable future.

[25:17] Tamim shares what water infrastructure looks like 30 years from now.

GUEST

Dr. Tamim Younos is Founder & President of the Green Water-Infrastructure Academy. Dr. Younos earned a doctoral degree in urban and environmental engineering from the University of Tokyo. His research and educational interests include watershed assessment, sustainable water management systems, and water-energy nexus in urban environments. Dr. Younos has authored/co-authored more than 150 publications and has edited five books: “Advances in Watershed Science and Assessment” (Springer 2015) “Potable Water: Emerging Global Problems and Solutions (Springer 2014), “Climate Change and Water Resources” (Springer, 2013); “Total Maximum Daily Load: Approaches & Challenges” (PennWell Books 2005), “Advances in Water Monitoring Research” (Water Resources Publications 2003). Dr. Younos is a former Research Professor of Water Resources and Interim Director of Virginia Water Resources Research Center at Virginia Tech, and a past President of the Cabell Brand Center for Global Poverty and Resource Sustainability Studies, a nonprofit organization.

ORGANIZATION

The Green Water-Infrastructure Academy is a nonprofit organization in Washington, D.C. The mission of the Academy is to enhance human health and quality of life in global urban environments by promoting green water-infrastructure research, education and outreach programs. The Academy promotes a paradigm shift toward a holistic approach for sustainable management of water resources in global urban environments. The Green Water-Infrastructure Academy activities include awarding competitive grants to support green water infrastructure research and development, developing and coordinating partnerships between academia, governmental entities, nonprofits and private sector to support green water infrastructure projects, sponsoring green water infrastructure educational and outreach opportunities, and encouraging policy discussions pertinent to implementation and regulation of green water infrastructures.

TAKEAWAY QUOTES

“We have public water systems, like the one in Flint, Michigan, and then we have private water systems; and the public water systems serve about 86% of the population, which is about 260 million people in the United States, and the remaining is served by private water systems, which is about 45 million people.”

“The public water systems, such as the one in Flint, are regulated by the U.S. EPA, so they’re supposed to measure 94-plus water-quality parameters when it leaves the treatment plant.”

“The water is tested at the time it is leaving the water-treatment facility, and it travels through the pipelines, which sometimes are corroded and sometimes they’re falling apart, to the households and other facilities. So the tap water is not tested that often because utilities reporting to the EPA, the water which leaves that utility, and the tap water is not tested that often; and if it’s tested, then we find lead problems or other problems.”

“In 2008, there were about 19.5 million cases of waterborne diseases reported in the United States—19.5 million—and about 76% of these cases attributed to the private water wells. So it means that the remaining, which is 24%, can be attributed to the public water supplies, which are mostly small systems.”

RESOURCES

Episode 013: Access to Safe Drinking Water in Rural America [U.S. Water Crisis Part One] – In this episode, we speak with the Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project, Inc. (SERCAP) about the impact lack of access to safe drinking water has on the health and economies of rural communities and the approach SERCAP is taking to remedy these dire situations.

Episode 014: Climate Change and Storm Water Utilities [U.S. Water Crisis Part Two] – In this episode, we speak with Matthew Naud, Environmental Coordinator for the The City Of Ann Arbor about how climate change is affecting storm-water systems and the innovative steps Ann Arbor is taking to meet the challenge.

Green Water-Infrastructure Academy

THANKS FOR LISTENING

Thanks so much for joining us. Have some feedback or an idea you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave an honest review for Infinite Earth Radio on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are super helpful and greatly appreciated as it helps us expose this show to a wider audience – plus, we read each and every one of them!

Apr 14 2016

27mins

Play

Rank #13: Bottom Up Water Solutions

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Topic:

Fresh Water, Climate Change, and Community Resilience

In This Episode:

[02:10] Guest Rebecca Wodder is introduced.

[03:19] Rebecca expresses how the first Earth Day impacted her life and career path.

[05:06] Rebecca tells if fresh water has always been the focus of her environmental career.

[05:48] Rebecca talks about how water affects climate change.

[09:18] Rebecca explains the degree to which our fresh-water supply is being threatened.

[11:28] Rebecca describes the Clean Water Rule.

[14:41] Rebecca shares which industries are most impacted by the 2015 Clean Water Rule.

[16:26] Rebecca addresses natural capital and social capital.

[18:33] Rebecca speaks about New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina.

[21:39] Rebecca states where people can learn more about her work (check out the Resources section below!).

[23:10] Rebecca mentions the wisdom she would pass along to her younger self on Earth Day 1970.

[25:52] Rebecca talks about whether she’s more hopeful now than she was in the past.

Guest and Organization:

Rebecca Wodder is a nationally known environmental leader whose conservation career began with the first Earth Day. As president of the national advocacy organization, American Rivers, from 1995 to 2011, she led the development of community-based solutions to freshwater challenges. From 2011 to 2013, she served as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of the Interior. Previously, Rebecca was Vice President at The Wilderness Society, and Legislative Assistant to Senator Gaylord Nelson. In 2010, she was named a Top 25 Outstanding Conservationists by Outdoor Life Magazine. In 2014, she received the James Compton Award from River Network. In her writing and speaking, Rebecca explores how communities can enhance their resilience to climate impacts via sustainable, equitable approaches to rivers and freshwater resources. She serves on the boards of River Network, the Potomac Conservancy, and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Take Away Quotes:

“When the first Earth Day came along…my high school chemistry teacher asked if I would organize this event for the community. We really didn’t know what it was supposed to be about, but we knew it was intended to engage people and help them recognize the environmental issues that were so prominent at the time…The first Earth Day was just a great event in my life because it showed me how I could combine my passion for making a difference with my academic interests in science and biology.”

“Water is the way that we experience weather, and weather is the way we experience climate change in our daily lives.”

“Ultimately, the reason that we have a blue planet, the reason there is life on this planet is because of water. It is the fundamental reason for life.”  

“One of the things that is so important about small streams is that they are the head waters, they are the sources of our drinking water, and something like one-third of all Americans get their drinking water—it starts with these small streams.”

Resources:

Fight the attempt to kill the Clean Water Rule

The Community Resilience Reader: Essential Resources for an Era of Upheaval

Resilience Matters: Forging a Greener, Fairer Future for All (Free e-book!)

River Network

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Aug 03 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #14: The California Endowment: Empowering Grassroots Communities

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TOPIC

Giving People a Voice


IN THIS EPISODE

[01:31] Introduction of Dr. Craig Martinez.

[01:59] Introduction of Veronica Garibay and Phoebe Seaton.

[02:27] Craig describes the California Endowment and its mission.

[03:15] Craig explains that health happens in neighborhoods, not just in a doctor’s office.

[04:10] Craig shares why this work is important to him.

[05:27] What is the geographic description of the San Joaquin Valley, and what are the economic and social conditions there?

[07:00] What are the health outcomes overall within San Joaquin Valley?

[09:43] Craig shares that there’s a benefit to building healthier communities to get better health outcomes.

[11:26] Veronica describes the organization of the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability.

[15:23] What steps are needed to give people a voice when they aren’t being heard in their communities?

[20:01] Phoebe shares why this work is important to her.

[21:22] Veronica shares why this work is important to her.

[23:54] Craig shares that the people who produce the food for the country don’t have the most basic quality of life.

[25:26] Craig explains how the California Endowment and the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability are working together.

[28:10] Phoebe and Veronica explain the partnership of the work they’ve been doing together with the California Endowment.

[30:32] Phoebe and Craig share how people can access their work and get in touch with them.

[32:03] Craig, Phoebe, and Veronica share one change that would lead to smarter, more sustainable, and more equitable communities.

[32:45] Veronica, Phoebe, and Craig share the action that listeners can take to help build a more equitable and sustainable future.

[33:25] Veronica, Phoebe, and Craig explain what the San Joaquin Valley looks like 30 years from now.

GUESTS

Dr. Craig Martinez, joined The California Endowment in May 2012 as a program manager to work towards policy and systems changes that will result in improved neighborhood environments that support health. Prior to joining The Endowment, Dr. Martinez served as a health policy advisor in the Health Policy Office of the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee. He is based in The California Endowment’s Los Angeles office.

Veronica Garibay is Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability. Veronica immigrated from Michoacan, Mexico at a young age along with her parents and four siblings to the City of Parlier in Fresno County. Veronica grew up in this small farmworker town and graduated from Parlier Unified District Schools. As a first generation student, she attended the University of California, Santa Barbara where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Law and Society in 2008. Upon graduation, Veronica joined the California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. Community Equity Initiative (CEI) as the programs first Community Worker. While at CRLA Veronica earned a Master of Public Administration from Fresno State.

Phoebe Seaton is Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability. Prior to launching Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, Phoebe directed the Community Equity Initiative (CEI) at California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. and was the Policy Coordinator for issues related to water and land use at California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation. She initiated the CEI to address critical infrastructure and service deficits in low income, unincorporated communities in California. She and her colleagues at CRLA litigated civil rights and fair housing claims and maintained a robust writ practice, litigating against local and state agencies. At CRLA, Seaton also directed the organization’s Delano office and engaged in legal advocacy on Housing and Employment claims. She received her JD from UCLA and her BA in History from UC Berkeley. Prior to and during law school, Phoebe worked in Guatemala, addressing human rights violations.

ORGANIZATIONS

The California Endowment’s mission is to expand access to affordable, quality health care for underserved individuals and communities and to promote fundamental improvements in the health status of all Californians. They focus on fixing broken systems and outdated policies, ensuring the balance of power is with the people. The goal is simple: First, change the way people view health—from the notion that health happens in the doctor’s office to a belief that health happens where you live, work, learn, and play. The California Endowment calls this “narrative change.” Second, integrate smart solutions in communities across the state. The California Endowment does this by working with our partners and grantees to fundamentally change “the rules”—laws, policies, and systems—that impede health in our communities. They are changing the narrative around health to ensure health and justice for all.

The Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability is a not-for-profit based in the agriculturally rich San Joaquin and East Coachella Valleys that works alongside the most impacted communities to advocate for sound policy and eradicate injustice to secure equal access to opportunity regardless of wealth, race, income, and place. Through community organizing, research, legal representation and policy advocacy the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability will impact land use and transportation planning, shift public investment priorities, guide environmental policy, and promote the provision of basic infrastructure and services. In collaboration with local and statewide advocates, Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability will reverse trends that have reigned throughout our history and confront the inequality and deficiencies that continue to plague this state.

TAKEAWAY QUOTES

“For example, if a doctor says to someone who has a chronic disease, ‘You need to eat healthier,’ and in their community they’re not able to access fresh fruits and vegetables, that points to the importance of having those resources in the community.”

“It’s really hard to promote healthy communities when you don’t have those things in place that help to promote healthy behaviors.”

“What was really important was developing that relationship and the trust with community residents, that we were an organization that isn’t going to drive the agenda; we’re going to be a tool to support their agenda and support their priorities.”

RESOURCES

The California Endowment

Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability

California Communities Environmental Health Screening Tool (CalEnviroScreen)

THANKS FOR LISTENING

Thanks so much for joining us. Have some feedback or an idea you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave an honest review for Infinite Earth Radio on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are super helpful and greatly appreciated as it helps us expose this show to a wider audience – plus, we read each and every one of them!

Apr 21 2016

36mins

Play

Rank #15: The Future of Smart Growth

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TOPIC

Smart Growth and Sustainability in Communities in the U.S.

IN THIS EPISODE

[3:30] Kate explains her passion for her work with the Local Government Commission.

[5:37] Matt talks about his motivation to start at The Office of Sustainable Communities.

[8:08] The impact that the New Partners for Smart Growth Conference has had over the years.

[11:43] What does the Office of Sustainable Communities do for the EPA?

[14:33] How does the Smart Growth and Sustainability Act affect how we make community decisions now?

[15:50] Where we are now, and where do we need to go?

[23:02] One change that Kate and Matt would make.

[24:49] Action steps for listeners to take to help their communities.

[26:45] What will our country and communities look like 30 years from now?

[29:15] New Partners for Smart Growth Conference Information

GUEST BIOS

Kate Meis has served as the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC) since 2013. Since assuming directorship, her focus has been to strengthen partnerships and capacity to serve a growing number of community leaders across the state and the nation. Kate is a champion for local governments, a catalyst of early local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts, and an ardent coalition builder. Under Kate’s leadership LGC has become a forerunner on climate change – advancing the first California Adaptation Forum, developing a new Governor’s Initiative CivicSpark capacity building program and providing fiscal and staffing support for the new Alliance of Regional Collaboratives for Climate Adaptation. Kate is driven by the belief that given the right tools and partners people will innovate to improve their communities and respond to pressing challenges. Her unique background in agricultural research, social work, alternative transportation and community development has helped her to establish a rich network of partners and an integrated approach to assisting local governments.

Matthew Dalbey is the Director of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Sustainable Communities. The Office of Sustainable Communities (OSC) collaborates with other US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs; federal agencies; regional, state, and local governments; and a broad array of nongovernmental partners to help communities become stronger, healthier, and more sustainable through smarter growth, green building, green infrastructure and related strategies. OSC leads EPA’s participation in the interagency (HUD-DOT-EPA) Partnership for Sustainable Communities, as well as EPA’s cross-Agency focus on Making a Visible Difference in Communities. This work is integral to EPA’s priorities of improving air quality, addressing climate change, protecting America’s waters, cleaning up our communities and promoting environmental justice.

Take Away Quotes:

“The trajectory of growth that we all relied on for generations is not there any longer fundamentally all across this country we are trying to reinvent our economy there are places that have done better since the great recession and there are many places that have not yet begun to move forward. And I think the big challenge for all of us that are working in the smart growth, sustainable communities, environmental justice space is how do we work in our communities to help reinvent the economies that are not the economies of the 20th century but are the economies of the 21st century. I don’t know what that is going to look like but we need to figure it out because the trajectory of growth is just not there any longer. We have to work on economic development in every single one of our communities. We have to become good stewards of not only the environment but the economy in our communities right now. And I think it is a great space for all of us to move into as we continue to work together going forward.”

“For the past 6 years, what I am most proud of, and as an organization, we’re most proud of–and working with partners like you Bernice and Matt, and all of the other partners across the nation–is that we’ve been able to make equity and environmental justice a core of the programming at the conference. I think that has been a huge necessity and it’s really shaped the dialog, and evolved the dialog in some really important ways. Lastly, we’ve been able to not just bring people together but we’ve seen tangible results in the communities, and that’s really what this is all about.”

“If stakeholders in communities could spend some time envisioning what our communities will be looking like in the next 20 or 30 years, have a vision of that, even if it’s in someone’s mind or you could write it down, or draw a picture of it. Spend some time thinking about what you want your community to look like in the next 20 years and stick with it. Then, see what are the pieces that need to be pulled together in order to get there and the pieces have to be thought of very very broadly.”

Resources:

New Partners for Smart Growth Conference, Portland, Oregon February 11 – 13, 2016

Local Government Commission

Jan 21 2016

30mins

Play

Rank #16: Rural Economies and Urban Sustainability

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Topic:

The state of rural regions and economies.

Guest & Organization:

Steve Frisch is President of Sierra Business Council and one of its founding members. Over the last 20 years, Sierra Business Council has leveraged more than $100 million of investment in the Sierra Nevada and its communities through community and public-private partnerships. Sierra Business Council also manages the Sierra Small Business Development Center focusing on advancing sustainable business practices and linking new and expanding businesses to climate mitigation and adaptation funding.

Sierra Business Council pioneers and demonstrates innovative approaches and solutions to increase community vitality, economic prosperity, environmental quality, and social fairness in the Sierra Nevada. In the Sierra Nevada, change and challenge create opportunities. Through innovation, integrity, and respect, Sierra Business Council harnesses these opportunities by implementing projects that model proactive change. Their goal is a diverse, inventive, and sustainable region where the economy is vibrant, the land is thriving, and the communities offer opportunity for all. They act as steward leaders of the region, taking responsibility for the care and responsible management of our place, guided by the triple bottom line that considers the economy, environment, and community simultaneously.

Resources:

Infinite Earth Radio – Climate Adaptation Series with Steve Frisch and Jonathan Parfrey

• Episode 36 – Part 1

• Episode 37 – Part 2

• Episode 38 – Part 3

• Episode 39 – Part 4

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 100 – The Future of Smart Growth with Matthew Dalbey

Sierra Business Council

Local Government Commission

2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018

Dec 07 2017

26mins

Play

Rank #17: Replay – Regenerative Agriculture with John Roulac of Nutiva: Voting for a Sustainable Future Three Times Per Day

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Topic:

What you eat can help save the planet.

Guest & Organization:

John W. Roulac is the founder and CEO of Nutiva, the world’s leading organic superfoods brand of hemp, coconut, chia, and red palm superfoods. John founded Nutiva in 1999 with a mission to nourish people and planet. Through his leadership, Nutiva has become the fastest-growing superfoods company on the planet, with a 55 percent annual growth rate since 2002, and has for five years in a row been named one of Inc. magazine’s fastest-growing companies in America. This growth keeps bringing John closer to his dream of a world that places people above profits—one where people everywhere have access to wholesome, organic foods.

Nutiva® is the world’s leading brand of all-organic hemp foods, coconut oil, red palm oil and chia seeds. We’re a values-driven brand, dedicated to “Nourishing people and planet.” In a world where the industrialized food system has led us down a tangled path, where food choices have been reduced to the lesser-of-evils, and where distrust reigns, we are the champions of the greater good. Tireless seekers of pure and delicious foods that will nourish our bodies and our planet, we have devoted ourselves to a dream, a vision, a mission. We will revolutionize the way the world eats! And in so doing we will bring nourishment and balance, health and well being, sustainability and community to people and planet.

We know change is hard, but we want to make it easy. We went out looking for the kind of foods that packed a powerful amount of nutrition into every bite, so that you could make small changes to big effect. We found superfoods—nutrient-dense powerhouses that can also be grown and processed in a sustainable way. These are foods that are truly good for you and for the planet. They’re foods like hemp and coconut, chia and red palm. They’re organic, full of vital nutrition, easy to use and delicious additions to your diet.

We say food doesn’t have to be a choice between the lesser of evils.

We say let food lead us to a better world.

We say super people deserve superfoods.

We say, come join us in our mission.

Together, we can change the world.

Resources:

Learn More about John here

Learn More about John’s work

Find John on Facebook

Learn More about Nutiva

Nutiva’s Real Food Manifesto

Jul 26 2018

27mins

Play

Rank #18: Green Stormwater Management

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Topic:

Incorporating Green Infrastructure into Street Design

In This Episode:

[01:57] Guest Corinne Kisner is introduced.

[02:10] Corinne shares about the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO).

[02:33] Mike tells about Island Press and NACTO’s book, “The Urban Street Stormwater Guide”.

[03:17] Corinne explains why sustainable stormwater management matters and why transportation officials should be concerned about stormwater management.

[05:12] Corinne gives the benefits of using green stormwater infrastructure in street design.

[06:49] Corinne comments on green stormwater systems making cities more desirable and more attractive places to live.

[08:30] Corinne gives the characteristics of successful city projects.

[11:03] Corinne shares the elements that help make green infrastructure work within a street design.

13 :07 Corinne states the challenges that cities face in stormwater street design.

[14:02] What should be kept in mind when designing or implementing a stormwater street project?

[15:08] Corinne talks about underserved communities using green infrastructure as a community-building, community-investment strategy.

[17:16] Corinne shares whether there is a role for green stormwater infrastructure in areas that have a drier climate.

[17:47] How can green infrastructure projects positively change a city’s growth and development?

[19:06] Is green infrastructure more or less expensive than traditional infrastructure approaches?

[20:35] Is “The Urban Street Stormwater Guide” currently available, and where can people go to buy the book?

[21:25] Corinne discusses what needs to happen next to get more cities to implement green infrastructure as part of their normal course of business.

Guest and Organization:

Corinne Kisner is the Director of Programs at the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). In this role, she facilitates networks of peer cities working to build safe, sustainable transportation systems and equitable, active cities through better street design and transportation policy. Corinne directs the annual Designing Cities conference and facilitates city policy initiatives on issues such as Vision Zero, planning for automated vehicles, and integrating green stormwater infrastructure into multi-modal street design. Corinne also oversees NACTO’s communications, external partnerships, and leadership development program for city transportation officials.

NACTO’s mission is to build cities as places for people, with safe, sustainable, accessible and equitable transportation choices that support a strong economy and vibrant quality of life.

Follow Corinne and NACTO on Twitter

Take Away Quotes:

“NACTO is an association of 55 member cities and transit agencies across North America, formed to help exchange best practices and ideas in city transportation and raise the bar nationally to what city transportation can do in cities.”

“We’ve been seeing cities across the country really thinking critically about the design of streets and how that plays in to city goals for sustainability and equity and access and really livable, vibrant cities.”

“The network of cities that we work with are starting to think critically, too, about how streets play a role in the stormwater infrastructure, in the stormwater network within the city. Most streets are very impervious, meaning that water can’t absorb through the concrete or the asphalt into the ground, and so you just get enormous volumes of stormwater runoff running across streets and into storm drains. That really separates water from the natural cycle and causes water pollution and is very expensive to treat and manage.”

Resources:

National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO)

Urban Street Stormwater Guide

NACTO Overview of the Urban Street Stormwater Guide

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Sep 07 2017

24mins

Play

Rank #19: Resilience for All

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Topic:

Urban Resilience Series – Resiliency planning, equity and community-driven design

Guest & Organization:

Barbara Brown Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. Barbara Brown Wilson’s research and teaching focus on the ethics, theory, and practice of sustainable community design and development, and on the history of urban social movements. Wilson’s current research projects include understanding how grassroots community networks reframe public infrastructure in more climate and culturally appropriate ways across the U.S. and helping to elevate the standards of evaluation for community engaged design around notions of social and ecological justice. Her research is often change-oriented—she collaborates with real community partners to identify opportunities for engaged and integrated sustainable development. She is a member of the Equity Collective, whose work is currently featured in the Cooper Hewitt Museum’s By the People: Designing a Better America Exhibition. Alongside Architect Jeana Ripple, Wilson is coordinating the community engaged aspects of the Public Art Installation for the ArtHouse Social Kitchen Project in Gary, Indiana. She is also working, as a researcher, an educator, and a board member of the Piedmont Housing Alliance (PHA) with their leadership to identify venues where PHA residents can more actively engage in and shape their communities. In those collective posts, Wilson is serving as a resource ally to PHA’s new Youth Leadership in Land Use program that brings in resident youth from Friendship Court as valued members of the design team for the Redevelopment project currently underway in their neighborhood.

She is a co-founder of the Design Futures Student Leadership Forum, a five day student leadership training which convenes students and faculty from a consortium of universities with leading practitioners all working to elevate the educational realms of community engaged design; and a co-founder of the Austin Community Design and Development Center (ACDDC), a nonprofit design center that provides high quality green design and planning services to lower income households and the organizations that serve them.

Resources:

Resilience for All – Striving for Equity Through Community-Driven Design

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Jul 13 2018

25mins

Play

Rank #20: Art and Creative Place Making

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Topic:

The arts and community engagement as highly effective community and economic development strategies

Guest & Organization:

Juanita Hardy is the Senior Visiting Fellow (SVF) for Creative Placemaking at the Urban Land Institute (ULI). Her work supports the Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative by deepening and broadening ULI’s focus on creative placemaking through content, the ULI District Council network, and the Healthy Corridors grant program.

Hardy has a passion for making business and cultural connections that foster healthy, thriving, and culturally rich places to work, live, and enjoy. She founded Tiger Management Consulting Group, a global training and business consulting services firm, after retiring from IBM in 2005. Hardy has over 43 years of business experience, including 31 years with IBM, and over 35 years in the arts as a nonprofit leader, trustee, collector, and patron of the arts. For IBM, she led many client transformational leadership initiatives and frequently coached leaders on making change at the individual and organizational level. Her work with Tiger Management included helping clients build successful relationships with businesses in other countries and cultures.

As SVF for ULI, Hardy has done extensive research and identified best practices, conducted an assessment on the presence of creative placemaking at ULI, worked with ULI District Councils on programming and capacity building activities, and authored a guide on implementing creative placemaking in real estate development.

Hardy is the former Executive Director of CulturalDC, a nonprofit committed to making space for artists and art organizations and fostering cultural and economic vibrancy in communities through its creative placemaking services. While at CulturalDC, she worked closely with area developers to integrate arts and culture into development projects across the Washington, D.C., area. She served as an awards program juror for the ULI Washington District Council’s Real Estate Trends Conference for three years, 2015-2017. Since 2006, Hardy has served as an executive coach with Right Management, a global human capital development firm, and has served on many nonprofit art boards dating to the 1980s. She co-founded Millennium Arts Salon, an art education initiative, in 2000. Hardy is an accomplished writer and public speaker. Her recent writing includes a trilogy of creative placemaking articles in Urban Land magazine.

Resources:

Urban Land Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative

Urban Land Institute’s Creative Placemaking

National Endowment for the Arts

National Endowment for the Arts’ Creative Placemaking Paper by Ann Markusen, Markusen Economic Research Services and Anne Gadwa, Metris Arts Consulting

Local Government Commission 

Apr 12 2018

16mins

Play

The Grand Food Bargain

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Topic:

Urban Resilience Series – our modern food system

Guest & Organization:

Kevin D. Walker grew up farming and has seen almost every facet of agriculture firsthand, working in agribusiness, at the US Department of Agriculture, overseas with international nonprofits, and as a professor at Michigan State University. He has served on committees with the National Academies Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, and as a consultant to foreign governments and the World Trade Organization.

The Grand Food Bargain and the Mindless Drive for More (Publication Date: March 26, 2019) provides a powerful look at the global consequences of America’s modern food system. In it, Kevin D. Walker combines a lifetime of food system experience with pivotal research to craft a sweeping history of our relationship with food. The result is a stunning indictment of a system that prioritizes volume over nutrition, low costs over livable wages, and blinds consumers to harmful effects ranging from polluted rivers and food waste to obesity and disappearing species.

Resources:

The Grand Food Bargain and the Mindless Drive for More by Kevin D. Walker

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press Urban Resilience Project’s new, free e-book Resilience Matters: Strengthening Communities in an Era of Upheaval

May 17 2019

24mins

Play

Sixth IPCC Assessment Report

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – adaptation and the national climate assessment

Guest & Organization:

Robert Lempert is a principal researcher at the RAND Corporation and Director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for Longer Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condition. His research focuses on risk management and decision-making under conditions of deep uncertainty, with an emphasis on climate change, energy, and the environment.

Lempert is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a chapter lead for the US National Climate Assessment and for the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He was the Inaugural EADS Distinguished Visitor in Energy and Environment at the American Academy in Berlin and the inaugural president of the Society for Decision Making Under Deep Uncertainty. A professor of policy analysis in the Pardee RAND Graduate School, Lempert is an author of the book Shaping the Next One Hundred Years: New Methods for Quantitative, Longer-Term Policy Analysis.

Lempert received his Ph.D. in applied physics and S.M. in applied physics and science policy from Harvard University.

Kemble currently lives in Midtown Sacramento.

Resources:

Local Government Commission 

Mar 06 2019

28mins

Play

Opportunity Zone Tax Credits

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – leveraging a tool in the federal tax law

Guest & Organization:

Kemble K. Pope is an Urban Infill & Real Estate Entrepreneur in the Sacramento Region of Northern CA. He is a Founder and the Managing Member of POI Partners, LLC, a consulting firm that represents Opportunity Zone Fund investors by sourcing and vetting redevelopment projects, negotiating capital placement terms and overseeing the use of those funds until the project is completed and stabilized.

His academic background was focused on environmental and technology policy, but he has worked in a broad range of sectors including politics, business & economic development, mobile technology and land use. From 2011 to 2014, he led the Davis Chamber of Commerce (“DCOC”) as the full-time CEO.

Kemble’s most recently completed redevelopment work is “Meridian Place” in Central Davis. He assembled two underutilized lots and constructed a new 11-unit, 3-story, infill rental project. The project includes one permanently affordable unit, which allowed Pope to be the first developer in Davis to utilize the provisions of AB744 for increased density above the City of Davis standards. In Spring 2019, he will break ground on Trackside Center, a transit-oriented redevelopment in Downtown Davis. The 4-story building includes 9,000 SF commercial on the ground floor, with a large outdoor plaza, and 27 rental units above.

While living in Davis, CA from 2003-2017, Pope served as a political appointee on several community-serving committees. He was Chairperson of the City of Davis Climate Action Team, which created one of the first municipal Climate Action Plans in response to AB 32 and SB 375. He was Chairperson of the City’s Open Space & Habitat Commission and served on the Davis Joint Unified School District’s Property Tax Oversight Committee and Surplus Property Committee.

Kemble currently lives in Midtown Sacramento.

Resources:

Local Government Commission 

Mar 04 2019

21mins

Play

An Atlas of US Transit

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Topic:

Urban Resilience Series – key elements of urban transit systems

Guest & Organization:

Christof Spieler, PE, LEED AP, is a Vice President and Director of Planning at Huitt-Zollars and a Lecturer in Architecture and Engineering at Rice University. He was a member of the board of directors of Houston METRO from 2010 to 2018, where he oversaw a complete redesign of the bus network that has resulted in Houston being one of the few US cities that are increasing transit ridership. Christof has spent over a decade advocating for transit as an urban planner, transit board member, blogger, community leader, and enthusiast. In the fun and accessible Trains, Buses, People: An Opinionated Atlas of US Transit (Publication date: October 23, 2018), he profiles the 47 metropolitan areas in the 50 states that have rail transit or BRT, ranks the best and worst systems, and draws out lessons for cities to build better transit.

Resources:

Learn more about Trains, Buses, People: An Opinionated Atlas of US Transit

Find Christof on Twitter

Download the Island Press Urban Resilience Project’s new, free e-book Resilience Matters: Strengthening Communities in an Era of Upheaval

Feb 25 2019

27mins

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Life After Carbon

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Topic:

Urban Resilience Series – the next transformation of cities

Guest & Organization:

Peter Plastrik was born in Paris, grew up in New York City, and lived in four cities in Michigan. He is cofounder and vice president of the Innovation Network for Communities (INC), established in 2007. Along with John Cleveland, he was a founding consultant to the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance and helped it develop its strategic plan and Innovation Fund. He also consulted closely with the Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN) and managed USDN’s Innovation Fund. Pete has been the lead author on several INC reports about cities and climate change: “Essential Capacities for Urban Climate Adaptation,” supported by the summit Foundation, and “Leadership by US Cities Innovations in Climate Action,” supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. He is coauthor with John and Madeleine Taylor of Connecting to Change the World: Harnessing the Power of Networks for Social Impact (2014). He coauthored two books with David Osborne: Banishing Bureaucracy: The Five Strategies (1997) and The Reinventor’s Fieldbook: Tools for Transforming Your Government (2000). His latest book is Life After Carbon: The Next Global Transformation of Cities (2018), coauthored by John Cleveland. He lives on Beaver Island in Lake Michigan with his wife Deb and their pugs.

Resources:

Learn more about Life After Carbon

Innovation Network for Communities

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press Urban Resilience Project’s new, free e-book Resilience Matters: Strengthening Communities in an Era of Upheaval

Feb 25 2019

32mins

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Oakland and the New IPCC Climate Change Report

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – acting now and bringing change to scale

Guest & Organization:

Daniel Hamilton serves as the Sustainability Manager for the City of Oakland, California. Daniel has 20 years of experience in managing sustainability programs, policies, and plans for local governments and utilities. He has led multiple award winning projects and plans across California and has taught professional and university courses in energy management, sustainable policy development, and green building design and construction. He holds a BA in Architecture and an MA in Sustainable Planning, both from the University of Kansas.

Resources:

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) – Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR15)

Oakland Preliminary Sea Leve Rise Road Map (Fall 2017)

Pathways to Deep GHG Reductions in Oakland: Executive Summary (March 2018)

Pathways to Deep GHG Reductions in Oakland: Final Report (March 2018)

Local Government Commission 

Nov 15 2018

43mins

Play

Addressing Inequity in Rural California

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – the widening disparity in California and the challenges to address across California’s regions

Guest & Organization:

Jim Mayer is President & CEO of California Forward, a bipartisan public interest effort to bolster democracy and improve the performance of government in California. Working with civic and governmental partners statewide, CA Fwd has been the consistent advocate for comprehensive governance reforms that will lead to better results and accountability. As its chief executive, Mayer has helped to usher California’s modernization of redistricting, primary elections, term limits, ethics and transparency laws – to empower voters, encourage bipartisan solutions and restore public trust. He shepherded CA Fwd’s efforts to build capacity within governments to improve outcomes, and to advance a shared agenda among private, civic and public sector leaders to sustainably and equitable increase prosperity.

Resources:

California Forward

California Economic Summit’s Elevate Rural CA Initiative

Local Government Commission 

Nov 08 2018

23mins

Play

The Intergalactic Design Guide

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Topic:

Urban Resilience – design for social innovation

Guest & Organization:

Cheryl Heller is the Founding Chair of the first MFA program in Design for Social Innovation at SVA and President of the design lab CommonWise. She was recently awarded a Rockefeller Bellagio Fellowship, and is a recipient of the prestigious AIGA Medal for her contribution to the field of design. She founded the first design department in a major advertising agency and as president, grew the division to $50m in billings when it was spun off as an independent entity. As a strategist, she has helped grow businesses from small regional enterprises to multi-billion global market leaders, launched category-redefining divisions and products, reinvigorated moribund cultures, and designed strategies for hundreds of successful entrepreneurs. She has taught creativity to leaders and organizations around the world.

Her clients have included Ford Motor Company, American Express, Reebok, Mariott International, Renaissance Hotels, Sheraton, MeadWestvaco, StoraEnso, the Arnhold Institute for Global Health, Medtronic, Pfizer, Mars Corporation, Discovery Networks International, Cemex, Herman Miller, Gap, Bayer Corporation, Seventh Generation, L’Oreal, Elle Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, The World Wildlife Fund, Ford Foundation, and the Girl Scouts of America.

Heller is the former Board Chair of PopTech, and a Senior Fellow at the Babson Social Innovation Lab. She created the Ideas that Matter program for Sappi in 1999, which has since given over $13 million to designers working for the public good, and partnered with Paul Polak and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum to create the exhibit, “Design for the Other 90%.” She is the author of Intergalactic Design Guide: Harnessing the Creative Potential of Social Design, published by Island Press.

Resources:

Find Cheryl on Twitter @cherylheller

CommonWise

Design for Social Innovation at SVA

The Intergalactic Design Guide – Harnessing the Creative Potential of Social Design by Cheryl Heller

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press App! Learn more about the app here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Nov 01 2018

29mins

Play

Facing the Environment and Invisibility in West Virginia

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Topic:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – seeking justice in a disempowered place

Guest & Organization:

Angie Rosser is the Executive Director of West Virginia Rivers Coalition, a statewide advocacy organization promoting access to clean water for all. Her 20+ years of experience in social justice work came to bear during a massive water contamination event that sparked transformative dialogue around safe drinking water. Her motivation is personal and political; she believes everyone has a right to enjoy clean water and that conservation of our water resources is central to a shared prosperity. Angie holds a BA in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina and an MA in Organizational Communication from West Virginia University.

Resources:

Facing Race: A National Conference is presented by Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation – November 8-10, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan

West Virginia Rivers

Expanding the Circle: Strategies to Authentically Engage Under-Resourced Communities to Improve the Chesapeake Bay for All

Skeo – Equity, Sustainability and Resiliency

Oct 25 2018

25mins

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Climate Safe Infrastructure

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – how to make infrastructure more resilient to the growing threats of climate change

Guest & Organization:

Cris Liban is the Executive Officer of Environmental Compliance and Sustainability at Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Agency. At LA Metro, Cris oversees their internationally recognized Environmental, Sustainability, and Energy initiatives. Cris has a bachelors of science in Geology, a masters in Civil Engineering and earned his PhD in environmental science and engineering from UCLA. Cris is a widely published author, a national speaker and serves on a number of commissions and working groups including the chairing the sustainability committee for the American Society of Civil Engineers, serving on the National Council for Environmental Policy and Technology at US EPA, and serving on California’s AB2800 Climate-Safe Infrastructure Working Group CA Department of Natural Resources.

Resources:

Climate Safe Infrastructure Report  

American Society of Civil Engineers Roadmap

Local Government Commission 

Oct 18 2018

48mins

Play

Rural Economic Development

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – building relationships and keeping rural communities rural

Guest & Organization:

Kim Dolbow Vann brings more than 20 years of experience and dedication to economic development and the improvement of rural life. As USDA Rural Development State Director, Vann oversees a $6.7 billion portfolio, more than 40 programs and 18 offices resulting in average annual investments of $1 billion into rural California. Previously, Vann spent eleven years as a Colusa County Supervisor representing the first district. During her tenure she served as the chair of Rural County Representatives of California, and led the charge on all federal and state issues that affect the state’s rural counties. In addition, from 2016-2017 Vann served as the chair of Sites Reservoir Joint Powers Authority, leading the new public private partnership in creating an above-ground water storage facility in rural Colusa County.

Resources:

United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development – California

Find California Rural Development on Twitter @CaliforniaRD

Local Government Commission 

Oct 11 2018

22mins

Play

Urban Heat Island Effects

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Topic:

Urban Resilience – heat impacts and cooling centers

Guest & Organization:

As Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator, Cynthia is tasked with advancing policy goals that align with WE ACT’s Northern Manhattan Climate Action (NMCA) project, which seeks to increase community participation, within and outside of the government and build neighborhood capacity in response to climate change. Prior to working at WE ACT, Cynthia served as a NASA Climate Change Research Fellow, using new technology to enhance understanding of urban climates and better inform policy makers. Cynthia is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and holds an M.S. in Sustainability Management from Columbia University.

Resources:

WE ACT for Environmental Justice

How We Can Use Climate Action Planning to Beat the Heat (WE ACT)

WE ACT’s Policy Campaigns & Initiative: 2017 Agenda

Heat Check – Extreme heat kills more than a hundred New Yorkers yearly. Here’s how the city’s tackling the problem in a warming world. (By Justine Calma on Jul 11, 2018)

Oct 04 2018

25mins

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Anacostia Community Museum and Urban Waterways

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Topic:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – the significance of the Anacostia River to Washington DC

Guest & Organization:

Katrina D. Lashley is Program Coordinator of Urban Waterways at Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum. She received her BA in English Literature and Italian at Rutgers University and earned an MA in History (Public History track) at American University, with a focus on the British Caribbean. Ms. Lashley has worked on projects for the National Museum of American History and Arlington House. In addition to her Public History work, she taught English Literature and English Language for 12 years.

Resources:

Urban Waterways Newsletter Issue 9

Urban Waterways Newsletter Issue 8

Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum

Skeo – Equity, Sustainability and Resiliency

Other related resources developed by Skeo:

The Urban Waters National Partnership Handbook

Expanding the Circle: Strategies to Authentically Engage Under-Resourced Communities to Improve the Chesapeake Bay for All

Sep 27 2018

36mins

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Transitioning Fossil Fuel Communities

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – how communities can prosper economically despite transitions

Guest & Organization:

Kate Gordon is an internationally recognized expert on the intersection of clean energy and economic development. She wears a number of hats including Partner on the sustainability team of RIDGE-LANE Limited Partners; Senior Advisor at the Paulson Institute; and non-resident Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. Kate may be best known for her work as the founder and director of the “Risky Business Project,” co-chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson, and Tom Steyer. The Risky Business project focused on the economic risks the U.S. faces from unmitigated climate change. Kate is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal as one of the paper’s “Energy Experts.” Kate also serves on the non-profit board the American Jobs Project; is also a member of the Sustainable Investing Advisory Board at Brown Advisory.

Resources:

Risky Business Project

California Adaptation Forum

Local Government Commission

American Jobs Project

Sep 20 2018

33mins

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Lyft – Fighting Climate Change One Ride at a Time

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – transportation, climate change and sustainability goals

Guest & Organization:

Sam Arons is the Director of Sustainability at Lyft. Sam oversees the company’s sustainability and climate impact efforts. He plays an essential role in helping Lyft achieve its Climate Impact Goals to address the threat posed by global climate change, and make the long-term vision a reality. Sam comes to Lyft after 10 years at Google, where he developed the company’s sustainability efforts as Senior Lead for Energy & Infrastructure. Prior to his time with Google, Sam researched wind energy and plug-in vehicles at Williams College and UC Berkeley, respectively.

Resources:

Lyft

Local Government Commission 

Sep 13 2018

20mins

Play

Replay – Hunger in America – Thinking Outside the Food Pantry

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Topic:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – Taking a Look at Food Insecurity

Guest & Organization:

Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family.

Resources:

Follow Sharon Thornberry on Twitter

Oregon Food Bank

A Place at the Table book and film

Local Government Commission

Skeo Solutions

Sep 06 2018

33mins

Play

Cap and Trade and Environmental Injustice

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Topic:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – revolutionary air quality monitoring

Guest & Organization:

Veronica Eady is Assistant Executive Officer for Environmental Justice at the California Air Resources Board. In this capacity, Ms. Eady is responsible for overseeing Environmental Justice activities of the Board.Her role will be to serve as the primary internal and external contact for CARB on environmental justice issues and concerns and will be responsible for providing policy consultation and recommendations to CARB staff. She will also participate in decision making during the development and implementation of all major CARB programs to ensure that environmental justice and tribal concerns are considered.

Ms. Eady was formerly the Vice President and Director of Conservation Law Foundation Massachusetts and was the Associate General Counsel and Director of Environmental Justice at New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, a non-profit civil rights law firm in New York City. Eady has also served as Director of the Environmental Justice and Brownfields Programs for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, where she was the principal author of Massachusetts Environmental Justice Policy. Eady was also Executive Director of Alternatives for Community and Environment, an environmental justice advocacy organization. She is the former chair of EPA’s federal advisory committee for environmental justice, the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. Eady has held appointments on several faculties, including Europe-Viadriana University in Germany, Tufts University, in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Fordham Law School, and at the Stanford Law School. Eady received her B.A. in journalism from the University of Southern California, and her J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

Luis Olmedo is the executive director of Comité Civico Del Valle, a community advocacy group serving Imperial County, California. Comite Civico Del Valle (CCV) is a 501 (c) (3) organization founded in 1987 that has grown to serve thousands of children, students, community residents, and professionals in California through a variety of programs: Promotoras, Outreach Events, Educator Training, Health Education, Environmental Health Research, and Environmental Conference. In 2007, the CCV expanded its programs to work with government agencies, academia, and underserved groups on specific neighborhood environmental justice problem solving that culminated in the implementation of the “First Environmental Justice Leadership Conference”. Our Environmental Conference has been the catalyst for major policy change in the U.S./Mexico Rural California Border Region.

Resources:

California Air Resources Board

Comite Civico Del Valle, Inc.

Skeo Solutions

Aug 30 2018

35mins

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Transformative Equitable Resilience

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Topic:

Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – funding and financing resilience

Guest & Organization:

Joyce Coffee, is founder and President of Climate Resilience Consulting, a Certified B Corp. She is an accomplished organizational strategist and visionary leader with over 25 years of domestic and international experience in the corporate, government and non-profit sectors implementing resilience and sustainability strategies, management systems, performance measurement, partnerships, benchmarking and reporting.

More recently, she created corporate social responsibility plans and reports for Fortune 500 companies as a Vice President at Edelman and ran a preeminent global adaptation nonprofit grounded in university-based research and analytics, the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Initiative, ND-GAIN. Joyce regularly speaks as an expert in climate adaptation and resilience and has presented at Climate Week, WEF and COP side-events, and Greenbiz, among others.

Resources:

Climate Resilience Consulting

California Adaptation Forum – the 3rd California Adaptation Forum will be held in Sacramento, CA from August 27-29, 2018. Register now!

Local Government Commission

Aug 23 2018

32mins

Play

The Sustainable City with Dr. Steven Cohen

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Topic:

Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – importance of cities as the center of industry and life

Guest & Organization:

The Research Program is led by Dr. Steven Cohen, Professor in the Practice of Public Affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is also Director of the Master of Public Administration Program in Environmental Science and Policy at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and the Director of the Masters of Science in Sustainability Management at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies. He is a consultant, former policy analyst, and former member of the Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology for the U.S. EPA. Cohen is the author of several books, including The Sustainable City (2017), Understanding Environmental Policy (2006, 2014), Sustainability Management (2011), The Effective Public Manager (1988, now co-authored in its fifth edition), and the co-author of Sustainability Policy: Hastening the Transition to a Cleaner Economy (2015), and is a regular contributor for the Huffington Post on issues sustainability management and environmental policy. He is a graduate of Franklin College of Indiana (1974) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (MA, 1977; PhD, 1979). Dr. Cohen views the forthcoming research as a necessary next step in moving the needle towards more rigorous sustainability initiatives.

Resources:

Learn more about Dr. Steven Cohen

The Sustainable City

Local Government Commission 

Aug 16 2018

24mins

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Open Spaces Sacred Places

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Topic:

Urban Resilience – urban green spaces designed with a purpose

Guest & Organization:

Fred Smith is the Director of Stringfellow Health Fund Grants at the Community Foundation of Northeast Alabama. He has an Associate of Science degree from Southern Union Community College, Bachelor’s degree in marketing and a Master’s degree in Public Administration—both from Jacksonville State University. Fred is also a graduate of the Alabama Association of Not for Profit Executive Leadership certificate program. He is a recent appointee to the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama Roundtable, a group that gives young civic and business leaders the opportunity to study issues and government policy in Alabama in conjunction with the research conducted by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama. The group meets with public officials and other leaders to learn about and discuss issues currently affecting the state and local governments while also seeking solutions to the state’s problems.

Prior to joining the Community Foundation, he served as an Instructor for Gadsden State Community College and previously served as, the Director of Jacksonville State University’s Community Wellness program which received several local and state commendations for its contributions to community programming. He completed the Essential Skills & Strategies for New Grantmakers in 2016 and has also participated in Foundations on the Hill held in Washington D.C. both hosted by Southeastern Council of Foundations. Fred also has a previous connection to the Foundation. He has written grants to, received grants from, and successfully managed grants for the Foundation and has served as a volunteer grant reviewer. In addition to managing the Stringfellow Health Fund competitive grants program, Fred also conducts grantee site visits, manages the poverty project to align the foundation’s grant making with the Community Needs Assessment, and is coordinating the 100th anniversary celebration of Susie Parker Stringfellow’ s will in 2020.

Fred met his lovely wife Rochelle while they both attended Jacksonville State University. They have two daughters, Eden and Zion, and they reside in Jacksonville Al.

Resources:

A Southern Interpretation of Sacred

Nature Sacred

Island Press Urban Resilience Project

Download the Island Press App! Learn more about the app here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!

Aug 09 2018

22mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

267 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Excellent, thought-provoking podcast

By Hommie alot - Jun 16 2016
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This is a must listen! Thank you guys for doing this podcast.

Podcast series

By Novotny Joe - Mar 12 2016
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Series fills a void regarding important land use planning and community development topics!