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History Talk

Updated about 13 hours ago

Education
Society & Culture
Courses
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Smart conversations about today’s most interesting topics - a history podcast for everyone.

Read more

Smart conversations about today’s most interesting topics - a history podcast for everyone.

iTunes Ratings

12 Ratings
Average Ratings
8
4
0
0
0

Interesting Discussions of History

By V Tach - Jan 04 2018
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The guests are intelligent and explore each subject to a satisfying depth. If you are interested in history and enjoy college level discussions on disparate subjects, this podcast may be for you!

Worth a listen

By Boberta B - Sep 28 2016
Read more
Guests usually do a good (and often nuanced) job providing historical context on current political and social issues. I'd recommend this podcast for people who appreciate programs like All Things Considered.

iTunes Ratings

12 Ratings
Average Ratings
8
4
0
0
0

Interesting Discussions of History

By V Tach - Jan 04 2018
Read more
The guests are intelligent and explore each subject to a satisfying depth. If you are interested in history and enjoy college level discussions on disparate subjects, this podcast may be for you!

Worth a listen

By Boberta B - Sep 28 2016
Read more
Guests usually do a good (and often nuanced) job providing historical context on current political and social issues. I'd recommend this podcast for people who appreciate programs like All Things Considered.

Listen to:

Cover image of History Talk

History Talk

Updated about 13 hours ago

Read more

Smart conversations about today’s most interesting topics - a history podcast for everyone.

Rank #1: North Korea: The Myth of a Hermit Kingdom

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In this episode of History Talk, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit speak with three experts on North Korea: Deborah Solomon, Mitchell Lerner, and Youngbae Hwang. Westerners tend to think of North Korea as an isolated "Hermit Kingdom" led by crazy dictators, but what is the view from inside Pyongyang? Join us as we discuss when and how North Korea got its nickname, debate its accuracy, and find out what's shaping North Korea's decisions. 

                - Posted December 2016

Dec 15 2016

37mins

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Rank #2: Secrecy and Celibacy: The Catholic Church and Sexual Abuse

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Over the last two decades, the Catholic Church has been buffeted by a series of sexual abuse scandals. High-profile investigative reports have uncovered cases of sexual abuse of minors, both boys and girls, as well as nuns and adult women, by Catholic priests, bishops, and members of religious orders. But while clerical abuse has only recently become a news item, it has a much longer history.
This month, your History Talk podcast hosts Lauren Henry and Eric Michael Rhodes speak with two experts on the Church — Professors Wietse de Boer and Alexander Stille.  What makes the Catholic Church such a rife environment for sexual abuse? How do these scandals reflect the history of the Church? How has the Church responded to this problem, and how might the scandal shape its future? In this episode, we’ll seek to answer these questions and more in an exploration of the historical context and contemporary ramifications of the sexual abuse scandal within the Catholic Church.
To learn more about the history of the Catholic Church and clerical abuse, read this month's feature, The Catholic Church and Sexual Abuse, Then and Now by Dr. Wietse de Boer. Interested in more coverage of the Church? Be sure to check out The People's Pope and the Changing Face of Catholicism and Two Popes and a Primate: The Changing Face of Global Christianity.
- Posted February 2019

[A transcript of this podcast is available here.]

Feb 28 2019

45mins

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Rank #3: Beyond the Veil: Women in the Mideast and North Africa

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On this episode of History Talk, guests Johanna Sellman, Gulsah Toronoglu, and Sabra Webber discuss the diverse and dynamic history of women in the Middle East and North Africa. Highlighting the region's great range of historical experiences, they question the idea that women's rights marks a divide between Islamic societies and the "West," explore the history of women's movements, and address the ways in which the flourishing of new media is transforming political and artistic expression throughout the Islamic world.

- Posted July 2016

Jul 22 2016

28mins

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Rank #4: Jefferson Cowie on Deindustrialization, Trade, and the 2016 Presidential Election

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On this episode of History Talk, host Patrick Potyondy interviews Jefferson Cowie, the James G. Stahlman Chair in the Department of History at Vanderbilt University. Cowie has written extensively on American economic, racial, cultural, and political history, and is the author most recently of The Great Exception: The New Deal and the Limits of American Politics. In this interview, Cowie helps make sense of the 2016 presidential election by discussing the connections between the collapse of the New Deal exception, populism as the primary driving force of change in American politics, immigration as a key political pivot, the long-term movement of manufacturing jobs from place to place, and international trade like NAFTA and the TPP. He also explains why today's political climate looks a lot like the 1970s, not only in the electoral arena but in pop culture, too.

- Posted September 2016

Sep 18 2016

46mins

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Rank #5: The EU: Past, Present, and Future

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On this episode of History Talk, Patrick and Mark sit down with Donald Hempson,  Lauren Henry, and Chris Otter to discuss the history of the European Union, an organization that has united Europeans in ways that were almost unthinkable a century ago. Today, the EU faces an unprecedented combination of challenges, including a lingering economic crisis, a massive influx of migrants, and the specter of terrorism.  But as our guests tell us, the EU has proven to be surprisingly resilient and adaptable, constantly reinventing itself in the face of sweeping historic changes.

- Posted March 2016

Apr 05 2016

30mins

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Rank #6: Road to Europe: The 2015 Migration Crisis

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Over the past months, the news media has presented dramatic scenes of desperate people trying to reach Europe by embarking on flimsy boats in Turkey and Greece, crossing barbed wire fences in Bulgaria and Hungary, catching rides in overcrowded trains in Macedonia, and sleeping in public squares in Serbia and elsewhere. But many more refugees find themselves in Middle Eastern countries like Jordan, Iraq, and Lebanon. This is hardly the first time that Europe or the Middle East has experienced mass migration. And all of the migrants in these two regions are but a small proportion of the total number of migrants across the globe. Locals are divided; while some greet the refugees with water, blankets, and toys, others utter ugly words, emphasize their own economic vulnerability, or simply turn their eyes away. Join guests Theodora Dragostinova, Robin Judd, and Steven Hyland as they discuss today’s refugee and migrant crisis in not only Europe but in the Middle East, too—all within the much larger context of global migration history.
Syrian refugees in Vienna, Austria, September 2015. Photo by Josh Zakary
- Posted October 2015

Oct 26 2015

27mins

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Rank #7: Food for Thought: Diet in History

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How and what we eat defines who we are. Food is both everywhere and nowhere, so normal that we rarely consider how radically the production and consumption of food have shaped not only human culture but the environment as well (and how radically the production of food has changed over time). Sample a little food history with historians Chris Otter, Helen Veit, and Sam White, who reveal that what we shove into our mouths has shaped our cultures, our bodies, and our planet.
- Posted December 2015

Dec 21 2015

23mins

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Rank #8: Nuclear Tensions, Nuclear Weapons, and a Long History of Nuclear War

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In the last year, tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, a false nuclear missile alert in Hawaii, and debates over the Iran nuclear deal have renewed public attention to the development of nuclear weapons and armament and the potential for war. But from the Cold War, to the Cuban Missile Crisis, to Chinese nuclear tests in the 1960s, the U.S. and the world have frequently faced these fears, and attempted to place particular countries’ access to nuclear weapons technology under international control. So how concerned should we be about nuclear weapons and who has them? How did the U.S. become so central in efforts to control them? And how can past attempts to limit nuclear proliferation inform how we address these questions today? On this episode of History Talk, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Viñas-Nelson speak with experts Christopher Gelpi, Dakota Rudesill, and Matt Ambrose to discuss the history of nuclear armament and control.

For more on this topic, see:
Johnathan Hunt - "Learning to Love the Nuclear Pariah: From China to North Korea"
Dakota Rudesill - "MIRVs Matter: Banning Hydra-Headed Missiles in a New START II Treaty," Stanford Journal of International Law Vol. 54, 2018
Matt Ambrose - The Control Agenda: A History of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks, Cornell University Press, 2018
- Posted June 2018

Jun 30 2018

52mins

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Rank #9: HIV/AIDS: Past, Present and Future

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In the West, many think of HIV/AIDS  as a phenomenon that began in the 1980s, when news first broke of a mysterious and highly deadly disease. In reality, however, the history of HIV/AIDS stretches back more than a hundred years, and has been shaped by some of the most important trends of the 20th century: from European colonialism in Africa, to the proxy conflicts fought between allies of the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War, to the globalization and economic neoliberalism that transformed the global economy in the late twentieth century. On this episode of History Talk, hosts Eric Michael Rhodes and Lauren Henry speak with three experts — Thomas F. McDow, Kathy Lancaster, and Jesse Kwiek— about the origins, spread, and future of HIV/AIDS in both the United States and around the world.

For more Origins coverage of HIV/AIDS and other related topics, check out Thomas F. McDow's feature Origins article A Century of HIV, as well as A New Congo Crisis?, Searching for Wakanda: The African Roots of the Black Panther Story and The Soccer World Goes to South Africa: Sport and the Making of Modern Africa.
- Posted December 2018

Dec 31 2018

39mins

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Rank #10: The Sixth Extinction and Our Unraveling World

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As the effects of climate change, toxic pollution, and over-exploitation of resources increasingly dominate the news, there may be an even larger threat on the horizon. By the end of this century, scientists are warning that nearly 25-50% of all species on earth could be lost, in what they are calling a "sixth extinction." Are humans on the cusp of a global extinction event of our own making? And if so, what will this mean for humanity and what can we do about it? Listen in as hosts Jessica Viñas-Nelson and Brenna Miller take a long view of environmental history with two esteemed guests, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Kolbert and historian Sam White. Learn more about how human actions have reshaped ecosystems in the past, their consequences for animal and plant diversity, and what this may mean for the future of life on earth.

Sep 18 2017

30mins

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Rank #11: The Long History of #MeToo

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From Donald Trump’s Access Hollywood tapes to the allegations against Harvey Weinstein, sexual harassment and sexual violence seem to have suddenly burst into the news cycle. Nearly every day, new allegations against powerful men emerge as more women come forward. But, while many are heralding the rise of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements as an opportunity for change, many of those who are raising awareness about these issues today have protested them in the past. So what’s different now? And how does contemporary activism fit into the longer history of awareness? On this episode of History Talk, hosts Jessica Viñas-Nelson and Brenna Miller invite three experts—Professors Treva Lindsey, Kimberly Hamlin, and Martha Chamallas—to discuss the social and legal histories of sexual assault and harassment in the US, past movements to fight it, and how the conversations going on today fit into the broader story of gender and sexual equality.

             - Posted January 2018

Jan 26 2018

41mins

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Rank #12: Legacies of the Great War

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This month marks the 100-year anniversary of U.S. entry into World War I. But, as the world commemorates the centennial of the war, U.S. events have been few and far between. Why is the war remembered so differently in Europe versus the United States, and what legacies might we be forgetting? In this episode of History Talk, we speak to three experts—Jennifer Siegel, Aaron Retish, and Julie Powell—about the war that shaped the course of the 20th century. Join us to learn why World War I is remembered so differently in combatant countries, what the war's most important geopolitical and human impacts were, and how its legacies continue to affect us today.

                 - Posted December 2017

Dec 10 2017

37mins

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Rank #13: Climate Change and Human Life

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Delegates from across the globe will soon gather at the Paris Climate Change Conference, set to begin at the end of November. Sponsored by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, conference representatives will endeavor—not for the first time—to find ways to "stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that will prevent dangerous human interference with the climate system." On this episode of History Talk, three environmental historians, Sam White, John Brooke, and Nicholas Breyfogle, discuss past patterns of climate change—both recent and others from the deep planetary past—and what these historical processes of climate adaptation and survival tell us about humanity's prospects today.

- Posted November 2015

Nov 24 2015

29mins

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Rank #14: Russia and the World

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In recent years, Russia has gained prominence on the world stage. From hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics, to regional interventions, to allegations of interference in foreign elections, the country's international activities suggest that its leadership is on a mission to shape world affairs. But what exactly does Russia want? And how does this compare to its ambitions in the past? In this episode of History Talk, hosts Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller talk to two experts—Stephen Norris and Gerry Hudson—about the Russian perspective on world affairs and the role that power, prestige, and influence play in shaping the country's foreign objectives.

   - Posted June 2017

Jun 16 2017

45mins

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Rank #15: Brexit: Dividing the United Kingdom

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On June 23rd, 2016, 52% of voters in the United Kingdom stunned the British political and media establishment—and the entire world—by voting to leave the European Union. Nearly three years, later, however, the final outcome of Brexit remains uncertain. And issues that affect the lives of millions hang in the balance, from the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and Britons living in the EU, to the status of the land border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In this month’s History Talk , we speak with Professors Laura Beers and Ian Sheldon to better understand the roots and consequences of Brexit. How has the relationship between Britain and the European continent changed? What were the political and economic forces that compelled the UK to join the EU in the first place? What made so many Britons eager to leave? We'll explore these questions, and more, during our conversation about this fast-changing situation.

For more on the United Kingdom and the European Union, check out European Disunion: The Rise and Fall of a Post-War Dream?, Treating the Symptoms: Northern Ireland’s Incomplete Peace, and The EU: Past, Present, and Future.
-Posted March 2019
[A transcript of this podcast is available here.]

Mar 18 2019

57mins

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Rank #16: Fault Lines: The Urban-Rural Divide in America

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Today, urban and rural areas seem more distant than ever. Pitted against one another on a range of economic, political and social issues, many attributed the outcome of the 2016 election to the frustrations of just 15% of rural American voters. But is the divide that clear? Are the differences that stark? And are conflicts between rural and urban areas a new phenomenon? Explore the history of rural-urban conflicts with hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit as they speak with three experts on rural-urban relations: Steven Conn, Clay Howard, and Mark Partridge. Discover the long history of conflict, animosity, and rare moments of cooperation and shared goals. 

   - Posted May 2017

May 06 2017

41mins

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Rank #17: From Romanovs to Reds: Russia's Revolutions at 100

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In February 1917, the 300-year reign of the Romanov dynasty ended. Eight months later in October, Bolshevik forces led by Vladimir Lenin seized power, establishing the world's first state operated on Marxist principles. In the aftermath, a myriad of political, economic, social, and cultural changes reshaped life inside Russia as the establishment of the Soviet Union upended the global order. To mark the 100-year anniversary of the Russian Revolutions, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Viñas-Nelson interview expert guests Drs. Angela Brintlinger, Nicholas Breyfogle, and Stephen Norris. Join us to explore the causes of the Russian Revolutions, their profound consequences, and how the world is remembering their centennial anniversary today.

- Posted October 2017
[A transcript of this podcast is available here.]

Oct 12 2017

44mins

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Rank #18: Honduras, TPS, and U.S. Policy

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The Trump administration has taken a hardline on immigration. News from the U.S. border that asylum seekers are being turned away, that parents are being separated from their children, and the termination of Temporary Protected Status for 57,000 Hondurans currently living in the U.S. has drawn widespread public attention. But why are people fleeing? What is life like in their home countries? And what role does the U.S. play in creating the conditions that spur migration? On this episode of History Talk, we zero in on Honduras, as hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Viñas-Nelson speak with two experts, Professors Dana Frank and Katherine Borland, to learn why so many Hondurans are seeking refuge in the U.S., the political, economic, and social challenges faced by people living in Honduras, and the dynamics of migration and U.S. foreign policy at the heart of today's debates.

- Posted April 2018

Jun 13 2018

37mins

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Rank #19: The Equal Rights Amendment: Then and Now

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In March 2017 Nevada became the first state in 40 years to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—a provision written to address discrimination on the basis of sex. Now, in an atmosphere of renewed national attention on issues affecting women, this proposed amendment could be just two states short of addition to the United States Constitution. Explore the long history of the ERA with hosts Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller as they speak with three historians: Kimberly Hamlin, Susan Hartmann, and Katherine Marino. Find out why it stalled and how for nearly a century the ERA has garnered both passionate supporters and ardent opponents.

                 - Posted April 2017

Mar 27 2017

35mins

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Rank #20: Shifting Borders: The Many Sides of U.S.-Mexican Relations

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Long before the recent initiatives to strengthen the border wall with Mexico and contentious debates surrounding immigration and deportation, the U.S. and Mexico have had a tangled history of both animosity and cooperation. From the Texas Revolution and the Mexican-American War to the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement, what can history tell us about the current state of affairs and prospects for the future between the U.S. and Mexico? Join us as hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit discuss U.S.-Mexican relations with three experts: Dr. Elena Albarran, Dr. Mathew Coleman, and Dr. Lilia Fernandez.

- Posted July 2017

Jul 19 2017

53mins

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